US2571860A - Pile fabric - Google Patents

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US2571860A
US2571860A US115528A US11552849A US2571860A US 2571860 A US2571860 A US 2571860A US 115528 A US115528 A US 115528A US 11552849 A US11552849 A US 11552849A US 2571860 A US2571860 A US 2571860A
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wool
warp
warps
fabric
carpet
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Expired - Lifetime
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US115528A
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Russell C Gebert
Howard J Eberwein
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JAMES LEES AND SONS CO
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JAMES LEES AND SONS CO
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D27/00Woven pile fabrics
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D2700/00Woven fabrics; Methods of weaving; Looms
    • D03D2700/50Pile-fabric looms; Pile fabrics
    • D03D2700/60Pile fabric weaving in general

Description

Oct. 16, 1951 R. c. 'GEBERT ET AL FILE FABRIC 2 SHEETS'SHEET 1 Filed Sept. 13, 1949 O 1951 R. c. GEBERT ETAL 2,571,860

FILE FABRIC Filed Sept. 13, 1949 2 S HEETSSHEET 2 I JYWZJZZWW 5 Wm him/27% Patented Oct. 16, 1951 ms FABRIC Russell 0. Gebert, Elkins Park, and Howard J. Eberwein, Jenkintown, Pa., assignors to James Lees and Sons Company, Bridgeport, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application September 13, 1949, Serial No. 115,528

4 Claims. (Cl. 139-403) This invention relates to carpet construction and more particularly to a pile faced fabric that may be produced on a velvet loom and in which a wide variety of effects may be achieved.

In the carpet weaving art, it is well known that the cheapest fabric can be produced on a velvet" loom. Not only is a velvet loom fabric cheaper because the time required in setting up the loom is less than with other looms, but this type of loom weaves faster than any other; The disadvantage of a velvet loom however, resides in the fact that the patterns or effects which may be produced are extremely few by comparison. Many attempts have been made to improve the range of pattern effects which can be produced on a velvet loom and an example of one of such different effects is shown and described in the Gebert Patent No. 2,285,332 dated June 2, 1942.

The present invention relates to an improvement in velvet loom fabrics and is further characterized by the fact that a substantial reduction in cost is achieved by reason of the fact that less wool for the pile loops is needed without sacrificing wearing qualities or appearance of the carpet. This saving in wool is achieved by tying the pile loops only under the top layer of weft or filling threads in combination with a staggered, overlapping arrangement of the wool pile forming yarns so that the carpet is of desirable stiffness and will not grin even when folded.

A further advantage of the present fabric resides in the fact that the identical carpet weave may be produced on both narrow and broad velvet looms. This feature is of great importance in carpets which are sold to institutionssuch as hotels, railroads, etc. that require a wide range of dimensions in matching carpet patterns.

A primary object therefore of the present invention, is to provide an improved carpet fabric adapted to be woven on either a board or a narrow loom and which is chacterized by less wool, wide pattern variety, and long wearing qualities.

A further object is to provide a. carpet fabric in which the wool warp is woven under alternate top filler wefts.

A further object is to provide a pile carpet fabric having two wool warps in each reed dent, a single or double chain warp tying successive filler wefts; the wool warps being positioned over the stuifer warps in each reed dent.

Further objects will be apparent from the specification and drawings in which:

Fig. 1 shows the top of a carpet woven in accordance with the present invention. before the wool warp loops are cut;

Fig. 2 is a warpwise section as seenat 2-2 of Fig. 3 is a weftwise section as seen at 3-3 of Fig. 2; and

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic showing similar to Fig. l, which more clearly brings out the weave.

The present fabric is woven with a 2 and 2 wool draw and a 1 and 1 wire plant and there is one wool warp yarn from the rear wool harness and one wool warp yarn in the front wool harness in each reed dent. The wool warp loops before cutting show weftwise aligned pairs of loops but each pair of loops consists of warp yarns from adjacent dents rather than yarns in the same dent. The warp yarns in the same dent are staggered in such a Way that there is a warp yarn bewteen the stuffer warp and each upper weft yarn, despite the fact that the wool warp yarns pass under only alternate weft yarns. The upper weft yarns lie in a horizontal plane substantially parallel to each other whereas the lower weft yarns lie in a horizontal plane parallel with each other and vertically between the yarns of the upper plane so that the weft yarns are successively staggered.

In addition, the binder or chain warp passes over and under successive weft shots or yarns and is therefore a single chain warp. The staggering of the wool warps permits both the chain, and especially the stufler warps, to be completely concealed even though the carpet is bent or folded excessively, as would be the case when used on Stairways. The staggered wool warps also assist in providing different pattern effects since the use of suitable high and low wires enables the loops to be out at unequal lengths.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, the pile or wool warp l0 passes under alternate upper weft or filling yarns ll, l2, l3, l4 and I5 whereas the second wool warp 16, which is in the same dent as warp I0, passes under weft yarns l1, l8, I9 and 20. Accordingly, each wool warp l0 and I6 is looped over the upper weft yarn, between the weft yarn under which the warp is tied. As will beapparent from Fig. 2, the upper weft yarns l|--I5 are between and above the lower weft yarns 22-22 so that the weft yarns of the base fabric are in warpwise staggered relation to each other.

The width of each dent is substantially the same as the width of only one wool warp so that the upper portions of the loops must displace each other weftwise of the fabric before cutting, as brought out clearly in Figs. 1 and 3. Thus both wool warps I0 and is are positioned in the fabric above the stufier warps 2!, 2| and between each upper weft and the stuifer. The lower weft yarns 22. 22 are tied to the upper weft yarns by means of the chain warp 23 which in the present case comprises two yarns which are woven around successive weft yarns, shown in Fig. 3. This single chain warp serves to secure the stuifer warps and the wool warps to provide a tightly woven fabric, as shown in Fig. 3. The ability to weave a satisfactory base for a carpet in which the pile warps are not carried down and around the lower weft yarns, is a characteristic feature of the present invention. The saving in wool by looping the pile warp only over the upper weft yarns, is substantial.

In weaving the fabric of the present invention, only four harnesses are used; one for the chain warps, one for the stuifer warps, and two wool harnesses. The loom cams are arranged to provide a split shed for the wool harnesses so that both wool harnesses are raised simultaneously to permit the lower weft filling to be shot.

The broken lines in Fig. 2 show the loop ends after being cut by wires all of substantially the same height. This effect may be increasedby using high and low wires and thereby a different appearance to the carpet may be provided. The present fabric lends itself readily to producing a moresque pattern by using a multicolored hard twisted yarn and it will be understood that the use of variously colored wool warps in the same or adjacent dents also enables a wide variety of pattern effects to be achieved when used in conjunction with high and low wires or even the same height wire. It will be apparent that plain wires may also be used in conjunction with the knives o that some or all of the loops may remain uncut, thus further increasing the possible range of patterns.

Having thus described this invention, we claim:

1. A pile carpet comprising a solid ground fabric composed of an upper series of wefts in one horizontal plane, a lower series of wefts in warpwise staggered relation to said upper wefts in another relatively spaced parallel plane, chain warps for tying the upper and lower wefts, a group of stufier warps between adjacent chain warps, a first continuous wool pile warp between adjacent chain warps, said wool pile warp passing under and tied by only alternate upper wefts, and a second continuous wool pile warp between said adjacent chain warps, said second wool pile warp passing under and tied by only the alternate wefts between the wefts to which said first wool pile warp is tied.

2. A pile carpet comprising a solid ground fabric composed of an upper series of wefts in one horizontal plane, a lower series of wefts in warpwise staggered relation to said upper wefts in another relatively spaced parallel plane, single chain, warps passing over and under successive wefts, a group of stutter warps between adjacent chain warps, a first continuous wool pile warp between adjacent chain warps, said wool pile warp passing under and tied by only alternate upper wefts, and a second continuous wool pile warp between said adjacent chain warps. said second wool pile warp passing under and tied by only the alternate wefts between the wefts to which said first wool pile warp is tied.

3. A carpet in accordance with claim 1, in which one of the wool pile warps is cut to provide tufts, as distinguished from loops, on the surface of the carpet.

4. A carpet in accordance with claim 2, in which one of the wool pile warps is cut to provide tufts, as distinguished from loops, on the surface of the carpet.

RUSSELL C. GEBERT. HOWARD J. EBERWEIN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the i file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

US115528A 1949-09-13 1949-09-13 Pile fabric Expired - Lifetime US2571860A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2714405A (en) * 1950-06-19 1955-08-02 Masland C H & Sons Pile carpet
US2714902A (en) * 1950-10-16 1955-08-09 Masland C H & Sons Multiple pile staggered w-weaving
US2715921A (en) * 1951-06-14 1955-08-23 Lees & Sons Co James Pile fabric
US2717005A (en) * 1950-06-19 1955-09-06 Masland C H & Sons Process of weaving
US2754856A (en) * 1950-06-12 1956-07-17 Masland C H & Sons Velvet or tapestry carpet fabric
US2754850A (en) * 1950-06-12 1956-07-17 Masland C H & Sons Velvet or tapestry weaving
US2924251A (en) * 1958-07-10 1960-02-09 Lees & Sons Co James Method of weaving a pile fabric
US2946355A (en) * 1959-01-27 1960-07-26 Lees & Sons Co James Axminster pile fabric
EP1408143A1 (en) * 2002-10-07 2004-04-14 Anker-Teppichboden Gebr. Schoeller GmbH & Co.KG Carpet made on a pile wire loom

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US204546A (en) * 1878-06-04 Improvement in carpets
US782745A (en) * 1903-05-23 1905-02-14 Charles C Gelder Pile fabric.
GB190802056A (en) * 1908-01-29 1909-01-28 George William Grosvenor Improvements in Weaving Axminster Carpets and other Tufted Fabrics.
US923682A (en) * 1909-02-06 1909-06-01 William H Beattie Woven pile fabric.
US1688341A (en) * 1927-10-01 1928-10-23 Mason Howard Woven pile fabric
US2492670A (en) * 1948-11-10 1949-12-27 Mohawk Carpet Mills Inc Pile fabric

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US204546A (en) * 1878-06-04 Improvement in carpets
US782745A (en) * 1903-05-23 1905-02-14 Charles C Gelder Pile fabric.
GB190802056A (en) * 1908-01-29 1909-01-28 George William Grosvenor Improvements in Weaving Axminster Carpets and other Tufted Fabrics.
US923682A (en) * 1909-02-06 1909-06-01 William H Beattie Woven pile fabric.
US1688341A (en) * 1927-10-01 1928-10-23 Mason Howard Woven pile fabric
US2492670A (en) * 1948-11-10 1949-12-27 Mohawk Carpet Mills Inc Pile fabric

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2754856A (en) * 1950-06-12 1956-07-17 Masland C H & Sons Velvet or tapestry carpet fabric
US2754850A (en) * 1950-06-12 1956-07-17 Masland C H & Sons Velvet or tapestry weaving
US2714405A (en) * 1950-06-19 1955-08-02 Masland C H & Sons Pile carpet
US2717005A (en) * 1950-06-19 1955-09-06 Masland C H & Sons Process of weaving
US2714902A (en) * 1950-10-16 1955-08-09 Masland C H & Sons Multiple pile staggered w-weaving
US2715921A (en) * 1951-06-14 1955-08-23 Lees & Sons Co James Pile fabric
US2924251A (en) * 1958-07-10 1960-02-09 Lees & Sons Co James Method of weaving a pile fabric
US2946355A (en) * 1959-01-27 1960-07-26 Lees & Sons Co James Axminster pile fabric
EP1408143A1 (en) * 2002-10-07 2004-04-14 Anker-Teppichboden Gebr. Schoeller GmbH & Co.KG Carpet made on a pile wire loom

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