US2718243A - Two-shot modified axminster weave - Google Patents

Two-shot modified axminster weave Download PDF

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US2718243A
US2718243A US489556A US48955655A US2718243A US 2718243 A US2718243 A US 2718243A US 489556 A US489556 A US 489556A US 48955655 A US48955655 A US 48955655A US 2718243 A US2718243 A US 2718243A
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shot
warp
weave
double weft
axminster
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Russell R Matthews
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Firth Carpet Co Inc
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D27/00Woven pile fabrics
    • D03D27/12Woven pile fabrics wherein pile tufts are inserted during weaving

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  • FIG FRONT HEDDLE V REAR HEDDLE 1ST sHoT UP DOWN 2ND sHoT DOWN 7 up WITH THREE FRAMES (FIG. 5.)
  • This invention relates to Axminister carpets and has for its object the provision of a modified Axminster weave of novel and improved characteristics.
  • Thepresent invention departs considerably from all the previously'known types of Axminster weave by reason of the fact that only .acycle of two double weft shots (or a multiple thereof) is required for each face row inserted.
  • this invention provides a two-shot modified Axminster weave, while :at the same time retaining the fine qualities of Axminster carpeting, namely, unlimitedidesign andcolcr-ranges within the pattern of design. 7
  • Another important purpose of thisinvention is to enable themanufacturers of such a weave toincreasernaterialiy theamount of sizing adhesion to the 'facetufts and thus prevent them from being pulled out without considerable difliculty.
  • a still further object of .this invention resides in the provision of an Axminster weave by means of which the speed of manufacture can be increased by one-third, the amount of weft material and/or warp material can be decreased by one-third in weight, and the new.modified.
  • Fig. 4 is a warp-wise section similar to Fig. 2 in pile loop arrangement, but having a stufier warp included;
  • Fig. 5 shows another warp-wise section of fabric similar to that of Fig. 2 but having a stuifer warp used as an additional binding;
  • Fig. 6 is a table of heddle positions for the weaving cycle utilized in producing the fabric of Fig. l;
  • Fig. 7 is another table of heddle positions applicable in this instance to the weaving cycle utilized in the fabric of Fig. 5.
  • the two-shot modified Axminster weave shown in .Fig. 1 comprises a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots 10 and 12 respectively lying in substantially the same plane and bound together by a forward chain warp 14 and a rearward chain warp 16 forming a double warp chain.
  • a length of a pile yarn warp end is looped under each alternate double weft shot 10 and cut to form pile tufts 13 of U-shape having an upstanding pair .of legs joined beneath the corresponding weft shot by a generally horizontal knob formation 19 projecting below the adjacent portion of the chain warp 16.
  • the hpysical arrangement of the double weft filler shots 10 and 12 is determined during weaving by tensions on the chain warps 14 and 16. While in the conventional three-shot Axminster weave, at least two warp beams are necessary, the equal tensionsrequired in'Fig. l (and also Fig. 2) of the double chain warp ends makes it possible to weave with only one beam, something not heretofore possible in Axminster weaving.
  • Alternate double weft filler shots 2i) and 22 disposed in substantially the same plane are bound together by a forward chain warp 24 and a rearward chain warp 26 comprising a double warp chain.
  • a continuous pile warp end of yarn 28 is looped under each alternate double weft shot 20 and extendsas a loop pile over each double weft shot 22 in position intermediate the alternate double weft shots 20.
  • Each U-shaped portion 30 of yarn end underlying the alternate weft shots 20 has its connecting part '31 projecting below the chain warp 26 as a flat knob formation.
  • the pile yarn warp ends 28 of this weave lie alternately in front of and behind the double weft shots, and are preferably of a yarn that application of steam will cause to form twisted loops 32 over each double weft shot 22.
  • the modified Axminster weaves shownin 'Figs. 1 and 2 have only two warp ends in each dent.
  • the table of Fig. 6 explains the positioning and operation of the heddle frames when only chain warp ends are used in producing the weave construction of Fig. 1. It is also to be noted that the weave construction of Fig. 2 is produced in a similar manner.
  • the also two-shot modified Axminster weave construction of Fig. '3 is shown as comprising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots 34 and 36 arranged with every other double weft shot 36 lying in a substantially common lower plane and .the intermediate double weft shots 34 lying in a substantially common upper plane.
  • a forward binder warp 38 extends over each upper plane double weft shot 34 and under each lower plane double weft shot 36, and a rearward chain warp 40 extends over each lower plane double weft shot 36 and under each upper plane double weft shot 34.
  • File tuft elements 42 formed and cut to U-shape are looped under each upper plane double weft shot 34 and have pairs of free legs.
  • a straight and preferably fairly thin stuffer warp 44 extends between the binder warp 38 and chain warp 40 intermediate the upper and lower plane weft shots 34 and 36 immediately beneath the connecting loop portions of the cut pile tufts 42. The presence of the straight stufier warp 44 prevents the bottom parts of the pile tufts 42 from going all the way through the back, and thereby prevents the double weft filler shots 36 and 34 respectively from lying within a common plane.
  • Standard carpet materials are used in the production of the carpet weaves described herein.
  • the weft materials may be jute, Kraft cord yarns, linen, and the like.
  • cotton, jute, Kraft cord, glass-centered Kraft cord, rayon, nylon or linen may be used.
  • the pile It will be seen by reference to the table of Fig. 7 that A three heddle frames are used in producing the weave illustrated in Fig. 3. In the first double weft shot the front and middle heddles will remain up and the rear heddle will be down. During the following double weft shot the front and middle heddles will be down and the rear heddle will be up.
  • FIG. 4 A still further modification of the novel two-shot modified Axminster weave construction of this invention is illustrated in Fig. 4 which resembles the construction of Fig. 2. as well as that of Fig. 3.
  • a plurality of double weft shots 46 and 48 are arranged to lie respectively in a common upper plane and a common lower plane with the lower level weft shots 43 intermediate the upper level weft shots 46 in an alternating relation.
  • a forward binder warp 50 and a rearward chain warp 52 secure the weft shots 46 and 48 in the position described and have a straight stuffer warp 54 extending between them in a plane intermediate that of the double weft shots of stuffer material.
  • yarn warp end material will be Wool, synthetic fibers, mixtures of wool and synthetic fibers or any other known yarns suitable for the purpose.
  • the modified Axminster carpet weaves with which this invention is concerned are those in which the pile is formed from yarn drawn from separate supplies during the operation of the loom, and such yarns are inserted in the fabric and looped about weft shots. Therefore, the term Axminster as used herein with reference to carpet weaves is to be interpreted as and limited to pile fabrics produced in the manner indicated. In those instances where the weave embodies continuous lengths of pile yarn ends, novel effects are obtainable, as illustrated by Figs. 2 and 4, and there is no fixed limit as to pile height, but only as to pattern by reason of the use of pile yarn ends having areas of different color printed thereon.
  • the combination of advantages afforded by the modified Axminster carpet weaves as herein described will be more clearly apparent from a short summary.
  • the twoshot weaves disclosed are specially adaptable to a sizing operation that locks in the tufts more strongly and imparts more flexibility to the carpet body.
  • the available saving of one-third of the weft material and, in the construction of Fig. 1, one-third of warp materials also makes it possible for the manufacturer of these novel two-shot weaves to perform a better sizing operation on the fabric without the necessity of increasing overall manufacturing costs. But none of the other advantages is as important as the time saving in operation of an Axminster loom.
  • Fig. 5 a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots 62 and 64 are arranged alternately and lie in substantially the same plane.
  • a stuffer warp 66 is used in conjunction with a rearward chain warp 68.
  • an additional binder warp 70 is used in front of the rearward chain warp 68 and extends over the intermediate double weft shots 62 and under the alternate double weft shots 64.
  • pile yarn warp end 72 is disposed in front of the forward and rearward chain warps 66 and 68 and also the binder warp 70.
  • This yarn end 72 which may be a plied one as shown, is looped under each alternate double weft shot 64 and extends over each intermediate double weft shot 62 with a twisted open ring formation 74.
  • the pile yarn warp end 72 runs under the adjacent portion of the binder warp 70 as a depending knob portion 76 lying substantially below the general level of the back. Ample provision is thus made for sizing adhesion binding of the looped under portions of the pile yarn end 72.
  • the adhesion sizing of the back which has been omitted from the figures of the drawing for purposes of clarity, may be of any of the commercially known rubber, plastic, or newer type washable starch formulations. In this manner it is possible to produce a weave which eliminates some of the binding functions within the fabric without reducing the quality thereof.
  • the finished fabric is considerably more flexible than a similar one made with a three-shot Axminster weave, and the pile tufts are bound much more tightly into the weave minster loom running at 30 picks per minute, face rows are inserted, while in a two-shot weaving operation running at the same speed, face rows are inserted in the same period of time, thus increasing production
  • a two-shot modified Axminster carpet weave comprising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots
  • pile tuft elements looped under each intermediate double weft shot, a chain warp extending over each alternate double weft shot and under each intermediate double weft 4 shot, a binder warp extending over each intermediate double weft shot and under each alternate double weft shot, and a stutfer warp extending between the chain warp and the binder warp above the alternate double weft shots and beneath the intermediate double weft shots.
  • a two-shot modified Axminster carpet weave comprising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots having every other double weft shot lying in a common lower plane and the intermediate double weft shots lying in a common upper plane, a chain warp extending over each lower plane double weft shot and under each upper plane double weft shot, a binder warp extending over each upper plane double weft shot and under each lower plane double weft shot, a straight stuffer warp extending between the chain warp and the binder warp above the lower plane double weft shots and beneath the upper plane double weft shots, and a pile yarn warp end looped under each upper level double weft shot and extending as a loop pile over each lower level double weft shot and lying between the binder warp and the chain warp above the straight stuffer warp.
  • a two-shot modified Axminstcr carpet weave comprising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots disposed in substantially the same plane, a pile yarn warp end looped under each alternate double weft shot and extending as an uncut loop pile over each double weft shot intermediate the said alternate double weft shots, a double warp chain binding together all said double weft shots, and a binder warp end of stutter material extending over the intermediate double weft shots lying beneath the uncut loop piles and over the alternate double weft shots, said pile yarn end lying in front of the double warp chain and the binder warp end and projecting below the chain binding underlying each alternate double weft shot.

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Description

R. R. MATTHEWS 2,718,243
TWO-SHOT MODIFIED AXMINSTER WEAVE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Sept. 20, 1955 Filed Feb. 21, 1955 INVENTOR v ATTORNEYS P 20, 1955 R. R. MATTHEWS 2,718,243
TWO-SHOT MODIFIED AXMINSTER WEAVE Filed Feb. 21, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 WITH TWO FRAMES (F16. 7.)
POSITION OF HEDDLES FIG FRONT HEDDLE V REAR HEDDLE 1ST sHoT UP DOWN 2ND sHoT DOWN 7 up WITH THREE FRAMES (FIG. 5.)
POSITION 0F HEDDLES Fla FRONT HEDDLE MIDDLE HEDDLE REAR HEDDLE 1ST SHOT UP UP DOWN 2ND SHOT DOWN oowu UP I INVENTOR BY ,ZE Z 1 ATTORNEYS United States Patent TWO-SHOT MODIFIED AXMINSTER WEAVE Russell R. Matthews, Cornwall, N. Y., assignor to The Firth Carpet Company, Inc., New York, N. Y., a cor poration of New York Application February 21, 1955, Serial No. 489,556
Claims. (Cl. 139-401) This invention relates to Axminister carpets and has for its object the provision of a modified Axminster weave of novel and improved characteristics.
Hitherto,.Axminster weaves produced in needle looms were constructed so as to have three double weft shots to each face row .as it appears in the finished carpet. While this basic weave has been improved in various ways over the long period .of its use, thisis particularly so with respect to the old fashioned Imperial Axminster which usuallyhad six double weft shotsto one face row. The Axminster weave as commonly manufactured today hasthree double weft shots of backing to each face row. One of thecommon objections to such prior Axminster weaves was its lack of flexibility. In an earlier effort to overcome this basic objection there was produced a flat or soft Axminster weave which had appreciably greater flexibility. A patent application on that improved weave has been filed jointly by Harold E. Wadely and Russell R. Matthews, and is identified as Serial No.
Thepresent invention, however, departs considerably from all the previously'known types of Axminster weave by reason of the fact that only .acycle of two double weft shots (or a multiple thereof) is required for each face row inserted.
As will be more particularly disclosed, this invention provides a two-shot modified Axminster weave, while :at the same time retaining the fine qualities of Axminster carpeting, namely, unlimitedidesign andcolcr-ranges within the pattern of design. 7
Therefore, it is the principal object of .thisinvention to provide-a flexible, two-shot modified weave Axminster carpeting -,having all the advantages of .the :previously known practices in the application of face yarn...
Another important purpose of thisinvention is to enable themanufacturers of such a weave toincreasernaterialiy theamount of sizing adhesion to the 'facetufts and thus prevent them from being pulled out without considerable difliculty. V
A still further object of .this invention resides in the provision of an Axminster weave by means of which the speed of manufacture can be increased by one-third, the amount of weft material and/or warp material can be decreased by one-third in weight, and the new.modified.
Axminster weave carpet which results lends itself to the economy of mannfactureand high speed-of production required .by the presentage.
.The nature of this invention will be better-understood from the following detailed description of illustrative embodiments thereof, when taken inconjunction with Fig. '3 is another warp-wise section of the fabric--em- Patented Sept. 20, 1955 bodying the weave of this invention having a stutter warp added to the construction of Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a warp-wise section similar to Fig. 2 in pile loop arrangement, but having a stufier warp included;
Fig. 5 shows another warp-wise section of fabric similar to that of Fig. 2 but having a stuifer warp used as an additional binding;
Fig. 6 is a table of heddle positions for the weaving cycle utilized in producing the fabric of Fig. l; and
Fig. 7 is another table of heddle positions applicable in this instance to the weaving cycle utilized in the fabric of Fig. 5.
Referring to the drawing in more detail, the two-shot modified Axminster weave shown in .Fig. 1 comprises a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots 10 and 12 respectively lying in substantially the same plane and bound together by a forward chain warp 14 and a rearward chain warp 16 forming a double warp chain. A length of a pile yarn warp end is looped under each alternate double weft shot 10 and cut to form pile tufts 13 of U-shape having an upstanding pair .of legs joined beneath the corresponding weft shot by a generally horizontal knob formation 19 projecting below the adjacent portion of the chain warp 16.
The hpysical arrangement of the double weft filler shots 10 and 12 is determined during weaving by tensions on the chain warps 14 and 16. While in the conventional three-shot Axminster weave, at least two warp beams are necessary, the equal tensionsrequired in'Fig. l (and also Fig. 2) of the double chain warp ends makes it possible to weave with only one beam, something not heretofore possible in Axminster weaving.
Except for the absence of cut pile the weave shown in' Fig. 2 .is substantially similar to that described in detail with respect to Fig. 1. Alternate double weft filler shots 2i) and 22 disposed in substantially the same plane are bound together by a forward chain warp 24 and a rearward chain warp 26 comprising a double warp chain. A continuous pile warp end of yarn 28 is looped under each alternate double weft shot 20 and extendsas a loop pile over each double weft shot 22 in position intermediate the alternate double weft shots 20. Each U-shaped portion 30 of yarn end underlying the alternate weft shots 20 has its connecting part '31 projecting below the chain warp 26 as a flat knob formation. The pile yarn warp ends 28 of this weave lie alternately in front of and behind the double weft shots, and are preferably of a yarn that application of steam will cause to form twisted loops 32 over each double weft shot 22.
In both the constructions of Figs. 1 and '2 the downwardly projecting knob formations 19 and 31 respectively are so exposed in the back as to permit the application of very substantial amounts of adhesive sizing materials and thus securely anchor the .pile yarn against removal.
The modified Axminster weaves shownin 'Figs. 1 and 2 have only two warp ends in each dent.
The table of Fig. 6 explains the positioning and operation of the heddle frames when only chain warp ends are used in producing the weave construction of Fig. 1. It is also to be noted that the weave construction of Fig. 2 is produced in a similar manner.
The weave illustrated in Fig. 3, which will now berlescribed, represents a distinct modification of the more basic weave of Figs. 1 and 2. The also two-shot modified Axminster weave construction of Fig. '3 is shown as comprising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots 34 and 36 arranged with every other double weft shot 36 lying in a substantially common lower plane and .the intermediate double weft shots 34 lying in a substantially common upper plane. A forward binder warp 38 extends over each upper plane double weft shot 34 and under each lower plane double weft shot 36, and a rearward chain warp 40 extends over each lower plane double weft shot 36 and under each upper plane double weft shot 34. File tuft elements 42 formed and cut to U-shape are looped under each upper plane double weft shot 34 and have pairs of free legs. A straight and preferably fairly thin stuffer warp 44 extends between the binder warp 38 and chain warp 40 intermediate the upper and lower plane weft shots 34 and 36 immediately beneath the connecting loop portions of the cut pile tufts 42. The presence of the straight stufier warp 44 prevents the bottom parts of the pile tufts 42 from going all the way through the back, and thereby prevents the double weft filler shots 36 and 34 respectively from lying within a common plane.
4 of the fabric by reason of the fact that the adhesive backing or sizing material is better able to fill the space be tween two weft shots than it is three disposed within the same area.
Standard carpet materials are used in the production of the carpet weaves described herein. The weft materials may be jute, Kraft cord yarns, linen, and the like. For the warp materials, cotton, jute, Kraft cord, glass-centered Kraft cord, rayon, nylon or linen may be used. The pile It will be seen by reference to the table of Fig. 7 that A three heddle frames are used in producing the weave illustrated in Fig. 3. In the first double weft shot the front and middle heddles will remain up and the rear heddle will be down. During the following double weft shot the front and middle heddles will be down and the rear heddle will be up.
A still further modification of the novel two-shot modified Axminster weave construction of this invention is illustrated in Fig. 4 which resembles the construction of Fig. 2. as well as that of Fig. 3. In this instance a plurality of double weft shots 46 and 48 are arranged to lie respectively in a common upper plane and a common lower plane with the lower level weft shots 43 intermediate the upper level weft shots 46 in an alternating relation. A forward binder warp 50 and a rearward chain warp 52 secure the weft shots 46 and 48 in the position described and have a straight stuffer warp 54 extending between them in a plane intermediate that of the double weft shots of stuffer material. In this construction a continuous pile yarn warp end 56 is looped under each upper level double weft shot 46 as a U-shaped portion 58 and extends without interruption as a joined loop pile portion 60 above the lower level weft shots 48. While the substantial similarity of the weave constructions of Figs. 3 and 4 respectively is apparent, there is one important difference. In the weave construction of Fig. 4 the full freedom of pattern color inherent in Axminster weaving is restricted by reason of the use of continuous, uncut pile yarn ends.
yarn warp end material will be Wool, synthetic fibers, mixtures of wool and synthetic fibers or any other known yarns suitable for the purpose.
The modified Axminster carpet weaves with which this invention is concerned are those in which the pile is formed from yarn drawn from separate supplies during the operation of the loom, and such yarns are inserted in the fabric and looped about weft shots. Therefore, the term Axminster as used herein with reference to carpet weaves is to be interpreted as and limited to pile fabrics produced in the manner indicated. In those instances where the weave embodies continuous lengths of pile yarn ends, novel effects are obtainable, as illustrated by Figs. 2 and 4, and there is no fixed limit as to pile height, but only as to pattern by reason of the use of pile yarn ends having areas of different color printed thereon.
The combination of advantages afforded by the modified Axminster carpet weaves as herein described will be more clearly apparent from a short summary. The twoshot weaves disclosed are specially adaptable to a sizing operation that locks in the tufts more strongly and imparts more flexibility to the carpet body. The available saving of one-third of the weft material and, in the construction of Fig. 1, one-third of warp materials also makes it possible for the manufacturer of these novel two-shot weaves to perform a better sizing operation on the fabric without the necessity of increasing overall manufacturing costs. But none of the other advantages is as important as the time saving in operation of an Axminster loom.
For example, in a three-shot weave conventional Ax- As shown in the drawing, the weave of Fig. has much in common with Fig. 2, which has been described in detail. In Fig. 5 a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots 62 and 64 are arranged alternately and lie in substantially the same plane. In this modification, however, a stuffer warp 66 is used in conjunction with a rearward chain warp 68. In order to bind together the double weft shots 62 and 64, an additional binder warp 70 is used in front of the rearward chain warp 68 and extends over the intermediate double weft shots 62 and under the alternate double weft shots 64. pile yarn warp end 72 is disposed in front of the forward and rearward chain warps 66 and 68 and also the binder warp 70. This yarn end 72, which may be a plied one as shown, is looped under each alternate double weft shot 64 and extends over each intermediate double weft shot 62 with a twisted open ring formation 74. In the back of this weave the pile yarn warp end 72 runs under the adjacent portion of the binder warp 70 as a depending knob portion 76 lying substantially below the general level of the back. Ample provision is thus made for sizing adhesion binding of the looped under portions of the pile yarn end 72.
The adhesion sizing of the back, which has been omitted from the figures of the drawing for purposes of clarity, may be of any of the commercially known rubber, plastic, or newer type washable starch formulations. In this manner it is possible to produce a weave which eliminates some of the binding functions within the fabric without reducing the quality thereof.
The finished fabric is considerably more flexible than a similar one made with a three-shot Axminster weave, and the pile tufts are bound much more tightly into the weave minster loom running at 30 picks per minute, face rows are inserted, while in a two-shot weaving operation running at the same speed, face rows are inserted in the same period of time, thus increasing production It will be understood by those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains that various changes and modifications may be made in the preferred embodiments that have been illustrated and described without departing from the principles of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.
In this weave construction a continuous a x Having thus described my invention, what I claim as novel and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. A two-shot modified Axminster carpet weave comprising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots,
pile tuft elements looped under each intermediate double weft shot, a chain warp extending over each alternate double weft shot and under each intermediate double weft 4 shot, a binder warp extending over each intermediate double weft shot and under each alternate double weft shot, and a stutfer warp extending between the chain warp and the binder warp above the alternate double weft shots and beneath the intermediate double weft shots.
2. A two-shot modified Axminster carpet weave com prising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots under each upper level double weft shot and lying between the binder warp and the chain warp above the straight stutter warp.
3. A two-shot modified Axminster carpet weave comprising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots having every other double weft shot lying in a common lower plane and the intermediate double weft shots lying in a common upper plane, a chain warp extending over each lower plane double weft shot and under each upper plane double weft shot, a binder warp extending over each upper plane double weft shot and under each lower plane double weft shot, a straight stuffer warp extending between the chain warp and the binder warp above the lower plane double weft shots and beneath the upper plane double weft shots, and a pile yarn warp end looped under each upper level double weft shot and extending as a loop pile over each lower level double weft shot and lying between the binder warp and the chain warp above the straight stuffer warp.
4. A two-shot modified Axminstcr carpet weave comprising a plurality of closely spaced double weft shots disposed in substantially the same plane, a pile yarn warp end looped under each alternate double weft shot and extending as an uncut loop pile over each double weft shot intermediate the said alternate double weft shots, a double warp chain binding together all said double weft shots, and a binder warp end of stutter material extending over the intermediate double weft shots lying beneath the uncut loop piles and over the alternate double weft shots, said pile yarn end lying in front of the double warp chain and the binder warp end and projecting below the chain binding underlying each alternate double weft shot.
5. The combination of claim 4 in which the pile yarn warp end is of a plied yarn and each uncut loop pile is twisted into an open ring formation.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Davis May 25, 1920
US489556A 1955-02-21 1955-02-21 Two-shot modified axminster weave Expired - Lifetime US2718243A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2745442A (en) * 1955-08-30 1956-05-15 Firth Carpet Company Inc Three-shot axminster weave
US2950741A (en) * 1955-10-31 1960-08-30 Lees & Sons Co James Pile fabric
US2986174A (en) * 1959-03-12 1961-05-30 Lees & Sons Co James Double face pile fabric
US3027919A (en) * 1956-11-05 1962-04-03 Firth Carpet Company Inc One-shot modified axminster weave
CN103966730A (en) * 2014-05-21 2014-08-06 廖军艺 Carpet weaving method
US10463203B2 (en) * 2013-02-22 2019-11-05 Uchino Co., Ltd. Towel product and manufacturing method for towel product

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1341417A (en) * 1916-06-06 1920-05-25 Thomas Bond Worth & Sons Ltd Loom for weaving tufted fabrics, such as carpets and the like
US2437379A (en) * 1946-04-08 1948-03-09 Marshall Field And Company Loom for weaving pile fabric

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1341417A (en) * 1916-06-06 1920-05-25 Thomas Bond Worth & Sons Ltd Loom for weaving tufted fabrics, such as carpets and the like
US2437379A (en) * 1946-04-08 1948-03-09 Marshall Field And Company Loom for weaving pile fabric

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2745442A (en) * 1955-08-30 1956-05-15 Firth Carpet Company Inc Three-shot axminster weave
US2950741A (en) * 1955-10-31 1960-08-30 Lees & Sons Co James Pile fabric
US3027919A (en) * 1956-11-05 1962-04-03 Firth Carpet Company Inc One-shot modified axminster weave
US2986174A (en) * 1959-03-12 1961-05-30 Lees & Sons Co James Double face pile fabric
US10463203B2 (en) * 2013-02-22 2019-11-05 Uchino Co., Ltd. Towel product and manufacturing method for towel product
CN103966730A (en) * 2014-05-21 2014-08-06 廖军艺 Carpet weaving method
CN103966730B (en) * 2014-05-21 2015-06-24 廖军艺 Carpet weaving method

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