US2437379A - Loom for weaving pile fabric - Google Patents

Loom for weaving pile fabric Download PDF

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US2437379A
US2437379A US660573A US66057346A US2437379A US 2437379 A US2437379 A US 2437379A US 660573 A US660573 A US 660573A US 66057346 A US66057346 A US 66057346A US 2437379 A US2437379 A US 2437379A
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loom
pile
fabric
guides
warps
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US660573A
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Eugene F Clark
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MARSHALL FIELD AND Co
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MARSHALL FIELD AND Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D39/00Pile-fabric looms

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  • My invention relates to looms for use in weaving of pile fabrics for use in carpets,v rugs and the like and also to the fabric itself and has for its primary object the provision of a loom for rapid weaving of pile fabrics and which is practically automatic in its operation and requires very little attention on the part of a weaver exthe cept to keep the loom supplied with material, and I embodies specifically actuating means for the pile yarn weaving mechanism shown and vdescribed in my copending application Serial NoQ 566,853, filed December 6, 1944, of which this application is a continuation-impart.
  • One of the main objects of my invention is the provision of pile weaving mechanisms which can be incorporated into a loom adapted to produce the usual base fabric comprised of the usual warp and filler yarns, and in which the pile weaving means functions and operates with the specific.
  • Anotherv and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom for weaving either one shot ller fabric or two shot iiller fabric and which can be easily changed from a one shot to a two shot loom in distinction to the usual three shot loom of the'Axminster type.
  • Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom in which heavy pile fabric for use as carpets, rugs and the like can be woven rapidly with extremely simple weaves with a body of sufficient weight and thickness to insure proper laying of the fabric on a oor and to insure long wear and lasting qualities.
  • Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom in which an improved fabric is produced both from the standpoint of manufacturer and user, in that I am able to produce a fabric in which the yarn making up the pile is closer together, particularly immediately adjacent the base fabric than is common with fabrics of this type heretofore woven. thereby eliminating the spaces between the tufts of pile and on the surface of the base fabric under which dirt lodges in the use of oor coverings,
  • Another and further object of my invention is y the provision of a loom for the weaving of pile fabrics in which the pile is woven in the form of loops simultaneously with the weaving of the fabric with the pile yarn drawn around and in frictional engagement with the fingers thereby providing a backingagainst which the fabric is beat up thereby enabling a. more closely woven v 2 and tighter fabric than what has been'produced heretofore.
  • Another and further object of my invention is the provision of pile weaving means which can be combined in many ways with a loom which weaves the usual base fabric. comprised of the usual warp ⁇ and, filler in such manner that the pile is interwoven with the base fabric in one complete andcontinuous operation.
  • Figure 1 is a perspective view of the power transmitting mechanism of a loom showing the Filler inserting needle and operating means there-f for taken from the front of the loom.
  • Figure 2 is a perspective view of a portion of the frame of a loom showing the power means and gear transmission for the operation of a loom taken from the rear of the 100m.
  • Figure 3 is a perspective view taken from the front of the loom showing the frame of the loom and a portion of the pile inserting mechanism.
  • Figure 4 is a rear view taken in perspective of the samev side of the loom as Figure 3.
  • Figure 5 is a perspective view of the operating cams and connecting shafts showing particularly the operating parts for the pile guide frames taken from the front of the loom.
  • Figure 6 is a rear perspective view of the operating cams for the pile guide frame and operating parts
  • Figure 7 is a detailed elevational view ofthe ⁇ one end of the pile inserting guide frame and operating parts therefor.
  • Figure 8 is a detailed elevational view of the pile frame and operating parts therefor for .one shot operation.
  • Figure 9 is a detail of the cam shown in Figure 8 with a segment securedthereto for use in the two shot operation of the loom.
  • Figure 10 is a detail view of one ofthe fingers, the 'pile insertion guides and a section of the cloth rest.
  • Figure 11 is a detailed elevational view through a section of one shot fabric slightly expanded to show the relative position of the warp and pile yarn.
  • Figure 12 is a detailed elevational view through a section of two shot fabric somewhat expanded to show the'position of the warp and illler yarns and with all warps at equal tension.
  • Figure 13 is a detailed elevation view through a i section of two shot fabric showing the fabric somewhat approximating the completed fabric, with unequal tension warps.
  • a main loom frame 20 is shown having an auxiliary frame 2l at one side thereof upon which the power supply together with certain of the power shafts and gears are mounted with auxiliary framemembers 22 and 23, which are mounted on the frame 20 and extend upwardly from said frame and have the pile yarn beam mounted thereon (not shown) together with V certain of the pile yarn weaving mechanism hereinai'ter described.
  • a motor 24 is provided on the frame 2
  • has a ratio of 2 to 1 with respect to the gear 82 so that with each two revolutions of the shaft 88 the secondary power shaft 33 makes one revolution.
  • a bevel gear 34 which meshes with a bevel gear 35 on the end of a shaft 36 upon which a gear 31 is mounted, which, in turn, meshes with a gear 38, which is mounted upon a short axle secured to ,the auxiliary frame 2
  • a needle guide 43 is provided which is mounted on the auxiliary frame 2
  • a link connects the crosshead 41 with the upper end of the lever 42 so that as the main drive shaft 30 of the loom rotates the lever 42 isoscillated and the needle moved into and out of the shed of the loom.
  • the gears connecting the main drive shaft 39 with the lever 42 are of 1 to 1 relation with each other and the travel of the needle is continuous except as it reverses its position at each end of its travel, the needle being drawn out a sumcient distance so that as it travels out of the shed of the loom back to a stationary position and then returns to the shed of the war-p, suillcient time has elapsed for the beat-up operation to take place and the heddles to shed the warp so that the warp is in position to receive another shot of Cams 52 and 53 are provided which are mounted on the main power shaft 30 and with rocker arms 54: 54 on a shaft 55 mounted in the main frame 28 with rollers 56, 56 on the ends of the rocker arms 54, 54 operating in closed tracks ⁇ in the cams 52 and 53 with rocker arms 51, 51 mounted on the shaft 55, on the upper ends of which a reed box 58 is mounted, having the usual reed
  • Heddle guides -shaft 33 which operate to shed the warp threads carried by warp beams in the usual manner upon the main frame of the machine and not shown in the present drawings. These operations are all carried on in synchronism with the operation of the needle 48 and the operation of the reeds 59 to perform the beat-up operations in the weaving of the base fabric.
  • the mechanism heretofore described is common to various types and kinds of' looms for the weaving of the base fabric in pile materials and is all old and Well known in the art.
  • My invention has to do with the pile yarn weaving means and comprises a finger bar 69, which extends across the main frame 20 of the loom and secured to the heddle bar guides 60 and 6
  • are notched at their rear ends and t over a rib cap 14 tted over the upper ends of the ngers 1
  • a pair of frames 16 and11 are pivotally mountd ed upon shaft 18 journalled in brackets 19 and secured to the inner faces of the upstanding frame members 22. and 23.
  • the members 16 and 11 have channel members 8
  • the bars 82 and 83 are slotted at their ends and have bolts 86, 86 extending therethrough in the slots and through the channel members 8
  • the guides 84, 84 are removably mounted in Yopenings formed in the underside of the bars 82 and 83 respectively, and are held in position by means of screws 88, 88.
  • a pair of rods 89 and 90 are provided which are pivotally secured to the members 16 and 11 near the forward ends thereof, and at their lower ends are pivotally attached to crank members 8
  • An arm 83 is attached to the shaft 82 which in turn has a rod 84 attached thereto and which extends rearwardly and is connected to a rocker link 93 secured at its lower end to a bracket 93 mounted'upon the frame 20.
  • a cam 91 is mounted upon the secondary power shaft 33, this cam 91 having two low faces 98 and 99 thereon', and two high surfaces and
  • 05 are provided which are secured to the main cam by meansl of brackets
  • the link 93 moves forward, thereby permitting the frames 13 and 11 to drop into voperative relation into the shed of the loom while as the high cam surfaces
  • 28 is secured to the outer face of the frame member 22, and has a bell crank
  • 5 are mounted upon each of the rolls
  • 1 thereon in spaced relation with each other is secured to the forward edge of the members 1B and 11 with the pile yarn being fed between the pins or teeth
  • 8 is provided, one end of which is attached to the bars 82 and 83,'the other end of which is attached to a lever
  • 33 is bolted to the face of the gear wheel
  • 34 is normally secured 'inv fixed'rotatable relation with the secondary power shaft 33 by means of a key
  • 43 are in ratio with each other, while the gear ratio of the gear
  • 45 is mounted on a collar forming an integral part of the gear
  • 31 is removed from the gear wheel
  • 41 which have blocks
  • the fabric as illustrated comprises groups of warps, each groupy consisting preferably of four warps a, b, c and d, each group being spaced a short distance from the adjacent group so as to receive the pile yarn e between each group of i warps, producing rows of tufts f, with the warps a, b, c and d being grouped close together, and so positioned in the loom that one of the fingers 1
  • the pile yarn is carried into the shed of the loom st one side of the fingers 1
  • Alternate warps are shedded in the same direction by the harnesses, the warps a-c being controlled by one harness, while the warps b-d are controlled by the other harness. so that the warps ac are parallel with each other, while the warps bd are also parallel with each other in the weave illustrated in Figures 1l and 12.
  • the bases of the tufts f are in abutting relation with each other in a warpwise direction, and because of the fact that the fabric is beat up against the friction of the pile yarn about the fingers 1I as hereinafter described, as well as the tension of the warps, a very tight weave is produced, in which the tufts ,f are firmly secured and cannot easily be removed.
  • FIG 13 a two shot weave is illustrated in which the arrangement of the warps is the same as in the weaves heretofore described with the exception that certain of the warps a and c in the form illustrated are placed under greater tension than the warps b and d, preferably the warps b and d being under about one-half of the tension applied to the warps a and c.
  • the tension of thewarps a and c is determined by the weaver and may be slightly in excess of that usually used upon all of the warps in normal weaves of pile fabrics, and I have found that with the alternate warps being about one-half the tension of the warps a and c, that when the warps a and c are shedded up, the pile yarn inserted and the shot of filler placed in position, with the slack warps under the shot of ller passing through the pile loops, this filler will be low in the fabric.
  • the loom Upon the next shedding of the warps, the loose warps are up, the taut warps down, the filler is placed in between these warps and beat up into engagement with the pile yarn above its base, and also forming a backing against which the next succeeding row of pile yarn loops is-positioned, thereby in eifect locking the piley loops in
  • the loom is simple and will be yunderstood as designed for continuous operation as long as materials are supplied to it, with the warps being supplied from beams, usually two or' more in number mounted on the rear of the frame 28, in the .usual manner, preferably with vthe warps a and c being carried by one beam.
  • the warps pass through the heddles 82 and 88, and are grouped as herein above described, while filler yarn is supplied tothe loom and inserted into the warp by means of -the needle 48, this combination -being old and well known in the art, f y
  • the pile yarns are supplied from a beam usually mounted in the frame portions 22 and 28 with the strands preferably threaded under the snap roller
  • two strands of ber yarn are simultaneously yinserted in the shed of the loom and the two bars 82 and 83 are shifted in unison during the operation of the loom.:
  • 82 is starting to ascend in one of the high sides of the cam 81 and through its connections to the frames 18 and 11 these frames descend bringing the pile guides 84, 84 between the fingers 1
  • v'I'he guides 84, 84 descend into the shed of the loom below the path of travel of the needle 48. and dwell lthere momentarily while'the roller
  • the fingers'll are in effect interwoven in the fabric with the pile loops being in engagement therewith at their tops and sides while the ller is in frictlonal engagement with the underside of these ngers thus providing a background against which subsequent formations of the fabric are beat up.
  • the pile yarns are in continuous strands in the fabric after it is woven until severed by the knives in the fingers 'Il and is therefore under control until firmly woven in the fabric thus producing a tight weave. If loop pile is desired, then the knives are omitted from the fingers 1
  • a plurality of spaced fingers mounted at one of their ends on said loom and free at their other ends substantially spanning the space between the loom heddles and the cloth rest on the loom, a pair of vertically mov able frames, a pile thread guide bar on said frames laterally movable thereon.
  • a plurality of fillerwise spaced iingers mounted on the loom at one of their ends and free at their other ends extending parallel with the warp, vertically movable frames on said loom, a plurality of pile yarn guide bars mounted for sliding fillerwise movement in said frames pile yarn guides in said bars, a rotating cam on a power shaft of said loom, a lever operated by said cam, a bell crank, connections from the bell crank to the pile yarn guide bars, a rod connecting the lever with said bell crank whereby the pile yarn guidesare shogged over the said fingers, a second rotating cam on a power shaft of the loom, and operating connections actuated by said second cam whereby the'pile yarn guides are moved into and out of the shed of the loom at pre-determined times.
  • a plurality of fillerwise spaced ilngers mounted on the loom at one of their ends and free at their other ends extending parallel with the warp, vertically movable frames on said loom, a plurality of pile yarn guide bars mounted for sliding f'lllerwise movement on said frames pile yarn guides in said bars, a rotating cam on a power shaft of said loom, a lever operated by said cam, a bell crank, connections from the bell crank to the pile yarn guide bars, a rod connecting the lever with said bell crank whereby the pile yarn guides are shogged over the said lingers, a second rotating cam on a powershaft of the loom, and operating connections actuated by said second cam whereby the pile yarn guides are moved into the shed of the loom in advance of the travel of the ller yarn inserting means and withdrawn from the shed of the loom after the ller inserting means has passed out of the warp whereby the ller yarn is loop
  • a pile yarn mechanism comprising a pair of vertically movable frames, pile yarn guide bars siidabie llerwise on the forward ends of the said frames pile yarn guides in spaced relation with each other in the said bars, ngers on the said loom extending parallel with the warps in spaced relation with each other, the spacing of the ngersand the spacing of the pile yarn guides being the same, operating connections with the power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile yarn guides are shogged over the lingers at pre-determined times, and operating connections with the power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile l yarn guides arey intermittently forced into and out of the shed of the loom at pre-determined times, the shogging of the guides always preceding the descent of the pile yarn guides, and the descent and ascent of each pile yarn guide being in the same plane.
  • a pile yarn inserting mechanism comprising a pair of vertically movable frames, pile yarn guide bars slidable fillerwise on the forward ends of the said frames pile yarn guides in spaced relation with each other in the said bars, fingers on the said loom extending parallel with the warps in spaced relationl with each other, the spacing of the ngers and the spacing of the pile yarn guides being the same, operating connections with the power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile yarn guides are shogged over the lingers at pre-determined times, and operating connections with theI power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile yarn guides are intermittently forced into and out of the shed of the loom at pre-determined times, the shcgging of the guides always preceding the descent of the pile lyarn guides, and the descent and ascent of the pile yarn guides being in the same plane.
  • a .pile yarn inserting mechanism comprising a pair of vertically movable frames, pile yarn guide bars slidable iillerwise on the forward ends oi' the said frames pile yarn guides in spaced relation with each other in the said bars, ngers on the said loom extending parallel with the warps in spaced relation with eachother, knives in said fingers.

Description

March 9, 1948. l E. F. CLARK 2,437,379
` y LOOM FOR WEAVING PILE FABRIC Filed April a, 194e s sheets-sheet 1 March 9, 1948. E. F. CLARK 2,437,379
V L00 FOR WEAVING ?ILE FABRIC FilAed April 8, 1946 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 l 'Ill Y Ell March'9, 1948. E. F. CLARK K Y I L00 FOR WEAVING PILE FABRIC Filed April 8, 1946 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 Malch 9, E, F CLARK Loon FoR wEAvING PILE FABRIC Filed April 8, 194s 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 March 9, 1948. y E. F; CLARK 2,437,379
LOOII FOR WEAVING PILE FABRIC Filed April a, V194e; 9 sheets-sheet 5 Unsinn l March 9, 1948.
E. F. CLARK LGOII' FOR WEAVING PILE FABRIC 9 sheets-sneu 6 med April s. 194e K Y @WZ- March 9, 1948, E. F. @mL/RKl 2,437,379
' 'Loon Fon mamme PILE FABRIC Filed April 8,. 194s 9 sneetssheet 7 March 9, 1948.
E. F. CLARK LOOM FOR 'NEM/'ING PILE FABRIC vFiled April a, 194e 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 Mardi 9, 1948. E F, CLARK' 2,437,379
Loon" Fon wEAvING PILE FABRIC Filed April a, 1946 9 sheets-sheet 9 Patented Mar. 9, 1948 LOOM FOR WEAVING PILE FABRIC Eugene F. Clark, Damariscotta, Maine, assignor to Marshall lField and Company, Chicago, Ill.,
a corporation of Illinois Application April 8, 1946, Serial No. 660,573
12 Claims. (Cl. 139-46) My invention relates to looms for use in weaving of pile fabrics for use in carpets,v rugs and the like and also to the fabric itself and has for its primary object the provision of a loom for rapid weaving of pile fabrics and which is practically automatic in its operation and requires very little attention on the part of a weaver exthe cept to keep the loom supplied with material, and I embodies specifically actuating means for the pile yarn weaving mechanism shown and vdescribed in my copending application Serial NoQ 566,853, filed December 6, 1944, of which this application is a continuation-impart.
One of the main objects of my invention is the provision of pile weaving mechanisms which can be incorporated into a loom adapted to produce the usual base fabric comprised of the usual warp and filler yarns, and in which the pile weaving means functions and operates with the specific.
weaving apparatus of a loom which produces the base fabric. Y
Anotherv and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom for weaving either one shot ller fabric or two shot iiller fabric and which can be easily changed from a one shot to a two shot loom in distinction to the usual three shot loom of the'Axminster type.
Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom in which heavy pile fabric for use as carpets, rugs and the like can be woven rapidly with extremely simple weaves with a body of sufficient weight and thickness to insure proper laying of the fabric on a oor and to insure long wear and lasting qualities.
Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom in which an improved fabric is produced both from the standpoint of manufacturer and user, in that I am able to produce a fabric in which the yarn making up the pile is closer together, particularly immediately adjacent the base fabric than is common with fabrics of this type heretofore woven. thereby eliminating the spaces between the tufts of pile and on the surface of the base fabric under which dirt lodges in the use of oor coverings,
' and in which, when such rugs and carpets are cleaned the cleaner agents can be completely removed thereby eliminating the chance of this material remaining in the fabric causing the fabric to deteriorate, thereby vimproving the wearing qualities of the fabric and increasing its life.
Another and further object of my invention is y the provision of a loom for the weaving of pile fabrics in which the pile is woven in the form of loops simultaneously with the weaving of the fabric with the pile yarn drawn around and in frictional engagement with the fingers thereby providing a backingagainst which the fabric is beat up thereby enabling a. more closely woven v 2 and tighter fabric than what has been'produced heretofore.
Another and further object of my invention is the provision of pile weaving means which can be combined in many ways with a loom which weaves the usual base fabric. comprised of the usual warp `and, filler in such manner that the pile is interwoven with the base fabric in one complete andcontinuous operation.
These and other objects of my invention will be more fully and better understood and in which:
Figure 1 is a perspective view of the power transmitting mechanism of a loom showing the Filler inserting needle and operating means there-f for taken from the front of the loom.
Figure 2 is a perspective view of a portion of the frame of a loom showing the power means and gear transmission for the operation of a loom taken from the rear of the 100m.
Figure 3 is a perspective view taken from the front of the loom showing the frame of the loom and a portion of the pile inserting mechanism.
Figure 4 is a rear view taken in perspective of the samev side of the loom as Figure 3.
Figure 5 is a perspective view of the operating cams and connecting shafts showing particularly the operating parts for the pile guide frames taken from the front of the loom.
Figure 6 is a rear perspective view of the operating cams for the pile guide frame and operating parts,
Figure 7 is a detailed elevational view ofthe `one end of the pile inserting guide frame and operating parts therefor.
Figure 8 is a detailed elevational view of the pile frame and operating parts therefor for .one shot operation.
Figure 9 is a detail of the cam shown in Figure 8 with a segment securedthereto for use in the two shot operation of the loom.
Figure 10 is a detail view of one ofthe fingers, the 'pile insertion guides and a section of the cloth rest.
Figure 11 is a detailed elevational view through a section of one shot fabric slightly expanded to show the relative position of the warp and pile yarn.
Figure 12 is a detailed elevational view through a section of two shot fabric somewhat expanded to show the'position of the warp and illler yarns and with all warps at equal tension.
Figure 13 is a detailed elevation view through a i section of two shot fabric showing the fabric somewhat approximating the completed fabric, with unequal tension warps.
Referring now specifically to the ldrawings and in which like reference characters refer to like parts throughout, a main loom frame 20 is shown having an auxiliary frame 2l at one side thereof upon which the power supply together with certain of the power shafts and gears are mounted with auxiliary framemembers 22 and 23, which are mounted on the frame 20 and extend upwardly from said frame and have the pile yarn beam mounted thereon (not shown) together with V certain of the pile yarn weaving mechanism hereinai'ter described. A motor 24 is provided on the frame 2| having a gear 25 mounted on the motor shaft and in mesh with a second gear 26, which, in turn, is mounted upon a jack shaft 21 upon which a gear 28 is mounted, which, in turn, meshes with a large gear wheel 29 upon the main loom drive shaft I5, this shaft 30 extending across the main frame 28 and the auxiliary frame 2|, and through which power for all of the weaving operations is applied to the various operating parts of the loom, either directly from this shaft 38. or indirectly throush a gear 3| mounted upon the main shaft 38, which meshes withva gear 32 mounted upon a secondary power shaft 33, which also extends transversely across both the main frame 20 and the auxiliary frame 2| and to which some oi' the .operating parts of the loom are connected. The
gear 8| has a ratio of 2 to 1 with respect to the gear 82 so that with each two revolutions of the shaft 88 the secondary power shaft 33 makes one revolution.
Also mounted upon the main power shaft 30 is a bevel gear 34, which meshes with a bevel gear 35 on the end of a shaft 36 upon which a gear 31 is mounted, which, in turn, meshes with a gear 38, which is mounted upon a short axle secured to ,the auxiliary frame 2|, and has a crank arm 39 secured thereto to which a second arm 40 is secured, this arm 48 being secured by means of a stud 4I to a lever 42 pivotally mounted at its lower end to the frame `2| at the front of the loom. A needle guide 43 is provided which is mounted on the auxiliary frame 2| upon an arm 44 by means of a link 45, and at its inner end is mounted upon a bracket 46 secured to the main-frame 28 of the loom, the needle guide 43 having a crosshead 41 slidably mounted thereon to which the rear end of a needle 48 is secured. with the front end of the needle 48 passing through a guide 49 secured to the cloth rest 50 of the loom, which, in turn, is mounted upon the main frame 20. A link connects the crosshead 41 with the upper end of the lever 42 so that as the main drive shaft 30 of the loom rotates the lever 42 isoscillated and the needle moved into and out of the shed of the loom. carrying the filler threads into the shed of the loom between the warps during the weaving operation. The gears connecting the main drive shaft 39 with the lever 42 are of 1 to 1 relation with each other and the travel of the needle is continuous except as it reverses its position at each end of its travel, the needle being drawn out a sumcient distance so that as it travels out of the shed of the loom back to a stationary position and then returns to the shed of the war-p, suillcient time has elapsed for the beat-up operation to take place and the heddles to shed the warp so that the warp is in position to receive another shot of Cams 52 and 53 are provided which are mounted on the main power shaft 30 and with rocker arms 54: 54 on a shaft 55 mounted in the main frame 28 with rollers 56, 56 on the ends of the rocker arms 54, 54 operating in closed tracks` in the cams 52 and 53 with rocker arms 51, 51 mounted on the shaft 55, on the upper ends of which a reed box 58 is mounted, having the usual reed dents 59 positioned therein. Heddle guides -shaft 33 and which operate to shed the warp threads carried by warp beams in the usual manner upon the main frame of the machine and not shown in the present drawings. These operations are all carried on in synchronism with the operation of the needle 48 and the operation of the reeds 59 to perform the beat-up operations in the weaving of the base fabric. The mechanism heretofore described is common to various types and kinds of' looms for the weaving of the base fabric in pile materials and is all old and Well known in the art.
My invention has to do with the pile yarn weaving means and comprises a finger bar 69, which extends across the main frame 20 of the loom and secured to the heddle bar guides 60 and 6| by means of angles 10, 10, the bar having a plu- -rality of spaced fingers 1|, 1| thereon which are inclined downwardly and extend forwardly towardsthe front of the loom parallel with the warps and in front of the heddles 62 and 63 and terminate immediately above the marginal edge of the cloth rest 50, and in the form shown have blades 12, 12 therein for the purpose of severing the loops of the pile thread after these loops are formed on the fingers 1|, 1| as will be more fully hereinafter described. The fingers 1| are notched at their rear ends and t over a rib cap 14 tted over the upper ends of the ngers 1|,
1| which is held in position by means of screws 15, 15.
A pair of frames 16 and11 are pivotally mountd ed upon shaft 18 journalled in brackets 19 and secured to the inner faces of the upstanding frame members 22. and 23. The members 16 and 11 have channel members 8|, 8| thereon at their lower front edges within which a pair of bars 82 and 83 are slidably mounted having a plurality of pile yarn guides 84, 84 therein, these guides having openings 85, 85 in the lower ends thereof through which the pile yarn passes during the operation of theloom. The bars 82 and 83 are slotted at their ends and have bolts 86, 86 extending therethrough in the slots and through the channel members 8|, 8| with spacers 81, 81 being provided so that the bars 82 and 83 are normally spaced apart from each other to allow space for the pile yarns to pass between the bars 82 and 83 as they are threaded through the guides 84 in bar 82, The guides 84, 84 are removably mounted in Yopenings formed in the underside of the bars 82 and 83 respectively, and are held in position by means of screws 88, 88. A pair of rods 89 and 90 are provided which are pivotally secured to the members 16 and 11 near the forward ends thereof, and at their lower ends are pivotally attached to crank members 8|, 8| mounted upon a shaft 92 which is journalled at each of its ends in bearings secured to the main frame 28.
An arm 83 is attached to the shaft 82 which in turn has a rod 84 attached thereto and which extends rearwardly and is connected to a rocker link 93 secured at its lower end to a bracket 93 mounted'upon the frame 20. A cam 91 is mounted upon the secondary power shaft 33, this cam 91 having two low faces 98 and 99 thereon', and two high surfaces and |0I, these surfaces providing a track for a roller |02 which is mounted upon the link 95 so that as the cam rotates, the arm 95 is oscillated, which through its various connections including a. spring |03 which is attached to the link 9|, causes the members 16 and 11 to oscillate in a vertical plane, thus bringing the guides 84, 84 into and out of the shed oi the loom carrying with them pile yarns which are woven linto the fabric simultaneously with the weaving of the base fabric, Aas will be more fully described hereinafter. v
Cam guards |04 and |05 are provided which are secured to the main cam by meansl of brackets |08, |03 and provide a closed cam immediately opposite the high places |00 and |0| provide for smooth operation of the frames and 1'1` during the operation of the loom. As the roller |02 travels on the lower surfaces 98 and 99 the link 93 moves forward, thereby permitting the frames 13 and 11 to drop into voperative relation into the shed of the loom while as the high cam surfaces |00 and |0| reach the roller |02, the frames v 18 and 11 are forced upward so that the guidesl 84, 84 are above the warp and fingers 1|, 1| as shown in Figure 10. The operations heretofore described are in timed relation with the needle 48 and the beat-up mechanism during the normal one-shot operation of the loom. In Figure 9 a cam segment |01 is secured' to the cam 91 across the low face 99 by means of brackets |08, |08 so that as the cam 91 rotates with the segment |01 attached to it, only one descent of the guides, 84, 84 will be made into the shed of the loom 6 |2| and |22 which are mounted in a block |23 fixed to a shaft |24. the .shaft |24 being slidably mounted in a U-shaped member which is secured to the side of the upstanding frame mem-` ber 22. A- bracket |28 is secured to the outer face of the frame member 22, and has a bell crank |21 mounted thereon which is connected to the outer end of the shaft 24 and to a rod |28 secured at its lower end to a lever |29 mountmounted upon the secondary power shaft 33.
with the rotation of the secondary power shaft.
33 and which operates in timed relation with the needle 48 and beat-up mechanism and'producesA a two shot fabric. In the operation of the .loom this two shot fabric is as illustrated in Figures 12 and 13, a fabric in which only alternate shots of filler pass through the pile loops at their bottoms.
MountedV upon the frames 1E and 11 are rolls |09 and ||0 in spaced relation with each other,j
each of which has snap rolls and ||2 thereon mounted upon pins ||3, ||3 in the rolls |09 and ||0. Brackets ||4 controlled by springs ||5 are mounted upon each of the rolls |09 and ||0, which with the snap rolls and ||2 form a combination which provides means by which the required tension is maintained upon the pile yarn which is threaded around the rolls |09 and ||0 and the sna'p rolls and ||2 and /the slack in the pile yarn is taken out at the beginning of the ascent of the guides 84, 84 after they have reached the lowermost point of their travel into the shed of the loom and commence the return to their normal position above the warp. A comb ||9 having pins ||1, ||1 thereon in spaced relation with each other is secured to the forward edge of the members 1B and 11 with the pile yarn being fed between the pins or teeth ||1 on the comb ||6 so Athat the strandsof pile yarn do not become tangled or twisted with each other as they pass to the guides 84, 8 4.
An arm ||8 is provided, one end of which is attached to the bars 82 and 83,'the other end of which is attached to a lever ||9 pivotally mounted upon a bracket |20 which is secured to the side of the frame 18 the rear end of the lever' ||3v extending rearwardly between a pair of pins The Ycam |33 is bolted to the face of the gear wheel |34 and has a high cam surface |35 and a low cam surface |35, these surfaces being equal in distance around the periphery 0f the cam |33 which forms a track vfor the roller 3|. The gear |34 is normally secured 'inv fixed'rotatable relation with the secondary power shaft 33 by means of a key |31, so thatthe vgear |34V and the cam I 33 rotate in synchronism Iwith the secondary power shaft 33 when the loom is in oper- `the shaft |40 having a gear |43 mounted on the outer end thereof with a second gearv |44 mounted on the inner end thereof in mesh' with the gear |34 on the secondary power shaft 33. The gears |39 and |43 are in ratio with each other, while the gear ratio of the gear |44 with respect to the gear |34 is 2-|. A threaded bolt |45 is mounted on a collar forming an integral part of the gear |44, and in the normal operation of the loom when weaving the one shot fabric, this bolt |45 is out of engagement with theshaft |40 although this entire gear train operates, the gear |44 rotates on the shaft |40, although this shaft |40 is rotating it travels at only one half the speed of the gear |44. When it is desired to convert the loom to weave the two shot fabric, the key |31 is removed from the gear wheel |34 and the screw |45 is turned up into engagement with the shaft |40, whereupon the cam|33 is' driven through the gears |39, |43 and |44, rotating the cam |33 at one-half the speed at which it normally travels in the operation of the loom for the two shot Weave. It will be understood that as shown in Figures 3 and 4, the roller |13| is on the high side of the cam |33 and a's the roller |3| travels onto the low cam surface |35, the spring |32 lifts the lever |29, resulting in an upward thrust in the f the ngers 1|, this movement taking place just prior to the time when the roller |02 is about to reach one of the low sides of the cam 91, resulting in the descent of the pile yarn guides 84, 84 into the'shed of the loom carrying the :Mazara pile yarns with them in which Position the needle 45 traverses transversely ofthe loom, carrying with it the two strands of flller normally used in the base fabric into the open warp and above the pile yarn. As the needle 45 is withdrawn the cam 91 has reached a point where the roller |02 engages on one of the high surfaces of this cam, resulting dn forcing the frames 1l and 11 upward and carrying the pile yarn guides 84, I4 out of the shed of the loom. A beating up 09eration thereupon takes place through the cams 52 and 53 mounted on the main power shaft 30. of the loom.
Mounted upon the cloth rest 55 is a pair of bracketsl |45 and |41 which have blocks |45, |48 mounted thereon by means of bolts |4l and |50, and upon which a shaft is mounted, this shaft |5| having disks |52 thereon, with spacers` |53 mounted between the disks |52 which serves to space the disks |52 apart from each other approximately the same distance as the spacing of the fingers 1|, this construction forming a roll which extends across the loom-from side to side with the disks |52 passing between the rows of pile loops with the fingers 1| extending between the disks |52 so as to hold the fabric down in place upon the cloth rest 50 and prevents an undue amount of lifting force on the fingers 1| when the pile thread `guides 84, 84 ascend, drawing the pile thread yarns around the flller. and because of the tension on the pile thread yarns, exerts a considerable upward pulling force on the fingers and tending to lift the fabric upward away from the cloth rest -50 unless some -means is provided for holding the fabric down taut upon the cloth rest.
The usual let off and take up mechanism is employed which is operated by cams |53 (Fig. 3) and |54 (Fig. 5) on the main loom power shaft 30, these elements being common to all looms and form no part of my present invention. Likewise, particularly in Figure 1, a lever |55 is shown which is connected to a clutch which is connected through a series of shafts and levers to a clutch mechanism, which clutch mechanism connected with the gear wheel 28 is mounted on the jack shaft 21, which mechanism forms a convenient means for the operator to start and stop the loom and which mechanism is common to all looms and forms no part of my present invention.
'I'he fabric as woven on the loom heretofore described is illustrated in Figures 11 to 13 inclusive of the drawings. The warp and filler beams, as well as the Warp, filler and pile yarn, are not shown in the drawings illustrating the loom, because the warp and filler beams are standard equipment and their position and relation to the loom are well understood by those skilled in the art. If the warp, pile and iiller yarn were shown in the drawings, the various working parts of the loom would be obscured and it is believed the operation of the loom and the weave can be readily understood by those skilled in the art of weaving.
The fabric as illustrated comprises groups of warps, each groupy consisting preferably of four warps a, b, c and d, each group being spaced a short distance from the adjacent group so as to receive the pile yarn e between each group of i warps, producing rows of tufts f, with the warps a, b, c and d being grouped close together, and so positioned in the loom that one of the fingers 1| is immediately above the center of each of those groups of warps. The pile yarn is carried into the shed of the loom st one side of the fingers 1| and at one side of each group of warps so the warps a and d of each group are in contact with the sides of the pile yarn. Alternate warps are shedded in the same direction by the harnesses, the warps a-c being controlled by one harness, while the warps b-d are controlled by the other harness. so that the warps ac are parallel with each other, while the warps bd are also parallel with each other in the weave illustrated in Figures 1l and 12.
Even tension is maintained in all of the warps shown in Figures 11 and l2 with tutfs j anchored around each shot of filler composed of two cords an' made of strong material, preferably Jute, and which is placed in position by the needle 45 and anchored into selvage edges on each side of the fabric mechanism common to looms of this type and which forms no part of my present invention. Because of the fact that the filler cords are very strongvand are securely anchored at each side of the fabric, as the pile yarn is woven into the fabric and beat up the warps are pressed tightly together at hh, the points where they cross each other because of the shedding operation"`performed by the heddles, until slight recesses are formed at the sides of the warps within which the next adjacent warps are partially embedded, producing tension in the woven fabric to a slight degree in a tlllerwise direction and binding the tufts ff tightly in the fabric at their sides. In the use of one shot fabric, the bases of the tufts f are in abutting relation with each other in a warpwise direction, and because of the fact that the fabric is beat up against the friction of the pile yarn about the fingers 1I as hereinafter described, as well as the tension of the warps, a very tight weave is produced, in which the tufts ,f are firmly secured and cannot easily be removed.
In the two shot weave illustrated in Figure 12, with all of the warps under equal tension, instead of the bases of the tufts f being in engagement with each other, a shot of filler ga is placed on the fabric and as'it is. beat up against the base of the preceding tuft f, and on its opposite `side has the next succeeding rows of tufts f beat up against it, thereby anchoring the tufts and providing a slightly heavier base and slightly lighter pile than what I have illustrated and described vwith reference to vthe one shot fabric illustrated in Figure 11.
In Figure 13 a two shot weave is illustrated in which the arrangement of the warps is the same as in the weaves heretofore described with the exception that certain of the warps a and c in the form illustrated are placed under greater tension than the warps b and d, preferably the warps b and d being under about one-half of the tension applied to the warps a and c. The tension of thewarps a and c is determined by the weaver and may be slightly in excess of that usually used upon all of the warps in normal weaves of pile fabrics, and I have found that with the alternate warps being about one-half the tension of the warps a and c, that when the warps a and c are shedded up, the pile yarn inserted and the shot of filler placed in position, with the slack warps under the shot of ller passing through the pile loops, this filler will be low in the fabric. Upon the next shedding of the warps, the loose warps are up, the taut warps down, the filler is placed in between these warps and beat up into engagement with the pile yarn above its base, and also forming a backing against which the next succeeding row of pile yarn loops is-positioned, thereby in eifect locking the piley loops in In operation the loom is simple and will be yunderstood as designed for continuous operation as long as materials are supplied to it, with the warps being supplied from beams, usually two or' more in number mounted on the rear of the frame 28, in the .usual manner, preferably with vthe warps a and c being carried by one beam.
and the warps b and d by another, and in the case of fabric illustrated in Figure 13 this ar rangement of the warp beams is necessary in order that different tension be applied to different sets of warps. The warps pass through the heddles 82 and 88, and are grouped as herein above described, while filler yarn is supplied tothe loom and inserted into the warp by means of -the needle 48, this combination -being old and well known in the art, f y
The pile yarns are supplied from a beam usually mounted in the frame portions 22 and 28 with the strands preferably threaded under the snap roller ||2, over the roller |88. around and under the snap roller and over the roller Ill, between the teeth ||1 on the comb I I8, and thence through the guides 84, the strands preferably being divided, alternate 'strands passing behind the bar 83 and threaded forwardly through the eye 85 inthe guides 84.l 84 mounted in the bar` 88 while the other strands are threaded bei tween the bars 82 and 83 and forwardly through the eye 85 in the guides 84, 84 in the front bar 82. In the form shown two strands of ber yarn are simultaneously yinserted in the shed of the loom and the two bars 82 and 83 are shifted in unison during the operation of the loom.:
It will be understood that the operation of all of the parts which co-operate to form the base fabric is continuous, which includes the needle 48 and the beating up mechanism including the reed dents 58, both of which are operated from themain drive shaft 30, while the heddles 62 and 83 are operated from the secondary power shaft 33 in timed relation however with the operation of the needle 48 and beat up mechanism, and that the operation of the pile yarn weaving parts, with which my invention is primarily concerned is timed to work in synchronism with the continuous operation of the base fabric weaving mechanism. I
Assuming that the loom is weaving the oneshot fabric illustrated in Figure l1, and for purposes of Aillustration a complete cycle of operation of these loom parts takes place with each completed function of all of the mechanism, it will be understood that the secondary power shaft 33 makes only one revolution while the main power shaft 38 revolves twice, due to the gear ratio of the gear wheels 3| and 32, and that the needle 48 makes one complete in and out movement with cach revolution of the main shaft 30. As the needle 48 is withdrawn from the Warp, the cam |33 functions through the roller 3|, lever |28, rod |28 and connections to the bars 82 and 83 to move these bars 82 and 83 and pile yarn guides 84 laterally to a position directly above the spaces between the fingers 1|, 1|. Simultaneously with this operation, and Yas the needle leaves the shedded warp a beat up stroke-is made beating up the shot of ller gg left by the needle 48 and the warps are shedded. As the warps are shedded.
the roller |82 is starting to ascend in one of the high sides of the cam 81 and through its connections to the frames 18 and 11 these frames descend bringing the pile guides 84, 84 between the fingers 1| 1| carrying thek pile yarns with them over the tops of the ngers 1l. 1| and forming loops therev over, because the pile yarns are always anchored in the fabric onv the opposite sides of the fingers 1|, 1| between which the guides 84, 84 descend due to the previous shifting of these guides.
v'I'he guides 84, 84 descend into the shed of the loom below the path of travel of the needle 48. and dwell lthere momentarily while'the roller |82v remains on one of the low surfaces of the cam 81. VDuring this dwell the needle 48 makes an in and outmovement, placing a shot of filler in between the shedded warps and into the v-shapcd space formed by the guides 84, 84 and pile yarns extending below the lingers 1|, 1|, the shot oi' filler being in front of the guides 84, 84 and behind the strands of pile yarns. As the needle 48 is withdrawn the roller |82 runs onto one of the highk sides of the cam 81, forcing the frames 'I8 and 11 upward with the guides 84. 84 out'of the shed of the loom. As the guides 84, 84 ascend, the pile yarns are drawn around the under side of the filler yg, which is drawn up snugly against the under side ofthe ngers 1| 1| while the pile yarns are also drawn snugly over the fingers 1 I, 1|
guides 84, 84. As the guides 84, 84 ascend, the
beat up mechanism again functions, the filling including the pile loops are beat up against the fabric previously woven, and against the usual tension of the warp, and because of the frictional engagement of the loops of pile yarns around the fingers 1|, 1| a fairly solid background of fabric is produced against whichthe beat up operation takes place, thus enabling a much tighter woven fabric to be produced than what has been possible heretofore. Each pile yarn thus is' beat up onitseif at its front and rear at the base. with pressure by the Warps on each side as herein above described, so the pile yarn is very firmly anchored in the base of the fabric, although the weave is a simple one.
While the beat up operation is taking place, the warp ls'shedded by the heddles, the rod |28 ls pulled downward, andvthrough the bell crank |21 and its connections to the bars 82 and 88, these frames 18 and 11 ascend, and these operations combine with the bars 82 and 83 shogging the pile yarns over the lingers 1 I, V1| with each operation of the frames 18 and 11. In each complete cycle of operation with the functioning of all of the elements two shots of filling are placed in the fabric, and two rows of pile loops are formed on the fingers r1|, 1|, the main drive shaft 88 re.
volves twice 'and the secondary power shaft 88 revolves once. l
- In weaving the fabric illustrated in FigureslZ and 13, thesegment |81is secured to the cam 81 over one of the low surfaces so this cam 81 is andere converted into a cam having only one low surface extending approximately one fourth of the distance of the periphery of this cam. The key |31 is removed from cam |35 and the bolt |45 tightened so the gear wheel |44 is in fixed engagement with the shaft |40. These changes in the cam 91 result in the guides 84, 84 making only one descent into the shed oi.' thev loom with each rotation of the secondary power shaft 33, and because only one descent is made, the bars 82 and 83 are shifted onlyA once, thereby shogging the pile yarns just prior to such descent, so only alternate shots of filling have pile loops placed around them, the shots of filling not through the pile loops forming binders for the bases of the pile loops. The weaving for each of thefabrics illustrated in Figures 12 and 13 are the same in each instance, the difference in the level of the filler in the weaves being produced by less tension on one set of warps than on the other as heretofore explained.
In the weaves illustrated in Figures 11, 12 and 13 as the base fabric is woven, and pile yarns are interwoven therewith simultaneously with the weaving of the base fabric, the pile yarn strands are shogged back and forth on the fingers and then carried into the warp by the guides 84, 84 on alternate sides of the fingers 1I, 1| where the pile yarns are interwoven with the warp and filler into a series of loops over the ngers 'll which are successively formed and as the beat up operations combine and the fabric is formed the loops are forced along the fingers towards the ends thereof until they reach the knives where they are severed through their tops thus producing the usual pile on fabrics of this type and'kind. The fingers'll are in effect interwoven in the fabric with the pile loops being in engagement therewith at their tops and sides while the ller is in frictlonal engagement with the underside of these ngers thus providing a background against which subsequent formations of the fabric are beat up. The pile yarns are in continuous strands in the fabric after it is woven until severed by the knives in the fingers 'Il and is therefore under control until firmly woven in the fabric thus producing a tight weave. If loop pile is desired, then the knives are omitted from the fingers 1|. 1| and the loops formed on these fingers pass over the ends without being severed.
It is to be understood that this application is not to be limited by the exact embodiments of the device shown. which are merely by way of illustration and not limitation as various and other forms of the device will, of course, be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the claims.
I claim:
1. In combination with a loom, a plurality of spaced fingers extending warpwise of the loom, a pair of frames vertically movable on the said loom, a pile'thread guide bar slidably mounted on said frames, pile thread guides in said bar, means whereby the said pile thread guides are shogged to various positions over the said fingers and means whereby the said frames are moved in vertical planes thereby carrying the pile thread guides into the shed of the loom.
2. In combination with a loom, a plurality of spaced fingers extending warpwise of the loom and in fixed relation therewith, vertically reciprocating frames on said loom, a pile thread guide bar slidably mounted on said frames, pile thread guides mounted in said guide bar, means operated by the power mechanism of the loom whereby the said bars 'are shifted laterally on' said frames.
and means whereby the pile'thread guides are moved into and out of the shed of the loom at predetermined times 3. In combination with a loom having a reciprocating needle for insertion of the filler yarn as the fabric is woven, a plurality of spaced fingers mounted at one of their ends on said loom and free attheir lother ends substantially spanning the space between the loom heddles and the cloth rest on the loom. a pair of vertically movable frames, a pile thread guide bar on said frames laterally movable thereon, spaced pile thread guides in said bar, means connected with the 'power mechanism of the loom whereby the guides are moved laterally on said frames at predetermined times, and means whereby the pile thread guides are moved into and out of the shed of the loom in synchronism with the operation of the ller yarn insertion needle.
4. In combination with a loom having a reciprocating needle for insertion of the filler yarn as the fabric is woven, a plurality of spaced fingers mounted at one of their ends on said loom and free at their other ends substantially spanning the space between the loom heddles and the cloth rest on the loom, a pair of vertically mov able frames, a pile thread guide bar on said frames laterally movable thereon. spaced pile thread guides in said bar, a rotating cam on the power shaft of the loom, and connections from said cam to said pile yarn guide bar whereby the said pile yarn guide bar is shogged over the said fingers, a second cam on the power shaft of the loom, connections therefrom to the said movable frames whereby the pile thread guides are moved into and out of the shed of the loom, both shogging operation and' movement of the guides into the shed of the loom being in timed relation with the operation of the ller yarn inserting needle.
5. In combination with a loom having a reciprocating needle for the insertion of 1111er yarn as the fabric is woven, a plurality of spaced fingers mounted at one of their ends and free at the other extending parallel with the warp threads, a pair of movable frames, pile thread guide bars slidably mounted on the forward end of the said frames, pile thready guides mounted in the said bars, a plurality of rotating cams actuated by the power shaft of the loom, connecting means from one of said cams to the said frames whereby the said pile yarn guides are moved into and out of the shed of the loom, and connections from 'the other of said cams to the pile yarn guide bars whereby the said guide bars are slidably moved on the said frames, both of these latter operations being performed in synchronism with the operation of the reciprocating needle.
6. In combination with a loom having a recip-y rocating needle for the insertion of filler yarn as the fabric is woven, a, plurality of spaced fingers mounted at one of their ends and free at the other extending parallel with the warp threads, a pair of movable frames, pile thread guide bars slidably mounted on the forward end of the said frames, pile thread guides mounted in the said bars, a plurality of rotating cams actuated by the power shaft of the loom, connecting means from one the said guide bars are slidably moved on the y said frames", both of these latter operations being performed in synchronism with the operation of the reciprocating needle, and means whereby the operation of the cams can be changed to alter the timing of the shogging of the pile yarn guides and their descent and ascent into the shed of the loom.
7. In combination with a loom having means for the insertion of filler yarn during the `Weaving process, a plurality of fillerwise spaced iingers mounted on the loom at one of their ends and free at their other ends extending parallel with the warp, vertically movable frames on said loom, a plurality of pile yarn guide bars mounted for sliding fillerwise movement in said frames pile yarn guides in said bars, a rotating cam on a power shaft of said loom, a lever operated by said cam, a bell crank, connections from the bell crank to the pile yarn guide bars, a rod connecting the lever with said bell crank whereby the pile yarn guidesare shogged over the said fingers, a second rotating cam on a power shaft of the loom, and operating connections actuated by said second cam whereby the'pile yarn guides are moved into and out of the shed of the loom at pre-determined times.
8. In combination with a loom having means for the insertion of filler yarn during the weaving process, a plurality of fillerwise spaced ilngers mounted on the loom at one of their ends and free at their other ends extending parallel with the warp, vertically movable frames on said loom, a plurality of pile yarn guide bars mounted for sliding f'lllerwise movement on said frames pile yarn guides in said bars, a rotating cam on a power shaft of said loom, a lever operated by said cam, a bell crank, connections from the bell crank to the pile yarn guide bars, a rod connecting the lever with said bell crank whereby the pile yarn guides are shogged over the said lingers, a second rotating cam on a powershaft of the loom, and operating connections actuated by said second cam whereby the pile yarn guides are moved into the shed of the loom in advance of the travel of the ller yarn inserting means and withdrawn from the shed of the loom after the ller inserting means has passed out of the warp whereby the ller yarn is looped around the ller yarn.
9. In combination with a loom having a ller yarn inserting needle operable therewith, a plurality of spaced fingers extending warpwise of the loom mounted on the loom at one of the ends, a pair of vertically oscillating frames on said loom, pile yarn guide bars slidably mounted on said frames at their forward ends, pile thread guides in spaced relation with each other and with respect to the said ngers in said guide bars, a cam on a power shaft of the said loom, operating connections from said cam to the said frames whereby the pile yarn guides are caused to travel into and out of the shed of the loom at pre-determined times, a second cam on a power shaft of the loom, connections between this second cam and the suide bars whereby the pile yarn suides are moved illlerwise on said frames. the nllerwise movement of the pileyarn guides being prior to their descent into the shed of the loom and the descent ot the Dile yarn guides being before the operation of the iiller inserting needle and retained in the shed during the travel of the needle into and out of the shedded warp, whereby the pile yarn is woven into a series of loops around the said fingers and the illler yarn.
10. In combination with a, loom a pile yarn mechanism comprising a pair of vertically movable frames, pile yarn guide bars siidabie llerwise on the forward ends of the said frames pile yarn guides in spaced relation with each other in the said bars, ngers on the said loom extending parallel with the warps in spaced relation with each other, the spacing of the ngersand the spacing of the pile yarn guides being the same, operating connections with the power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile yarn guides are shogged over the lingers at pre-determined times, and operating connections with the power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile l yarn guides arey intermittently forced into and out of the shed of the loom at pre-determined times, the shogging of the guides always preceding the descent of the pile yarn guides, and the descent and ascent of each pile yarn guide being in the same plane.
1l. In combination with a loom a pile yarn inserting mechanism comprising a pair of vertically movable frames, pile yarn guide bars slidable fillerwise on the forward ends of the said frames pile yarn guides in spaced relation with each other in the said bars, fingers on the said loom extending parallel with the warps in spaced relationl with each other, the spacing of the ngers and the spacing of the pile yarn guides being the same, operating connections with the power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile yarn guides are shogged over the lingers at pre-determined times, and operating connections with theI power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile yarn guides are intermittently forced into and out of the shed of the loom at pre-determined times, the shcgging of the guides always preceding the descent of the pile lyarn guides, and the descent and ascent of the pile yarn guides being in the same plane.
each succeeding descent andiasoent of the guides being in dierent planes. y
12. In combination with a loom a .pile yarn inserting mechanism comprising a pair of vertically movable frames, pile yarn guide bars slidable iillerwise on the forward ends oi' the said frames pile yarn guides in spaced relation with each other in the said bars, ngers on the said loom extending parallel with the warps in spaced relation with eachother, knives in said fingers. the spacing of the fingers and the spacing of the pile yarn guides being the same, operating connections with the power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile yam guides are shogged over the lingers at pre-determined times, and operating connections with the power mechanism of the loom whereby the pile yarn guides are intermittently forced into and out of the shed of the loom at pre-determined times, the shogging of the guides always preceding the descent of the pile yarn guides, and the descent and ascent of the pile yarn guides being in the same plane.
' EUGENE F. CLARK.
CES CITED The following references are of record in the ille of this patent:
, UNITED STATES PATENTS Number
US660573A 1946-04-08 1946-04-08 Loom for weaving pile fabric Expired - Lifetime US2437379A (en)

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US2745442A (en) * 1955-08-30 1956-05-15 Firth Carpet Company Inc Three-shot axminster weave
US2896670A (en) * 1958-03-27 1959-07-28 Mohasco Ind Inc Apparatus for making pile fabric
US3027919A (en) * 1956-11-05 1962-04-03 Firth Carpet Company Inc One-shot modified axminster weave
US3160176A (en) * 1963-01-25 1964-12-08 Bigelow Sanford Inc Process for making axminster type carpet
US20080083472A1 (en) * 2006-10-06 2008-04-10 Groz-Beckert Kg Shaft transmission for a weaving machine

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US762526A (en) * 1903-05-21 1904-06-14 Hartley Loop Weave Company Loom for weaving pile fabric.
US762584A (en) * 1903-08-20 1904-06-14 Hartley Loop Weave Company Flexible looper for doup-weaving.
US791678A (en) * 1904-05-11 1905-06-06 John F Dustin Pile-fabric loom.
US1054969A (en) * 1910-04-22 1913-03-04 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Spreader for pile-fabric looms.
US2043165A (en) * 1933-09-02 1936-06-02 Thermoid Rubber Company Doup heddle loom
US2318499A (en) * 1941-04-17 1943-05-04 Collins & Aikman Corp Loop pile fabric
US2355789A (en) * 1941-12-30 1944-08-15 Benjamin S Faber Method of making fabric

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2718243A (en) * 1955-02-21 1955-09-20 Firth Carpet Company Inc Two-shot modified axminster weave
US2745442A (en) * 1955-08-30 1956-05-15 Firth Carpet Company Inc Three-shot axminster weave
US3027919A (en) * 1956-11-05 1962-04-03 Firth Carpet Company Inc One-shot modified axminster weave
US2896670A (en) * 1958-03-27 1959-07-28 Mohasco Ind Inc Apparatus for making pile fabric
US3160176A (en) * 1963-01-25 1964-12-08 Bigelow Sanford Inc Process for making axminster type carpet
US20080083472A1 (en) * 2006-10-06 2008-04-10 Groz-Beckert Kg Shaft transmission for a weaving machine
US7594522B2 (en) * 2006-10-06 2009-09-29 Groz-Beckert Kg Shaft transmission for a weaving machine

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