US2783776A - Method of making pile fabrics - Google Patents

Method of making pile fabrics Download PDF

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US2783776A
US2783776A US492884A US49288455A US2783776A US 2783776 A US2783776 A US 2783776A US 492884 A US492884 A US 492884A US 49288455 A US49288455 A US 49288455A US 2783776 A US2783776 A US 2783776A
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double
pile
shot
weft
fabric
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US492884A
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Lyle Charles
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James Lees and Sons Co
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Lees & Sons Co James
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D39/00Pile-fabric looms
    • D03D39/02Axminster looms, i.e. wherein pile tufts are inserted during weaving

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  • the present invention relates to ,a method of making pile fabrics and more particularly to producing carpet fabrics-exhibiting the flexibility in design which is typical of Axminster-type fabrics.
  • This application is a .division of my co-pending application Improved rPile .Fabric and Method of Making the Same, Ser. No. .449 .,42-7, fi1ed August 12, '1954, .now abandoned.
  • Axminster-type fabrics are characterized by wide flexibility in the design of the pile surface. In such fabrics, it is possible to use an infinite number of color variations in the pile without substantially increasing the cost of the fabric.
  • Figured Wilton-type fabrics are costly by reason .of the necessity to float the colored yarns not being used in the body of the .base fabric underneath the upper weft shots.
  • the pile is not as dense as in the Wilton-typefabrics since :two upper double weft shots are required for each 'weftwise row of pile loops.
  • the conventional .Axminster-type fabric exhibits a tendency to grin and expose the base fabric by reason of the separation of the individual legs of the pile tufts.
  • the individual legs of pile :tuft are separated by a double upper weft shot, sinceitisinecessary to tie the pile tufts under a double weft shot.
  • a primary-object of the present invention is to provide a method of producing a pile fabric wherein pile yarn tufts having varying characteristics are tied under individual strands of double upper weft shots, and wherein a substantial portion of each pile yarn in the fabric'is disposed in the pile surface, only a very minor portion being retained in theba'se fabric, i. e., only a suflicient'length of yarn to tie thepile tufts in place.
  • Another object of the present invention is to provide a method of weaving a pile fabric wherein substantial economy is effected by employing an Axniinster type lo'om to produce a carpet fabric having certain characteristics of the more expensively produced Wilton fabrics.
  • a further object of the invention is to produce-apile carpet fabric having a high (ratio of pile yarn tobacking yarn.
  • Still another object is .to provide a method-of weaving on an AXminster-type loom wherein substantial economy is effected by inserting a weftwise row of pile tufts for each double upper weftshot.
  • Fig. 1 is a warpwise sectional view of-a Ifabric made .in accordance with -.the;present.invention; and,
  • FIGs. 2 to 6 are illustrations ofa portion of an Axminster-type loom showing successive steps .in the formation of afabric made in accordance with vthe'presentinvention, for example, as shown in Fig. 1.
  • the -novel fabric of the present invention is shown in Fig. 1.
  • Thefabric comprises aseries of upper double weft shots 10a, 10b, 10c, etc., .and lower double weft shots 11.
  • the upperand lower double weft shots are bound together .by chain warps .12, 12 respectively 'pass- .ing alternately above and below the upper and lower double weft shots.
  • .Astufter warp 13 is provided intermediate the upper and lower weft shots to separate the same and provide :body to the ground fabric.
  • pile tufts 15, 16, .17, 18, etc., . are tied into the base fabric by passing the same shot.
  • the yarn 15 originates at'a;givenzheight above :the base fabric, passes into the base .fabric between the strands of the upper double weft shot 1911, around one of the individual strands of said upper double weft shot 10a, and up to the level at which the opposite pile leg originated.
  • the pile yarn tuft 16 originates at the same level, passes between the strands of the upper double weft shot 1%, around one of the strands thereof, and back-up to the aforementioned level.
  • the various:pile tufts may have differing characteristics, for-example as indicated by the shading thereon, and that it is not :necessaryto float the pile yarns in with the base fabric when they are not employed to form pile'tufts.
  • the loom for weaving the fabric is somewhat similar to a conventional Axminster loom.
  • the loom comprises a breast plate 20 on'whic'h the substantially firiishedfabric F is carried to the breastbeam (not shown) for winding up.
  • Spaced rearwardly from the breast plate 20 is a conventional reed 21 having :mounted adjacent thereto a separator finger 22 arranged to .operate as more fully set forth hereinafter.
  • An auxiliary reed 23 is provided to operate from its normal position below the breastplate 20 in a-generally circularpath, rearwardly and upwardly towards the reed 21 and forwardlyto the trailing edge of the breast plate 20, then downwardly to its normal position shown in Fig. 2.
  • a latch arm 33 is provided to "operate adjacent the fell of the cloth to engage the weft shots.
  • a conventional comb is provided at 24 which operates in the usual manner to-wrap the pile tufts 'around the weft shots. If desired the combmay be replaced by a nose board mounted on the breast plate.
  • the usual cutting knives are provided at 25, '25 to shear the pile tufts after they are formed in the base fabric.
  • the loom i provided with harness mechanism (notshown) to form a split shed and upper and lower needles 26 and 27 respectively operate to insert double weft shots into the upper and lower istics of the pile yarn inserted in the fabric.
  • the latch arm 33 engages the strands carried by the auxiliary reed to hold the same in place, and if the separator finger 22 is employed, it releases the separated shot of the double upper weft shot, for example, by a latch memher 31 pivoted to the separator finger as shown in Fig.
  • the separator finger 22 thereupon retracts, leaving the separated strand of the double upper weft shot in position in front of the reed 21.
  • the auxiliary reed continues its circular movement until -it resumes its position below the breast plate 20, for
  • the tube frame 29 continues its forward advance and is withdrawn to lay the pile yarn P against the strands of the weft shots which have been advanced to the fell of the fabric F by the auxiliary reed 23.
  • the comb 24 is actuated to wrap the trailing end of the pile yarn P upwardly around the separated strand into the upright position indicated at 15 in Fig. 6.
  • the knives 25, 25 are then operated to sever the tuft 15 from the yarn P and the tube frame 29 is retracted and is returned to its carrier chain (not shown).
  • the elements are returned to their original position.
  • the adjacent upper and lower double weft shots are inserted into the shed, and a tube frame carrying the pile yarn for the pile tuft 16 is picked off the carrier chain and brought into position for insertion of the pile tuft 16 into the fabric.
  • the succeeding pile tufts are taken from pile yarns on succeeding tube frames, it is possible to obtain an infinite variation in the character- Since the pile tufts are tied under only a single strand of the weft shot, less of the pile yarn is retained in the base fabric; and the greater part of the yarn is employed to form the pile surface. It should be further noted that since the upper double weft shots and the lower double weft shots are each inserted by an individual needle, it is possible to form the lower double weft shots of a different material than that used for forming the upper double. weft shots.
  • the lower weft shots must engage against the floor on which the carpet is placed and are subjected to greater abrasion than the upper weft shots.
  • the upper weft shots may be relatively weak and the lower weft shots may be formed of material exhibiting a great abrasion resistance.
  • the upper and lower shots need not be inserted simultaneously, whereby the same needle may insert both shots in sequence.
  • An additional double weft shot may be inserted above or below the stufier to form a fabric corresponding to the conventional three-shot Axminster fabric, or the lower weft shot and stuffer may be omitted to form a fabric corresponding to a one-shot Axminster fabric.
  • the method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming upper and lower sheds of base fabric warps, inserting a double upper weft shot and a double lower weft shot into the respective sheds and disposing the individual strands of said double upper weft shot in vertical alignment, holding the upper strand of said double upper weft shot, displacing said lower double weft shot and the lower strand of said upper double weft shot forwardly to separate said upper double weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said upper shed intermediate the strands of said separated upper double weft shot, releasing the upper strand of said double upper weft shot and bringing the strands of said separated upper double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around the upper strand of said upper double weft shot.
  • the method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming upper and lower sheds of base fabric warps, inserting a double upper weft shot and a weft shot in vertical alignment, displacing the upper strand of said double upper weft shot rearwardly, displacing said lower double weft shot and the lower strand of said upper double weft shot forwardly to separate said upper double weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said upper shed intermediate the strands of said separated upper double weft shot, bringing the strands of said separated upper double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around one of the strands of said upper double weft shot.
  • the method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the' steps of forming upper and lower sheds of base fabric warps, simultaneously inserting a double upper weft shot and a double lower weft shot into the respective sheds and disposing the individual strands of said double upper weft shot in vertical alignment, displacing the upper strand of said double upper weft shot rearwardly and holding the same, displacing said lower double weft shot and the lower strand of said upper double weft shot forwardly to separate said upper double weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said upper shed intermediate the strands of said separated upper double weft shot, releasing the upper strand of said double upper weft shot and bringing the strands of said separated upper double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around the upper strand of said upper double weft shot.
  • the method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming a shed of base fabric warps, inserting a double weft shot into said shed and disposing the individual strands of said double weft shot in vertical alignment, holding the upper strand of said double weft shot, displacing the lower strand of said double weft shot forwardly to separate the same, inserting a pile yarn into said shed intermediate the strands of said separated dou- -b1e weft shot, releasing the upper strand of said double weft shot and bringing the strands of said separated double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around the upper strand of said double weft shot.
  • the method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming a shed of base fabric warps, inserting a double weft shot into said shed and disposing the individual strands of said double weft shot in vertical alignment, displacing the upper strand of said double weft shot rearwardly, displacing the lower strand of said double Weft shot forwardly to separate said double weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said shed intermediate the strands of said separated double weft shot, bringing the strands of said separated double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around one of the strands of said double weft shot.
  • the method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming a shed of base fabric warps, inserting a double weft shot into said shed and disposing the individual strands of said double weft shot in vertical alignment, displacing the upper strand of said double weft shot rearwardly and holding the same, displacing the lower strand of said double weft shot forwardly to separate said weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said shed intermediate the "strands of said separated weft shot, releasing the upper strand of said double weft shot and bringing the strands of said separated double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around the upper strand of said double weft shot.

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  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Textile Engineering (AREA)
  • Woven Fabrics (AREA)

Description

March 5 1957 c. LYLE METHOD OF MAKING PILE FABRICS Original Filed Aug. 12, 1,954
United States Patent .METHOD .OF MAKING PILE FABRICS Charles Lyle, Buena Vista, Va., 'assignor to James Lees and Sons 'Company, Bridgeport, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Original application August 12, 1954, Serial No. 499,427. Divided and this application March 8, 1955, SerIaI 'NO. 492,884
6 Claims. (Cl. 139-7) The present invention relates to ,a method of making pile fabrics and more particularly to producing carpet fabrics-exhibiting the flexibility in design which is typical of Axminster-type fabrics. This application is a .division of my co-pending application Improved rPile .Fabric and Method of Making the Same, Ser. No. .449 .,42-7, fi1ed August 12, '1954, .now abandoned.
Conventional Axminster-type fabrics are characterized by wide flexibility in the design of the pile surface. In such fabrics, it is possible to use an infinite number of color variations in the pile without substantially increasing the cost of the fabric. Figured Wilton-type fabrics, on the other hand, are costly by reason .of the necessity to float the colored yarns not being used in the body of the .base fabric underneath the upper weft shots. However, in conventional Axminster-type fabrics, the pile is not as dense as in the Wilton-typefabrics since :two upper double weft shots are required for each 'weftwise row of pile loops. As a result, the conventional .Axminster-type fabric exhibits a tendency to grin and expose the base fabric by reason of the separation of the individual legs of the pile tufts. The individual legs of pile :tuft are separated by a double upper weft shot, sinceitisinecessary to tie the pile tufts under a double weft shot.
In Wilton fabrics, on the other hand, it is possible to tie the pile tufts :under only a single weft .shot so :th'ata dense pile may be obtained and the possibility of grinning is substantiallyreduced. However, as pointed out above, to obtain -a variation in the pattern by using different colored pile :yarns, it is necessary to carry the various colors of pile yarns in the base of the fabric, raising only the desired color .of pile yarn out of the base fabric to form atuftorloop.
With the foregoing :in mind, a primary-object of the present invention is to provide a method of producing a pile fabric wherein pile yarn tufts having varying characteristics are tied under individual strands of double upper weft shots, and wherein a substantial portion of each pile yarn in the fabric'is disposed in the pile surface, only a very minor portion being retained in theba'se fabric, i. e., only a suflicient'length of yarn to tie thepile tufts in place.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a method of weaving a pile fabric wherein substantial economy is effected by employing an Axniinster type lo'om to produce a carpet fabric having certain characteristics of the more expensively produced Wilton fabrics.
A further object of the invention is to produce-apile carpet fabric having a high (ratio of pile yarn tobacking yarn.
Still another object is .to provide a method-of weaving on an AXminster-type loom wherein substantial economy is effected by inserting a weftwise row of pile tufts for each double upper weftshot.
These and other objectsof the invention and the'various features and details of the construction and operation ice thereof are morefullyssetjforth lhereinafter with reference fto'the accompanying drawingin which:
Fig. 1 is a warpwise sectional view of-a Ifabric made .in accordance with -.the;present.invention; and,
Figs. 2 to 6 are illustrations ofa portion of an Axminster-type loom showing successive steps .in the formation of afabric made in accordance with vthe'presentinvention, for example, as shown in Fig. 1.
.The -novel fabric of the present invention is shown in Fig. 1. Thefabric comprises aseries of upper double weft shots 10a, 10b, 10c, etc., .and lower double weft shots 11. The upperand lower double weft shots are bound together .by chain warps .12, 12 respectively 'pass- .ing alternately above and below the upper and lower double weft shots. .Astufter warp 13 is provided intermediate the upper and lower weft shots to separate the same and provide :body to the ground fabric.
.In accordance with the invention, pile tufts 15, 16, .17, 18, etc., .are tied into the base fabric by passing the same shot. Thus, the yarn 15 originates at'a;givenzheight above :the base fabric, passes into the base .fabric between the strands of the upper double weft shot 1911, around one of the individual strands of said upper double weft shot 10a, and up to the level at which the opposite pile leg originated. Likewise, the pile yarn tuft 16 originates at the same level, passes between the strands of the upper double weft shot 1%, around one of the strands thereof, and back-up to the aforementioned level. It should be noted that the various:pile tufts may have differing characteristics, for-example as indicated by the shading thereon, and that it is not :necessaryto float the pile yarns in with the base fabric when they are not employed to form pile'tufts.
The novel method for forming the fabric described above is illustrated diagrammatically in Figs. '2 to 6 inclusive. Asshown in the figures, the loom for weaving the fabric is somewhat similar to a conventional Axminster loom. The loom comprises a breast plate 20 on'whic'h the substantially firiishedfabric F is carried to the breastbeam (not shown) for winding up. Spaced rearwardly from the breast plate 20 is a conventional reed 21 having :mounted adjacent thereto a separator finger 22 arranged to .operate as more fully set forth hereinafter. An auxiliary reed 23 is provided to operate from its normal position below the breastplate 20 in a-generally circularpath, rearwardly and upwardly towards the reed 21 and forwardlyto the trailing edge of the breast plate 20, then downwardly to its normal position shown in Fig. 2. A latch arm 33 is provided to "operate adjacent the fell of the cloth to engage the weft shots. A conventional comb is provided at 24 which operates in the usual manner to-wrap the pile tufts 'around the weft shots. If desired the combmay be replaced by a nose board mounted on the breast plate. The usual cutting knives are provided at 25, '25 to shear the pile tufts after they are formed in the base fabric. The loom i provided with harness mechanism (notshown) to form a split shed and upper and lower needles 26 and 27 respectively operate to insert double weft shots into the upper and lower istics of the pile yarn inserted in the fabric.
ates to engage and position an individual strand, in the present instance the upper strand of the upper double weft shot, back against the reed to separate the same from the other strand of the upper doubleweft shot.
' At this point in the operation, the auxiliary reed 23 is to the position shown in Fig. 4 in advance of the dipping '-of the tube frame 29 into the shed. At the same time,
the latch arm 33 engages the strands carried by the auxiliary reed to hold the same in place, and if the separator finger 22 is employed, it releases the separated shot of the double upper weft shot, for example, by a latch memher 31 pivoted to the separator finger as shown in Fig.
4. The separator finger 22 thereupon retracts, leaving the separated strand of the double upper weft shot in position in front of the reed 21.
The auxiliary reed continues its circular movement until -it resumes its position below the breast plate 20, for
example as shown in Fig. 5. The tube frame 29 continues its forward advance and is withdrawn to lay the pile yarn P against the strands of the weft shots which have been advanced to the fell of the fabric F by the auxiliary reed 23.
Simultaneously with the advance of the tube frame 29, thereed 21 carries the separated weft strand forwardly to a position against the pile yarn P and the latch arm 33 is retracted. The reed 21 engages the separated strand against the remaining strand of the double upper weft shot to grip the pile yarn P therebetween. The tube frame 29 thereupon retracts upwardly, simultaneously feeding out sufiicient yarn to form the pile tuft,
,for example the tuft 15. At this point in the operation, the comb 24 is actuated to wrap the trailing end of the pile yarn P upwardly around the separated strand into the upright position indicated at 15 in Fig. 6. The knives 25, 25 are then operated to sever the tuft 15 from the yarn P and the tube frame 29 is retracted and is returned to its carrier chain (not shown).
During this operation, the chain warps 12, 12 are shedded to reverse their position and hold the weft shots 10 and 11 in place in the fabric.
Thus, the elements are returned to their original position. The adjacent upper and lower double weft shots are inserted into the shed, and a tube frame carrying the pile yarn for the pile tuft 16 is picked off the carrier chain and brought into position for insertion of the pile tuft 16 into the fabric.
It should be noted that since the succeeding pile tufts are taken from pile yarns on succeeding tube frames, it is possible to obtain an infinite variation in the character- Since the pile tufts are tied under only a single strand of the weft shot, less of the pile yarn is retained in the base fabric; and the greater part of the yarn is employed to form the pile surface. It should be further noted that since the upper double weft shots and the lower double weft shots are each inserted by an individual needle, it is possible to form the lower double weft shots of a different material than that used for forming the upper double. weft shots.
This is advantageous since the lower weft shots must engage against the floor on which the carpet is placed and are subjected to greater abrasion than the upper weft shots. Thus, the upper weft shots may be relatively weak and the lower weft shots may be formed of material exhibiting a great abrasion resistance.
While a particular embodiment of the present invention' has been herein illustrated and described, it is not intended to limit the invention to such disclosures, but changes and modifications may be made therein and thereto within the scope of the following claims. For example, the upper and lower shots need not be inserted simultaneously, whereby the same needle may insert both shots in sequence. An additional double weft shot may be inserted above or below the stufier to form a fabric corresponding to the conventional three-shot Axminster fabric, or the lower weft shot and stuffer may be omitted to form a fabric corresponding to a one-shot Axminster fabric.
' I claim:
1. The method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming upper and lower sheds of base fabric warps, inserting a double upper weft shot and a double lower weft shot into the respective sheds and disposing the individual strands of said double upper weft shot in vertical alignment, holding the upper strand of said double upper weft shot, displacing said lower double weft shot and the lower strand of said upper double weft shot forwardly to separate said upper double weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said upper shed intermediate the strands of said separated upper double weft shot, releasing the upper strand of said double upper weft shot and bringing the strands of said separated upper double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around the upper strand of said upper double weft shot.
2. The method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming upper and lower sheds of base fabric warps, inserting a double upper weft shot and a weft shot in vertical alignment, displacing the upper strand of said double upper weft shot rearwardly, displacing said lower double weft shot and the lower strand of said upper double weft shot forwardly to separate said upper double weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said upper shed intermediate the strands of said separated upper double weft shot, bringing the strands of said separated upper double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around one of the strands of said upper double weft shot.
3. The method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the' steps of forming upper and lower sheds of base fabric warps, simultaneously inserting a double upper weft shot and a double lower weft shot into the respective sheds and disposing the individual strands of said double upper weft shot in vertical alignment, displacing the upper strand of said double upper weft shot rearwardly and holding the same, displacing said lower double weft shot and the lower strand of said upper double weft shot forwardly to separate said upper double weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said upper shed intermediate the strands of said separated upper double weft shot, releasing the upper strand of said double upper weft shot and bringing the strands of said separated upper double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around the upper strand of said upper double weft shot.
4. The method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming a shed of base fabric warps, inserting a double weft shot into said shed and disposing the individual strands of said double weft shot in vertical alignment, holding the upper strand of said double weft shot, displacing the lower strand of said double weft shot forwardly to separate the same, inserting a pile yarn into said shed intermediate the strands of said separated dou- -b1e weft shot, releasing the upper strand of said double weft shot and bringing the strands of said separated double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around the upper strand of said double weft shot.
5. The method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming a shed of base fabric warps, inserting a double weft shot into said shed and disposing the individual strands of said double weft shot in vertical alignment, displacing the upper strand of said double weft shot rearwardly, displacing the lower strand of said double Weft shot forwardly to separate said double weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said shed intermediate the strands of said separated double weft shot, bringing the strands of said separated double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around one of the strands of said double weft shot.
6. The method of producing a pile carpet fabric comprising the steps of forming a shed of base fabric warps, inserting a double weft shot into said shed and disposing the individual strands of said double weft shot in vertical alignment, displacing the upper strand of said double weft shot rearwardly and holding the same, displacing the lower strand of said double weft shot forwardly to separate said weft shot, inserting a pile yarn into said shed intermediate the "strands of said separated weft shot, releasing the upper strand of said double weft shot and bringing the strands of said separated double weft shot together, and wrapping the inserted pile yarn around the upper strand of said double weft shot.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 631,233 Southwell Aug. 15, 1899 FOREIGN PATENTS 382,943 Great Britain Oct. 31, 1932 478,249 Germany June 20, 1929
US492884A 1954-08-12 1955-03-08 Method of making pile fabrics Expired - Lifetime US2783776A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2940479A (en) * 1957-10-28 1960-06-14 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Axminster-type carpet
US3208482A (en) * 1965-03-29 1965-09-28 Bigelow Sanford Inc Pile fabric floor covering
US20070235102A1 (en) * 2006-04-05 2007-10-11 N.V. Michel Van De Wiele Method for weaving pile fabrics with variable pile height

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US631233A (en) * 1898-05-27 1899-08-15 Thomas Martin Southwell Loom for weaving tufted fabrics.
DE478249C (en) * 1926-02-07 1929-06-20 Thos Bond Worth & Sons Ltd Loom for the production of pile fabrics with knobs inserted in the direction of the warp
GB382943A (en) * 1931-07-31 1932-10-31 Platt Brothers & Co Ltd Improvements in looms for weaving royal axminster or moquette carpets and other tufted pile fabrics

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US631233A (en) * 1898-05-27 1899-08-15 Thomas Martin Southwell Loom for weaving tufted fabrics.
DE478249C (en) * 1926-02-07 1929-06-20 Thos Bond Worth & Sons Ltd Loom for the production of pile fabrics with knobs inserted in the direction of the warp
GB382943A (en) * 1931-07-31 1932-10-31 Platt Brothers & Co Ltd Improvements in looms for weaving royal axminster or moquette carpets and other tufted pile fabrics

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2940479A (en) * 1957-10-28 1960-06-14 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Axminster-type carpet
US3208482A (en) * 1965-03-29 1965-09-28 Bigelow Sanford Inc Pile fabric floor covering
US20070235102A1 (en) * 2006-04-05 2007-10-11 N.V. Michel Van De Wiele Method for weaving pile fabrics with variable pile height
US7487804B2 (en) * 2006-04-05 2009-02-10 N.V. Michel Van De Wiele Method for weaving pile fabrics with variable pile height

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