US2527224A - Garment pocket assemblage - Google Patents

Garment pocket assemblage Download PDF

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US2527224A
US2527224A US4605348A US2527224A US 2527224 A US2527224 A US 2527224A US 4605348 A US4605348 A US 4605348A US 2527224 A US2527224 A US 2527224A
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pocket
standard
auxiliary
zipper
formation
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Landy William
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Landy William
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D27/00Details of garments or of their making
    • A41D27/20Pockets; Making or setting-in pockets
    • A41D27/201Pocket closures
    • A41D27/202Pocket closures with flap-sealed slide fastener

Description

Oct. 24, 1950 w, LANDY 2,527,224

GARMENT POCKET ASSEMBLAGE Filed Aug. 25, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 MAL/AM 1, AND Y Oct. 24, 1950 w. LANDY GARMENT POCKET ASSEMBLAGE Filed Aug. 25, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Z I ML/AM LAND) ill Oct. 24, 1950 w. LANDY 2,527,224

GARMENT POCKET ASSEMBLAGE Filed Aug. 25, 1948 s sheets-shed 3 gwucm tov l V/LL/AM LANDY Patented Oct. 24, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GARMENT POCKET ASSEIWBLAGE William Landy, Cleveland, Ohio Application August 25, 1948, Serial No. 46,053

40mins. (01.2-25.2)

This invention relates to improvements in garment pocket assemblages.

Male garments, for which the present invention is especially designed, are provided with pockets with the locations practically fixed according to standards of long usage and similarly the forms of the difierent pockets have been more or less standardized. The present invention does not materially change these conditions.

It has also been proposed -to add additional pockets as auxiliary to the standard pockets," For instance, it has been contemplated to provide an additional pocket effect in connection with a standard pocket, as by dividing the latter, "or by the addition of a second pocket within the standard pocket, with the latter generally formed to be removable at will. 'Withthe former (exemplified by thesmall change pocket within one ofthe coat pockets) both pockets are open for service at all times, while with the latter, the added pocket may serve to provide the service of the standard pocket, as'where the standard pocket has become worn and the removable pocket is then positioned therein to perform the service of the standard pocket, it then being possible to substitute one removable pocket for another to meet the conditions of wear of the pocket being substituted.

The present invention is of the dual pocket type, but differs from the types referred to in that under normal service conditions only the additional pocket is open for usual service; but having the standard pocket completely serviceable and accessible at will. This practically makes the standard pocket more orless of the secret pocket type. For instance, the added openmouthpocket may be used for carrying usual articles, including monetary change, with the standard pocket used for carrying paper'money or the like and the assemblage permits temporary separation of a side of the added pocket from its connection with the standard pocket thus affording access to the secret standard pocket. While the removable pocket referred to above I (generally secured in position by buttons or snap fasteners) will permit such opening at the side of the standard pocket, the arrangement necessarily discloses the presence of both pockets, thus destroying the secrecy characteristic of the standard pocket, since the-division of the walls of the two pockets, due to the nature of the mounting, is apparent even to casual inspection and feel.

In the present invention, the mounting is such as to make the added pocket either a permanent part of the assemblage or it is possible to remove the added pocket by temporarily deranging the closed end of the mechanical fastening which is utilized. This would permit of thesublstitution of a new pocket by then incorporating mounting of the auxiliary pocket. This form,

when the zipper is closed, providesan approximately smooth face such as can form a definite part of the pocket wall without affecting the free movement of the hand into and out of the pocket. With a button or snap fastening, there is present a superposed ply over the standard pocket ply so that the hand can readily pass between the plies and reach into the standard pocket, but with the zipper typeaccess to the standard pocket could be had only by actuating a zipper slide. This diflerence in action is advantageous as a' preventative of pick-pocket activity designed to reach the secret standard pocket, since'attempted movement of the slide would be instantly detected. With the zipper segment-carrying side strips permanently sewed to'the' exposed face of the wall of the standard pocket and to the outer face of the auxiliary pocket, the inner face of the zipper formation is maintained smooth, exceptingwhen the slide 'is actuated to open the mouth of the standard pocketi I The assemblage is particularly applicable for use with male garments, and especially with the side pockets of trousers, although it is applicable for'use in connection with coat pockets where the garment is designed for special services. Its

reat value comes in connection with its service with one or both of the side pockets of the trousers, since these generally carry money values and the presence of a secret and protected pocket can serve to carry paper money with less danger of loss and in a position more difiicult to surreptitiously abstract, due to its location.

To these and other ends, therefore, the nature of which will be better understood as the inven tion is hereinafter disclosed, said invention consists in the assemblage formations hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims. I, 7 u V In the acco p alljilkg drawings in which similar reference'characters indicate similar parts in each of the views:

the auxiliary pocket can thus practically conform to those of the mouth zone of the standard pocket, or can be varied therefrom to make a difierent mouth for the auxiliary pocket by the arrangement of the zipper formations. By extending the length of movement of the zipper slide to equal the length of a lip of the mouth of the standard pocket at each side of the latter, the mouth of the auxiliary pocket practically becomes a substitute for the mouth of the standard pocket leaving the entrance to the standard pocket wholly concealed. If the slide on but one side is moved to open position, access to the standard pocket is opened through the open side; if both slides are moved to open position, the mouth of the auxiliary pocket can be collapsed into position at the closed end of the formations, thus practically opening Figure l is a fragmentary side elevation of' a pocket zone of a trousers assembly showing the present invention in applied position, parts being broken away to illustrate underlyingparts' -entrance to the standard pocket=-being concealed.

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on line 22 of Fig. 1. l

Fig. 3 is an elevation of one form of zipper formation utilized inthe :invention.

Fig; 4 is aschematic perspective view-showing the zipper formation of one side of the, pocket as in an openposition toeXpQsean-entrance to the standard pocket. l

Fig. 5 is a detail view of one. form of auxiliary pocket. Fig. 6 is a detail'view of a modified form of pocket. r

Fig. '7 is asectional view takenaon line.'l-1:of Figs.5and 6.-. Q I w Fig. 8 is a fragmentary side.elevationof'azpocket ;zone of a coat assembly showing thepresent in- ;vention-in applied position, partsheing broken .awayto illustrate .underlying parts; Fig.9 is a sectional'yiewntaken:on .line .9-9 of Fig.8..

' :Fig, 101is a side-elevation of the auxiliary pocket of Fig. 8. -m

Fig. 11 isfragmentaryview,jin,elevation of the closedv end zoneaof an alternative form of zipper formation for service in connection with removable pockets.

Fig. 12 is a vertical.sectionalzyiewp-the.plane of {section being central oftheanchoring member and parallel with its;face.- i. 1 1

Fig. 13 is a similar view ,showing'oneof the segment-bearing strips indetached :position.

Fig-14 is aschematic elevation. ofthe rzipper formation, with: parts-broken away, and showing an overlying fabric cover for the segment zone.

. Fig. 15 is asectional view taken on 1ine.-l5 l,5

OfFig. 14. 2421:: The assemblage.is.,made up.lof a standard or conventional. pocket,. which-.forms apart of the garment, an, auxiliary pocket dimensioned-.for

- mounting within the;standardq-pocket, and-:a mechanical fastening; structure of, the zipper. type connecting the mouth :zones-of'the, two; pockets on opposite sides o f, theuauxiliary pocket,.thus making possible the ,opening-,of, the standard pocket on eitherside of -theauxiliary'pocket;

- This is made possible by securing, asbysewing, the side strips of the zipper formationywhich carry the zippersegments; respectively tothe inner face of .the mouth-10f; the, standard pocket and to the outer face; of-the auxiliary-pocket, with a separate formationused for each of the opposite sides-ofthe mouthgof, the auxiliary pocket. The dimensionsof the :mouth zone f the mouth of the standard pocket to almost com- "plete extent,

- iliary pocket, as by locating the closed position of the slide below the upper end of the lip of the mouth of the auxiliary pocket (assuming use in a side trousers pocket) the unsecured portions of the lips can be in the form of a free zone. of the mouth of the auxiliary pocket. Such zone is capable of folding into position conforming to the mouth of the standard pocket or provide an opening of greaterwidth'in the upper zone-of the auxiliary pocket when entrance into the pocket is being had. The free zone beingat the top-of the pocket would be free to assumeeithercondition, since the support ofthe pocket content .is provided .by the connected-portions .of the sides. The complete.physicalconcealment of the standard pocket is changed by such arrangement, since the entrance, of the, hand into.;the auxiliary pocket would cause the, free zone to change its form and expose: a smalLportionof ,thegupper end of the standard pocket. However, the-exposed zone wouldgnot permit the entrance-of a hand therethrough to gainzacoess to the lower zone of the standardpocket unless at least one of .the slides was moved'to its open position The arrangement a thus provides ample protection against-,ipocket-picking of the standard pocket, even though the entrance tothe standardpocket is-lnot completely concealed and-closed. I

As will be understood,- the-auxiliary pocket is permanently open,- the zipper formations anchor such pocket to the standard pocket, but have no eifect upon the mouth of 'the-zauxiliary :pocket. Th zipper formations conceal, ornearly conceal, the interior of the standard'pocket and prevent entrance thereinto when theslides are in closed position. The movement ofa'slide toopenposition is always in the direction-of length of-a lip of the mouth of either pocket, and only by such movement can the content of the standard pocket be reached, Since such directionof slide movement is transvers tothe distance between the lips of the mouth, and the Slide movement ini-tself does not materially increase suchdistance.actual-entrance of ahand to gain access to the 1-standard pocket content. requires the initial slide movement to preparethe mouthgto receive the hand, andsince the direction of slide movement is transverse to the direction of. move- :ment. ofthe hand in :making the. entrance, the two activities are necessarily successive and. cannot be concurrent. Because. of this, any attempt at pocket-picking withrespect:to the standard --openthe zipper slide and the need for thesuc ceeding entrance of thehand.

In Figures 1 to "7, the assemblage is shown as applied to a side pocket of a pair of trousers. .In

these figures, A indicatesa, portion of the trousers, and B the stan'dard pocket thereof having the'mouth zone b the' outer side of which is the usual outer side of the mouthof the pocket zone, the oppositeside of the pocket generally extending to the side seam of the trousers, A'findicat ing a usual facing of trouser material which is exposed at the entrance to the innerside of the conventional pocket.-

I The auxiliary pocket'is indicated at I0, and is shown illustratively, since it may have any desired conformation which would be conveniently received within the standard pocket. The pocket 7 10, however, has its mouth ll dimensioned with respect to the dimensionsof the mouth zone b as above explained. Any desired material can be used in the production of the auxiliary pocket. -F.or .instance, itcan be of fabric type similar to the. standard pocket, or may be formed of chamois or the like, or it'may-be formed of soft leather, the material used being dependent somewhat upon the particular service to which the pocket is to be put. r

. The twolips I2 of the ,mouth H are securedto .the lips of mouthb by the use of mechanical fastening formations of the zipper type, one for- -mation for each of the lips of the respective mouths, these formations being generally of standard type made up of segment-bearing strips l3, with the segments of the closed endlof; the formation united by a suitabl member hi, the formation including a slide which is designed to move between the opposite end zones. of the opposed segment, series to place the formation in either its closed or open positions. I-Themem her It serves normally to anchor the segment bearing strips together a l the closed end and is a generally not designedgfor"removability without a; disrupting the formation.- P i As shown in Fig. 2, when applying the pair of formations to complete the assemblage, the

.7 proper strip l3 of one formation is applied to the inner or exposed face of the outer:or loose ply of the standard pocket (shown as the lower side of the standard pocket in this figure) the edge of the Zstrip may be infolded as shown. The other strip [3 of the formation is secured to the outer or concealed side of the mouth plyof the auxiliary ,pocket, the strips being secured to the respective plies by stitching'lengthwise of the strips, so that the latter become permanent parts of the mouth zones of the standard and auxiliaryvpockets.

:The application of a similar formation to the opposite side of the standard pocket may besimilar to the above, or applied between the facing strip A and the face of-th standard pocket, the facing strip be formed of trouser material (the, arrangement shown as the upper side of the standard pocket in this figure), in which case .the' 'facingstrip may. extendto and into the side .riseam'of the trouser..

In mounting the formations, {the length of the estrips it may be such as to extend for the 'full length of, the loose ply of th standard pocket and theffull lengthfiof one of thesides of:the F mouth zone of the auxiliary pocket, in which case thesegment zone would extend from the top to the bottom of thamouth of=both pockets 1 such case, the ends of the respective strips 13- of the two formationswould-abe practically joined at the top andbottomportions ,of themouthszof bothtpockets. If the arrangement is such that both slides ,move in the same 'generaldirection 'in movingbetweenopen and closed positions,

both slides would -normally-be located at the same end in closed position, preferably the top of. the mouth, since in such;position the slides would not interfere with the entrance of the hand into-theauxiliary pocket. 7 v

,Assshown in Fig. 6, the length of the strips may bemade less than the length of the lips of the mouth of the auxiliary pocket, in which base-the strips I 3 extend to the bottom of the mouth zone of the auxiliary pocket but terminate short of the upper end, the slides thus being located, in closed position, spaced from such upper end thus leaving a free and unsecured zone of the auxiliary pocket between the slides in such position. As explained above, this permits of a greater width at the top of the mouth of the auxiliary pocket for the entrance of the hand,

but leaves the standard pocket as exposable within this free zone, although the normal folding of the free zone would nominally also close this zone of the standard pocket, thus distin guishing from the other form in which the entrance to the standard pocket is practically concealed by the fact that its mouth is closed by the two zipper formations, the strips I3 of which are secured, by sewing, to the respectiv lips ofthe mouth zones of both pockets and the even face of the zipper segments interlocked bythe movement of the slides to the closing position.

. However,--t he Fig- 6 form of pocket also permits of the use of the pocket where the standard pocketformation tends more to-the slash pocket effect, the free side of the pocket extending angular tothe vertical. In such form, the strip length shown is of the full length of such-free side, thehorizontal portion of the pocket shown in -Figo being\ designed to overlie the trouser zone between the top of such free side and-the opposite zipperv formation location, azone which is normally exposed. Since .this zone is on the vsideof the trousers and follows the ourvatureof the body, such horizontal portion will be heldin contact with'the trouser material, and need not .be stitched -.to the material.

provided by the. slash pocket effect is of especial importance. This; can be understood from the :fact that-with an entrance that is truly vertical,

the zipper formations would extend trulyvertical with the stitching line being practically linear in such direction. -Under such conditions, the

from its lower end upward to the top,

pocket support would be limited to such direction and of practicallylinear width. By extending the entrance angularly inclined forwardly the sew- -ing 1ine remains linear in type, but thepocket support effect takes on the character of a band of considerable width, since the progression of stitches, although linear, are laterally displaced slightly relative to each other and with respect to the true vertical, and each stitch thus becomes .the equivalent of aseparate supporting connection for the pocket, thus-setting up a band efiect having-a width equalto the width of the angle, itsb fiing understood, of course, that-a supporting magma 7 ''ffect is present withieacnzstitch valthough fthe progression of stitches may place the support effect-of one stitch as located a diiferentidistance from he top-of the pocket as comparedwithlanother stitch, each stitch {thus tending :to produce an individual support,- as compared -withaa -common supporting effect produced where the stitching is truly vertical. With the'stitches tlius distributed to produce the band'like 'eife'ctjthe auxiliary pocket becomes adequately suppor ted and positioned within the standard pocket.- While it is preferred to locate the zipper forma- "tions in such relation that the slidesare in their upper positions when the formation is in its closed condition, it is apparent that this may be reversed so that the closed positions would have the slides atthe bottom, or the arrangement could be such that the slide of one formationis at the top'and the other at the bottom, when both are in closed position, the latter arrange- "ment obviously preventing any confusion in the selection of slide to be moved when it is desired to open up a side of the standard pocket to per- "mit entrance thereinto. The slide formation is of such form that either condition can be secured by the needed arrangement of strips I3 at the time the formations are being installed to connect the two pockets. 7 I

As will be understood, the fact that the zipper formation is itself an assemblage which presents its opposite faces as practically fiat, serves to make the assemblage of the invention one that isnot'only readily applied in position, but which permits the use of the auxiliary and permanently open "pocket with minimum interfererice to the entrance of thefhand, eventhou'gh the zipper "formation be exposed beyond the lips of such "pocket. This is due-tothe fact that the under side of the formationpbeing substantially 'flat, lies in close contact with the facefof "the standard pocket, while the exposed face, also flat when "the zipper slide isin closed position, presents'no material irregularities such as could-injure or 'interru'ptthe free entrance of the 'hand. Actually," the use scarcely notices the presence of the narrow metallic'strip-like body which the 'seg- 'ments produce,'as the hand approaches the ac- 'tual lips of the pocket' And while the actual lips of the pocketare exposed on theins'ide of the entrance, the fact that the lip and the strip I3 are secured together'by sewing throughout the lengthof the strip prevents the exposed lipfrom "producing any obstructive effect to the entrance of "the hand into the pocket.

As indicated in Figs. '14 and 15, the exposed -faces of the segments of the zipper may have a fabric cover 25, this beingsewed to the-strip l3 "witha loose portion overlying" the segments and "which lies within the slide, thus permitting free slide movement over'the cover with the segments -covere'd. 'When this form is used, the segments "are unexposed at the entrance to theauxiliary *p'ocket, the exposed surface of-the zone bein'g'of 'fabric 'type. Y F f- -When'a slide is moved to open the formation (Fig. 4) the entranceto the standard pocket is thereby opened with the separated segments forming the side edges'of the openingywhile the segments are individuaLthey are small and-pres- 'ent no material sharp edges, the adjacent prongs being close together, so that the handcan be introduced through" the created openingwith freedom and with practically no liability of being "damaged by the side walls which are open. I *ZDue' 'tothe'fact' that the segments are individualLand small,the zipper formation is flexible iii the direction of its-length so that the opposing The same is true whenlaccessiis of the slides to open the formation, since the flexibility of the'segments remains and the walls ofithe auxiliary pocket are themselves of flexible material.

As shown in Figs. 8 to 10, the invention is also readily applied to the pockets of coats. Since the lips of such pockets generally extend horizontally, the direction of length of the zipper formations extends .in the .same direction. And with such pockets it is possible to locate the lips of-the auxiliary pocket somewhat below'therlip zoneof the standard pocket, if desired, since the mouth zone of the standard pocket, which includes the opposite zipper formations, will irreffect form a portion of the auxiliary pocket :by serving as the entrance to the latter.

The auxiliary pocket may be removable or 'not removable,'as desired, this depending uponthe character of the zipper formation that is being employed. For instance, with the usual commercial formof zipper formations, one end zoneis generally formed in such way as to hold the .end

segments of the zone anchored in lockedposition by member M, the slide moving toward and frornl'such member when opening and closing the formation. Due to the anchored condition of member I'M-the two segment-bearing stripsare not separable bodily, excepting by deranging or disablingmember l4. Under these conditions the auxiliary pocket would be considered as of the non-removable type, since it would be necessary to derange or disable member 14 to permit separation of the strips 13. The member 14 may be deranged or disabled and thus permit separation of the strips, and thereby change the auxiliary pocket 'into a pocket of the removable type, but when the strips l3 are again assembled, a new member !4 would probably be required, owing to the difficulty of restoring the disabled member to its original form.

However, as shown in Figs. '11 to 13, the'zipper formation may have its closed end zone of special formation. In the form shown, the assemblage normally functions in service similar to the commercial form referred to. However, when it is desired to bodily separate the strips, the end of at least one of the segment-bearing strips is bodily removed from the member to break down the normal relation therebetween;

preferably the member is so arranged asto limit the withdrawal to but one of the strips, so that when the separation is had the member will 'remain with the other strip. The co-relationiis such that by simply restoring the strip tothe member a'fter restoring the slide relation, the formation becomes restored to normal condition. With such arrangement, the auxiliary pocket' is removable at will. i 1

In the formation shown in these latter figures,

the-anchoring member, indicated as 20, is formed with two parallel zones extending longitudinally, the zones being connected medially with rounded surfaces. One of the zones is solid and formed with a pin-like extension?! to'which'thezend segment of one of the strips I3 is permanently secured, thus anchoring the member to such strip. The other zonev is recessed inwardly ifrom l l I l l its upper end adapted toreceive the end of a pin; zsw ch. searried. b he lowe se mentof thea fil tr p 1 wb np z s perl-yrosit o d w ,hin..the re. es lthe exposed r n of therei formslthe esiuiyal ntso ri Z th re p acin :thev lower. e m nts. o he two'strips as properly positioned for zipperqaction-by slide m v me -1.1 510 .1 when riz s hdrawn o its ecess; th normally closed end zones of the zipper formation become separated, making it possible to withdraw the strip l3 which bears pin 22 from the slide, thus completely separating the two strips, with the slide and member 20 remaining on the strip which carries the pin-like member 2|. By again threading the withdrawn strip through the slide and then positioning pin 22 within its recess, the zipper formation becomes restored to its normal condition.

The arrangement permits removal of the auxiliary pocket at will, when the formations on each side of the pocket have both been manipulated in such manner as to separate the two strips of a formation, and whether the removed strip is carried by the standard pocket or by the auxiliary pocket. Obviously, a substitute auxiliary pocket may be equipped with the strips l3 of the removed pocket or with an equivalent strip on each side, and can be properly positioned in the standard pocket by following the above indicated manipulations. When the zipper formation is restored, the member 20 with its pin 2| and the positioned pin 22 provide the closed end of the formation with the slide operative to open and close the formation in normal manner.

Since the auxiliary pocket, with its permanently open entrance, forms the primary service pocket of the assemblage, and is thus subject to the greatest wear, this ability to bodily remove the pocket by simple manipulation of the zipper formations, enables this pocket to be renewed at will or enables the substitution of a particular type of service pocket designed to meet special conditions, such, for instance, as the substitution of a leather pocket for one of woven fabric material, whenever it is desired to make such substitution. Where the strips I3 of the removed pocket are used with the substitute, the substitution involves only the temporary separation of the strips l3 of the pair of formations and the return thereof to normal service conditions. Obviously, the form and dimensions of the substituted pocket may be varied as desired, as long as the entrance dimensions accord with those of the removed pocket.

While the zipper formations have heretofore been utilized for closing the lips of a pocket and have been used as a ready means for controlling the opening and closing of garment openings, its use in the present invention differs somewhat from the usual manner of use in these services, in that the formation itself becomes a definite and important element of the entrance to the auxiliary pocket, forming part of the walls of such entrance with the pocket itself remaining permanently open, thus augmenting the usual service usage of such formations. Because of this condition, the character and position of the zipper formation together with its manner of mounting becomes of definite importance, since it must permit the free entrance of the hand into the auxiliary pocket.

While I have herein shown and described several ways in which the invention may be utilized, it will be understood that changes and/or modifications thereof; may be found-essential or desirable in meeting the exigellcisof. service or the individual. desires of a user; I, therefore, .reserve the rightto makje fany and all such changes and/ or modifications therein as may be so found essential or desirable, insofar asthe same may fall within the spirit and scope of the inventionas expressed in the accompanying claims, when broadly construed.

What l claim isi 151K 2 i '1. A pocket assemblage for the side pocketsof tr u er eeie risieae t n rd or w n iom pocket formation wherein the entrance is elongated approximately vertically and its length is less than the depth dimension of the pocket, an auxiliary pocket also having an elongated entrance the length of which is less than the pocket depth, the direction of entrance elongation being angularly inclined forwardly to the vertical from its lower end to its top zone, and means for mounting the auxiliary pocket relative to and within the standard pocket with the respective entrances or mouths substantially alined and with the means operative to maintain the positioned auxiliary pocket entrance permanently open and active to substantially conceal entrance to the standard pocket, said means including a normally closed zipper formation connecting a side wall of the entrance of the standard pocket with a similar wall of the entrance to the auxiliary pocket, and a similar zipper formation connecting the side walls of the two pockets at the opposite side of the entrances, said zipper formations providing the supporting means for the positioned auxiliary pocket with the pockets otherwise free from mutual securing connection, said zipper formations when closed preventing access to the standard pocket through its entrance, the movement of the slide of either zipper formation to open position being operative to open the corresponding side of the entrance of and permit access to such side of the interior of the standard pocket.

2. An assemblage as in claim 1 characterized in that the zipper formation has its segments carried by fabric strips, the securing of the formation in position being by a sewed connection between the strips and the respective pocket mouth zones to thereby position the slide direction of movement between open and closed positions as being outside of the lips of the mouth of the auxiliary pocket, and further characterized in that one of the segment-bearing strips of a zipper formation is sewed to the exposed face of the mouth of the standard pocket with the strip of the opposite and complemental member of the formation sewed to the concealed side of the auxiliary pocket.

3. An assemblage as in claim 1 characterized in that the length of each zipper formation extends from one end of the lip zone of the mouth of the auxiliary pocket to a point at least approaching the opposite end of such lip, with the closed position of the slides of both formations located at such latter point.

4. An assemblage as in claim 1 characterized in that each zipper formation includes a member operative to maintain an end zone of the segment bearing strips in anchored closed relation in service, the lower segment of at least one of the strips being separable from said member to thereby permit separation of the strips of each zipper formation and permit bodily removal of the auxiliary pocket at will, such end segment carrying a pin adapted to be removably mounted within the" memberdndlin: tbf fender. tfie end segment cooperative" with the endsegment 0f the companion strip" 'fbrzipper' functioning:

REFERENCES CITED Number Name Date Sweeney Dec. 1, 1903 Number 1 2 Name Hate Hester ...,Jim. 16,- 1917 Lundb'erg efi'al". July15; 191 9 Pofrlhotte Mar: 211-, 1923 DesiltS- 'May 4, 192 6 I Rich- Sept. 25; 1928' Fit July 11, I939 Kopf Dec. 10, 1 940 Bong Feb; 23, 1943 Carter Aug. 31', 1948 Marks Mar. 29,1949

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2678447A (en) * 1952-02-26 1954-05-18 American Pad & Textile Co Removable creel or the like
US3537108A (en) * 1969-03-19 1970-11-03 Richard W Daniels Pocket construction
US3968523A (en) * 1975-01-20 1976-07-13 Sydney Newman Method for producing a zipper closable garment pocket and a pocket provided thereby
USD279138S (en) 1982-12-13 1985-06-11 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Athletic shoe with pocket
US4638579A (en) * 1979-12-26 1987-01-27 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed athletic shoe
US20080141431A1 (en) * 2006-12-15 2008-06-19 Speedo International Limited Garments
US20080141430A1 (en) * 2006-12-15 2008-06-19 Speedo International Limited Garments
US20090025117A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2009-01-29 Jay French Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US20100050312A1 (en) * 2008-08-29 2010-03-04 Jay French Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US20110030126A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2011-02-10 Jay French Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US8522367B2 (en) 2008-04-25 2013-09-03 Ccw Breakaways Llc Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US9557139B1 (en) * 2015-05-08 2017-01-31 Berne Apparel Company Article of apparel including concealed weapon pocket

Citations (11)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US745927A (en) * 1903-02-28 1903-12-01 John A Sweeney Supplemental coat-pocket.
US1212639A (en) * 1915-10-29 1917-01-16 William A Hester Pocket for overalls.
US1310125A (en) * 1919-07-15 Detachable pocket
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US2311847A (en) * 1942-02-19 1943-02-23 Stewart D Long Lady's pocketbook
US2448416A (en) * 1946-09-24 1948-08-31 Masland C H & Sons Removable game pocket
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US1212639A (en) * 1915-10-29 1917-01-16 William A Hester Pocket for overalls.
US1448940A (en) * 1921-12-05 1923-03-20 Gem Shirt Company Garment
US1583674A (en) * 1924-05-05 1926-05-04 Transferable Safety Pocket Com Pocket
US1685243A (en) * 1927-12-29 1928-09-25 Rich John Woods Game pouch
US2165843A (en) * 1938-10-24 1939-07-11 Feit Abraham Pocket
US2224734A (en) * 1939-05-04 1940-12-10 Sterling Clothing House Concealed slide-lock pocket
US2311847A (en) * 1942-02-19 1943-02-23 Stewart D Long Lady's pocketbook
US2465736A (en) * 1946-08-09 1949-03-29 Jeannette M Marks Safety pocket and bag fabrication
US2448416A (en) * 1946-09-24 1948-08-31 Masland C H & Sons Removable game pocket

Cited By (42)

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US2678447A (en) * 1952-02-26 1954-05-18 American Pad & Textile Co Removable creel or the like
US3537108A (en) * 1969-03-19 1970-11-03 Richard W Daniels Pocket construction
US3968523A (en) * 1975-01-20 1976-07-13 Sydney Newman Method for producing a zipper closable garment pocket and a pocket provided thereby
US4638579A (en) * 1979-12-26 1987-01-27 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed athletic shoe
USD281117S (en) 1981-08-28 1985-10-29 Envoys U.S.A. Inc. Athletic shoe with pocket cover flap
USD279327S (en) 1981-10-23 1985-06-25 Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc. Athletic boot with pocket
USD281116S (en) 1981-10-23 1985-10-29 Kangaroos Pocketed athletic shoe upper
USD280776S (en) 1982-09-29 1985-10-01 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Athletic shoe with pocket
USD280778S (en) 1982-10-25 1985-10-01 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed boot
USD280862S (en) 1982-10-25 1985-10-08 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed shoe
USD280777S (en) 1982-10-25 1985-10-01 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Athletic shoe with wraparound pocket
USD283365S (en) 1982-12-13 1986-04-15 Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc. Athletic shoe
USD279232S (en) 1982-12-13 1985-06-18 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Athletic shoe
USD279138S (en) 1982-12-13 1985-06-11 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Athletic shoe with pocket
USD281640S (en) 1983-01-06 1985-12-10 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Basketball Shoe
USD283364S (en) 1983-01-17 1986-04-15 Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc. Athletic shoe
USD281639S (en) 1983-04-01 1985-12-10 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Angle flapped pocketed athletic shoe
USD280949S (en) 1983-04-01 1985-10-15 Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc. Athletic shoe with padded counter
USD285261S (en) 1983-05-26 1986-08-26 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Purse pocketed shoe
USD281925S (en) 1983-06-01 1985-12-31 Kanagroos U.S.A., Inc. Boot with tongue pocket
USD281736S (en) 1983-06-06 1985-12-17 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed casual gymnastic and aerobic shoe
USD281734S (en) 1983-07-05 1985-12-17 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Strap pocketed shoe
USD281738S (en) 1983-08-01 1985-12-17 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Athletic shoe for kicker
USD281737S (en) 1983-08-05 1985-12-17 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed shoe
USD291020S (en) 1984-03-30 1987-07-28 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed boot upper
USD291021S (en) 1984-06-04 1987-07-28 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed shoe
USD283750S (en) 1985-03-28 1986-05-13 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Casual shoe with pocket
USD287540S (en) 1985-07-22 1987-01-06 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Athletic shoe with pocket
USD289102S (en) 1985-12-16 1987-04-07 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed athletic shoe
US20080141431A1 (en) * 2006-12-15 2008-06-19 Speedo International Limited Garments
US20080141430A1 (en) * 2006-12-15 2008-06-19 Speedo International Limited Garments
US8286262B2 (en) * 2006-12-15 2012-10-16 Speedo International Limited Garments
US8196220B2 (en) 2006-12-15 2012-06-12 Speedo International Limited Garments
US20110030126A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2011-02-10 Jay French Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US8839464B2 (en) 2008-04-25 2014-09-23 Ccw Breakaways Llc Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US8856970B2 (en) 2008-04-25 2014-10-14 Ccw Breakaways Llc Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US20090025117A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2009-01-29 Jay French Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US8484765B2 (en) * 2008-04-25 2013-07-16 Ccw Breakaways Llc Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US8522367B2 (en) 2008-04-25 2013-09-03 Ccw Breakaways Llc Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US20100050312A1 (en) * 2008-08-29 2010-03-04 Jay French Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US8307465B2 (en) 2008-08-29 2012-11-13 Ccw Breakaways Llc Garment pocket for carrying an object in a concealed state
US9557139B1 (en) * 2015-05-08 2017-01-31 Berne Apparel Company Article of apparel including concealed weapon pocket

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