US2437378A - Method of and apparatus for weaving - Google Patents

Method of and apparatus for weaving Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2437378A
US2437378A US566853A US56685344A US2437378A US 2437378 A US2437378 A US 2437378A US 566853 A US566853 A US 566853A US 56685344 A US56685344 A US 56685344A US 2437378 A US2437378 A US 2437378A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
pile
loom
fingers
guides
warp
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US566853A
Inventor
Eugene F Clark
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
MARSHALL FIELD AND Co
Original Assignee
MARSHALL FIELD AND Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by MARSHALL FIELD AND Co filed Critical MARSHALL FIELD AND Co
Priority to US566853A priority Critical patent/US2437378A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2437378A publication Critical patent/US2437378A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D27/00Woven pile fabrics
    • D03D27/02Woven pile fabrics wherein the pile is formed by warp or weft
    • D03D27/06Warp pile fabrics

Description

8. E. F. CLARK 2,437,378
METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WEAVING Filed Dec. e, 1944 v sheets-sheet 1 jfl/5 M d? March 9, 1948. E. F. CLARK METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WEAVING Filed Dec. 6, 1944 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 9v, 1948. E. F. CLARK METHOD oF AND APPARATUS Fon wEAvING '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 6, 1944 NNN March 9, 1948. E. F. CLARK 2,437,378
METHOD 0F AND APPARATUS FOR WEAVING Filed Dec. e, 1944 7 sheets-sheet 4 9 HH" m46 k @merg/w.'
March 9, 1948. E, F, CLARK ETHOD 0F AND APPARATUS FOR WEAVING Filed Dec. 6, 1944 '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 .Mmh 9, l948 A E. F. CLARK 2,437,378
mamon oF Arm APPARATUS Fon wEAvIuG 'A Filed Dec. e, 1944 '7 sheets-sheet e 2 fa/e2@ r.' Y Zz-@992261. Zar/;
9, 1948. E, F, CLARK 2,437,378
HETHOD 0F AND APPARATUS FOR WEAVING Filed Dec. 6, 1944 7 sheets-sheet '7 Patented Mar. 9, 1948 METHOD F AND APPARATUS FOB WEAVING Eugene F. Clark, Damariscotta, Maine, assignor to Marshall Field and Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application December s,`1s44, semi Ne. scossa (c1. 13s-4s) 1 44 Claims.
My invention relates to an improved method of and apparatus for weaving, preferably for the weaving of heavy pile fabrics used for rugs and carpets and the'like, as well as draperies, and tapestries, and may also be used for terry cloth used in the manufacture of bath towels, bath mats, and the like.
The primary object of'my invention is the provision of mechanism incorporated in a loom for the weaving of pile into fabrics independently of any of the apparatus for the Weaving of the fabric base in a continuous process, with the warp taken from warp beams in the usual manner with filling threads woven with the warp threads to form the backing, while the pile is formed from continuous strands of yarn taken from a beam, spools, banks or creels and woven into the fabric initially in the form of loop pile, formed by means of guides which thread the yarn back and forth overfingers which extend warpwise of the loom in front of the harnesses and between the fingers into the shed of the loom where the filler threads are inserted through the open warp and -loops andbeat up into fabric.
I am aware that in the art of weaving, fingers or wires extending warpwise of the loom in combination with doup heddles or harness have been employed for the weaving of certain kinds of fabrics, usually lightweight, as compared with carpets, and in which wires, fingers or gauges are used which usually extend through the harness, which confines the use of looms of this type to very narrow limits, usually to 'open fabrics or loosely Woven fabrics. Also, for the weaving of heavy fabrics, wires or guides extending fillerwise of the loom have been employed, but both of these types are objectionable because of the diiculty of handling doup needles and the insertion and removal of the fillerwise guides, In my improved loom I am able to weave heavy and close woven pile fabric very rapidly and very accurately with varying kinds and types of pile yarn and in which the pile yarn is accurately and firmly woven into the base fabric and in such nearly perfect condition that it requires very little hurling and very little trimming, so that ya saving in time and labor is secured as well as a substantial saving in material, which is not true with respect to some of the other forms of weaving.
Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom having spaced lingers extending parallelwith the warp, mounted in front of the harness and independent in operation therefrom, over which strands of pile yarn are of the fingers, if loops are desired, and severed through the crown of the loops by knives mounted along the upper sides of the fingers adjacent the 4 ends to form the usual pile, with from three to five loops normally being on the fingers at all times to form a backing against which the suc.
ceeding loops are beat, thereby providing a heavier pile more closely woven and evenly formed than is pOssible heretofore.
Another and further object of myy invention is the provision of a loom in which any and all kinds of materials such as wool, worsted, cotton, jute, rayon, and nylon yarn and combinations thereof may be used, with particular emphasis placed upon cotton yarn, which is especially difficult to weave properly into pile fabric, and in which plain or al1-over fabrics in color or design andvvarious combinations thereof can be woven or various patterns may' be woven, particularly through the use of spot dyeing now common `with many types of weaving, if desired.
Another and further object of my invention is the provisionA of a loom in which the pile may be fashioned to any height desired or with tight or closely woven pile or loosely Woven if desired with the usual variety of picks or ends, as may be desired, and in which plain back or woven through to the back fabrics may be woven with the placing of shots of filler threads in many combinations, and also for the weaving of various kinds and types of fabric now commonly used in the making of shag rugs and carpets and the like.
Another and further object of my invention is the elimination of waste in the weaving operation in that all of the material is incorporated in the finished pile, whereas in the normal cutv ting .of the pile yarn in the ordinary weaving there is usually a. large amount of waste, all of whichis saved through the use of my improved loom, as there is no waste in the weaving operation.
Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom in which the hurling and finishing operations are materially reduced, in some of the operations as much as one-half.
Anotherand further object of my invention is the provision of the combination of fixed fingers free of the harness, and sets of pile yarn guides. movable iillerwise in combination with raising and lowering means therefor, all of which is independent and free of all other operating parts ot the loom but operate in synchronism therewith for the weaving of the pile into the fabric, l
the sets of guides being shifted together if desired or independently in opposite directions for the production of various kinds of pile, color combinations of pile, and various texture effects, thereby retaining control of the strands oi Pile yarnat all times.
Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom for the making of pile fabrics in which the strand of yarn forming the pile is retained under control and under such tension as may be desirable at all times, until it becomes an integral part of the fabric, and at no time are there any loose or free ends of the pile yarn such as is the case in some of the practices heretofore followed in the weaving of'pile fabrics.
Another and further object of my invention is the provision of pile weaving apparatus which operates independently of the warp handling apparatus of the loom and without regard to the number or spacing of the warps and in which the op.. eration of the loom is very much faster and more accurate than what is possible at the present time.
Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a loom in which double looped pile is woven through the use of two pile yarn guide bars, which, when yarn of contrasting co1- ors is looped together, presents a fabric of unusually attractive appearance and in which exceeding coarse pile yarn may also be used, thus increasing the speed of Weaving and producing a tight, heavy pile having long wearing qualities.
These and other objects of my invention will be more fully and better understood by reference to the accompanying sheets of drawings, and in which- Figure 1 is a side elevation of a loom embodying my invention, the side of the machine illustrated being on the right side of the operator of the loom.
Figure 2 is a side elevational view of the opposite side of the loom.
Figure 3 is a plan sectional view on lines 3-3 oi' Figure 1 with some of the pile inserting guides and fingers being omitted and showing the pile guide bar shifting means Figure 4 is a detail side elevational view of the pile Weaving mechanism showing the upper position of the pile yarn insertion guides and showing two pile yarn guide bars with pile yarn guides, one in dotted position.
Figure 5 is a detail side elevational view of the pile weaving mechanism showing two pile yarn guide bars, the front guide being in dotted position. with the guides extending into the shed of the loom.
Figure 6 is a perspective view of one of the pile forming fingers for loop pile.
Figure '1 is a perspective view of a finger used in forming and cutting the loops of the pile.
Figure 8 is a top plan view of a portion of the guide bar shifting means which is arranged to shift the guide bars in opposite directions.
Figure 9 is a diagrammatic expanded perspective view showing two pile guide bars with front and rear guides for the weaving of double or crossed loop pile.
Figure 10 is a bottom plan view on a reduced scale of the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 9.
Figure 11 is a diagrammatic expanded view similar to Fig. 9 with the pile guide bars shifted to a position opposite to that shown in Fig. 9.
Figure 12 is a bottom plan view in a reduced scale of the apparatus in the position shown in Fig. 11.
Figure 13 is an expanded diagrammatic view of one of the fabrics produced with a single set of pile insertion guides; and
Figure 14 is an expanded diagrammatic view of one of the fabrics produced with the multiple set of pile guides.
Figure 15 is a vertical sectional view of a piece of fabric produced by my improved loom.
AReferring specifically to the drawings and in which like reference characters refer to like parts throughout, a main frame I0 is shown generally rectangular in shape upon which all of the operating parts are mounted for weaving purposes. The loom as ilustrated is adapted to produce a pile securely Woven into a base fabric and it is the Weaving of the pile with which my invention has particular reference, with the apparatus for weaving the base fabric being old in the art and forming no part of my present invention.
A motor 9 is mounted on the frame I0 for supplying power for the operation of the loom, having any form of power transmitting means to the main drive shaft I I of the loom mounted in the frame I0, such as a belt I2 extending over a pulley I3 on the motor shaft and a pulley I4 on the end of the main drive shaft II,
The pile fabric base is woven of the usual warp and filler preferably of a series of groups of warp threads usually three in number as illustrated in Figures 13 and 14 such as I5, I6, and I1, with a beam I8 carrying the warp threads I5 and I6, and a beam I9, on arms 20, 2li of the main frame I0, carrying the warp threads I1, although many combinations and variations of weave are possible through the operation of the harness through which all the warp passes. Arm 2l, 2I are provided on the outer end of which is a fixed roll 22 and snap rolls 23 and 24 around which the warp threads I1 pass with an arm 25 which is connected to let-off and take-up mechanism (not shown because this mechanism is well-known in the art and does not form any part of my present invention). An arm 26 is provided from which a weight 21 is suspended which serves to apply tension to the warp yarn I1. Intermediate the ends of the .arms `2 I, 2I is a pair of snap rollers 28 and 29 with an arm 30 being provided from which a weight 3I is suspended by means of which the warp I5 and i6 is kept under tension with an arm 32 leading to the let-off mechanism of the loom. Harnesses 33, 34, and 35 of the usual form are shown and through which the warps I5, I6, and I1 are threaded, which have rods 36, 36 connected thereto which lead to suitable cams on the drive shaft II, commonly used in looms of this character and not shown in the drawing because they form no part of my present invention. A reed or beating means is provided comprising' a box 31, having reed dents 38, 38 mounted thereon with openings therein through which the warps I5, I6, and I1 are threaded. The reed box 31 is operated by rocker arms 31a, 31a mounted on a shaft 39 in brackets on the frame II) in the usual manner and operated by a lever 40 connected with a cam on the drive shaft I I through proper linkage, all of which is common in loom construction. y
At one side (Figure 1) of the loom is a frame 4I upon which a needle track 42 is mounted by means of angles 43 with a needle carriage 44 slidably mounted on the track 42 with a needle 45 being securedat its rear end to the needle carriage 44 and passing through a fixed guide 46 mounted on the track 42 with the usual operating mechanism for passing the needle 45 llerwise of the loom for the insertion `of the ller threads between the warps or "making the shot" as it is known in this particular kind of weaving. A breast beam 41 is provided transversely of the frame I8 at the front thereof with brackets 48, 48 being provided to which a breast plate 49 is fastened for the support of the fabric after it has been woven. The apparatus thus far described has long been in use and is well known and understood in the art, and if desired will function to weave complete fabric 'which in eifect is the foundation fabric of carpets, rugs, and the like,
My particular invention has to do with the incorporation of the pile yarn in the fabric during the process of weaving lthe fabric, either the form of loops or cut pile as desired. If cut pile is desired.-l then th'e loops are severed by knives mounted in the ngers o ver which the pile loops are initially formed during the weaving of the fabric. Brackets 58, 58 are secured to the frame l `screws 64, 54 extending through the upper horizontal flange of the Z bars 52, 52 and into engagement with the upper edges of the brackets 68, 58. The nger holding bar 5| is mounted upon horizontal flanges 55, 55 of the Z bars 52, 52 at the lower sides thereof and forward of and entirely free of harnesses 33, 34, and 35, and has a plurality of spaced ngers 56, 56 mounted therein and extending forward therefrom with their free ends terminating over the breast plate 48.
The fingers 56, 56 at their rear ends, have recesses 59, 59 therein and are tted over arib 68 formed in the bar 5I and are spaced from each other by being seated in slots formed in the forward edge of the bar 5I with a cap 6| extending across the top of the bar 5I and secured thereto by means of screws 58, 58. The bar and finger assembly is held in position on the Z bar brackets 52, 52 by means of cap screws 62, 62.
The ngers 56, 56 are of two kinds as illustrated in detail in Figures 6 and '7 of the drawings. Fingers 56, 56 having tapered ends are used for the weaving of fabrics with loop pile. When it is desired to produce fabric having the usual cut pile, fingers 63 are used, each of these ngers 63 each having its free end slotted and a. knife 64 inserted therein, which severs the loops as they are pushed into engagement with the knives 64, 64 during the weaving of the fabric.
A pile yarn beam 65 is mounted on the top of the loom frame by brackets 66, 66 with a gear wheel 61 on the beam shaft in engagement with a worm 68 on a shaft 69 leading to the let-of! and take-up mechanism theretofore' referred to as being common to all looms of this character. The pile yarn 18 passes over a snap roller 12, a xed roller 13 mounted in brackets A14, l14 secured to the frame I8, while a roller 15 pivotally mounted in arms 16, 16 applies tension to the yarn 18 by means of an arm 11 having a weight 18 thereon, with another arm 19 leading to the take-up and let-0E mechanism. The yarn 18 is passed through an open reed 88 which acts as a 6 spacing means for the yarn and into the pile insertion guides presently described.
Brackets 8| and 82 are secured to the frame I8 on each side thereof, upon which a rocker member assembly is mounted comprising a shaft 83 having arms 84 and 85 adjacent each end thereof and extending radially therefrom, upon which arms 84 and 85 the guide bar members or frames 86 and 81 are pivotally mounted for lateral movement by means of bolts 88, 88 which pass through the guide bar members 86 and 81 intermediate their ends.-
The front lower portions of these guide bar members 86 and 81 are generally rectangular in shape, extend outward towards the front of the loom and have guide bars 89 and 89a mounted therein in side by side relation with spacers 89h therebetween and iixed to the members 86 and 81 by means of studs'89c and 89d. each of which is fixed in one of the guide bar members 89 and 89a and extends through an elongated opening in the other bar so these bars 89 and 89a are movable relative kto each other and slide on the spacers y89h through which each of the studs 89e and 89d extend. For example, the stud 88e may be xed in the bar 89 and extend rearwardly through a hole 'in the guide bar member 86 and forwardly through the spacer 89h and through an elongated opening in the guide bar 89a. with anut loosely positioned on the forward end of the stud 89o so that the guide bar 89 will be moved latterly by the guide bar member 86, and the stud 89o will slide in the elongated opening inthe guide bar 89a. At the opposite end of the 'guide bars se and ssa the stud ssa win be fixed in the guide bar 89a and extend through an elongated opening in the bar 89 and be secured to the guide bar member 81. This particular arrangement may be reversed if desired, but in any event the movement of the guide bars 83 and 69a. is independent of each other and actuatedby the guide bar members 86 and 81 llerwise of the loom.
A plurality of spaced guides 98, 98 are mounted in the guide bar 89 by screws 9|, 9l` each of these guides 98, 98 having eyelets 92, 92 therein adjacent to the ends thereof through which the strands of the pile yarn 18 are threaded. A plurality of guides 98a also having eyelets therein are mounted in the guide bar 89a by means of screws 9 I a, the guides 98a being normally in warpwise alignment with the guides 98 and are slightly shorter than the guides 98, 98 and have additional pile threads 18a threaded therethrough,
which may come from the pile beam 65 or from any other suitable source of supply and pass between the guide bar members 89 and 89a to the rear of the guides 98a and are threaded forwardly therethrough. The guides 98, 98 are spaced in relation to the fingers 56, 56 and are adapted to pass between the lingers 56. 56 in front of the reeds 38, 38, and carry the pile yarn 10 below the iingers 56, 56 and into the shed of the loom, so that the needle 46 passes through the loops of pile yarn 18 thus formed and positions double ller threads 93. 93 between the warp threads and over the strands of pile yarn 18 (Figure 5), below the ilngers 56 when loops 94 of a single strand are desired. If desired, the additional guides 98a are used with the pile yarn 18a threaded therethrough, thereby producing double loops if the guides 98 and 98a are shifted in the same direction, and crossed pile loops, if the guide bars 89 and 89a are shifted in opposite directions in relation to each other. as will be hereinafter described.
Extending transversely across the front of the loom and mounted in brackets 95, 95 is a roller 98 around which the strands of pile yarn 10 and 10a (if two strands of pile yarn are used) pass with a second roller 91 being provided in links 98, 98, which in turn lead to brackets 98, 99 on the frames 85 and 81 and within which a roller is mounted. Studs |0I, 0| having inturned ends are mounted in the frames 88 and 81 and have springs |02, |02 secured to said inturned end portions which are anchored at one end on the studs |0I, |0| and at the other end are connected to the links 98, 98 so that the strands of pile yarn are kept under tension at, all times and all slack is kept out of the yarn during the operation of the guides 90, 90 in handling the pile yarn during the weaving operation.
The lower portions of the members 88 and 81 have arm portions |03 and |04 which extend rearwardly from the bolts 88, 88 and have cross rods and |06 secured thereto adjacent the rear ends thereof, these rods |85 and |06 being pivotally connected to a Z-shaped link |01 which is pivotally mounted on a pin |08 which projects upward from the rocker shaft 83 centrally thereof. A lug |09 extends upward from the rocker shaft 83 adjacent one end thereof, and has a guideway I0 therein, within which the rear end of the member |03 extends and moves during the lateral movement of the members 86 and 81. The lug 09 has an ear thereon, to which a spring ||2 is attached which is connected to an ear ||3 at the side of the Z member |01, the force -of the spring ||2 being exerted upon the Z member |01 to normally turn the Z member |01 in a clockwise direction, when considering Figure 3 of the drawing. A lug ||4 is provided adjacent the opposite end of the rocker shaft 83 with a guideway ||5 therein for the rear end of the member |04, the lugs |09 and H5 forming supports also for the rear ends of the members |03 and |04 and assisting with the bolts 88, 88 in supporting the members 86 and 81.
A cross-rod ||6 slidably mounted ln a lug ||1 rearwardly extending from the rocker shaft 83 is connected to the rear projecting portion of the Z member |01 and has an arm I I8 thereon which is engaged by a pivotally mounted vertical lever |I9 mounted upon an axle |20- in a bracket |2| which is secured to the frame |0 of the machine in any approved manner. The lever ||9 has a roller |22 on the lower end thereof in engagement with a face cam |23 formed integrally with a gear wheel |24 and which in turn meshes with a second gear wheel |25 on the main drive shaft of the loom.
During the operation of the looml thelever ||9 is oscillated by the roller |22 in engagement with the cam |23 which has high cam face |23a and a low cam face |23b causing the upper end of the lever ||9 to move in a counter-clockwise direction when considered from the standpoint of the operator in front of the loom which, in turn, moves the Z member |01 about its pivot point against the force of the spring ||2 and through the arms |05 and |06, shifts the members 86 and 81 in proper alignment to insert the guides 90, 60 alternately on each side of the fingers 56, 56 each guide being alternately shifted to each side of its co-operating nger so as to form single loops 94, 94 in the fabric from the pile yarn 10. When desired to weave pile fabrics with double loops, the guide bar 89a has the 8 guides a fitted therein and additional strands 10a of pile yarn are provided from any suitable source of supply, with the members 88 and 81 and guide bars 88 and 89a operating together in a unit movement, thereby icrming double loops ln the fabric with the filler 88 being inserted through both loops instead of only one when a singlev set of guides is used.
A horizontal lever |26 is pivotally mounted to the frame I0 of the loom at its rear end by means of a bolt |21 and has a spring |28 connected thereto which is attached to a lug |29 on the frame I0 of the loom, the opposite end of this spring |28 being secured to the lever |28 by a pin |30. A roller |3I is mounted upon the lever |26 near the free end thereof, which engages a cam wheel |32, this wheel having a high cam surface |33 and a low cam surface |34 thereon, with the cam wheel being mounted upon and rotating with the main shaft of the loom, and which as the cam |32 rotates, due to the action of the spring |28 imparts an up and down movement to the free end of the lever |26.
A rod |35 is attached to the free end of the lever |26, extends upwardly therefrom and is connected to the arm fixed to the rocker shaft 83 'so that during the operation of the loom at predetermined times the members 86 and 81 are oscillated vertically by the cam wheel |32 and moved downward so the guides 90, carry pile thread down into the open warp between and below the fingers 56, 56 and remain momentarily in this position while a shot of filling is placed into the open warp and above the pile threads 10 by the operation of the needle 45.
The operation of the cam wheel |32 is, of course, in timed relation to the operation of other parts of the loom, and particularly with relation to the cam |23 which shifts the members 86 and 81 laterally during the operation of the loom, until the guides 90, 90 are in alignment with the spaces between the fingers 56, 56 before the guides 90, 90 descend, .as well as the guides 90a when they are used for the weaving of double loop pile.
Attached tothe breastplate 49 is a .pair of brackets |31 and |38 which are Z shaped with an elongated portion thereof fitted in face-to-face relation upon the bracket 48 which supports the breastplate 49. The brackets |31 and |38 have blocks |39, |39 mounted therein, ln which a shaft |40 is journaled, the blocks |39, |39 being secured in vertical position by bolts |4|, |4| engaged with blocks |39, |39 while other bolts |42, |42 extend horizontally through the brackets |31 and |38 and into the blocks |39, |38 to secure blocks |39, |39 to the brackets |38, |38. The shaft |40 has a plurality of guide discs |43 thereon, being spaced apart to receive the fingers 56, 56 and the loops 94, 94 thereby forming guides for the fingers 56, 5B with each disc |43 passing between the rows of loops 94, 94 formed in the fabric as it is woven, thereby serving to keep the iingers 56, 56 in proper alignment and also holding the fabric firmly on the breastplate 49. It is necessary to appli7 some tension to the pile yarn in order that the loops be formed regularly and snugly around the fingers 56 so there ls a pulling force exerted on the fabric and the fingers inan upward direction by the pile yarns 10 and 10a so the guide discs |43 serve to hold the fabric firm, and being adjustable vertically the discs |43 can be separated the proper distance by spacers |44 so the periphery of the discs |43 can engage the base of the fabric if necessary, or adjusted deep or shallow in the fabric to pro- Manara 9 duce the proper friction at the sides of the loops u', u to guide the angers and hold the fabric in position during the weaving thereof.
The usual take-up roller |45 is provided at the l front of the loom over which the fabric passes, a second roller |48 being provided, these two rollers being standard parts of the usual loom and Y are connected with the iet-offend take-up mechanism of the -loom not shown, so that the woven fabric'after being loomed, and the warp threads prior to being loomed, are kept under constant predetermined tension.
Another method of operation of the loom is illustrated in Figs. 8 to 12 inclusive of the drawings and which show the weaving of a fabric with crossed loopy pile which is a particularly eifective weave in appearance when pile yarns 10 and 10a of different colors are used, and which may also be used if cut pile is desired. When the loom is operated to produce the crossed loop fabric, the rod |06 is removed from the connection to the forward end o1' the Z bar |01 and attached to a stud I 41 extending upward from the Z member I 01 on the opposite side of the pivot point |08 of the Z member I 01. As the loom operates and the roller |22 on the lever |I9 is in engagement with the high cam surface I 23a on the cam I 23, a pull is exerted on the rod II6, thereby moving the Z member I 01 about its pivot point in a counter-clockwise direction. A thrust force is exerted on each of the rods and |06 which moves the member 86 about its pivot point 88 in a clockwise direction, thereby moving the guide bar 89 carrying the guides 90, 90 to the position shown in Figs. 9 and 10 of the drawings and moving the member 81 in La counter-clockwise direction, which shifts the guide bar 89a in a direction opposite to the movement of the guide bar 89, also as shown in Figs. 9 and 10 of the drawings. The guide bars 89 and 89a are each fixed only to one of the guide bar members 86 and 81 by the studs 89e and 89d as heretofore described .and are individu-ally actuated only as the guide bar members 86 and 81 .are moved and therefore are shifted independently of each other, in opposite directions for the weaving of crossed pile fabric, and in the same direction for the weaving of either single or double pile fabric. 'I'his shifting of the guide bars 89 and 89a crosses the pile yarns 10 and 10a in which position the guides 90 and 90a carry the pile yarns 10 and 10a into the shed of the loom, where the needle 45 places the two strands of filler through the loops thus formed over the fingers 56 at the bottoms thereof and under the lingers 56, 56. After the guides 90 and 90a are withdrawn from the shed of the loom, the reeds 38 beat up the filler and the loops into the fabric. As the roller II9 reaches the low cam surface 23h on the cam I 23, the spring II2 rotates the Z member |01 in a clockwise direction, thereby exerting a pull cn the rods |05 and |06, thereby moving the member 86 in a counter-clockwise direction and the member 81 in a clockwise direction, thereby moving the guide bars 89 and 89a into the position shown in Figs 11 and 12 of the drawings, which causes the guides 90 and 90a to again cross the pile yarns 18 and 10a, in which position the guides 90 and 90a again carry the pile yarns between the fingers 56 into the shed of the warp forming loops over the lingers 56, where the needle 45 again places the strands of filler 93 under the fingers 56 and through the loops thus formed, and as the guides 90 Iand 90a pass upward, the reeds again beat up the filler and loops into the fabric. Be-
- 10 tween the operations Just described, shots of filler are placed in the open shed of the warp which is shedded by the harness in the usual manner.
It will be understood that inthe weaving of the fabric bobbins are used (which are not shown) at the marginal edges of the fabrics so the ller threads are firmly and securely anchored at the marginal edges of the fabric. all of which is common practice in the weaving of fabrics.
Figures 13 and 15 illustrate a preferred form lof fabric woven as a result oi' a method of weaving v known as a three shot cycle, which can be practiced in the loom heretofore described when a single guide bar is used for the insertion of the pile yarn, with the same weave being produced when two guide bars are used, except that two strands of pile yarn are inserted as shown in Figure 14. I prefer to space the warps nllerwise of the loom in groups of three onset flllerwise only very slightly with respect to the warps of eachl group with the spacing of the groups of warps corresponding generally to the spacing of the fingers 56, 66 on the loom, with each group being under or very closely adjacent to the fingers 56, 58 and composed of two stuifer warp threads I5 and I1 and a binder warp I6, Considering the fabric illustrated in Figure I6 as being produced from the right hand side of the drawing towards the left, the warps are open with I5 up and I5 and I1 down, the lier 93 would be placed through the warp and beat up. Because of the fact that both stuiler warps I5 and I1 are taut and below the finer and only the binder warp I6 is above the filler, when this shot of filler is beat up it goes into the base fabric at a higher level than do the next two succeeding shots of 1111er. In the next step the warps I5 and I1 areshedded up and the binder warp I8 down, the pile yarn 10 inserted into the shed by the guides 90, 90 and a shot of filler 99 placed over the strands of pile yarn 10 below the stutter warps I5 and I1 and above the binder warp I6. As the guides 90 descend into the shed, because of the tension on the pile yarn and the fact that the guides 90 have been shogged over the fingers prior to their descent, the pile yarn is looped over the fingers somewhat taut and held in this 'condition until the shot of ller is made and the needle 45 withdrawn from the shed whereupon the guides 90 ascend drawing the shot of filler previously inserted over the pile yarn against the under side of the fingers '56. The filler and the pile loops are thereupon beat up at a low level in the fabric. with the filler 93 through the base of pile loop, and the pile loop beat snugly against the first mentioned shot of iiller. For the next step, the warp I1 is shedded down and the binder warp I5 and stuier warp I6 are floated, whereupon another shot of filler is, placed through the warps, and beat up. When this last mentioned shot 0f filler is beat up against the loops, the loops arr compressed until the strands of yarn composing the loops are together, above the base of the loops, thereby anchoring the pile loop very rmly in the fabricand making its removal very diflicult. For the next step the binder warp I5 is shedded down, stuffer warp I6 is shedded upward, and the stuffer warp I1 is floated, and the cycle of operations repeated as the fabric is woven.
A complete cycle of operation is completed with each revolution of the main shaft I I of the loom.
The operating means for the needle 45 is timed -means for the heddles 33, 34 and 35 is timed to` operate at least one of the heddles after each ller shot is beat up by the lay. y The filler inserting needle operating means and the heddle cams and operating parts are not shown or described, as these operating parts are old and well known standard parts of looms used heretofore in the manufacture of fabrics and well known in the art. The movement of the pile guides 90 into and out of the warp shed and the movement of these guides laterally over the fingers 58, thereby shogging the pile yarn over the nngers 58. is performed and controlled by the operating parts for these pile guides in relation to the operation of the needle 45 as it places the filler into the warp.
The wheel |25 has a gear ratio of 2 to 1 with respect to the gear |24, with the cam surfaces |23a and |23b on this gear |24 being of equal length as shown particularly in Fig, 2. The gear |24 is so positioned on its axis that during each cycle of operation the roller IIS passes from one of these surfaces |23a and |23b to the other, thereby shogging the guides 90 over the fingers 56. Each complete revolution of the cam |23 shogs the guides over the fingers twice. but because of the gear ratio of the gear |24 to the gear |25, only one shogging movement of the guides 96 is made with each complete revolution of the main loom shaft I The high cam surface |33 on the cam |32 ex tends two-thirds of the distance around the periphery of the cam |32, with the low surface |34 extending the other one-third of the distance making up the periphery of this cam |32. As the roller |3| travels on the low surface I 34, the guides 90 are forced down into the warp shed and remain in this position long enough for the needle 45 to place the filler 93 through the warp shed below the warps i5 and Il and above the binder warp I6 and also above the pile yarn strands 10, and as the roller |3| travels up onto the high surface |33 the guides 90 are raised out of the warp shed to the position shown in Fig. 4 of the drawings.` At the beginning of each cycle of operation as herein described, the roller |3| is approximately at the center of the high cam sur face |33 with the guides 90 out of the shed of the loom, and as the roller |3| reaches the low side |34, the guides descend into the shed of the loom where they remain until a shot of lller is inserted into the shed and over the strands of pile `varn, when the guides 90 are raised by the roller |3I, again running into the high position |33 of the cam.
When the single guide bar such as 89 with its set of guides are used, single strands of pile yarn are therefore woven into the fabric with the guides 90 carrying the pile yarn into the warp first on one side of a particular finger and then shifted so the next descent of a guide 90 is on the opposite side of the same finger, thus initially weaving the pile into the fabric from a continuous strand of yarn which is looped over one of the fingers 56 at the upper side of the fabric and also looped on the underside of the fabric, Where the filler passes through the loop thus formed at the back of the fabric, and known in the art of weaving as weaving through to the back."
The double bars 89 and 89a with their guides 90 and 90a may be used in two different ways. They may be shifted as a unit, in which case double pile threads are woven into the fabric instead of single threads. Otherwise, the operation is the same, although producing `a pile that is heavier, provided,v of course, the same size of pile is used in both instances. If the bars and 88a are shifted in opposite directions, then the pile loops will cross each other as shown in Figs. 9 to 12 Vof the drawings, which produces fabric of unusual appearance when pile threads of different colors are used either for loops or cut pile. It will be understood` that the guides in the -bars always alternate on 4each side of the fingers as well as on each group of warps, and that at least two of the warps pass through the pile loops, when considering the loops as extending from one set of filler threadsto. the next set of filler threads.
The operation ofthe loom has hereinabove been described in sufiicient detail to enable any `weaver to understand its operation so that repe- -if a strand of pile yarn -10 were followed in the initial weave it would describe a series of loops which were formed over the tops of the fingers and under the filler threads. This pile yarn is under tension at all times so that the yarn is drawn fairly snugly around the fingers and being under tension, the slack is kept out of the filler threads during the beating up operation, so that these loops are drawn firmly around the fingers, the width of which controls the height of the loops. The filler threads which extend through the pile loops under the fingers are also snugly drawn up against the underside of the fingers 56, 56 as the pile yarn guides 90 ascend out of the shed .of the loom. During the Weaving operation several of these loops remain on each of the iingers', producing a certain amount of frictional resistance in addition to the tension on the warp threads against which the reeds beat, thereby providinga very firm and closely Woven base fabric with both the warp and the filler yarns fitting snugly about the base of the loops, thereby very smoothly anchoring the pile yarn into the fabric and making it almost impossible to pull out one of the strands of the pile fabric after the cloth is loomed without breaking the yarn, a strip of the Woven fabric is thus formed into which the fingers 56 are woven providing a base against which the reed beats at all times thereby insuring close and tight woven fabrics with the pile yarn being under complete control as long as it remains in the fingers.
If a pile having a closed loop is desired the iingers such as 56, 56 are shown having tapered ends over which the loops pass as the fabric is woven, with the guides |40, |40 having discs |43, |43 spaced in such manner that the loops on each side of the lingers can pass between the discs |43, |43 thereby serving to prevent lateral displacement of the fingers 56, 56 during the looming of the fabric.
If it is desired to cut the loops, then the fingers 56, 56 are removed and fingers 63, 63 placed in position so that as the loops pass over the ends of the fingers the knives 64, 64 sever the loops through the crowns and result in the usual pile fabric with the free ends of the yarn forming a 13 pile such as is used in rugs, carpets, and the like. Also, if desired, fingers with the knives therein may be used with fingers without knives, thus producing a fabric with looped pile and regular pile, thus producing a fabric of striped effect of unusual appearance.
Due to the fact that the pile yarn is under tension at all times and there is no opportunity for it to slip or move out of position during the weaving, the pile loops are even in height and -when severed by the knives are cut across the crowns, so that in effect a fabric is produced which needs very little, if any, trimming in order to produce a fabric having an even pile; which has not been true with the looming machines heretofore usedfor this-kind of fabric, so that substantially all waste is eliminated during the looming operation and very little waste results from the trimming operation and inasmuch as there is no possible chance for the pile yarn to slip out of psition, each pile loop placed into position in the fabric, which results iny very little of the burling operation being necessary, thereby producing from the loom a substantially perfect fabric which results not only in lower cost of manufacture. but also in saving of material and in increase of speed with which the looming operation can be performed.
The spacing of the fingers 56, 56 may be varied as desired, as well as the distance which the pile insertion guides 90, 90 may travel flllerwise, depending entirely upon the character of the weave desired, such as thickness of the pile, the denseness thereof, and the weight and character of the pile yarn, and other factors, all of which are within the knowledge and skill of the ordinary weaver.
Although I have shown and described certain embodiments of my invention, it will be understood that I do not wish to be limited to the exact construction shown and described, but that various changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.
I claim: y
1. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabrics l comprising in combination with a loom, ya series of spaced ngers mounted onthe loom forward ,of the harness and extending parallel with the warp, a series of spaced pile yarn feeding guides having eyelets therein through which strands of pile yarn are threaded movably mounted above the spaced fingers, means whereby the said feeding guides are shifted transversely to predeter' mined. positions above the spaced fingers and moved into and out of the warp whereby the pile yarn is looped over the spaced fingers and means for beating up the loops thus formed as the fabric is woven.
2. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabrics comprising in combination with a loom, a series of spaced fingers mounted on'the loom forward of the harness secured at one of their ends and free at their opposite ends and extending parallel with the warp, a series of pile yarny feeding guides having eyelets therein through which strands of pile yarn are threaded movably .mounted above the spaced fingers, means whereby the said feeding guides are shifted transversely'to y predetermined positions and moved vertically incomprising in combination with a loom, spaced fingers mounted on the loom 'forward of the harness secured at one of their ends and free at the other, pile yarn guides having eyelets adjacent the ends thereof through which strands of pile yarn are threaded mountedI above the fingers and adapted to extend between ,the fingers and bev tween the warp threads, means independent oi the said fingers whereby the said guides are moved vertically and laterally whereby the pile yarn carried by said guides is threaded over the fingers and into the warp, means whereby. filler threads are threaded through the loops thus formed and means on the loom whereby the pile;
loops and filler threads are beat up into fabric.
4. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabricsy comprising in combination with a loom, spacedA fingers mounted forward of the harness and extending parallel with the warp and having vfree ends terminating over the breast plate of the loom, reciprocating pile yarn guides having eye,- lets therein through which strands of pile yarn are threaded mounted above and independently of the ngers, means whereby the guides are shifted laterally to predetermined positions,-'
means whereby the said guides are moved vertically between the fingers into the warp threads thereby forming continuous loops, means whereby filler threads are placed insaid loops below the fingers and between the warp threads, and means associated with the loom for beating the loops and ller threads into position in the warp.
5. A loom attachment for weaving pile .fabrics comprising in combination with a loom, a vfixed bar extending transversely of the loom mounted forward of the harness, spaced fingers fixed at one of their ends to said bar and free at their other ends extending substantially parallel with the warp, movable pile yarn guides having eyelets therein adjacent their free ends through which strands of pile yarn are threaded mounted above the fingers and carrying pile yarn, means whereby the guides are shifted to predetermined lateral positions, means whereby the said guides are f moved into position 'into the warp between the fingers and means in said loom for threading filler threads into the loops of pile yarn below the fingers formed by the said guides. v
6. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabrics comprising in combination with a loom, a fixed bar extendingflllerwise of the loom mounted forward of` the harness, means whereby thesaid v bar and free at the other extending substantially parallel with the warp, the free ends of the fingers being tapered and terminating over the breastplate of the loom, movable pile guides carrying pile yarn mounted over the said fingers, means whereby the guides are shifted to predetermined lateral positions, means whereby the said guides are moved vertically into position into the warp between the fingers and means in said loom for threading filler threads into the loops of pile yarn formed by the said guides below the said fingers. v
'1. A- loom attachment for weaving pile .fabrics comprising in combination with a loom, a fixed y v bar extending fillerwise of the loom mounted forward of the harness, bars xed to the frame of the loom to which the said fixed bar is secured at its ends, means whereby the angular position of the fixed bar can be changed, spaced fingers.
fixed at one of their ends to said bar and free at the other, extending substantially parallel with altem-evs the warp, the free ends of the fingers being tapered and terminating over the breastplate of the loom, movable pile guides carrying pile yarn mounted over the said fingers, means whereby the guides are shifted to predetermined lateral positions, means whereby the said guides are moved vertically into position into the warp between the fingers aximeans in said loom for threading filler threads into the loops of pile yarn formedby the said guides below the said fingers.
8. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabrics comprising in combination with a loom, a bar extending fillerwise of the loom, spaced fingers fixed at one of their ends to said bar and free at the other, extending substantially parallel with the warp, movable pile yarn guides having eyelets therein through which the pile yarn is threaded mounted above the said fingers and spaced relative thereto and carrying pile yarn, means whereby the guides are shifted to predetermined lateral positions, means whereby the said guides are moved vertically into position into the warp between the fingers, a non-yielding fabric holding and guiding member spanning the free ends of the said fingers mounted on the breast beam of the loom, and means on said loom for threading filler threads into the loops of pile yarn formed by the said guides.
9. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabrics comprising in combination with a loom, a bar extending fillerwise of the loom, spaced fingers fixed at one of their ends to the said bar and free at.
the other, extending substantially parallel with the warp, movable pile yarn guides having eyelets therein adjacent their free ends through which strands of pile yarn are threaded mounted above the said fingers and spaced relative there.- to 'and carrying pile yarn, means whereby the guides are shifted to predetermined lateral positions, means whereby the said guides are moved into position into the warp between the fingers,4
a combined non-yielding fabric holding and guiding member spanning the free ends of the fingers and in engagement with the rows of loops formed on each finger, and means on said loom for threading filler threads into the loops of pile yarn formed by the said guides.
10. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabrics comprising in combination with a loom, a bar extending llerwise of the loom, spaced fingers fixed at oneof their ends to the said bar and free at the other, extending substantially parallel with the warp, movable pile guides having eyelets adjacent their ends through which strands of pile yarn are threaded mounted above the said ngers, and spaced relative thereto, means whereby the guides are shifted to predetermined lateral positions, means whereby the said guides are moved into position into the warp between the fingers, means on said loom for threading filler threads into the loops of pile yarn formed by the said guides, and a rotatable non-yielding hold down and spacing member mounted on the breast beam of the loom having spaced discs thereon between which the free ends of the fingers extend.
l1. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabare shifted laterally to predetermined positions, means whereby the said guides are moved into position into the warp between the fingers, and means on said loom for threading filler threads into the loops of pile yarn formed by the said guides.
12. In combination with a loom for weaving pile fabrics comprising in combination, a bar extending transversely of the loom in front of the harness, a plurality of fingers mounted in said bar extending substantially parallel with the warp fixed at one of their ends and free at the other, pile thread guide bar frames movably mounted on the loom, a guide bar in said frames spanning the spaced fingers, pile thread guides in said bar,
\means whereby the guide bar frames are oscillated vertically at predetermined times, means whereby the said guide bar is moved laterally to position the pile thread guides before the downward movement of the said frames whereby the pile thread guides passon opposite sides of the fingers with eachsuccessive operation, and means in said loom whereby filling threads'are placed through the loops of pile on the under side of the said fingers.
13. In combination with a loom for Weaving pile fabrics comprising in combination a bar extend ing transversely of the loom in front of the harness, a plurality of fingers mounted in said bar extending substantially parallel with the warp, fixed at one of their ends and free at the other in spaced relation with each other, a rocker shaft extending transversely of the said loom, pile thread guide bar frames pivotally mounted on said rocker shaft for lateral movement, a guide bar mounted in said frames and spanning the said fingers, pile thread guides in spaced relation in said guide bar, means connecting the rocker shaft and the power shaft of the loom whereby the guides are moved vertically and means whereby the said pile guide bar frames are shifted I laterally to predeterminedpositions prior to the descent of the pile thread guides at each'operation of the loom.
14. A loom attachment for the weaving of pile fabric in combination with a loom, a fixed bar extending transversely of the loom, fingers spaced from each other mounted at one of their ends in rics comprising in combination with a loom, a bar said bar, rocker means having arms thereon in said loom, pile guide bar frames pivotally mounted intermediate their ends upon the said arms, pile guide bars in said pile guide bar frames spanning the said fingers, pile guides in said bars, and means whereby the said guide bar frames are actuated to shift the pile guides laterally and also move the said pile guides into and out of the warp 0f the loom.
15. A loom attachment-for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom,a bar extending llerwise of the loom, a plurality of spaced fingers extending substantially parallel with the warp fixed in said bar at one of their ends and free at their other ends, a rocker member, guide bar support frames mounted upon said rocker member, pile guide bars mounted in said frames spanning the said fingers, a plurality'of spaced pile thread guides in said pile guide bars, actuating means on the loom and connecting means operated by the said actuating means, whereby the said guide bar support members Iand guide bars are oscillated vertically and shifted laterally during predetermined cycles of operation of the loom.
16. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom, a 'finger support member extending transversely of said mazen loom forward of the harness, :lingers mounted in said support member in spaced relationf-wi'th v cechi-'daher extending warpwise of the loom, a'.
' tions for said guide bar members for vertical and lateral movement ofthe said guide bar members, whereby the said guides are moved into and out of the warp and alternately on opposite sides of the fingers.
17. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom, a finger support member extending transversely of said loom forward of the harness, ngers'mounted in said support member in spaced relation with each other extending warpwise of the loom, a shaft extending transversely of the said loom, having arms extending radially therefrom, guide bar members movably mountedon said arms, extending forwardly and downwardly therefrom, a guide bar spanning the said fingers mounted insaid guide bar members, spaced guides in said guide bar and operating vconnections for said guide bar members for vertical and lateral movement of the said guide bar members, whereby the said guides are moved'into and out of thev warp and alternately on opposite sides of the ngers.
said flngers, a plurality of spaced pile-thread guides in said pile guide bar, cams connected with the main loom shaft and connecting means with the said frames operated by the said cams whereby the said guide bar frames and guide bar are moved vertically and shifted laterally during v predetermined cycles of operation of the loom.
2l. A loom attachment for weaving pile arie comprising with aloom a bar extending transversely of the loom forward of the harness, a
, plurality of spaced fingers extending substantially parallel with the warp xed at one of their 18. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom, a nger support member extending transversely of said loom forward of the harness, lingers mounted in said support member in. spaced relation with each other extending warpwise of the loom,a shaft extending transversely of the said loom, having arms extending radially therefrom, guide ybar members movably mounted onsaid arms intermediate their ends,` extending forwardlyand downwardly therefrom, a guide bar spanningthe said fingers mounted in said guide bar members, spaced -guides in said `guide bar and operating connections for said guide bar members for vertical and lateralmovement of the said guide bar members, whereby the said guides are moved into and out of the warp andalternately on opposite sides of the fingers. l
19. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with ay loom a bar extending fillerwise lof the loom, a plurality of spaced nngers extending substantially parallel with the warp fixed at one offtheir ends to thev said bar, knives in said ngers adjacent their ends, a rocker member, a pair of frames pivotally mounted on said rocker member, a pile guide bar on said frames spanning the said lingers. a plurality of spacedpile thread guides in said pile guide bar, cams on themain loom shaft and a plurality of connecting means operated by said cams whereby the said frames and pile guide bar are moved vertically. and laterally during predetermined cycles of operation of the loom.
20. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom a plural' ity of spaced fingers free of the harness and reed ofthe loom extending substantially parallel with the warp xed at one .of their ends, knives mounted in said fingers whereby the loops formed thereinl are severed as the loops pass over the fingers, a rocker member,- a pair of guide bar frames pivotally mounted on said rocker member,
ends and free at their other ends, knives mounted in said fingers along their upper edges adjacent the free ends thereof whereby the loops formed on said ngers are severed before leaving the said ngers, a rocker shaft extending transversely of the loom, arms on `said rocker shaft, frames pivotally mounted on said arms and extending forward and downward fromk the said arms, a pile guide bar-on said frames span- Vning the said fingers, a plurality of spaced pile thread guides in said pile guide bar, cams connected with the main loom shaft and connecting means with the said frames operated by the said cams whereby the said frames are oscillated vertically and shifted laterally during predetermined cycles of operation of the loom. l
` 22. A loom attachment 4for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom a bar extending transversely of the said loom forward of the harness, a plurality of spaced ngers mounted in the said barextending substantially parallel with the warp fixed at one oftheir ends and free at their other ends, a rotatable guide member having spaced discs thereon between which the free ends of .the ngers extend, a rocker shaft having' fi'xed arms thereon, a pair of members pivotally lmounted intermediate their ends on the arms in the said rocker shaft extending forward and downward therefrom, a pile guide bar on said members spanning the said lingers, a plurality of spaced pile thread guides in said pile guide bar, cams connected with the main loom shaft and a plurality of connecting means operated by 'thesaid cams whereby the said members are oscillated vertically and shifted laterally during predetermined cycles of operation of the loom.
23. A loom attachment for weaving pile-fabric comprising in combination with a loom a bar extending iillerwise vof the `loom forward of the harness, aplurality of spaced lingers extending substantially parallelwith the warp fixed at one of their ends, the said fingers being wider at' their free ends than at other portions, knives in said widened portions of. thesaid fingers, guiding means forv the fingers, rocker means extending transversely of the s'aid loom, a pairofframes pivotally mounted for lateral movement on said rocker means, a pile guide bar on said frames spanning the said iingers,`a pluralityof n a pile guide bar on said frames spanning the walls of the channels extending between ythe nngers and spaced therefrom to allow fabric loops to pass between the said side walls, rocker means, a pair of frames pivotally mounted on said rocker means, a pile guide bar on said frames spanning the said fingers, a plurality of spaced pile thread guides in said pile guide bar, cams connected with the main loom shaft and aplurality of connecting means operated by the said cams, whereby the said frames are osciilated vertically and shifted laterally during predetermined cycles of operation of the loom.
25. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom a bar extending fillerwise of the loom, a plurality of spaced fingers extending substantially parallel with the warp iixed to the said bar at one of their ends and free at their other ends, a guide roller having spaced discs thereon between which the free ends of the lingers extend, the said discs being spaced sufiiciently to permit the loops formed on the ngers to pass therebetween, a rocker shaft having iixed arms thereon, pile guide bar members mounted on said arms, a pile guide bar on said pile guide bar members, a plurality of spaced pile thread guides in said pile guide bar, cam means connected with the main loom shaft. and a plurality of connecting means operated by the said cam means whereby the said frames are oscillated vertically and shifted laterally during predetermined cycles of operation of the loom.
26. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom a bar extending iillerwise of the loom, a plurality of spaced fingers extending substantially parallel with the warp fixed at one of the ends to the said bar and free at the other, rocker means mounted on the loom, pile thread guide bar frames pivotally mounted on said rocker means, a pile thread guide bar in said members, a plurality of spaced pile thread guides in said bar, a cam on the main drive shaft of the loom, a pivotally mounted lever actuated by the cam, a connection to the said rocker shaft whereby with the rotation of the cam the pile guides carry pile yarn between the ngers and into the open warp, a face cam connected with the said drive shaft, a pivotally mounted lever in engagement at one of its ends with the face cam. and connections between the lever and the guide bar frames whereb;J at predetermined times the pile thread guides are moved laterally, whereby with each descension in the warp the said pile guides pass on opposite sides of the fingers whereby loops are formed over the said fingers and ans chored into the fabric by the filler and warp threads.
27. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination with a loom, a bar extending fillerwise of the loom, spaced fingers mounted at one of their ends on said bar extending warpwise of the loom. rocker means extending fillerwise of the loom, pile guide bar support frames mounted on said rocker means, guide bars supported by the said frames, pile guides in said bars, one of said pile guide bars being secured to one of said frames and the other guide bar to the other frame, and operating means for said pile guide frames, whereby they are moved vertically and shifted horizontally and cause the pile guides to pass alternately on each side of the said fingers into the open warp on the loom.
28. A loom attachment Vfor weaving pile fabric comprising in combination witha loom, a bar I extending flllerwise of the loom, spaced ngers mounted at one of their ends on said bar extending warpwise of the loom, a rocker shaft extending llerwise of the loom arms on said shaft, a pile guide bar support frames mounted on said arms. pile guide bars in said frames, pile guides in said bars, one of said pile guide bars being secured to one of said frames and the other guide bar to the other frame, and operating means for said pile guide frames, whereby they are moved vertically and shifted horizontally and cause the pile guides to pass alternately on each side of the said fingers into the open warp on the loom, the said pile guide bars being mounted on said frames in side to side relation with each other and movable independently of each other. 29. A loom attachment for weaving pile fab rlcs comprising in combination with a loom, spaced fingers mounted thereon extending warpwise of the loom, vertically and horizontally movable pile guide bars positioned above the said fingers and above the shed of the loom, pile yarn guides in said bars having eyelets adjacent the ends thereof through which strands of pile yarn are threaded, and means connecting the said pile guide bars with the said loom, whereby a plurality of strands of yarn is shogged over the said fingers and. threaded between said fingers into the shed of the loom and interwoven with the base fabric during the weaving' thereof by the loom.
30. In combination with a loom for weaving pile fabric comprising in combination, a plurality of spaced fingers extending warpwise of the loom and mounted on the said loom, a set of spaced pile thread guideshaving pile yarn receiving eyelets adjacent the ends thereof mounted above the said fingers above the shed of the loom, the spacing of the guides corresponding approximately with the spacing of the fingers, vertical actuating members for said guides whereby the said guides are moved into and out of the shed of the loom and means whereby each of the said guides are shifted to predetermined positions above the spaces between the said ngers prior to each descent of the guides into the shed of the loom.
31. A method which comprises arranging warp threads iril'fa loom having movable beating means in spaced groups each group comprising stuffer warps and a binder warp, each warp being spaced slightly fillerwise with respect to other warps in the same group, at least one warp of each group being a binder warp and at least two of the warps being stuffer warps, placing a filler through the warp under the binder warp, threading pile yarn under tension over fingers and into the warp on each side of each group of warp threads and entirely in advance of the heating means, placing filler yarn through the loops of pile formed on the ngers below the stuffer warps and above the binder warp, drawing the strands of pile yarn snugly over the ngers and the filler against the under edges of the fingers shedding one of the stuier warps and floating the balance of the warps, inserting a filler thread and beating up the last mentioned filler directly against one side of the loops of pile yarn.
32. A method which comprises arranging warp threads in a loom having movable beating means in spaced groups, each group comprising a plurality of warps4 spaced llerwise only slightly with respect to other warps in the same group, at least one warp of each group being a binder warp and at least two of the warps being stuifer warps, placing a filler through the warp under the binder warp, threading pile yarn under tension over the beating means, placing nller yarn through the loops of pile formed on the lingers below the stuifer warps and above the binder warp drawing thec pile yarn snugly over. the iingers and the filler against the under edges of the ngers. shedding one of the stuer .warps and floating the balance of the warps, inserting a iiller thread and beating up the last mentioned ller directly against one side of the loops of pile yarn and thereafter cutting the pile loops as the loops are forced towards the ends of the fingers during successive weaving operations.
33. A method which comprises arranging warp threads in a loom having movable beating means in spaced groups, each group consisting of a, plu rality of warps in side'to side relation with each other and odset only slightly-in a illlerwise direction with respect to each adjacent warp of each group. at least one warp of each group being a binding warp and at least two of the warps being stuifer warps, placing a illier through the warp under the binding warp, threading a plurality of strands of pile yarn under tension over flngersand into the shed of the warp in eachy side of each group of warp threads and entirely in advance of the beating means, placing ller yarn through the-loops of pile formed on the ngers below the stuifer warps and above the binding warp drawing vthe pile yarn snugly over the ilngers and around the filler yarn, shedding one of the stuifer warps and floating the balance of the warps beating the loops thus formed and the illier yarn against :the previously formed fabric. inserting a iiller thread and beating up the last mentioned filler directly againstone side of the loops of pile yarn.
34. A method which comprises arranging warp threads in a loom having movable beating means in spaced groups, each group consisting of a plurality of warps in side to side relation with each other and oifset only slightly in a illlerwise direction with respect to each adjacent warp of eachv group. at least one warp of each group being a binding warp and at least two of the warps being stuifer warps, placing a filler through the warp under the binding warp, vthreading a plurality of strands of pile yarn under tension over fingers in the same direction and into the warp on each side of each group of warp threads and entirely in advanceof the beating means, placing filler yarn through the loops of pile formed on the lingers below the stuifer warps and above the binding warp drawing'the pile yarn snugly over the iingers and the illler against the under side of the fingers, shedding one of the stutter warps and floating the balance of the warps, inserting a ller thread and beating up the last mentioned illler directly against one side of the loops or pile yarn. f
35. A method which comprises arranging warp threads in a loom having movable beating means in spaced groups, each group consisting of a plurality of warps in side to side relation with each other and oifset only slightly in a fillcrwise direction with respect to each adjacent warp of each group, at least one warp of each group being a binding warp and at least two of the warps being stutter warps, placing a nller through the warp under tension under the binding warp, threading a plurality of strands of pile yarn over fingers in opposite directions and into the warp on each side of each group of warp threads, and entirely in advance of the beating means, placingillleryarnthroughtheioopsofpile formed 22 on the lingers below the stuifer warps and above the binding warp, shedding one of the stuifer warps and floating the balance of the warps, vinserting a illler thread and beating up the last mentioned illler directly against one side of the loops of pile yarn.
36. A method of weaving pile fabrics ons, loom having movable beating means which comprises weaving warp and filler yarn into a base fabric and conc ently withthe weaving of the base fabric interweaving pile yarn into the fabric by shOg'Elng strands of pile yarn over warpwiseextending fixed fingers. threading the strands of pile yarn between thefingers and entirely forwardly of the beating means .into the shed of the loom below the path of the filler inserting means, inserting illler strands over the pile yarn and through the open shedded warp,again threading the pile yarn upward between the fingers. thereby looping the pile yarn around the filler, keeping the pile yarn under tension whereby the loops thus formed are drawn snugly around the fingers with the illler and beating ,up .the nller and pile loops against the previously formed fabric held in frictional engagement with the said fingers.
3'7. A method weaving -pile fabrics on a loom having movable beating means which comprises weaving a base fabric of ther usual warp and filler threads and concurrently weaving pile yarn into the -base fabric by shogging pile yarn over xed warpwise extending fingers, threading pile yarn between the fingers and the warp threads and 'entirely forwardly of the beating means to a point below the path of the illler thread insertion means, placing illler threads over the pile yarn and between certain of the warps, drawing the pile yarn upward between the nge keeping the pile yarnvunder tension whereby continuous loops are formed over the fingers and filler yarns in ksnug frietional engagement with the finger, beating up the yarn thus positioned against previously formed fabric against the frictional resistance of the loops and filler on the fingers and the tension of the warps. v
38. A method of weavingpilefabrlcs on a loom having a movable beating means which comprises weaving a base fabric of the usual warp and filler threads and concurrently weaving pile yarn vinto the base fabric by shogging pile yarn over ixed-warpwise extending fingers, threading pile yarn between the fingers and the warp threads and entirely forwardly of the beating means to a point below the path of the filler thread insertion means, placing filler threads over the pile yarn and between certain of the warps, drawing. the
the pile yarn under tension whereby continuous loops are formed over the :lingers and filler yarn in snug frictional engagement with Vthe ringer, beating up the yarn thus positioned against previously formed fabric against the frictional resistance of the loops and iier on the lingers and the tension of the warps and retaining in the ngers a plurality of loops whereby an area in the fabric forms a base against which subsequent fabric is formed in addition to the tension provided by the warp threads.
39. In combination with a. loom for weaving a base fabric composed of a plurality of warp and filler threads, a series of fingers extending y mounted above the said ngers, means whereby the said pile thread guides are moved vertically between the spaced fingers into and out ofthe shed of the loom at pre-determined times, means whereby the said pile thread guides are shogged over the said lingers prior to their descent into the shed of the loom and means whereby pile yarn is supplied to said guides.
40. In combination with a loom for weaving pile fabrics comprising means whereby a base fabric is woven of warp and ller threads, a series of nngers extending warpwise of the loom and in spaced relation with each other illlerwise of.
the loom, rod like pile yarn guides having eyelets therein vertically movable into and out of the shed of the loom betweenthe fingers and below the path of travel of the iller thread inserting means and laterally movable over the said fingers, means whereby the said guides are 'actuated laterally and vertically, and pile yarn supply means, the said guides serving to shog the pile yarn over the fingers and to carry the said pile yarn below the path of the illler inserting means whereby the ller is placed over the pile yarn.
41. In combination with a loom for weaving pile fabrics comprising means whereby a base fabric is woven of warp and illler threads, a series of fingers extending warpwise of the loom and in spaced relation with each the looml rod like pile yarn guides having eyelets therein adjacent their ends vertically movable into and out of the shed of the loom between the fingers and below the path of travel of the ller thread inserting means and laterally movable over the said fingers, means whereby the said guides are actuated laterally and vertically and pile yarn supply means and tension means for said pile yarn.
42. In combination with a loom for weavingv pile fabrics comprising means whereby a base fabric is woven of warp and filler threads, a series of fingers extending warpwise of the loom and in spaced relation with each other nllerwise ofv the loom, rod like pile yarn guides having eyelets therein vertically movable into and out of the shed of the loom between the ngers and below the path of travel of the illler thread inserting means and laterally movable over the said fingers, means whereby the said guides are actuated laterally and vertically, pile yarn supply means, and means whereby the pile yarn is placed under tension the said guides serving to shog the pile yarn over the fingers and into the shed of the loom below the path of travel of the ller thread in serting means thereby forming a series of loops over the fingers and around the ller inserted over the said pile yarn.
43. In combination with a loom for weaving pile fabrics comprising means whereby a base other nllerwise of fabric is woven of warp and ller threads. a series of fingers extending warpwise of theloom and in spaced relation with each other illlerwise of the loom, rod like pile yarn guides having eyelets therein ,vertically movable into and out of the shed of the loom, between the nngers and below thevpath lof travel of the ller thread inserting means and laterally movable over the saidiingers, means whereby the said guides are actuated laterally and vertically. pile yarn supply means, and pile yarn tension means, the said guides threading the pile yarn in the fingers and into the shed of the loom below the path of the illler inserting means whereby a series of loops are formed over the fingers in frictional engagement therewith providing resistance to the movement of the fabric through the loom and a background for beating up the fabric in addition to the usual tension of the warp threads.
44. A loom attachment for weaving pile fabrics comprising in combination with a loom, a series of spaced ilngers mounted on the loom and extending parallel with the warp, a series of spaced substantially rigid pile yarn feeding guides having eyelets therein through which strands of pile yarn are threaded movably mounted at a diierent level than the spaced fingers, means for shifting said feeding guides transversely in unison to predetermined positions laterally of said spaced fingers, means for moving said feeding guides into and out of the warp whereby the pile yarn is looped over the spaced ngers, and means for beating up the loops4 thus formed as the fabric is woven.
EUGENE F.- CLARK.
REFERENCES crrEn The following'references are of record in the ille of this patent:
US566853A 1944-12-06 1944-12-06 Method of and apparatus for weaving Expired - Lifetime US2437378A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US566853A US2437378A (en) 1944-12-06 1944-12-06 Method of and apparatus for weaving

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US566853A US2437378A (en) 1944-12-06 1944-12-06 Method of and apparatus for weaving

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2437378A true US2437378A (en) 1948-03-09

Family

ID=24264663

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US566853A Expired - Lifetime US2437378A (en) 1944-12-06 1944-12-06 Method of and apparatus for weaving

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2437378A (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2497716A (en) * 1949-09-08 1950-02-14 Elsie C Bloch Loop pile carpet fabric
US2664919A (en) * 1951-12-22 1954-01-05 American Safety Razor Corp Cutting pile wire
US2691390A (en) * 1949-11-02 1954-10-12 Magee Carpet Co Pile fabric floor covering
US2710028A (en) * 1953-05-11 1955-06-07 Fieldcrest Mills Inc Loop pile attachment for axminster looms and method of weaving
US2808072A (en) * 1955-01-20 1957-10-01 New York Trust Company Loop-pile-forming wires for looms
US2860665A (en) * 1956-09-25 1958-11-18 New York Trust Company Pile yarn shogging motion for looms
US2860664A (en) * 1953-12-15 1958-11-18 New York Trust Company Method of and apparatus for weaving high and low pile fabrics
US2860669A (en) * 1956-10-04 1958-11-18 New York Trust Company High and low pile fabric and method of making same
US2896671A (en) * 1956-03-20 1959-07-28 Magee Carpet Co Apparatus for weaving loop pile fabrics
US2896670A (en) * 1958-03-27 1959-07-28 Mohasco Ind Inc Apparatus for making pile fabric
US2974690A (en) * 1957-06-26 1961-03-14 Magee Carpet Co Loop pile fabric
DE1104454B (en) * 1955-01-20 1961-04-06 Fieldcrest Mills Inc Loom for the production of warp pile fabrics using longitudinal rods
US3140592A (en) * 1960-11-02 1964-07-14 Fielderest Mills Inc Apparatus for knitting variant height pile fabrics
US3636988A (en) * 1969-12-08 1972-01-25 Fieldcrest Mills Inc Apparatus and method for weaving fabric with intricate pile formations

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US506467A (en) * 1893-10-10 of london
US762526A (en) * 1903-05-21 1904-06-14 Hartley Loop Weave Company Loom for weaving pile fabric.
US778363A (en) * 1904-05-11 1904-12-27 Hartley Loop Weave Company Loom for weaving pile fabric.
US791678A (en) * 1904-05-11 1905-06-06 John F Dustin Pile-fabric loom.
US1054969A (en) * 1910-04-22 1913-03-04 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Spreader for pile-fabric looms.
GB205130A (en) * 1922-05-17 1923-10-17 Ronald Leighton Sandeman Improvements in connection with looms for pile fabrics
US1739181A (en) * 1927-04-04 1929-12-10 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Axminster weave
US1797058A (en) * 1928-10-16 1931-03-17 Pennsylvania Carpet Corp Tufted yarn fabric and method for weaving same
US1934827A (en) * 1932-10-08 1933-11-14 Mohawk Carpet Mills Inc Pile fabric and method of weaving
US2043165A (en) * 1933-09-02 1936-06-02 Thermoid Rubber Company Doup heddle loom
US2075187A (en) * 1933-02-24 1937-03-30 James A Fligg Method of weaving cut pile fabric

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US506467A (en) * 1893-10-10 of london
US762526A (en) * 1903-05-21 1904-06-14 Hartley Loop Weave Company Loom for weaving pile fabric.
US778363A (en) * 1904-05-11 1904-12-27 Hartley Loop Weave Company Loom for weaving pile fabric.
US791678A (en) * 1904-05-11 1905-06-06 John F Dustin Pile-fabric loom.
US1054969A (en) * 1910-04-22 1913-03-04 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Spreader for pile-fabric looms.
GB205130A (en) * 1922-05-17 1923-10-17 Ronald Leighton Sandeman Improvements in connection with looms for pile fabrics
US1739181A (en) * 1927-04-04 1929-12-10 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Axminster weave
US1797058A (en) * 1928-10-16 1931-03-17 Pennsylvania Carpet Corp Tufted yarn fabric and method for weaving same
US1934827A (en) * 1932-10-08 1933-11-14 Mohawk Carpet Mills Inc Pile fabric and method of weaving
US2075187A (en) * 1933-02-24 1937-03-30 James A Fligg Method of weaving cut pile fabric
US2043165A (en) * 1933-09-02 1936-06-02 Thermoid Rubber Company Doup heddle loom

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2497716A (en) * 1949-09-08 1950-02-14 Elsie C Bloch Loop pile carpet fabric
US2691390A (en) * 1949-11-02 1954-10-12 Magee Carpet Co Pile fabric floor covering
US2664919A (en) * 1951-12-22 1954-01-05 American Safety Razor Corp Cutting pile wire
US2710028A (en) * 1953-05-11 1955-06-07 Fieldcrest Mills Inc Loop pile attachment for axminster looms and method of weaving
US2860664A (en) * 1953-12-15 1958-11-18 New York Trust Company Method of and apparatus for weaving high and low pile fabrics
US2808072A (en) * 1955-01-20 1957-10-01 New York Trust Company Loop-pile-forming wires for looms
DE1104454B (en) * 1955-01-20 1961-04-06 Fieldcrest Mills Inc Loom for the production of warp pile fabrics using longitudinal rods
US2896671A (en) * 1956-03-20 1959-07-28 Magee Carpet Co Apparatus for weaving loop pile fabrics
US2860665A (en) * 1956-09-25 1958-11-18 New York Trust Company Pile yarn shogging motion for looms
US2860669A (en) * 1956-10-04 1958-11-18 New York Trust Company High and low pile fabric and method of making same
US2974690A (en) * 1957-06-26 1961-03-14 Magee Carpet Co Loop pile fabric
US2896670A (en) * 1958-03-27 1959-07-28 Mohasco Ind Inc Apparatus for making pile fabric
US3140592A (en) * 1960-11-02 1964-07-14 Fielderest Mills Inc Apparatus for knitting variant height pile fabrics
US3636988A (en) * 1969-12-08 1972-01-25 Fieldcrest Mills Inc Apparatus and method for weaving fabric with intricate pile formations

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2437378A (en) Method of and apparatus for weaving
US2553303A (en) Method of making pile fabrics
US2141152A (en) Apparatus and method for the manufacture of pile fabrics
US2005951A (en) Manufacture of fabrics
US2808072A (en) Loop-pile-forming wires for looms
US2437379A (en) Loom for weaving pile fabric
US3204669A (en) Manufacture of cut pile fabrics
USRE24949E (en) Method of and apparatus for weaving
US3636988A (en) Apparatus and method for weaving fabric with intricate pile formations
US2555159A (en) Method of and apparatus for weaving relief designs in pile surfaces of textile fabrics
US2741270A (en) Apparatus for weaving tufted fabrics
US2804096A (en) Apparatus and method for weaving axminster fabrics
US2010115A (en) Loom
US1939864A (en) Fabric and method and apparatus for producing it
US2860664A (en) Method of and apparatus for weaving high and low pile fabrics
US1488795A (en) Method of and machine for making chenille
US1362625A (en) Tuft-pile-fabric loom
US1594600A (en) Loom for weaving reed and similar material
US3042081A (en) High speed carpet loom and method of weaving
US1965395A (en) Loom
US2814314A (en) Terry pile weave
US2945511A (en) Method of making axminster-type carpet
US547884A (en) Loom for weaving cane
US1944121A (en) Tuft pile fabric loom
US2710028A (en) Loop pile attachment for axminster looms and method of weaving