US3077209A - Pile wires - Google Patents

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US3077209A
US3077209A US108799A US10879961A US3077209A US 3077209 A US3077209 A US 3077209A US 108799 A US108799 A US 108799A US 10879961 A US10879961 A US 10879961A US 3077209 A US3077209 A US 3077209A
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wires
wire
pile
yarn
blade
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US108799A
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Sorbo Louis De
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Mohasco Industries Inc
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Mohasco Industries Inc
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D39/00Pile-fabric looms

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  • This invention relates to wires for use in looms pro ducing pile fabrics typified by carpets and rugs and 1s concerned more particularly with a novel pile wire which can be used advantageously in the production of fabrics having a pile formed of cut loops and uncut floats.
  • File fabrics used as carpets are frequently woven with a pile which is given an interesting and attractive appearance by being formed of cut and uncut loops arranged in accordance with a pattern.
  • pile wires are inserted into sheds beneath pile yarns to form pile loops bound in place by subsequent weft shots and, after all the wires of the set, with which the loom is equipped, have been inserted, the first wire inserted is withdrawn and inserted into another shed.
  • the wire used for that row will be of the plain type but, if the loops in a row are to be cut, the wire used for that row will have a cutter blade at its trailing end, so that, as the wire is withdrawn, all the loops over it will be cut.
  • the set of pile wires employed will include cutting and plain wires with the two kinds of wires arranged in the set as required by the pattern and frequently in alternation.
  • selected loops have been formed as float loops by causing such loops to pass over two or more non-cutting wires, which are successively inserted into sheds.
  • selected yarns are so manipulated during the insertion of two successive wires that the yarns pass under one of the wires and over the other.
  • the set of wires used In the weaving of the first form of fabric with float loops, the set of wires used must include successive non-cutting wires and this requirement imposes limitations on the pattern that can be produced. In weaving both forms of the fabric, the set of wires must include both cutting and non-cutting wires and the two kinds of wires must be employed in a particular sequence.
  • the present invention is directed to the provision of a novel pile wire which acts as a cutting wire, if a normal loop is formed thereover, but will not cut a loop of a yarn, which is raised thereover after having been floated beneath the next preceding wire.
  • a loom equipped with a set of wires consisting only of the new wires may thus be used in weaving a fabric having a pile formed of cut and float loops and the necessity of using both cutting and non-cutting wires arranged in a particular sequence is avoided.
  • FIG. 1 is a view in side elevation with parts broken away of one form of the new wire
  • FIG. 2 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the cutting end of the new wire on a larger scale and with parts broken away;
  • FIG. 3 is an exploded longitudinal diagrammatic view of one form of fabric woven by the use of the new wires and before the withdrawal of the wires;
  • FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing the fabric after withdrawal of the wires
  • FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing a different form of fabric which can be woven by the use of the new wires;
  • FIG. 6 is a vieW similar to FIG. 5 showing the fabric after withdrawal of the wires.
  • the wire 11 shown in FIG. 1 comprises a blade 11' to one end of which is secured a head 12 of conventional construction. Near its other end, the top 13 of the blade is cut away to form a recess 14 and the bottom of the recess is formed with a longitudinal slot 15, in which is seated a cutter element 16.
  • the cutter element has a cutting edge 17 extending upwardly and outwardly and the outer end 18 of the cutting edge lies approximately in the level of the top surface 13 of the blade. Near its outer end and beyond the end of the slot, the blade is reduced in thickness as indicated at 19 and a locking member 20 of inverted L-shape is secured to the vertical face of the thin part of the blade as by rivets 21.
  • the cutter element is of reduced width to form a projecting tongue 22. which lies beneath the horizontal leg of the locking member.
  • the upper edge of the recess curves upwardly adjacent the end of the cutter element, so that the blade terminates in a spoon 23, the top of which lies in approximately the level of the top edge 13 of the blade.
  • the upper and lower edges of the spoon are curved and converge to form a point 24, which is bent laterally.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates the use of the new wire in the weaving of a fabric having a single set of pile yarns forming a pile made up of cut loops and uncut floats.
  • the fabric includes stuffer warp yarns 25 and weft yarn Zea-26 inch, in an upper series above the stuffer warp yarns and weft yarns 27 in a lower series below the stutter warp yarns, the upper and lower wefts being bound in place by two sets of binder chain warp yarns 28, 29.
  • the pile of the fabric is made of a single set of pile warp yarns, of which a typical yarn is shown at 36.
  • the sheds are so formed that the pile yarn 30, which has been bound under an upper weft yarn 26a, is first raised over a wire 11:; and then bound beneath the next upper weft yarn 26b.
  • the pile yarn is floated beneath the second wire 11b, passes over the third upper weft yarn 26c and the third wire 11c, and is bound beneath the fourth upper weft yarn 26:1.
  • the pile yarn is then raised successively over the fourth and fifth wires 11d, lie and bound beneath the upper weft yarns 26e, 26 after the respective wires.
  • the pile yarn is next floated under the sixth wire 11f, passes over the upper weft yarn 26g and the wire 11g, and is bound beneath the upper weft yarn 2e11, after which the pile yarn is floated beneath the wire 11h, passes over the upper weft yarn 261' and the wire 11:, and is bound beneath the upper Weft yarn 261'.
  • the formation of later sheds is in accordance with the pattern desired and, when all the wires of the set have been inserted, the first wire is withdrawn from the goods in he next loom cycle and inserted in the shed and the operations described are repeated.
  • the remaining pile yarns in the fabric shown in FIG. 3 may be handled in the same way as the yarn 3% but, ordinarily, the pile yarns will be raised selectively by a Jacquard mechanism so that each yarn forms cut loops or tuft legs and uncut floats arranged in a sequence determined by the pattern with the sequence differing for different yarns.
  • the fabric shown in FIG. is generally similar to that shown in FIG. 3 and includes stufler warp yarns 33 and weft yarns 34, 35 in upper and lower series and bound above and below the stuifer warps by binder chain warp yarns 36, 37.
  • the pile yarns are in two groups with the yarns in one group of one color and typified by the yarn 33, while the yarns of the other group are of a different color and typified by the yarn 39.
  • the pile yarn 38 is bound beneath an upper weft yarn 34, raised over the wire 11 and bound beneath the next upper weft yarn.
  • the pile yarn then passes beneath wires 11k, 11m and beneath the upper weft yarns 34 following the respective wires.
  • the pile yarn is raised over the wires 1111, 110 successively and is bound beneath upper weft yarns 34 following the respective wires.
  • the pile yarn then lies buried beneath the wires 11p, 11: lir, and its and the upper weft yarns following the respective wires.
  • the pile yarn 39 lies buried beneath the wire 11 and the upper weft yarns on opposite sides of the wire, is floated under the wire 11k, passes over an upper Weft yarn and the wire 11m, and is bound beneath the upper weft yarn following the wire 11m.
  • the pile yarn is then buried beneath the wires 11m, 110 and the upper weft yarns following the respective wires and is then floated beneath the wire 11p, passes over an upper weft yarn and the wire 11c and is bound beneath an upper weft yarn following the wire liq.
  • the pile yarn is finally floated beneath the wire 11;, passes over an upper weft yarn and the wire 11s, and is bound beneath the upper Weft yarn following the yarn 11s.
  • the manipulation of the yarns 38 and 39 in relation to the remaining Wires of the set depends upon the pattern and, after insertion of all the wires, the first wire is withdrawn and re-inserted into a shed in the usual way.
  • the pile yarn 38 has been formed into loops over wires 11 Mn, and 110, while the yarn 39 has been floated beneath wires 11k, 11p, and 11; and raised over the wires 11m, liq, and 11s. Accordingly, upon withdrawal of the wires, the loops of yarn 38 are cut to form pairs of tuft legs 31g and 3111, 311' and 31 and 31k and 31m, while the yarn 39 has formed uncut floats 32d, 32c, and 32f.
  • a fabric having a pile made up entirely of tuft legs may be made by raising the pile yarns over wires lying between adjacent upper weft yarns, beneath which the yarns are bound.
  • a fabric having a pile made up wholly of uncut floats may be produced by causing each pile yarn to pass beneath the first wire and over the second of successive pairs of wires, with each yarn bound beneath an upper weft yarn in front of the first wire and behind the second wire of each pair.
  • the set of the new wires may thus be used in the production of fabrics having wide variations in the pile and having both cut loops and uncut floats.
  • a pile wire comprising a blade, a head attached to one end of the blade, the top edge of the blade having a recess adjacent the other end of the blade, and a cutter element mounted on the blade within the recess and lying substantially entirely within the recess, the cutter element having a cutting edge extending outwardly and upwardly from the bottom of the recess toward the adjacent end of the blade with the outer upper end of the cutting edge lying approximately in the level of the top edge of the blade.

Description

L. DE SORBO Feb. 12, 1963 PILE WIRES Filed May 9, 1961 OR m! BYZZQINVENS'R 2L; aME/jM V a ATTORNEYS a? 3,077,209 FILE WIRES Louis De Sorbo, Fort Johnson, N.Y., assignor to lvlohasco industries, Inc Amsterdam, N-Y., a corporation of New York Filed May 9, 1961, Ser. No. 108,799 4 Claims. (ill. 139-44) This invention relates to wires for use in looms pro ducing pile fabrics typified by carpets and rugs and 1s concerned more particularly with a novel pile wire which can be used advantageously in the production of fabrics having a pile formed of cut loops and uncut floats.
File fabrics used as carpets are frequently woven with a pile which is given an interesting and attractive appearance by being formed of cut and uncut loops arranged in accordance with a pattern. such a fabric, pile wires are inserted into sheds beneath pile yarns to form pile loops bound in place by subsequent weft shots and, after all the wires of the set, with which the loom is equipped, have been inserted, the first wire inserted is withdrawn and inserted into another shed.
If the fabric is to have uncut loops forming a particular.
row of pile elements, the wire used for that row will be of the plain type but, if the loops in a row are to be cut, the wire used for that row will have a cutter blade at its trailing end, so that, as the wire is withdrawn, all the loops over it will be cut. Accordingly, for a fabric having a pile containing cut and uncut loops, the set of pile wires employed will include cutting and plain wires with the two kinds of wires arranged in the set as required by the pattern and frequently in alternation.
In one form of carpet, in which the pile elements include both out and uncut loops, selected loops have been formed as float loops by causing such loops to pass over two or more non-cutting wires, which are successively inserted into sheds. In a variation of this fabric,
selected yarns are so manipulated during the insertion of two successive wires that the yarns pass under one of the wires and over the other. In the weaving of the first form of fabric with float loops, the set of wires used must include successive non-cutting wires and this requirement imposes limitations on the pattern that can be produced. In weaving both forms of the fabric, the set of wires must include both cutting and non-cutting wires and the two kinds of wires must be employed in a particular sequence.
The present invention is directed to the provision of a novel pile wire which acts as a cutting wire, if a normal loop is formed thereover, but will not cut a loop of a yarn, which is raised thereover after having been floated beneath the next preceding wire. A loom equipped with a set of wires consisting only of the new wires may thus be used in weaving a fabric having a pile formed of cut and float loops and the necessity of using both cutting and non-cutting wires arranged in a particular sequence is avoided.
For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be made to the accompanying drawing, in which FIG. 1 is a view in side elevation with parts broken away of one form of the new wire;
FIG. 2 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the cutting end of the new wire on a larger scale and with parts broken away;
FIG. 3 is an exploded longitudinal diagrammatic view of one form of fabric woven by the use of the new wires and before the withdrawal of the wires;
FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing the fabric after withdrawal of the wires;
FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing a different form of fabric which can be woven by the use of the new wires; and
In the weaving of.
3,0772% Patented Feb. 12, 1963 FIG. 6 is a vieW similar to FIG. 5 showing the fabric after withdrawal of the wires.
The wire 11 shown in FIG. 1 comprises a blade 11' to one end of which is secured a head 12 of conventional construction. Near its other end, the top 13 of the blade is cut away to form a recess 14 and the bottom of the recess is formed with a longitudinal slot 15, in which is seated a cutter element 16. The cutter element has a cutting edge 17 extending upwardly and outwardly and the outer end 18 of the cutting edge lies approximately in the level of the top surface 13 of the blade. Near its outer end and beyond the end of the slot, the blade is reduced in thickness as indicated at 19 and a locking member 20 of inverted L-shape is secured to the vertical face of the thin part of the blade as by rivets 21. At its outer end, the cutter element is of reduced width to form a projecting tongue 22. which lies beneath the horizontal leg of the locking member. The upper edge of the recess curves upwardly adjacent the end of the cutter element, so that the blade terminates in a spoon 23, the top of which lies in approximately the level of the top edge 13 of the blade. The upper and lower edges of the spoon are curved and converge to form a point 24, which is bent laterally.
The diagrammatic view, FIG. 3, illustrates the use of the new wire in the weaving of a fabric having a single set of pile yarns forming a pile made up of cut loops and uncut floats. The fabric includes stuffer warp yarns 25 and weft yarn Zea-26 inch, in an upper series above the stuffer warp yarns and weft yarns 27 in a lower series below the stutter warp yarns, the upper and lower wefts being bound in place by two sets of binder chain warp yarns 28, 29. The pile of the fabric is made of a single set of pile warp yarns, of which a typical yarn is shown at 36.
In the weaving of the fabric, the sheds are so formed that the pile yarn 30, which has been bound under an upper weft yarn 26a, is first raised over a wire 11:; and then bound beneath the next upper weft yarn 26b. The pile yarn is floated beneath the second wire 11b, passes over the third upper weft yarn 26c and the third wire 11c, and is bound beneath the fourth upper weft yarn 26:1. The pile yarn is then raised successively over the fourth and fifth wires 11d, lie and bound beneath the upper weft yarns 26e, 26 after the respective wires. The pile yarn is next floated under the sixth wire 11f, passes over the upper weft yarn 26g and the wire 11g, and is bound beneath the upper weft yarn 2e11, after which the pile yarn is floated beneath the wire 11h, passes over the upper weft yarn 261' and the wire 11:, and is bound beneath the upper Weft yarn 261'. The formation of later sheds is in accordance with the pattern desired and, when all the wires of the set have been inserted, the first wire is withdrawn from the goods in he next loom cycle and inserted in the shed and the operations described are repeated.
When the wire 11a is withdrawn from the fabric, its cutter element 16 is effective to cut the yarn and the loop of yarn raised over it. The reason is that the yarn is bound beneath upper weft yarns 26a, 26b on opposite sides of the wire and the tension on the yarn is such that, as the wire is withdrawn, the loop of yarn will contract and enter the recess 14 so that it will be severed by the cutter element 16. The cutting of the loop of yarn produces tuft legs 31a, 31b.
When the Wire 1117 is withdrawn, the only effect is to slackcn the yarn 30, which has been floated beneath the wire. When the wire 116 is withdrawn, the slackness of the yarn prevents it from being drawn down into the recess 14 of the wire to such an extent as to enable the cutter element 16 to sever the yarn. As a result, the withdrawal of the wires 11b, 11c results in the formation of an uncut float 32a, which extends from beneath the upper weft yarn 26b, over the upper weft yarn 26c, and beneath the upper weft yarn 26d.
The withdrawal of the wires 11d and lie produce tuft legs 31c, 3141', 31c, 31] and the successive withdrawal of the remaining wires 11 Mg, 1111, and Hi produces uncut floats 32b, 320 each of which is bound beneath a pair of upper weft yarns separated by an intermediate weft yarn. I
The remaining pile yarns in the fabric shown in FIG. 3 may be handled in the same way as the yarn 3% but, ordinarily, the pile yarns will be raised selectively by a Jacquard mechanism so that each yarn forms cut loops or tuft legs and uncut floats arranged in a sequence determined by the pattern with the sequence differing for different yarns.
The fabric shown in FIG. is generally similar to that shown in FIG. 3 and includes stufler warp yarns 33 and weft yarns 34, 35 in upper and lower series and bound above and below the stuifer warps by binder chain warp yarns 36, 37. The pile yarns are in two groups with the yarns in one group of one color and typified by the yarn 33, while the yarns of the other group are of a different color and typified by the yarn 39.
in the weaving of the FIG. 5 fabric, the pile yarn 38 is bound beneath an upper weft yarn 34, raised over the wire 11 and bound beneath the next upper weft yarn. The pile yarn then passes beneath wires 11k, 11m and beneath the upper weft yarns 34 following the respective wires. Thereafter, the pile yarn is raised over the wires 1111, 110 successively and is bound beneath upper weft yarns 34 following the respective wires. The pile yarn then lies buried beneath the wires 11p, 11: lir, and its and the upper weft yarns following the respective wires.
The pile yarn 39 lies buried beneath the wire 11 and the upper weft yarns on opposite sides of the wire, is floated under the wire 11k, passes over an upper Weft yarn and the wire 11m, and is bound beneath the upper weft yarn following the wire 11m. The pile yarn is then buried beneath the wires 11m, 110 and the upper weft yarns following the respective wires and is then floated beneath the wire 11p, passes over an upper weft yarn and the wire 11c and is bound beneath an upper weft yarn following the wire liq. The pile yarn is finally floated beneath the wire 11;, passes over an upper weft yarn and the wire 11s, and is bound beneath the upper Weft yarn following the yarn 11s.
The manipulation of the yarns 38 and 39 in relation to the remaining Wires of the set depends upon the pattern and, after insertion of all the wires, the first wire is withdrawn and re-inserted into a shed in the usual way.
It will be observed that, in the fabric shown in FIG. 5, the pile yarn 38 has been formed into loops over wires 11 Mn, and 110, while the yarn 39 has been floated beneath wires 11k, 11p, and 11; and raised over the wires 11m, liq, and 11s. Accordingly, upon withdrawal of the wires, the loops of yarn 38 are cut to form pairs of tuft legs 31g and 3111, 311' and 31 and 31k and 31m, while the yarn 39 has formed uncut floats 32d, 32c, and 32f.
The two fabrics illustrated are typical of those which can be made by the use of the new wire and many variations in the pile are possible. Thus, if desired, a fabric having a pile made up entirely of tuft legs may be made by raising the pile yarns over wires lying between adjacent upper weft yarns, beneath which the yarns are bound. Similarly, a fabric having a pile made up wholly of uncut floats may be produced by causing each pile yarn to pass beneath the first wire and over the second of successive pairs of wires, with each yarn bound beneath an upper weft yarn in front of the first wire and behind the second wire of each pair. The set of the new wires may thus be used in the production of fabrics having wide variations in the pile and having both cut loops and uncut floats.
I claim:
1. A pile wire comprising a blade, a head attached to one end of the blade, the top edge of the blade having a recess adjacent the other end of the blade, and a cutter element mounted on the blade within the recess and lying substantially entirely within the recess, the cutter element having a cutting edge extending outwardly and upwardly from the bottom of the recess toward the adjacent end of the blade with the outer upper end of the cutting edge lying approximately in the level of the top edge of the blade.
2. The pile wire of claim 1, in which the end of the blade remote from the head has the form of a spoon with upper and lower curved edges converging to a point.
3. The pile wire of claim 1, in which the bottom of the recess has a longitudinal slot and the cutter element is seated in the slot.
4. The pile wire of claim 3, in which the end of the blade beyond the slot is of reduced Width, the cutter element extends out of the outer end of the slot, and a locking member attached to the blade overhangs the part of reduced width of the element.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Claims (1)

1. A PILE WIRE COMPRISING A BLADE, A HEAD ATTACHED TO ONE END OF THE BLADE, THE TOP EDGE OF THE BLADE HAVING A RECESS ADJACENT THE OTHER END OF THE BLADE, AND A CUTTER ELEMENT MOUNTED ON THE BLADE WITHIN THE RECESS AND LYING SUBSTANTIALLY ENTIRELY WITHIN THE RECESS, THE CUTTER ELEMENT HAVING A CUTTING EDGE EXTENDING OUTWARDLY AND UPWARDLY FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE RECESS TOWARD THE ADJACENT END OF THE BLADE WITH THE OUTER UPPER END OF THE CUTTING EDGE LYING APPROXIMATELY IN THE LEVEL OF THE TOP EDGE OF THE BLADE.
US108799A 1961-05-09 1961-05-09 Pile wires Expired - Lifetime US3077209A (en)

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Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US440593A (en) * 1890-11-11 Pile fabrics
FR1024679A (en) * 1950-09-18 1953-04-03 Carpet Trades Ltd Process, iron and loom for the manufacture of rugs, rugs and the like
US2664919A (en) * 1951-12-22 1954-01-05 American Safety Razor Corp Cutting pile wire
US2870795A (en) * 1957-02-20 1959-01-27 Lees & Sons Co James Offset blade pile wire for looms
US2915091A (en) * 1955-09-09 1959-12-01 Masland C H & Sons Uncut floats over cutting wire, and wire construction

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US440593A (en) * 1890-11-11 Pile fabrics
FR1024679A (en) * 1950-09-18 1953-04-03 Carpet Trades Ltd Process, iron and loom for the manufacture of rugs, rugs and the like
US2664919A (en) * 1951-12-22 1954-01-05 American Safety Razor Corp Cutting pile wire
US2915091A (en) * 1955-09-09 1959-12-01 Masland C H & Sons Uncut floats over cutting wire, and wire construction
US2870795A (en) * 1957-02-20 1959-01-27 Lees & Sons Co James Offset blade pile wire for looms

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