TWI424886B - Substrate cleaning apparatus - Google Patents

Substrate cleaning apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
TWI424886B
TWI424886B TW97138512A TW97138512A TWI424886B TW I424886 B TWI424886 B TW I424886B TW 97138512 A TW97138512 A TW 97138512A TW 97138512 A TW97138512 A TW 97138512A TW I424886 B TWI424886 B TW I424886B
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TW
Taiwan
Prior art keywords
substrate
cover
rotary cover
rotating
polishing
Prior art date
Application number
TW97138512A
Other languages
Chinese (zh)
Other versions
TW200922701A (en
Inventor
Shinya Morisawa
Naoki Matsuda
Yasushi Kojima
Original Assignee
Ebara Corp
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to JP2007270330 priority Critical
Priority to JP2008142672A priority patent/JP5242242B2/en
Application filed by Ebara Corp filed Critical Ebara Corp
Publication of TW200922701A publication Critical patent/TW200922701A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of TWI424886B publication Critical patent/TWI424886B/en

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Description

Substrate cleaning device

The present invention relates to a substrate cleaning apparatus which cleans a substrate by supplying a cleaning liquid such as pure water or a chemical solution to the substrate, and dries the washed substrate.

In the process of manufacturing a semiconductor device, cleaning the substrate is an important procedure for increasing the yield of the product. This substrate cleaning process is performed, for example, after the substrate polishing process to remove unwanted debris from the substrate. Figures 28 and 29 of the accompanying drawings show examples of substrate cleaning devices. As shown in FIGS. 28 and 29, the substrate cleaning device has a substrate holding mechanism 100 configured to hold the substrate W, a motor 101 configured to rotate the substrate holding mechanism 100, and a fixed cover 102 disposed at The periphery of the substrate W; and the nozzle 103 for supplying pure water as a cleaning liquid to the surface of the substrate W to wash the substrate W. During the cleaning of the substrate W, the substrate W is rotated at a low speed, and pure water is supplied to the surface of the substrate W. During the drying of the substrate W, the substrate W is rotated, for example, at a high speed of about 1500 rpm (min -1 ) to separate the pure water from the surface of the substrate W. The pure water removed from the substrate W is captured and recovered by the fixed cover 102.

When pure water hits the fixed cover 102, the pure water may bounce back into small water droplets and adhere to the surface of the substrate W. Further, the high speed rotation of the substrate W generates a swirling airflow in the fixed cover 102. This vortex flow carries fine water droplets of pure water (i.e., mist of pure water) which is also attached to the surface of the substrate W. Water droplets and mist of pure water attached to the surface of the substrate W form a water mark on the substrate. These water marks may adversely affect the device formed on the substrate W, resulting in a decrease in product yield. When a chemical solution is used instead of pure water as a cleaning liquid, back contamination of the substrate W may also be caused for the same reason. Therefore, it is important to prevent water marks and back contamination of the substrate.

Recently, Rotagoni drying has been proposed as a drying process to prevent water marks from appearing on the substrate. According to the Nataorgani drying method, IPA steam (a mixture of isopropanol and nitrogen) and pure water are supplied from two parallel nozzles to the surface of the rotating substrate while the respective nozzles are moved in the radial direction of the substrate to dry the substrate. surface. The Notagoni drying method is capable of sufficiently drying the substrate even when the substrate is rotated at a relatively low speed range of, for example, 150 to 300 rpm. However, even if the plate is rotated at 300 rpm or lower, pure water may be converted into water droplets or mist when pure water hits the fixed cover. These water droplets and mist may adhere to the surface of the substrate.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a substrate cleaning apparatus capable of preventing water marks from occurring on the surface of a substrate and preventing backside contamination of the substrate.

To achieve the above object, a substrate cleaning apparatus according to an aspect of the present invention includes: a substrate holding mechanism configured to horizontally hold a substrate; and a rotating mechanism configured to be held by the substrate holding mechanism The substrate rotates; a liquid supply nozzle for supplying cleaning liquid to the substrate; and a rotating cover disposed around the substrate and capable of rotating at substantially the same speed as the substrate. The rotary cover has an inner peripheral surface shaped to surround the shape of the substrate, and the inner peripheral surface is inclined radially inward from a bottom end thereof to a tip end thereof.

In a preferred aspect of the invention, the substrate cleaning apparatus includes a fixed cover that is shaped to cover the entire outer periphery of the rotating cover.

In a preferred aspect of the invention, the substrate cleaning apparatus further includes: a relative moving mechanism group configured to provide relative movement between the substrate and the rotating cover along a rotational axis of the substrate.

In a preferred aspect of the invention, the rotating cover is mounted on the substrate holding mechanism, the substrate holding mechanism has a discharge hole having an opening above the lower end of the rotary cover, and the discharge hole is downward Tilt to the ground.

In a preferred aspect of the invention, the inner peripheral surface of the rotating cover has a vertical cross section including an arc, and the angle of the inner peripheral surface with respect to the horizontal plane gradually increases from the minimum value of the upper end of the inner peripheral surface to the lower end. Maximum value.

In a preferred aspect of the invention, the substrate cleaning apparatus further comprises: a liquid absorber disposed on an inner circumferential surface of the rotating cover.

In a preferred aspect of the invention, the substrate cleaning apparatus further comprises: an inner rotating cover disposed on a radially inner side of the rotating cover. The inner rotating cover can rotate together with the rotating cover.

In a preferred aspect of the present invention, the inner rotating cover has an outer peripheral surface having a curved vertical cross section, and the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotating cover has the substrate and the substrate held by the substrate holding mechanism The upper surface of the upper surface is the same height or slightly lower.

In a preferred aspect of the present invention, the substrate cleaning apparatus further includes: a support arm configured to couple the inner rotary cover and the rotary cover to each other. The support arm is disposed in a gap between the inner rotary cover and the rotary cover, and is shaped to generate a downward airflow in the gap when the inner rotary cover and the rotary cover rotate.

According to the present invention, since the rotary cover rotates substantially at the same speed as the substrate, the relative speed between the substrate and the rotary cover is substantially zero. Therefore, when the cleaning liquid collides with the rotating cover, the cleaning liquid hardly generates water droplets and mist. In this way, it is possible to prevent water marks and back contamination of the substrate from being generated. The cleaning liquid removed from the substrate to the rotating cover is quickly discharged downward along the inner peripheral surface of the rotating cover by the centrifugal force. Therefore, the cleaning liquid does not remain on the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover, and thus water droplets and mist are hardly generated. When the relative speed between the substrate and the rotating cover is substantially zero, a swirling air flow is hardly formed inside the rotating cover. Therefore, it is possible to prevent the mist of the cleaning liquid from being carried by the swirling airflow and adhering to the substrate.

The above and other aspects, features, and other advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the aspects of the invention.

A substrate cleaning apparatus according to an embodiment of the present invention will now be described with reference to the drawings. The same or corresponding parts will be marked with the same or corresponding reference signs.

1 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus according to a first embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 2 is a plan view of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in FIG. 1.

As shown in FIG. 1, the substrate cleaning apparatus includes a substrate holding mechanism 1 configured to horizontally hold the substrate W, and a motor (rotating mechanism) 2 through which the substrate is configured to hold the substrate W. Rotating with its own central axis; a rotating cover 3 disposed around the substrate W; and a front nozzle 4 for supplying pure water as a cleaning liquid to the surface (front surface) of the substrate W. A chemical solution can be used as the cleaning solution without using pure water.

The substrate holding mechanism 1 includes: a plurality of jaws 10, the system constitutes a peripheral edge sandwiching the substrate W; a circular first table 11A on which the jaws 10 are mounted; and a hollow body supporting the first table 11A a support shaft 12A; a circular second table 11B having a recess for receiving the first table 11A therein; and a hollow second support shaft 12B supporting the second table 11B. The first support shaft 12A extends through the second support shaft 12B. The first stage 11A, the second stage 11B, the first support shaft 12A, and the second support shaft 12B are arranged concentrically. The rotary cover 3 is fixed to the periphery of the circular second table 11B. The second table 11B and the rotating cover 3 are arranged concentrically. The substrate W and the rotary cover 3 held by the jaws 10 are positioned in a concentric manner.

The first support shaft 12A and the second support shaft 12B are coupled to each other by a linear motion guiding mechanism 15. The linear motion guiding mechanism 15 is configured to transmit torque between the first support shaft 12A and the second support shaft 12B while allowing the first support shaft 12A and the second support shaft 12B to face each other with respect to each other (ie, , moves along its axis of rotation). A specific example of the linear motion guiding mechanism 15 includes a ball spline bearing.

The motor 2 is coupled to the outer peripheral surface of the second support shaft 12B via a gear. The torque of the motor 2 is transmitted to the first support shaft 12A via the linear motion guiding mechanism 15, thereby rotating the substrate W held by the jaws 10. The rotation of the first table 11A and the rotation of the second table 11B are synchronized with each other at all times due to the linear motion guiding mechanism 15. In detail, the substrate W and the rotary cover 3 are integrally rotated with each other, and the relative speed between each other is zero. There may be some slight speed difference between the substrate W and the rotating cover 3. The substrate W and the rotary cover 3 can be rotated by different rotation mechanisms. In this specification, rotating the substrate W and the rotary cover 3 at substantially the same speed means rotating the substrate W and the rotary cover 3 in the same direction at substantially the same angular velocity, instead of rotating the substrate W and the rotary cover 3 Opposite Direction.

The brake 23, which is a vertical moving mechanism, is coupled to the first support shaft 12A via the coupling mechanism 24. The coupling mechanism 24 constitutes a driving force for transmitting the brake 23 (which acts in the direction of the rotation axis) to the first support shaft 12A while allowing the first support shaft 12A to rotate on its own axis. As shown in FIG. 3, the brake 23 vertically moves the first table 11A, the first support shaft 12A, and the jaws 10 (i.e., the substrate W) via the coupling mechanism 24. The brake 23 then constitutes a relative movement mechanism for providing relative movement between the substrate W and the rotary cover 3 along the axis of rotation.

The first support shaft 12A houses therein a back nozzle 17 coupled to the cleaning liquid supply source, and a gas nozzle 18 coupled to the dry gas supply source. The cleaning liquid supply source stores pure water therein as a cleaning liquid, and supplies the pure water to the rear surface of the substrate W via the rear nozzle 17. The dry gas supply source stores nitrogen or dry air therein as a dry gas, and supplies a dry gas to the rear surface of the substrate W via the gas nozzle 18.

The front nozzle 4 is directed to the center of the substrate W. The front nozzle 4 is coupled to a pure water supply source (i.e., a cleaning liquid supply source) not shown in the drawing, and supplies pure water from the pure water supply source to the center of the front surface of the substrate W. Two parallel nozzles 20 and 21 for performing the Notagoni drying method are disposed above the substrate W. The nozzle 20 is used to supply IPA vapor (a mixture of isopropanol and nitrogen gas) onto the front surface of the substrate W. The nozzle 21 is used to supply pure water to the front surface of the substrate W in order to prevent the front surface of the substrate W from drying out. The nozzles 20 and 21 are movable in the radial direction of the substrate W.

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the substrate holding mechanism 1. As shown in Figures 1 and 4, the second table 11B has a plurality of discharge holes 25 defined therein. The discharge hole 25 has an opening located above the lower end of the rotary cover 3 and an opening below the lower surface of the second stage 11B. As shown in Fig. 4, the discharge hole 25 is an elliptical hole which extends in the circumferential direction of the rotary cover 3 and is inclined radially outward toward the lower opening thereof. The cleaning liquid (for example, pure water) supplied from the front nozzle 4 and the rear nozzle 17 and the pure water supplied from the nozzle 21, and the gas from the gas nozzle 18 and the surrounding environment (typically air) are discharged through the discharge hole 25.

The second stage 11B also has a plurality of auxiliary discharge holes 26 for discharging the liquid (cleaning liquid, pure water) trapped between the first stage 11A and the second stage 11B. These auxiliary discharge holes 26 have an upper opening positioned in a gap between the first stage 11A and the second stage 11B, and an opening below the lower surface of the second stage 11B. The auxiliary discharge hole 26 is like the discharge hole 25, and is inclined radially outward toward the lower opening thereof.

The liquid outlet passage 30 and the gas outlet passage 31 are provided below the discharge opening 25 and the lower opening of the auxiliary discharge hole 26. The liquid outlet passage 30 and the gas outlet passage 31 are annular. The liquid outlet passage 30 is located radially outward of the gas outlet passage 31. In this arrangement, the liquid and gas discharged from the discharge hole 25 and the auxiliary discharge hole 26 are separated from each other by the centrifugal force, so that the liquid flows into the liquid outlet passage 30, and the gas flows into the gas outlet passage 31.

Figure 5 shows the path of the liquid and Figure 6 shows the path of the gas. The gas outlet passage 31 is coupled to a suction source 32 (such as a vacuum pump). As shown in Fig. 6, the operation of the attraction source 32 produces a downward flow of gas from the surface of the substrate W through the discharge orifice 25 and the gas outlet passage 31.

The annular fixing plate 35 is disposed below the second table 11B and has a small clearance between the lower surface of the second table 11B. The annular fixing plate 35 is for preventing the surrounding gas from being agitated by the rotation of the second table 11B. A downwardly extending tubular skirt 28 is secured to the periphery of the second table 11B. This skirt 28 is used to prevent scattering of liquid discharged from the discharge holes 25 and the auxiliary discharge holes 26, and is also used to enable liquid to be released at a position away from the substrate W.

The rotary cover 3 has a shape of an inner peripheral surface so as to surround the substrate W held by the substrate holding mechanism 1. The inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 has an upper end above the substrate W. The inner peripheral surface is shaped such that its diameter (the inner diameter of the rotary cover 3) gradually decreases toward the upper end of the inner peripheral surface. In other words, the inner peripheral surface as a whole is inclined radially inward toward the upper end thereof, and the angle θ (see Fig. 1) between the inner peripheral surface and the horizontal plane is less than 90 degrees.

As shown in Fig. 1, the vertical section of the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 includes two oblique lines. However, the vertical cross section of the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 is not limited to the shape shown in Fig. 1. As shown in Fig. 7, the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 may have a vertical cross section including a curved line, that is, an arched vertical cross section. In Fig. 7, the angle between the inner peripheral surface and the horizontal plane gradually increases from the minimum value of the upper end of the rotary cover 3 to the maximum value of the lower end (θ1 < θ2). The inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 shown in Fig. 7 can reduce the impact of liquid collision on the rotary cover 3, and allows the liquid to rapidly flow downward along the inner peripheral surface due to the centrifugal force. The angle of the inner peripheral surface at its upper end with respect to the horizontal plane is preferably substantially 0 degrees.

As shown in Fig. 2, the upper end of the rotary cover 3 has a plurality of recesses 3a each having a shape corresponding to the shape of each of the jaws 10. The diameter of the upper end of the rotary cover 3 is slightly larger than the diameter of the substrate W.

As shown in Fig. 1, the lower end of the rotary cover 3 is positioned above the respective upper openings of the discharge holes 25, so that the liquid flowing downward along the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 can be smoothly introduced into the discharge. Hole 25. If the opening above the discharge hole 25 is located away from the lower end of the rotary cover 3, the liquid flowing downward along the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 will hit the upper surface of the second table 11B and will not smoothly flow in. Discharge hole 25. According to the above configuration of the embodiment, the liquid does not collide with the upper surface of the second stage 11B. Therefore, the liquid system smoothly flows into the discharge hole 25.

The operation of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment will now be explained. The motor 2 energy is supplied to rotate the substrate W and the rotary cover 3. In this state, the front nozzle 4 and the rear nozzle 17 supply pure water to the front surface (upper surface) and the rear surface (lower surface) of the substrate W to rinse the entirety of the substrate W with pure water. The pure water supplied to the substrate W is dispersed on the front surface and the rear surface by centrifugal force, thereby rinsing all surfaces of the substrate W. The pure water removed from the rotating substrate W is captured by the rotary cover 3 and flows into the discharge hole 25. When the substrate W is thus washed, the two nozzles 20, 21 are positioned at a given standby position away from the substrate W.

Then, the supply of pure water from the front nozzle 4 is stopped, and the front nozzle 4 is moved to a given standby position away from the substrate W. The two nozzles 20, 21 are moved to an operating position above the substrate W. While the substrate W is rotated at a low speed range of 150 to 300 rpm, the nozzle 20 supplies IPA vapor, and the nozzle 21 supplies pure water to the front surface of the substrate W. During operation, the rear nozzle 17 supplies pure water to the surface behind the substrate W. The two nozzles 20, 21 are simultaneously moved toward the radial direction of the substrate W, thereby drying the front surface (upper surface) of the substrate W.

Thereafter, the two nozzles 20, 21 are moved to their standby positions, and the supply of pure water from the rear nozzles 17 is stopped. Then, the substrate W is rotated at a high speed range of 1000 to 1,500 rpm, and pure water is removed from the surface after the substrate W. During this operation, the gas nozzle 18 supplies dry gas to the surface behind the substrate W. In this way, the surface behind the substrate W is dried.

When the front surface (upper surface) of the substrate W is dried, as described above, pure water is supplied to the front surface and the rear surface of the substrate W. This pure water is removed from the substrate W by centrifugal force and moved to the rotary cover 3. Since the rotary cover 3 and the substrate W are rotated at the same speed, when pure water collides with the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3, it hardly scatters. In addition, the space between the rotating cover 3 and the substrate W that rotates at the same speed produces only a slight swirling airflow. Therefore, the mist of pure water is not carried to the substrate W by the swirling gas flow. In this way, water marks on the substrate W can be prevented from occurring. Furthermore, since the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 is inclined radially inward, the centrifugal force generated by the rotation of the rotary cover 3 causes the pure water to rapidly flow downward along the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 to the discharge hole. 25.

After the drying of the substrate W is terminated, the supply of the dry gas from the gas nozzle 18 is stopped. As shown in FIG. 3, the brake 23 lifts the substrate W until the substrate W is positioned above the rotary cover 3. The dried substrate W is removed from the substrate holding mechanism 1 by the hand of the transfer robot (not shown).

Preferably, the substrate W is positioned at different heights when the front surface of the substrate W is dried and when the surface behind the substrate W is dried. For example, when the front surface of the substrate W is dried, the substrate W is in the normal position shown in FIG. On the other hand, when the surface of the substrate W is dried, the substrate W is lifted to the position of the upper end of the rotary cover 3. In detail, the substrate W is lifted up until the upper end of the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 is positioned between the front surface and the rear surface of the substrate W as shown in Fig. 8. At this position shown in Fig. 8, the distance between the substrate W and the rotary cover 3 is the smallest. Therefore, it is possible to prevent water droplets and mist from flowing from the rear surface of the substrate W to the front surface.

Figure 9 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention. Portions of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the second embodiment which are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus of the first embodiment are denoted by the same reference numerals and will not be described below. The detailed operation of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the second embodiment is the same as that of the substrate cleaning apparatus of the first embodiment, and will not be described below.

According to the second embodiment, the substrate holding mechanism 1 includes a single table 11, a hollow support shaft 12 supporting the table 11, and a plurality of jaws 10 mounted on the upper surface of the table 11. The rotary cover 3 is fixed around the table 11. The relative position between the rotary cover 3 and the substrate W is fixed at any time.

Below the table 11, there are provided at least three push rods 40 and a brake 23 for vertically moving the push rods 40. The table 11 has a plurality of through holes 11a which are located at positions corresponding to the respective push rods 40. The fixing plate 35 disposed under the table 11 also has a plurality of through holes 11 (not shown) which are also located at positions corresponding to the respective through holes 11a. The table 11 has no auxiliary discharge holes.

The substrate W is dried in the same operation sequence as the first embodiment. After drying the substrate W, the brake 23 lifts the push rod 40. As shown in Fig. 10, the push rod 40 is moved upward through the through hole 11a to lift the substrate W. Thereafter, the dried substrate W is removed by the hand of the transfer robot (not shown).

Fig. 11 is an enlarged cross-sectional view showing a modification of the rotary cover 3 of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the second embodiment. As shown in Fig. 11, the rotary cover 3 is coupled to the auxiliary rotary cover 42 fixed to the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3. The rotary cover 3 and the auxiliary rotary cover 42 rotate together with each other. The auxiliary rotary cover 42 has an inner peripheral surface that is inclined radially inward toward the upper end thereof. The upper end of the auxiliary rotating cover 42 is located at substantially the same height as the substrate W. The upper end of the rotary cover 3 and the upper end of the auxiliary rotary cover 42 have substantially the same diameter. The upper end of the auxiliary rotary cover 42 has a plurality of recesses (not shown) which are similar to the shape of the recess 3a shown in Fig. 2. The auxiliary rotary cover 42 has a plurality of discharge holes 44 defined at its lower end.

The space above the surface before the substrate W and the space below the surface after the substrate W are separated from each other by the auxiliary rotating cover 42. Therefore, the process of drying the surface of the substrate W and the process of drying the surface after the substrate W hardly affect each other. In detail, the auxiliary rotary cover 42 prevents the mist of the liquid from flowing between the space above the surface before the substrate W and the space below the surface after the substrate W. Further, the order of the drying process for the front surface of the substrate W and the drying process for the surface after the substrate W can be changed. In detail, it is possible to first dry the surface after the substrate W and then dry the surface before the substrate W. The specific details of the drying process are the same as those of the first embodiment.

Figure 12 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a third embodiment of the present invention. The components of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the third embodiment are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment, and will not be described in detail hereinafter. The details of the operation of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the third embodiment are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment, and will not be described in detail hereinafter.

The substrate cleaning apparatus according to the third embodiment is different from the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment in that the fixing cover 45 is provided around the rotary cover 3. This fixing cover 45 is not rotatable and is shaped to cover the entire outer peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3. A small gap is formed between the outer peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 and the inner peripheral surface of the fixed cover 45. The fixed cover 45 has a discharge port 46. The fixing cover 45 has an upper end whose diameter is substantially the same or slightly larger than the diameter of the upper end of the rotary cover 3. The fixed cover 45 has a lower end that is positioned below the lower end of the skirt 28. Therefore, the fixing cover 45 is shaped to cover the entire outer peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 and the skirt 28.

The reason why the fixing cover 45 is provided is as follows. When the rotary cover 3 is rotated together with the substrate W, the rotary cover 3 may disturb the gas in the vicinity of its outer peripheral surface to generate a slightly rotating air flow. This swirling airflow may carry the mist of the liquid back to the surface of the substrate W. The swirling gas stream may also carry liquid to the wall of the cleaning chamber (i.e., the cleaning space) and may carry the atmosphere in the cleaning chamber to the surface of the substrate W. The fixing cover 45 can prevent such a swirling airflow from being generated, and thus prevents water marks from being generated on the substrate W and contamination on the back surface of the substrate W.

The gap between the fixed cover 45 and the rotary cover 3 is preferably as small as possible in order to prevent the gas in the gap from being disturbed by the rotating rotary cover 3 and flowing back toward the substrate W. The discharge port 46 is preferably coupled to a suction source (not shown) for forcibly extracting gas from the gap between the fixed cover 45 and the rotary cover 3 when the substrate W is dried. When the suction source is operated, an air flow is generated in a small gap between the rotary cover 3 and the fixed cover 45 as shown in Fig. 13. As a result, the gas once flowing into the gap does not flow back toward the substrate W during the rotation of the rotary cover 3.

Figure 14 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a modification of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the third embodiment of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 14, a plurality of fins 50 are fixed to the outer peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3. The fins 50 can prevent the gas that has flowed into the gap between the fixed cover 45 and the rotary cover 3 from flowing back due to the rotation of the rotary cover 3. The outer peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 may have a spiral groove instead of the fin 50 for causing the gas in the gap to flow downward due to the rotation of the rotary cover 3.

The fixing cover 45 according to the third embodiment can be applied to the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first and second embodiments.

Figure 15 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a fourth embodiment of the present invention. The substrate cleaning apparatus according to the fourth embodiment is the same as the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment, and is denoted by the same reference numerals and will not be described in detail below. The details of the operation of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the fourth embodiment, which will not be described hereinafter, are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment.

As shown in Fig. 15, the liquid absorber 53 is fixed to the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3. The liquid absorber 53 substantially covers the entire inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3. The liquid absorber 53 may be made of sponge, porous material, or mesh cloth of PVA (polyethylene ethanol). In order to easily replenish the liquid from the substrate W, the liquid absorber 53 should preferably be hydrophilic. The liquid absorber 53 should preferably also have continuous pores therein to direct the captured liquid downwardly through the liquid absorber 53 to the discharge orifice 25.

In the fourth embodiment having the above structure, the liquid absorber 53 is also capable of absorbing the impact of the liquid colliding on the rotary cover 3. The liquid absorber 53 can also be applied to the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first to third embodiments.

Figure 16 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a fifth embodiment of the present invention. The components of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the fifth embodiment which are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the third embodiment are denoted by the same reference numerals and will not be described in detail hereinafter. The details of the operation of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the fifth embodiment will be the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment, which will not be described in detail hereinafter.

As shown in Fig. 16, the cleaning chamber 51 is disposed around the fixed cover 45, and the discharge port 47 is provided at the lower portion of the cleaning chamber 51. The discharge port 47 and the discharge port 46 of the fixed cover 45 are coupled to a suction source (not shown). According to this embodiment, the operation of the suction source not shown and the suction source 32 coupled to the gas outlet passage 31 integrally forms a downward flowing gas in the cleaning chamber 51. In particular, when the gas in the cleaning chamber 51 is discharged through the discharge port 47, the downwardly flowing gas system is formed along the outer peripheral surface of the fixed cover 45. This downward flowing gas system prevents the water droplets and the surrounding atmosphere existing between the outer peripheral surface of the fixed cover 45 and the inner surface of the cleaning chamber 51 from reattaching to the substrate W, and also prevents the mist in the cleaning chamber 51 from reattaching to the substrate On the substrate W.

Figure 17 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a substrate cleaning apparatus according to a reference example of the present invention.

As shown in FIG. 17, the substrate cleaning apparatus includes a substrate holding mechanism 60 configured to horizontally hold the substrate W, and a motor (rotating mechanism) 2 through which the substrate is configured to hold the substrate W. Rotating with its own central axis; a fixed cover 70 disposed around the substrate W; and a front nozzle 4 for supplying pure water as a cleaning liquid onto the front surface of the substrate W. The substrate holding mechanism 60 includes a table 61, a hollow support shaft 62 that supports the table 61, and a plurality of jaws 10 mounted on the upper surface of the table 61.

The support shaft 62 houses therein a rear nozzle 17 coupled to a cleaning liquid supply source, and a gas nozzle 18 coupled to the dry gas supply source. The cleaning liquid supply source stores pure water therein as a cleaning liquid, and supplies the pure water to the rear surface of the substrate W via the rear nozzle 17. The dry gas supply source stores nitrogen or dry air therein as a dry gas, and supplies a dry gas to the rear surface of the substrate W via the gas nozzle 18.

The front nozzle 4 is directed to the center of the substrate W. The front nozzle 4 is coupled to a pure water supply source (i.e., a cleaning liquid supply source) not shown in the drawing, and supplies pure water from the pure water supply source to the center of the front surface of the substrate W. Two parallel nozzles 20 and 21 for performing the Notagoni drying method are disposed above the substrate W. The nozzle 20 is used to supply IPA vapor (a mixture of isopropanol and nitrogen gas) onto the front surface of the substrate W. The nozzle 21 is used to supply pure water to the front surface of the substrate W in order to prevent the front surface of the substrate W from drying out. The nozzles 20 and 21 are movable in the radial direction of the substrate W.

The fixed cover 70 has an inner peripheral surface that is inclined radially inward. The upper end of the fixing cover 70 is positioned above the substrate W. The liquid absorber 53 is fixed to the inner peripheral surface of the fixing cover 70. The liquid absorber 53 substantially covers the entire inner peripheral surface of the fixing cover 70. The liquid absorber 53 may be made of sponge, porous material, or mesh cloth of PVA (polyethylene ethanol). In order to easily replenish the liquid from the substrate W, the liquid absorber 53 should preferably be hydrophilic. The liquid absorber 53 should preferably also have continuous pores therein to direct the captured liquid to flow downwardly through the liquid absorber 53.

The liquid reservoir 63 for recovering the liquid (for example, the pure water supplied from the front nozzle 4 and the rear nozzle 17 as the cleaning liquid, and the pure water supplied from the nozzle 21) is disposed on the table 61 and the fixed cover 70. Below it. The liquid reservoir 63 has a water outlet 64 at its bottom. The water outlet 64 is coupled to a suction source (not shown) such that the liquid recovered by the liquid reservoir 63 is discharged along with the ambient gas via the water outlet 64.

The substrate cleaning apparatus in this example is operable to perform a drying process on the substrate W in accordance with the same processing procedure as the first embodiment. In detail, the motor 2 is supplied with energy to rotate the substrate W. Then, the front nozzle 4 and the rear nozzle 17 respectively supply pure water to the front surface and the rear surface of the substrate W to rinse the entirety of the substrate W with pure water. Pure water is removed from the rotating substrate W, and the removed pure water is captured by the fixed cover 70 and recovered by the liquid storage tank 63. When the substrate W is thus washed, the two nozzles 20, 21 are tied at a given standby position away from the substrate W.

Then, the supply of pure water is stopped, and the front nozzle 4 is moved to a given standby position away from the substrate W. The two nozzles 20, 21 are moved to an operating position above the substrate W. When the substrate W is rotated at a low speed range of 150 to 300 rpm, the nozzle 20 supplies IPA vapor and the nozzle 21 supplies pure water to the front surface of the substrate W. During this operation, the rear nozzle 17 supplies pure water to the surface behind the substrate W. The two nozzles 20 and 21 are simultaneously moved in the radial direction of the substrate W, thereby drying the front surface (upper surface) of the substrate W.

Thereafter, the two nozzles 20, 21 are moved to their standby positions, and the supply of pure water from the rear nozzles 17 is stopped. Then, the substrate W is rotated at a high speed range of 1000 to 1,500 rpm, and pure water is removed from the surface after the substrate W. During this operation, the gas nozzle 18 supplies dry gas to the surface behind the substrate W. In this way, the surface behind the substrate W is dried.

In this example having the above structure, the liquid absorber 53 can absorb the impact of the liquid colliding on the rotary cover 3.

Figure 18 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a substrate cleaning apparatus according to another reference example of the present invention. The structure and operation details of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in Fig. 18, which will not be described later, are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in Fig. 17, and will not be repeated. Description.

As shown in FIG. 18, the substrate cleaning apparatus includes a hollow cylindrical shield cover 65 which is formed to surround the table 61 and the support shaft 62. The shield cover 65 has an upper end that is substantially at the same height as the table 61, and a lower end that is fixed to the liquid reservoir 63. In this case, the above liquid absorber 53 is not provided. Since the table 61 and the support shaft 62 are covered with the shield cover 65, the rotational flow of the ambient gas can be prevented from being formed when the table 61 and the support shaft 62 rotate. As a result, the mist of the liquid is also prevented from reattaching to the surface of the substrate W, which would otherwise be carried by the rotational flow of such ambient gas.

The rotary cover 3 according to the first embodiment can be attached to the substrate cleaning device shown in Figs.

19 and 20 are schematic vertical sectional views of a substrate cleaning apparatus according to still another reference example of the present invention. The structural and operational details of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in Figures 19 and 20, which will not be described hereinafter, are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in Fig. 17, but will not Repeat the explanation.

In this example, the fixed cover 70 is vertically movable. As described above, when the surface before the substrate W is dried and when the surface after the substrate W is dried, the substrate W is rotated at different speeds. Therefore, it is preferable to change the position of the fixing cover 70 depending on which side of the substrate W is to be dried. In detail, when the front surface of the substrate W is dried, the fixing cover 70 is in the normal position as shown in Fig. 19. As described above, the substrate W is rotated at a low speed when the front surface of the substrate W is dried. Therefore, the water droplets removed from the rotating substrate W are free to fall and then collide with the inner peripheral surface of the fixed cover 70. Since the distance between the fixing cover 70 and the periphery of the substrate W is large, water droplets that collide with the inner circumferential surface of the fixing cover 70 hardly bounce back to the substrate W.

When the surface behind the substrate W is dried, the substrate W is rotated at a high speed. Therefore, the water droplets removed from the rotating substrate W travel substantially in a straight line and collide with the inner peripheral surface of the fixed cover 70 at a high speed as shown in FIG. Further, when the jaw 10 and the table 61 are rotated at a high speed, the gas surrounding the substrate W is disturbed to form a swirling airflow. This swirling airflow is undesirable because the swirling airflow may carry water droplets and mist to the surface of the substrate W. According to this example, the surface of the substrate W is dried while the fixing cover 70 is at a lower position. In detail, the fixing cover 70 is lowered to a position where the upper end of the fixing cover 70 is substantially the same height as the substrate W. At this position, the distance between the periphery of the substrate W and the fixed cover 70 is small. Therefore, water droplets and mist are prevented from flowing from the rear surface of the substrate W to the front surface.

Figure 21 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a sixth embodiment of the present invention. The parts of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the sixth embodiment which are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment are denoted by the same reference numerals and will not be described in detail below. The operation details of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the sixth embodiment are the same as those of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment, and will not be described below.

As shown in Fig. 21, the inner rotary cover 75 is provided on the radially inner side of the rotary cover 3. This inner rotary cover 75 is fixed to the second table 11B of the table 11. The rotary cover (first rotary cover) 3 and the inner rotary cover (second rotary cover) 75 are coupled to each other by a plurality of support arms 80. Therefore, the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3 are rotatably coupled together. A gap is formed between the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3.

Fig. 22A is an enlarged vertical sectional view of the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3, and Fig. 22B is a plan view of the inner rotary cover 75 and the jaws 10. The inner rotary cover 75 has a peripheral surface having a smooth arched vertical cross section. The angle of the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 with respect to the horizontal plane gradually increases from the minimum value of the upper end of the inner rotary cover 75 to the maximum value of the lower end. In detail, the angle of the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 with respect to the horizontal plane is about 0 degrees at the upper end and about 90 degrees at the lower end thereof.

The upper end of the inner rotary cover 75 is slightly positioned below the substrate W held by the jaws 10. In other words, the upper end surface of the inner rotating cover 75 is positioned below the upper surface of the substrate W, and the upper end surface of the inner rotating cover 75 is positioned above the lower surface of the substrate W. The upper end of the inner rotary cover 75 is located near the periphery of the substrate W. The diameter of the upper end of the inner rotary cover 75 is slightly larger than the diameter of the substrate W. The inner peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 preferably also has a smooth arched profile like its outer peripheral surface. As shown in Fig. 22B, the upper end of the inner rotary cover 75 has a plurality of recesses 75a, each of which has a shape corresponding to the shape of the jaws 10.

The outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 includes a smooth parabola extending downward from the periphery of the substrate W. Therefore, when the substrate W is rotated, the liquid on the substrate W is smoothly guided downward along the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 under the surface tension of the liquid. Therefore, the flowing liquid does not break into water droplets or mist. Since the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 is slightly lower than the upper end of the substrate W, the liquid is less likely to be trapped in the gap between the substrate W and the inner rotary cover 75. If the upper end surface of the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 is higher than the upper end of the substrate W, the liquid flow from the substrate W is broken between the substrate W and the inner rotary cover 75 to be converted into water droplets or mist. Therefore, the upper end surface of the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 is located at the same height as the upper surface of the substrate W, or preferably slightly below the upper surface of the substrate W.

The inner circumferential surface of the rotary cover 3 has substantially the same shape as the outer circumferential surface of the inner rotary cover 75. In detail, the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 has a smooth arched vertical cross section. The angle of the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 with respect to the horizontal plane gradually increases from the minimum value of the upper end of the rotary cover 3 to the maximum value of the lower end. In detail, the angle of the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 with respect to the horizontal plane is about 0 degrees at the upper end and about 90 degrees at the lower end thereof. Although not shown in the drawings, the upper end of the rotary cover 3 also has a plurality of recesses shaped like the shape of the inner rotary cover 75.

The support arm 80 is fixed to the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 and the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3. In detail, the support arm 80 is disposed in a gap between the outer circumferential surface of the inner rotary cover 75 and the inner circumferential surface of the rotary cover 3. Fig. 23A is a plan view of the support arm 80 fixed to the inner rotary cover as viewed from above, and Fig. 23B is a view of the support arm 80 as viewed from the radially outer side. In the 23A and 23B drawings, the rotary cover 3 is not shown for convenience of explanation. Each of the support arms 80 has the shape of a blade, so that when the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3 are rotated, the support arm 80 generates a downward flowing gas in the gap between the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3.

The inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3 rotate together with the substrate W. The liquid (for example, pure water) supplied to the upper surface of the substrate W is moved from the substrate W to the inner rotary cover 75 by centrifugal force, and flows downward along the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75. During rotation, the support arm 80, which functions as a blade, is attached to the gap between the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3 to form a downward gas flow. Therefore, the mist and the water droplets of the liquid are forcibly moved downward by the downward gas flow, and are prevented from adhering to the surface of the substrate W. The gap between the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3 can be appropriately adjusted so that the liquid can smoothly flow downward and prevent the mist from entering the space above the substrate W.

The surface of the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3 is preferably a hydrophilic surface so that water droplets are not easily released once the water droplets adhere to the inner rotary cover 75 and the rotary cover 3. Preferably, the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotary cover 75 and/or the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 has a spiral groove for directing the liquid guided on the inner rotary cover 75 and on the rotary cover 3.

The inner rotary cover 75, the rotary cover 3, and the substrate W are located in the cleaning chamber 51. The cleaning chamber 51 has a gas outlet 51a and a liquid outlet 51b at the bottom thereof. The liquid system supplied to the substrate W such as pure water is discharged through the liquid outlet 51b, and the gas system which forms the downward flow by the rotating support arm 80 is discharged via the gas outlet 51a. The vacuum pump can be coupled to the gas outlet .51a such that the gas is forced to drain from the cleaning chamber 51.

Figure 24 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a modification of the substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with the sixth embodiment of the present invention. In this modification, a fixing cover 85 is added. As shown in Fig. 24, this fixing cover 85 is provided to surround the rotary cover 3. The fixed cover 85 is non-rotatable and has a lower end located below the lower end of the rotary cover 3. Thus, the fixing cover 85 is shaped to cover the entire outer peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3. A small gap is formed between the outer peripheral surface of the rotary cover 3 and the inner peripheral surface of the fixed cover 85. Although not shown in the drawings, the upper end of the fixing cover 85 has a plurality of recesses each having a shape corresponding to the shape of each of the jaws 10. The diameter of the upper end of the fixed cover 85 is substantially the same as or slightly larger than the diameter of the upper end of the rotary cover 3. The reason why the fixing cover 85 is provided is the same as the reason why the above-described fixing cover 45 is provided.

Next, an example of a polishing apparatus having a substrate cleaning apparatus according to the above embodiment of the present invention will now be described. Figure 25 is a plan view of a polishing apparatus having a substrate cleaning apparatus according to any one of the first to sixth embodiments of the present invention. Figure 26 is a schematic perspective view of the polishing apparatus shown in Figure 25. As shown in Fig. 25, the polishing apparatus has a rectangular outer casing 100. The inner space of the outer casing 100 is partitioned into a loading and unloading portion 102, a polishing portion 130 (130a, 130b), and a cleaning portion 140 by partition walls 101a, 101b, 101c.

The loading and unloading unit 102 has two or more front loading units 120 (three in FIG. 25) on which the cassettes each storing a plurality of substrates are placed. The front loading unit 120 is configured to abut each other along the width direction of the polishing apparatus (perpendicular to the longitudinal direction of the polishing apparatus). Each of the front loading units 120 can receive an open cassette, a Standard Manufacturing Interface pod (SMIF pod), or a Front Opening Unified pod (FOUP pod) thereon. SMIF and FOUP are tightly sealed containers in which wafer cassettes are housed and covered with a dividing wall to provide an internal environment that is isolated from the external space.

Furthermore, the loading and unloading unit 102 has a moving mechanism 121 that extends in the direction in which the front loading unit 120 is disposed. The first transfer robot 122 is disposed on the moving mechanism 121 and is movable along the configuration direction of the front loading unit 120. The first transfer robot 122 is operable to move on the moving mechanism 121 to access the wafer cassette mounted on the front loading unit 120. The first transfer robot 122 has two hands that are vertically arranged and can be used independently. For example, the upper hand can be used to return the polished substrate to the wafer cassette, while the lower hand can be used to transfer the unpolished substrate.

The loading and unloading unit 102 is required to be the cleanest area. Therefore, the internal pressure of the loading and unloading portion 102 is maintained at a higher pressure than the outer space of the device, the polishing portion 130, and the cleaning portion 140 at any time. Furthermore, a filter fan unit (not shown) having a clean air filter (such as a HEPA filter or a ULPA filter) is disposed above the moving mechanism 121 of the first transfer robot 122. This filter fan unit removes particulates, toxic vapors, and toxic gases from the air to create clean air and constantly forms a clean, downward flowing air.

The polishing portion 130 is a region where the substrate is polished. The polishing portion 130 includes a first polishing portion 130a and a second polishing portion 130b, and has a first polishing unit 131A and a second polishing unit 131B in the first polishing portion 130a, and a third polishing portion in the second polishing portion 130b. The unit 131C and the fourth polishing unit 131D. As shown in Fig. 25, the first polishing unit 131A, the second polishing unit 131B, the third polishing unit 131C, and the fourth polishing unit 131D are disposed along the longitudinal direction of the polishing apparatus.

The first polishing unit 131A includes: a polishing table 132A for holding the polishing pad; a top ring 133A configured to hold the substrate and press the substrate against the polishing surface of the polishing pad on the polishing table 132A to polish the substrate; a liquid supply nozzle 134A for supplying a polishing liquid (for example, a slurry) or a conditioning liquid (for example, pure water) to a polishing surface of the polishing pad; a dresser 135A for trimming the polishing pad; and an atomizer 136A has a nozzle for spraying a mixture of a liquid (eg, pure water) in an atomized state and a gas (eg, nitrogen) onto the polishing surface.

Likewise, the second polishing unit 131B includes a polishing table 132B, a top ring 133B, a polishing liquid supply nozzle 134B, a trimmer 135B, and a sprayer 136B. The third polishing unit 131C includes a polishing table 132C, a top ring 133C, a polishing liquid supply nozzle 134C, a trimmer 135C, and a sprayer 136C. The fourth polishing unit 131D includes a polishing table 132D, a top ring 133D, a polishing liquid supply nozzle 134D, a trimmer 135D, and a sprayer 136D.

The first linear carrier 150 is disposed in the first polishing portion 130a. The first linear carrier 150 is configured to transfer the substrate between four transfer positions along the longitudinal direction of the polishing apparatus (hereinafter, the four transfer positions are sequentially loaded from the loading and unloading unit 102) It is referred to as a first transfer position TP1, a second transfer position TP2, a third transfer position TP3, and a fourth transfer position TP4). The reversing machine 151 for reversing the substrate transferred from the first transfer robot 122 is disposed above the first transfer position TP1 of the first linear carrier 150. The vertically movable lifter 152 is disposed below the first transfer position TP1. The vertically movable pusher 153 is disposed below the second transfer position TP2, the vertically movable pusher 154 is disposed below the third transfer position TP3, and the vertically movable pusher 155 is disposed in the fourth The transfer position is below the TP4.

In the second polishing portion 130b, the second linear carrier 160 is disposed adjacent to the first linear carrier 150. The second linear carrier 160 is configured to transfer the substrate between three transfer positions along the longitudinal direction of the polishing apparatus (hereinafter, the three transfer positions are sequentially referred to from the loading and unloading unit 102) It is a fifth transfer position TP5, a sixth transfer position TP6, and a seventh transfer position TP7). The vertically movable lifter 166 is disposed below the fifth transfer position TP5, the vertically movable pusher 167 is disposed below the sixth transfer position TP6, and the vertically movable pusher 168 is disposed in the The seventh transfer position is below the TP7.

As shown in Fig. 26, the first linear carrier 150 has four transfer stages: a first stage, a second stage, a third stage, and a fourth stage. These transfer stations have a two-wire structure with upper and lower lines. In detail, the first transfer workbench, the second transfer workbench, and the third transfer workbench are disposed on the lower line, and the fourth transfer workbench is disposed on the upper line.

The transfer table below and the transfer table above can move freely without interfering with each other because they are set at different heights. The first transfer stage transfers the substrate between the first transfer position TP1 and the second transfer position (ie, substrate receiving/transfer position) TP2. The second transfer stage transfers the substrate between the second transfer position TP2 and the third transfer position (ie, substrate receiving/transfer position) TP3. The third transfer stage transfers the substrate between the third transfer position TP3 and the fourth transfer position TP4. The fourth transfer stage transfers the substrate between the first transfer position TP1 and the fourth transfer position TP4.

The second linear carrier 160 has substantially the same structure as the first linear carrier 150. In detail, the fifth transfer workbench and the sixth transfer workbench are disposed on the upper line, and the seventh transfer workbench is disposed on the lower line. The fifth transfer stage transfers the substrate between the fifth transfer position TP5 and the sixth transfer position (ie, substrate receiving/transfer position) TP6. The sixth transfer stage transfers the substrate between the sixth transfer position TP6 and the seventh transfer position (ie, substrate receiving/transfer position) TP7. The seventh transfer stage transfers the substrate between the fifth transfer position TP5 and the seventh transfer position TP7.

As can be appreciated from the fact that the slurry is used during polishing, the polishing portion 130 is the dirtiest area. Therefore, in order to prevent the particles from being scattered outside the polishing portion 130, the gas is discharged from the space around the individual polishing table. Further, the pressure inside the polishing portion 130 is set to be lower than the pressure of the outside of the device, the cleaning portion 140, and the loading and unloading portion 102, thereby preventing scattering of particles. Generally, the discharge pipes (not shown in the drawings) are respectively disposed below the polishing table, and the filter (not shown) is disposed above the polishing table to form a filter from the filter to the discharge pipe. Clean air flowing under.

The cleaning unit 140 is a region for cleaning the polished substrate. The cleaning unit 140 includes a second transfer robot 124, a reversing machine 141 for reversing the substrate received from the second transfer robot 124, and four cleaning units 142 to 145 for cleaning the polished substrate. And a transfer unit 146 for transferring the substrate between the reversing machine 141 and the cleaning units 142 to 145.

The second transfer robot 124, the reversing machine 141, and the cleaning units 142 to 145 are sequentially disposed along the longitudinal direction of the polishing apparatus. A filter fan unit (not shown) having a clean air filter is disposed above the cleaning units 142 to 145. This filter fan unit group constitutes the removal of particulates from the air to produce clean air and constantly forms a clean air that flows downward. The pressure in the cleaning unit 140 is maintained at a higher pressure than the polishing portion 130, and the particles in the polishing portion 130 are prevented from flowing into the cleaning portion 140.

The transfer unit 146 has a plurality of arms configured to hold the substrate such that a plurality of substrates can be horizontally moved together with each other between the reversing machine 141 and the cleaning units 142 to 145 by the arms. The cleaning unit 142 and the cleaning unit 143 may include, for example, a roll type cleaning unit having upper and lower roll-shaped sponges that rotate and press against the front surface and the rear surface of the substrate, thereby Clean the front and back surfaces of the substrate. The cleaning unit 144 may include, for example, a pen-type cleaning unit having a hemispherical sponge that rotates and presses against the substrate to clean the substrate. The cleaning unit 145 includes the above-described substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with any one of the embodiments. In the cleaning units 142 to 144, in addition to the above-described roll type cleaning unit or pen type cleaning unit, a megasonic type cleaning unit for applying ultrasonic waves to the cleaning liquid to clean the substrate may be additionally provided.

A shutter 110 is installed between the reversing machine 151 and the first transfer robot 122. When the substrate is transferred, the shutter 110 is opened, and the substrate is transferred between the first transfer robot 122 and the reversing machine 151. The shutters 111, 1J2, 113, and 114 are also disposed between the reversing machine 141 and the second transfer robot 124, between the reversing machine 141 and the cleaning unit 142, and the first polishing unit 130a and the second transfer robot, respectively. Between 124, and between the second polishing portion 130b and the second transfer robot 124. These shutters 111, 112, 113, and 114 are opened when the substrate is transferred.

A polishing pad (not shown) is mounted on the polishing table 132A. The polishing table 132A is coupled to a motor (not shown) disposed therebelow and is rotatable about its own axis. As shown in Fig. 26, the top ring 133A is coupled to a top ring shaft 137A that is coupled to a motor and a lift cylinder (not shown). Therefore, the top ring 133A can be vertically moved and rotated about the top ring shaft 137A. The substrate to be polished is attracted and held by the vacuum suction or the like on the lower surface of the top ring 133A. The upper surface of the polishing pad constitutes a polishing surface for sliding contact with the substrate W.

The substrate held on the lower surface of the top ring 133A is rotated and pressed against the polishing pad on the rotating polishing table 132A by the top ring 133A. The polishing liquid is supplied from the polishing liquid supply nozzle 134A to the polishing surface (upper surface) of the polishing pad. The substrate is polished in the presence of a polishing liquid between the substrate W and the polishing surface. The polishing table 132A and the top ring 133A constitute a mechanism for providing relative motion between the substrate W and the polishing surface. The second polishing unit 131B, the third polishing unit 131C, and the fourth polishing unit 131D have the same structure as the first polishing unit 131A, and thus detailed description thereof will be omitted.

The polishing apparatus having the above structure is capable of performing a sequential processing in which a single substrate is continuously polished in four polishing units, and a parallel processing in which two substrates are simultaneously polished.

When the sequence is executed, the substrate is transferred in the following route: the wafer cassette of the front loading unit 120 → the first transfer robot 122 → the reversing machine 151 → the lifter 152 → the first linear carrier 150 The first transfer work station→the pusher 153→the top ring 133A→the polishing table 132A→the pusher 153→the second transfer work station of the first linear carrier 150→the pusher 154→the top ring 133B→the polishing table 132B→ The pusher 154 → the third transfer station of the first linear carrier 150 → the lifter 155 → the second transfer robot 124 → the lifter 166 → the fifth transfer workbench of the second linear carrier 160 → Pusher 167 → top ring 133C → polishing table 132C → pusher 167 → sixth transfer station of second linear carrier 160 → pusher 168 → top ring 133D → polishing table 132D → pusher 168 → second linear handling The seventh transfer work station of the device 160 → the lifter 166 → the second transfer robot 124 → the reverse machine 141 → the transfer unit 146 → the cleaning unit 142 → the transfer unit 146 → the cleaning unit 143 → the transfer unit 146 → Cleaning unit 144 → transfer unit 146 → cleaning unit 145 → first transfer robot 122 → front loading unit 12 0 wafer cassette.

When the parallel type is executed, the substrate is transferred in the following route: the wafer cassette of the front loading unit 120 → the first transfer robot 122 → the reversing machine 151 → the lifter 152 → the first linear carrier 150 The first transfer work station→the pusher 153→the top ring 133A→the polishing table 132A→the pusher 153→the second transfer work station of the first linear carrier 150→the pusher 154→the top ring 133B→the polishing table 132B→ The pusher 154 → the third transfer station of the first linear carrier 150 → the lifter 155 → the second transfer robot 124 → the reverser 141 → the transfer unit 146 → the cleaning unit 142 → the transfer unit 146 → The cleaning unit 143 → the transfer unit 146 → the cleaning unit 144 → the transfer unit 146 → the cleaning unit 145 → the first transfer robot 122 → the wafer cassette of the front loading unit 120.

The other substrate is transferred in the following route: the wafer cassette of the front loading unit 120 → the first transfer robot 122 → the reversing machine 151 → the lifter 152 → the fourth transfer operation of the first linear carrier 150 Stage→lifter 155→second transfer robot 124→lifter 166→the fifth transfer station of the second linear carrier 160→the pusher 167→the top ring 133C→the polishing table 132C→the pusher 167→the first The sixth transfer table of the linear conveyor 160 → the pusher 168 → the top ring 133D → the polishing table 132D → the pusher 168 → the seventh transfer station of the second linear carrier 160 → the lifter 166 → the second Transfer robot 124 → reversing machine 141 → transfer unit 146 → cleaning unit 142 → transfer unit 146 → cleaning unit 143 → transfer unit 146 → cleaning unit 144 → transfer unit 146 → cleaning unit 145 → first transfer The robot 122 → the wafer cassette of the front loading unit 120.

Another polishing apparatus provided with the substrate cleaning apparatus according to any of the first to sixth embodiments will be described below. Figure 27 is a plan view showing another polishing apparatus having a substrate cleaning apparatus according to any one of the first to sixth embodiments of the present invention.

As shown in Fig. 27, the polishing apparatus includes a loading and unloading portion 201 for accommodating a plurality of wafer cassettes 204 in which a plurality of substrates are stored. The transfer robot 202 having two hands is mounted on the moving mechanism 200 to access the wafer cassette 204 in the loading and unloading unit 201. The moving mechanism 200 uses a linear motor mechanism that allows the transfer robot 202 to stably carry large diameter and heavy substrates at high speed.

The polishing apparatus also includes two cleaning units 212 disposed on opposite sides of the wafer cassette 204 relative to the moving mechanism 200 of the transfer robot 202. Each cleaning unit 212 is a substrate cleaning apparatus according to any one of the first to sixth embodiments of the present invention. The cleaning unit 212 is disposed at an individual position that can be reached by the hand of the transfer robot 202. A wafer station 206 having four substrate placement stages is disposed between the two cleaning units 212. This wafer station 206 is located at a position that can be reached by the hand of the transfer robot 202.

The two transfer robots 208 are disposed at individual locations where their hands can reach the various cleaning units 212 and wafer stations 206. The two cleaning units 214 are respectively disposed adjacent to the cleaning unit 212. These cleaning units 214 are located at positions where the hands of the transfer robot 208 can reach the cleaning unit 214, respectively. The rotary carrier 210 is disposed at a position that can be reached by the hand of the transfer robot 208. The two polishing units 250 are disposed at a position where the polishing unit 250 can transfer the substrate to the rotary carrier 210 and transfer the substrate from the rotary carrier 210. A single transfer robot 208 can be provided in place of the two transfer robots 208.

The polishing apparatus has an In-line Thickness Monitor (ITM) 224 as a measuring unit for measuring the surface state (e.g., film thickness) of the substrate which has been washed and dried. This ITM 224 can be configured to perform measurements before or after polishing the substrate. As shown in FIG. 27, the ITM 224 is positioned at an extension of the mobile mechanism 200, or in other words, at the end of the mobile mechanism 200. The ITM 224 is based on the use of an optical mechanism before the transfer robot 202 transfers the polished substrate back to one of the wafer cassettes 204, or after the transfer robot 202 removes the substrate to be polished from one of the wafer cassettes 204. The polished state of the copper film or the barrier film on the surface of the substrate (eg, a semiconductor wafer) is measured by an optical signal applied to the substrate and reflected on the substrate.

Each polishing unit 250 includes a polishing table 230, a top ring 231, a polishing liquid supply nozzle 232 for supplying polishing liquid to a polishing pad (not shown) on the polishing table 230, a dresser 218 for conditioning the polishing pad, and a storage water The sink 222 of the dresser 218 is washed.

The operation of the polishing apparatus shown in Fig. 27 will be explained below.

A wafer cassette 204 storing a plurality of substrates each having a conductive film (such as a copper film) formed on the surface thereof is disposed in the loading and unloading portion 201. The transfer robot 202 removes the substrate from one of the wafer cassettes 204 and places the removed substrate at the wafer station 206. One of the transfer robots 208 receives the substrate from the wafer station 206, reverses it upside down if necessary, and transfers the substrate to the rotary carrier 210. The rotary carrier 210 rotates in a horizontal plane, and the substrate on the rotary carrier 210 is held by the top ring 231 of one of the polishing units 250.

The substrate held by the top ring 231 is moved to a polishing position above the polishing table 230. While the top ring 231 and the polishing table 230 are rotated, the substrate is lowered and pressed against the polishing surface of the polishing pad. When the polishing liquid is supplied from the polishing liquid supply nozzle 232 to the polishing surface, the substrate is polished.

The polished substrate is transferred to the transfer robot 208 via the rotary carrier 210, and if necessary, the transfer robot 208 reverses the substrate upside down and transfers the substrate to one of the cleaning units 214. In the polishing unit 250 that has performed the polishing process, the polishing surface of the polishing pad is trimmed by the trimmer 218 so as to be ready for polishing the next substrate.

The cleaning unit 214 removes and rinses the surface of the substrate and then dries the substrate. The dried substrate is then transferred by transfer robot 208 and placed at wafer station 206. The transfer robot 202 removes the dried substrate from the wafer station 206 and transfers the substrate to one of the cleaning units 212, where the substrate is cleaned and dried. The cleaned and dried substrate is returned by the transfer robot 202 to the original wafer cassette 204.

Since the polishing apparatus has two sets of the polishing unit 250, the cleaning unit 212, and the cleaning unit 214, the polishing apparatus can perform a series of processes on both substrates simultaneously, including polishing, cleaning, and drying. A single substrate can be polished by two polishing units 250.

While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described, it is understood that various changes and modifications can be made within the scope of the technical concept defined by the scope of the invention, the specification, and the drawings.

1. . . Substrate holding mechanism

2. . . motor

3. . . Rotating cover

3a. . . Concave

4. . . Front nozzle

10. . . Jaws

11. . . Workbench

11A. . . First workbench

11a. . . Through hole

11B. . . Second workbench

12A. . . First support shaft

12B. . . Second support shaft

15. . . Linear motion guiding mechanism

17. . . Rear nozzle

18. . . Gas nozzle

20, 21. . . nozzle

twenty three. . . Brake

twenty four. . . Coupling mechanism

25. . . Drain hole

26. . . Auxiliary discharge hole

28. . . skirt

30. . . Liquid outlet channel

31. . . Gas outlet channel

32. . . Attracting source

35. . . Fixed plate

40. . . Putt

42. . . Auxiliary rotating cover

44. . . Drain hole

45. . . Fixed cover

46, 47. . . Discharge

50. . . Fin

51. . . cleaning room

51a. . . Gas outlet

51b. . . Liquid outlet

53. . . Liquid absorber

60. . . Substrate holding mechanism

61. . . Workbench

62. . . Support shaft

63. . . Liquid storage tank

64. . . Outlet

65. . . Shield cover

70. . . Fixed cover

75. . . Internal rotating cover

75a. . . Concave

80. . . Support arm

85. . . Fixed cover

100. . . shell

101a, 101b, 101c. . . Partition wall

102. . . Loading and unloading department

110, 111, 112, 113, 114. . . Switch

120. . . Front loading unit

121. . . Mobile agency

122. . . First transfer robot

124. . . Second transfer robot

130. . . Polishing department

130a. . . First polishing section

131A. . . First polishing unit

130b. . . Second polishing section

131B. . . Second polishing unit

131C. . . Third polishing unit

131D. . . Fourth polishing unit

132A, 132B, 132C, 132D. . . Polishing table

133A, 133B, 133C, 133D. . . Top ring

134A, 134B, 134C, 134D. . . Polishing liquid supply nozzle

135A, 135B, 135C, 135D. . . Dresser

136A, 136B, 136C, 136D. . . sprayer

137A, 137B, 137C, 137D. . . Top ring axle

140. . . Cleaning department

141, 151. . . Reversal machine

142 to 145. . . Cleaning unit

146. . . Transfer unit

150. . . First linear carrier

152, 166. . . Lifter

153, 154, 155, 167, 168. . . Pusher

160. . . Second linear carrier

200. . . Mobile agency

201. . . Loading and unloading department

202. . . Transfer robot

204. . . Wafer cassette

206. . . Wafer station

208. . . Transfer robot

210. . . Rotary carrier

212. . . Cleaning unit

214. . . Cleaning unit

218. . . Dresser

222. . . Water tank

224. . . Online Thickness Monitor (ITM)

230. . . Polishing table

231. . . Top ring

232. . . Polishing liquid supply nozzle

250. . . Polishing unit

TP1. . . First transfer position

TP2. . . Second transfer position

TP3. . . Third transfer position

TP4. . . Fourth transfer position

TP5. . . Fifth transfer position

TP6. . . Sixth transfer position

TP7. . . Seventh transfer position

W. . . Substrate

1 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus according to a first embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a plan view of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a schematic vertical cross-sectional view of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in Figure 1 when the substrate is raised;

Figure 4 is a plan view showing the substrate holding mechanism of the substrate cleaning device shown in Figure 1;

Figure 5 is a view showing the path of liquid flowing through the substrate cleaning device shown in Figure 1;

Figure 6 is a view showing the path of gas flowing through the substrate cleaning device shown in Figure 1;

Figure 7 is an enlarged vertical sectional view showing a modification of the inner peripheral surface of the rotary cover of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment;

Figure 8 is an enlarged vertical sectional view showing the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the first embodiment when lifting the substrate to the upper end of the rotary cover;

Figure 9 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 10 is a schematic vertical sectional view of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in Figure 9 when the substrate is raised by the push rod;

Figure 11 is an enlarged cross-sectional view showing a modification of the rotary cover of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the second embodiment;

Figure 12 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a third embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 13 is a view showing the path of gas flowing through the substrate cleaning device shown in Figure 12;

Figure 14 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a modification of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the third embodiment;

Figure 15 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a fourth embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 16 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a fifth embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 17 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a substrate cleaning apparatus according to a reference example of the present invention;

Figure 18 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a substrate cleaning apparatus according to another reference example of the present invention;

Figure 19 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a substrate cleaning apparatus according to still another reference example of the present invention;

Figure 20 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a substrate cleaning apparatus according to still another reference example of the present invention;

Figure 21 is a schematic vertical sectional view of a substrate cleaning apparatus in accordance with a sixth embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 22A is an enlarged vertical sectional view of the inner rotary cover and the outer rotary cover;

Figure 22B is a plan view of the inner rotating cover and the jaw;

Figure 23A is a plan view of the support arm fixed to the inner rotating cover when viewed from above;

Figure 23B is a view of the support arm shown in Figure 23A when viewed from the radially outer side;

Figure 24 is a schematic vertical sectional view showing a modification of the substrate cleaning apparatus according to the sixth embodiment of the present invention with an additional fixing cover;

Figure 25 is a plan view showing a polishing apparatus having a substrate cleaning apparatus according to any one of the first to sixth embodiments of the present invention;

Figure 26 is a schematic perspective view of the polishing apparatus shown in Figure 25;

Figure 27 is a plan view showing another polishing apparatus having a substrate cleaning apparatus according to any one of the first to sixth embodiments of the present invention;

Figure 28 is a schematic perspective view of a conventional substrate cleaning apparatus;

Figure 29 is a plan view of the substrate cleaning apparatus shown in Figure 28.

1. . . Substrate holding mechanism

2. . . motor

3. . . Rotating cover

4. . . Front nozzle

10. . . Jaws

11A. . . First workbench

11B. . . Second workbench

12A. . . First support shaft

12B. . . Second support shaft

15. . . Linear motion guiding mechanism

17. . . Rear nozzle

18. . . Gas nozzle

20, 21. . . nozzle

twenty three. . . Brake

twenty four. . . Coupling mechanism

25. . . Drain hole

26. . . Auxiliary discharge hole

28. . . skirt

30. . . Liquid outlet channel

31. . . Gas outlet channel

32. . . Attracting source

35. . . Fixed plate

W. . . Substrate

Claims (9)

  1. A substrate cleaning device includes: a substrate holding mechanism configured to horizontally hold a substrate; a rotating mechanism configured to rotate a substrate held by the substrate holding mechanism through the substrate holding mechanism; and a liquid supply nozzle for Supplying a cleaning liquid to the substrate; rotating a cover disposed around the substrate and capable of rotating at the same speed as the substrate; and a relative moving mechanism configured to form a substrate held by the substrate holding mechanism and the rotating cover A relative movement is provided between the rotating shafts of the substrate; wherein the rotating cover has an inner peripheral surface formed to surround the shape of the substrate, the inner peripheral surface being inclined radially inward from a lower end thereof to an upper end thereof.
  2. The substrate cleaning device of claim 1, further comprising: a linear motion guiding mechanism configured to transmit torque between the substrate holding mechanism and the rotating cover while allowing the substrate to be held by the substrate holding mechanism The relative movement between the substrate and the rotating cover.
  3. The substrate cleaning device of claim 1, further comprising: a fixing cover formed to cover a shape of the entire circumference of the rotating cover.
  4. The substrate cleaning device of claim 1, wherein: the rotating cover is mounted on the substrate holding mechanism; the substrate holding mechanism has a discharge hole, and the discharge hole has a An opening above the lower end of the rotary cover; and the discharge hole is inclined downward toward the outside.
  5. The substrate cleaning device of claim 1, wherein the inner peripheral surface of the rotating cover has a vertical cross section including an arc, and an angle of the inner peripheral surface with respect to a horizontal plane is from an upper end of the inner peripheral surface The minimum value gradually increases to the lower limit.
  6. The substrate cleaning device of claim 1, further comprising: a liquid absorber disposed on the inner circumferential surface of the rotating cover.
  7. The substrate cleaning device of claim 1, further comprising: an inner rotating cover disposed radially inward of the rotating cover, the inner rotating cover being rotatable together with the rotating cover.
  8. The substrate cleaning device of claim 7, wherein the inner rotating cover has an outer peripheral surface having a curved vertical cross section, and the outer peripheral surface of the inner rotating cover is located and held by the substrate The upper surface of the substrate held by the mechanism is the same height or slightly lower.
  9. The substrate cleaning device of claim 7, further comprising: a support arm configured to couple the inner rotary cover and the rotary cover to each other, the support arm being disposed between the inner rotary cover and the rotary cover The gap is shaped and shaped to create a downward flow of air in the gap as the inner rotating cover rotates with the rotating cover.
TW97138512A 2007-10-17 2008-10-07 Substrate cleaning apparatus TWI424886B (en)

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JP2008142672A JP5242242B2 (en) 2007-10-17 2008-05-30 Substrate cleaning device

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JP2013131783A (en) 2013-07-04
TWI520795B (en) 2016-02-11
JP5242242B2 (en) 2013-07-24
CN101414549A (en) 2009-04-22
CN101414549B (en) 2012-01-25
TW201414549A (en) 2014-04-16
TW200922701A (en) 2009-06-01
JP2009117794A (en) 2009-05-28

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