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US1965395A
US1965395A US618839A US61883932A US1965395A US 1965395 A US1965395 A US 1965395A US 618839 A US618839 A US 618839A US 61883932 A US61883932 A US 61883932A US 1965395 A US1965395 A US 1965395A
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weft
yarns
loom
combs
pile
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US618839A
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Arthur W Shuttleworth
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Arthur W Shuttleworth
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D39/00Pile-fabric looms
    • D03D39/16Double-plush looms, i.e. for weaving two pile fabrics face-to-face

Description

y 1934- A. w. SHUTTLEWORTH 1, 65,395
LO OM Filed June 23, 1932 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEYS July 3, 1 A. w. SHUTTLEWORTH LOOM Filed June 23, 1952 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Z23 AQM M M ATTORNEYS @Q mm y 1934- A. w. SHUTTLEWORTH 1,965,395
LOOM
Filed June 23, 1952 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 83 m w w ATTORNEYs y 1934. A. w. SHUTTLEWORTH 1,965,395
LOOM
Filed June 23, 1952 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 ATTO R N EYS Juiy 3, 1934. A. w. SHUTTLEWORTH LO OM a She ets-Sheet 5 Filed June 25, 1932 a iNlE Y ATTORNEYS July 3, 1 4- A. w. SHUTTLEWORTH LOOM Filed June 23, 1932 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 ATTORNEYS Patented July 3, 1934 LOOM Arthur W. Shuttleworth, Amsterdam, N. Y. Application June 23, 1932, Serial No. 618,839
20 Claims.
This invention relates to looms for weaving pile fabrics, such as those of the Axminster type in which the pile tufts are formed by lengths of yarn which are drawn from a supply, inserted in the fabric and looped about weft threads, and then severed to produce tufts of the proper height. More particularly, the invention is concerned with a novel loom which weaves a compound fabric made up of a pair of such fabrics woven simultaneously and face to face, the fabrics having independent backing webs and pile tufts which have portions extending from one web to the other and connecting the two single fabrics together. The compound fabric produced in the new loom may be split into two single fabrics either in the loom or after removal therefrom by cutting the connecting strands of the pile yarns and the single fabrics resulting from the cutting operation have all the characteristics of an Axminster fabric woven in the usual manner and can be produced at much less cost.
The looms now commonly employed for weaving Axminster fabrics produce a single fabric which consists of stuffer and binder warps interlaced with weft threads and pile tufts inserted in rows with each tuft bound in the fabric by a weft thread. In these looms, the weft threads are inserted by a needle and ordinarily the loom operates to insert a plurality of shots of Weft for each row of tufts. A common Axminster weave made on such a loom has three shots of weft per row of tufts and is referred to as being of the three-shot type.
In such looms, the pile tufts are inserted by devices of several sorts as, for example, the pile yarns may be wound on spools mounted in tube frames, these tube frames being successively lowered to dip the yarn ends into the fabric in position to be looped about a weft shot by means of a comb. In another type of loom, the yarns are drawn from the supply by grippers which advance between the warp threads to seize the yarns and are then retracted to draw the yarns through the threads.
The present invention is directed to the provision of a novel loom for producing Axminster type fabrics, which is of the horizontal type and constructed to produce two fabrics simultaneously and bind these fabrics together by pile tufts into a compound fabric. In the new loom, heddles are provided for forming sheds in upper and lower levels by proper manipulation of the binder and stuifer warp threads and shots of weft are introduced simultaneously into the two sheds by a double needle. The new loom has a novel selvedge shuttle mechanism for inserting selvedge chords through the weft shot loops in the two sheds and also contains means of a generally standard construction for inserting pile yarns in rows with each yarn extending through the warp threads in the two levels. Cutting mechanism severs the pile yarns thus inserted from their supplies and a pair of cooperating comb devices loop the ends of the yarns about a weft shot. means for cutting the strands of the pile yarns which connect the fabrics together into a compound fabric and with separate take-up devices for taking up the single fabrics thus produced.
For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings, illustrating one form of loom embodying the invention and containing tube frames and transfer mechanism for inserting the pile yarns.
In the drawings,
Fig. 1 is a sectional view on the line 11 of Fig. 2, illustrating one form of the new loom;
Fig. 2 is a view of the new loom in front elevation with certain parts broken away;
Fig. 3 is a sectional view on the line 33 of Fig. 2;
Fig. 4 is a plane view of the selvedge shuttle mechanism;
Figs. 5 and 6 are sectional views on the lines 5-5 and 66, respectively, of Fig. 4;
Fig. 7 is an enlarged detailed view illustrating the manner of inserting the pile tufts;
Fig. 8 is a view in front elevation showingv parts of the comb mechanism;
Fig. 9 is a view in longitudinal section with parts removed showing the mechanism for inserting the pile yarns and cutting them from the supplies;
Fig. 10 is a similar view showing the operation of the combs;
Fig. 11 is a plan view of a part of the mechanism illustrated in Fig. 9;
Fig. 12 is a view similar to Fig. 5 showing a modified selvedge shuttle construction; and
Fig. 13 is a view similar to Fig. 1 on a larger scale and with parts omitted.
Referring now to the drawings, the loom as illustrated includes the usual side frames 10, at one end of which are mounted two warp beams 11 and 12, although additional beams may be used if desired. The beam 11 carries sets of binder warps 13, 14, 15, and 16, passing over tension roller 17 to the heddles, with the set 13 of binder warps passing through eyes in heddle 18, the sets 14 through eyes in heddle 19, the sets 15 through The new loom is further provided with 65 eyes in heddle 20, and the sets 16 through eyes in heddle 21. 'The beam 12 carries sets of stuffer warps 22, 23, which pass over tension roll 24, with the warps of set 22 passing through eyes in heddle 25 and the warps of set 23 passing through eyes in heddle 26. The several warps form two sheds, the top shed 2'7 illustrated being formed of warps 13', 14 and 22, and the bottom shed 28 comprising warps'15, 16 and 23. The opening and closing of these sheds is accomplished by the up and down movement of the six heddles.
Each of the heddles has its own operating lever 29 and is attached at one end thereof. All six levers are mounted for oscillation on a fixed stud 30 attached to a bracket 31 on a girt 32 supported on upright portions of the side frame members of the loom. At its other end, each lever 29 is connected by a rod 33 to its individual cam lever 34. The six cam levers 34 are mounted on stud 35 supported in a bracket 36 attached to one of the side frames of the loom, and each cam lever carries a roller which rests on the surface of its individual cam 3'7. The six cams 3'7 are mounted on an extension 38 from the main cam shaft 39 of the loom, the cam shaft being supported in appropriate bearings in the side frames. The cams operate through the connecting mechanism described to give the necessary motions to the heddles to form sheds as required by the weave and upon each formation of an upper and lower shed, a shot of weft is introduced into each shed by a needle.
In the loom illustrated, there are three insertions of weft per row of tufts in the fabric, and the insertion of the weft in the upper and lower sheds is accomplished by needles 40 and 41, which are connected together to lie one above the other. The needles are movable in the usual guides and are driven by means of a gear 42 on the cam shaft 39 which meshes with gear 43 on a shaft 44 mounted in suitable bearings on extensions from the loom side frame. The shaft 44 is provided with a crank 45 connected by crank pin 46 to crank 4'7 on shaft 48, and on the crank pin is mounted one end of a connecting rod 4841 which drives the needle motion. As the cam shaft rotates, the connecting rod 48a is reciprocated and shaft 48 is rotated. The connecting rod drives a needle motion of any standard construction commonly used in Axminster looms and, there fore, not illustrated.
The two needles 40 and 41 connected together one above the other insert wefts 49 and 50 in the upper and lower sheds, respectively, in the usual way, and when the needles pass entirely across the fabric, each weft shot must be caught by a selvedge chord in order to form a selvedge on each of the fabrics.
The insertion of the selvedge chords is accomplished by means of upper and lower shuttles 51, 52 actuated by a single swinging arm, the shuttles operating in a shuttle guide member, 53 supported on a bracket 54 attached to the loom side frame member. The shuttle 52 lies in a raceway in the bottom of the guide member and at its forward end has a recess in its upper surface in which is received a projection 55 on the bottom of shuttle 51, this projection fitting loosely in the recess so that the weft may pass between the shuttles. The shuttles are advanced through the loops by means of an extension 56 on the arm 5'7, this extension entering the guide member from above and being of sufficient length to engage both shuttles. The' driving arm 57 is mounted on the shaft 58 supported in bracket 54 and the shaft carries a crank arm 59 to which is attached a connecting rod 60. The connecting rod is actu= ated by means of a cam (not shown) on the main cam shaft of the loom. The shuttle guide member is provided with a longitudinal rib 61 in one lateral wall which in part defines the raceway for the upper shuttle and aflords partial support for that shuttle, and the wall of the guide member is cut away as at 62 so that the ends of the needles may enter the raceways.
When the needles have been advanced through their sheds and into the raceways to the position illustrated in Fig. 4, the shuttles 51 and 52 are engaged from the rear by the extension 56 on arm 57 and are advanced through the cut-away recesses 63 in the under surfaces of each needle, the shuttles in this movement passing through the loops of the weft threads.
The return movement of the shuttles is effected by a short projection 64 on the front edge of arm 57 which enters a recess in the front end of shuttle 51 at its top. When the arm swings back, the projection engages the rear wall of the recess and carries shuttle -51 with it, this shuttle moving lower shuttle 52 by engagement of projection 55 with the rear wall of the recess in shuttle 52.
The distance between the rear end of each shuttle and the adjacent wall of the recess therein is less than the distance between extension 56 on arm 57 and either projection 64 or 55. As a consequence, when the shuttles are being advanced, projections 55 and 64 are both out of contact with the rear walls of their recesses and as the shuttles pass through the loops of weft 49 and 50, the top strand of weft 49 may slide along the top of shuttle 51 and pass beneath the end of projection 64 and then along the top of the shuttle. Similarly, the bottom strand of the loop of weft 49 and the top strand of the loop of weft 50 may pass between the end of projection 55 and lower shuttle 52 and then pass between the shuttles. The bottom strand of the loop of weft 50 passes freely between the bottom of shuttle 52 and the bottom wall of its raceway. The passage of the shuttles through the loops in the weft causes the selvedgechords on the bobbins carried by the shuttles to be passed through the weft loops and a straight selvedge chord 66 is formed for each portion of the combined fabric.
In a modified construction illustrated in Fig. 12, the arm 5'7 has a short extension at its rear end engaging the back end of shuttle 51 and shuttle 51 drives shuttle 52 by means of a projection 6511 from its rear end which enters a recess in the rear end of shuttle 52.
In the loom illustrated, the pile yarns are wound on spools carried in tube frames and the tube frames are carried in transporting chains 67 which run about sprocket wheels 68 on a shaft 69 which is disposed directly over the weaving position. As the chains are advanced with a step by step motion, they bring the tube frames successively into position at the bottom of the sprocket wheels, and the tube frame in that position is then removed by transfer mechanism and lowered toward the warps.
The transfer mechanism is of the standard construction and it includes arms '70, one on each side of the loom, and each carrying a clutch '71 at its forward end. Each arm is attached to a shaft '72 supported in suitable bearings on the side frames of the loom and connected to the arm is a rod '73 actuated by the usual cam (not shown) mounted on the loom cam shaft. At the then lowered toward the warp. The tube frame- 74 is illustrated as occupying the position that it would assume at the lowermost point of movement of the transfer arms and the frame has been tipped from its normal upright position by means of rods 75 which are fastened to clutches 71. Each rod is attached to a crank 76 on a rocking shaft 77 mounted in suitable bearings and the shaft has another crank to which is attached a connecting rod 78 actuated by a cam on the main loom cam shaft.
The ends of the tuft yarns mounted on the spool or spools in each tube frame project out through the tubes of that frame in the usual way, and, when a row'of tufts is to be inserted, the tube frame removed from the chains by the transfer arms is lowered until the projecting ends of the yarns pass through the warps in the upper and lower levels. The needles are now advanced to insert a shot of weft in each shed and the shot of weft is beaten up by a reed 79 mounted on a. lay 80. The lay is supported in brackets in the loom side frames and is actuated by an arm 81 to which is attached connecting rod 82 operated by means of a cam on the main cam shaft and swinging the lay to give the reed three beat-ups per cycle. The forward movement of the reed causes the shots of weft in the upper andlower sheds to be forced against the inserted pile yarns, and, as soon as this occurs, the transfer arms 70 are raised by rods 73 until the spool 83 of the tube frame assumes the dotted line position 83'. This upward movement of the spool occurring while the ends of the tuft yarns wound thereon are held by the two shots of weft causes the yarns to be drawn off the spool in lengths suflicient to form the double tuft and, when this drawing off is accomplished, the yarns are severed by means.
of knives 84 and 85 (Figs. 1 and 9).
Front knife 84 is mounted on a knife stock 86 secured to arms 87, one at each end of the stock, and the arms are attached to a shaft 88 supported in suitable brackets on the side frames. The mounting for shaft 88 is adjustable up and down by screws 88a so that the height of the knife may be varied as may be required. The shaft 88 carries an arm 89 to which it attached a rod 90 connected to an arm 91 between the ends thereof, arm 91 being supported on a pin 92 carried by a bracket 93 on a girt 94. One end of arm 91 carries a pin on which is mounted a cam roller 95 contacting with the surface of a cam 96 on the main cam shaft 39. The front knife stock is held in its rear position, as illustrated, by means of a spring 97 encircling the shaft 88, one end of the spring being attached to a collar 98 on the shaft and the other bearing against the lower breast beam 99.
The back knife 85 is mounted in the knife stock 100 which slides in guide ways in suitable brackets 100a attached to the side frames of the loom and adjustable up and down to vary the height of the knife. The knife stock is moved forward and backward in its guideways by the combined for the tufts, the reed has been holding the weft shots against the inserted yarns and after severance of the yarns, the reed is retracted and comb mechanism is brought into action to turn the free ends of the lengths of yarn around the shots of weft.
The nature of the weave and the action of the combs are illustrated in Fig. 7 in which the lower portion 102 of the double fabric consisting of warps 15, 16 and 23, is illustrated as resting upon the lower breastplate 103 while the upper portion 104 of the fabric comprising warps 13, 14, and 22 rests against the top breastplate 105. Each tuft yarn 106 is looped about a weft shot in each portion of the combined fabric and a solid strand of each tuft yarn 106 connects both backing webs. The upper end of the tuft yarn is looped down about a shot in the upper portion of the double fabric and the lower end of the yarn is looped up about a shot in the lower portion of the fabric. Upon completion of the fabric, the strands of yarn which connect the two portions thereof are cut, as previously explained, to produce two single pile fabrics and the thickness of these fabrics is determined by the spacingof the breastplates. The upper breastplate is made adjustable for this purpose and it is constructed as an integral part of the upper breast beam a which has end extensions provided with tongues entering ways in brackets 105b which are attached to the lower breastplate 99. Screws 105a are provided for raising and lowering the upper breast beam and plate as may be required.
In Figs. 1 and 10, the upper and lower combs 107, 108, respectively, are shown in full lines in retracted position and in the operation of these combs each comb is given a combination of movements as a result of which the combs in their advance engage the projecting ends of the pile yarns and bend these ends to a position substantially parallel with the warp threads, after which the combs move toward each other and complete the looping action. The combs thus perform the complete operation of looping the pile yams about the shots of weft and inserting the ends of the pile yarns into the space between the two portions of the double fabric and no movement of the fabric is required to assist the combs in their action. Y
The mechanism for operating the lower com comprises a shaft 109 mounted in suitable brackets attached to the lower breast beam 103 and this shaft carries an arm 110-to which is attached a rod 111. The rod 111 is connected by a pin to one end of an arm 112 which is mounted by means of a pin on a bracket 113 on a girt 114. The arm 112 is provided with a cam roller 115 which acts on the surface of a cam 116 on loom cam shaft 39 and a spring 117 attached to girt 114 and to a collar on the rod 111 tends to maintain the rod in retracted position. At a suitable point on the shaft 109 is attached an arm 118 which contacts with the breastplate 103 and acts as a stop for the retractile movement of the comb mechanism produced by the action of the spring 117, the comb being moved away from this position by means of the cam 116 acting on the roller 115. Also mounted on shaft 109 are arms 119 in which is a shaft 120 carrying arms 121 towhich is attached the comb bar 108 on which is mounted the comb 122. A bracket 123 is attached to the comb bar 108 near its center and to this bracket is attached a rod 124, the other end of which is connected to one arm of a bell crank 125 mounted for free movement on the shaft 88 and held in place by suitable collars. The other arm of the bell crank is attached to a connecting rod 126 which is also attached by a pin to an arm 12'? pivotally mounted on a shaft 128 attached to the girt 114. The arm 128 carries a cam roller 129 which acts on the surface of a cam 130 on the loom cam shaft, and a spring 131 attached to a portion of the arm and to a bracket 132 on a fixed portion of the loom frame tends to pull downwardly on the bar on the rod 124, thus holding the comb bar in contact with a rest 133 attached to a bracket secured to the lower breastplate. As the cam is rotated, it acts through the connections to impart an upward movement to the rod 124.
To operate the upper comb,- the shaft 109 carries an arm to which is attached a rod 134 connected to a crank arm 135 on a shaft 136 which is free to rotate in brackets 13'! mounted in brackets 1051) on the lower breast beam 99. The shaft 136 is provided at suitable intervals with arms'139 which carry a shaft 140 on which are mounted arms 141, to the free ends'of which is attached a comb bar 107 carrying the comb 142. At each end of the bar 107 are brackets to which are attached rods 143 connected to arms 144 fast on shaft 145 supported in bearings mounted on girt 94. The shaft 145 carries an arm 146 which bears against the girt and limits the rotation of the shaft in one direction.
At any suitable location on the shaft 145 is an arm 147 to which is attached a rod 148 connected to an arm 149 mounted on a bracket 150 on the girt 114, and the arm 149 carrying a cam roller 151 which acts on the surface of the cam 152 on the loom cam shaft. A spring 153 attached to a collar 154 on rod 148 and also attached to the girt 94 acts through the connections to maintain the shaft 145 with its arm 146 in contact with the girt 94, and cam 152 acts through the connections and against the force of the spring to pull down on the rods 143 which in turn pull down on the comb 107.
As previously stated, the upper and lower combs are illustrated in Figs. 1 and 10 in retracted position as shown in the full lines, and both combs are held in that retracted position by the action of springs. In the first operation of the combs, they are advanced from retracted position to positions directly above and below the pile yarns which have been inserted and this first movement of the combs is accomplished by means of cam 116 which causes rod 111 to be advanced against the action of its spring. The movement of the rod 111 causesarm 110 to swing and this in turn moves the arm 119 in a clockwise direction and through. the connecting rods 121, the lower comb is moved toward the lower end of the tuft. At the same time, the counter-clockwise movement of shaft 109 has caused rods 134 to be pulled down and this causes shaft 136 to swing counter-clockwise. This movement of the shaft is imparted to arms 139 and shaft 140 and arms 141 are swung to the right (Fig. 1) so as to bring the upper comb into operating position. The combs are now in contact with the ends of the tuft yarns and the looping of the yarns about the weft shot is now accomplished by causing the combs to move toward each other.
The raising of the lower comb to complete its bending function is accomplished by means of cam 130 which acts to causea pull on rod 126, the pulling on this rod causing the connections to raise rod 124 which in turn causes the lower comb to move up and turn the lower end of the tuft about the lower weft shot. The downward movement of the upper comb is accomplished at the same time by means of the cam 152 which causesa pull on rod 148, lowering rod 143 and pulling down the upper comb. After the looping of the pile yarns about the upper and lower weft shots as described, the combs are withdrawn at the appropriate instants and returned to their retracted positions.
It will be observed that in the comb mechanism,
both combs are advanced to a position above the point of insertion of the tuft yarns and retracted from that position by the operation of the same shaft 109. After the combs have been moved into position above and below the point of insertion of the tuft yarns, the combs are independently operated in synchronism to move toward each other, and turn the free ends of the yarns into the fabric. The operating connections for the combs are provided with turn-buckles, such as that designated 134 in rod 134, which may be adjusted to vary the movements of the combs, and this adjustment makes it possible to vary the movements of the combs toward and away from each other as required in the weaving of fabrics of different thicknesses. Also, since the combs are given their put out motions by one means and their respective put up and put down motions by other means, the top comb may begin its put down motion and the bottom comb may begin its put up motion before their put out motions have been completed. The operating mechanism thus actuates the combs smoothly and rapidly and the action of the combs does n'otdepend upon fabric movement and'occurs while the fabric is at rest.
As the weaving operation proceeds, the completed fabric advances through the space between the upper and lower breast beams 99 and 1050 to the knife 156, which'severs the strands of pile yarns connecting the two portions of the fabric. The knife 156 is suitably clamped in a holder 157 which slides on a rail 158 supported in suitable brackets attached to the lower breast beam 99, the rail being mounted for vertical adjustment by means of adjusting screws in the usual manner. In the cutting operation, the holder carrying the knife blade is moved back and forth the width of the fabric and, for this purpose, the holder is clamped to a cable 159 by a plate 160, the cable passing around a grooved sheave 161 mounted on a stud in a bracket at tached to the side frame of the loom. The ends of the cable pass around and are fastened to a drum 162 mounted for free rotation on a stud on bracket 163 at the right hand side of the loom (Fig. 2), and the drum is given a; partial rotation in one direction and a movement in the reverse direction to effect the cutting action.
On the hub of the drum is a pinion 164 which meshes with a. gear segment 165 oscillating on a stud 166 on the bracket 163. The segment is provided with an arm 167 connected by a link 168 to a crank 169 on shaft 48 mounted in suitable bearings on the side frame. The shaft 48 is driven through crank 47 and crank pin 46 on which the connecting rod 49 of the needle motion is mounted and as shaft 44 is rotated, it causes rotation of shaft 48. Through the connections, a rocking movement is imparted to the gear segment 165 which in turn rotates the pinion 164 and drum 162, the drum having a partial rotation in one direction and then in the other so that the knife moves back and forth across the loom to sever the pile strands which connect the two portions of the compound fabric together.
Upon splitting of the compound fabric, the upper single fabric is carried around a spike roll 170 and over idler 171 and guide plate 1'72 to a suitable take-up roll, while the lower single fabric passes around spike roll 1'73 and idler 174 to another take-up roll. The lower spike roll is provided with a gear 175 meshing with a gear 176 on the shaft of the upper spike roll and gear 175 is driven by pinion 1'77 attached to a ratchet wheel 178 which is loosely mounted on a stud on the side frame member of the loom. The ratchet wheel is actuated by a pawl 179 connected to an arm 180 which is fast on the-shaft 181 mounted in bearings 182 and an arm 183 attached to the shaft 181 is connected by a rod 184 to a portion 185 of the lay. As the lay heats up, it causes the pawl 179 to advance step by step, thus rotating the ratchet wheel and causing a movement of the spike rolls through the gearing. Return movement of the ratchet wheel is prevented by means of a Weighted pawl 186.
In the loom illustrated, the insertion of the pile tuft is accomplished by tube frame and transfer mechanism, but it is to be understood that other methods of inserting the, pile yarns to form the pile tufts may be used as, for example, the pile yarns maybe inserted by grippers. When such grippers are employed, they may be arranged to move in a forward and downward path through the warp threads to deliver the tuft yarn to the fabric. In a loom provided with such grippers acting in this manner and wit) a stationary slotted breast beam comb, the cohoined action of the stationary comb and of the grippers after releasing the ends of the tuft yarns and beginning to rise would function as a folding comb to turn upward the lower ends of the tufts. The lower movable comb in the loom could then be omitted, althrough the upper comb would be retained.
As a further modification, the loom may include tuft yarn grippers mounted for movement in a backward and downward path through the warp threads. When such grippers are used, the movement of the grippers does not assist in folding the pile yarns and that is accomplished by means of the cooperating combs shown in the loom illustrated.
What I claim:
1. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, a plurality of heddles movable for manipulating warps from said beams to form a pair of sheds, a pair of needles lying parallel for inserting weft simultaneously in the sheds, and means for passing a selvedge chord through the loop of weft carried by each needle, said means including a pair of shuttles movable in raceways in a common guide member and lying with their longitudinal axes parallel, said raceways being in communication with each other throughout their length, and means for positively driving the shuttles in both directions.
2. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, a plurality of heddles movable for manipulating warps from said beams to form a pair of sheds, a pair of needles lying parallel for inserting weft simultaneously in the sheds, and means for passing a selvedge chord through the loop of weft carried by each needle, said means including a pair of shuttles movable in raceways in parallel paths, said raceways being in communication with each other throughout their length, a rock shaft driven from the main cam shaft of the loom, and means operatively connecting the shuttles to the rock shaft for positive movement in both directions.
3. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, a plurality of heddles movable for manipulating warps from said beams to form a pair of sheds, a pair of needles extending parallel for inserting weft simultane ously in the sheds, and means for passing a selvedge chord through the loop of weft carried by each needle, said means including a guide member, a pair of shuttles therein lying with their longitudinal axes parallel, driving means engaging said shuttles and a connection between said shuttles, said driving means and connection being constructed to permit weft strands to pass between the driving means and shuttles and between the shuttles.
4. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of horizontal warp beams, a plurality of heddles movable for manipulating warps from said beams to form sheds in two planes, a pair of needles one above the other for inserting weft simultaneously in the sheds, and means for passing a selvedge chord through the loop of weft carried by each needle, said means including a pair of shuttles one above the other, driving means engaging one end of both shuttles and the other end of one shuttle, and a connection between said shuttle driven at both ends and the other shuttle 5. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of horizontal warp beams, a plurality of heddles movable for manipulating warps from said beams to form sheds in two planes, a pair of needles one above the other for inserting weft simultaneously in the sheds, and means for passing a selvedge chord through the loop of weft carried by each needle, said means including a pair of shuttles movable in different levels, a swinging arm for driving said shuttles and having an extension engaging the rear end of both shuttles and a projection engaging the forward end of one shuttle, and a projection onsaid shuttle engaged at both ends, said projection entering a recess in the forward end of the second shuttle.
6. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, said means including a pair of combs lying on opposite sides of said pair of breast plates mountings for said combs adapted to be swung, and means for giving said mountings a combination of movements, in the first of which said combs swing into registry with said yarns and bend them partially about said pair of weft shots, and in the second of which said combs approach each other to complete the looping of said yarns about said shots, said means being operable to cause said second movement to begin before the first is completed.
7. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, said means including a pair of combs lying on opposite sides of said pair of breastplates mountings for said combs adapted to be swung, and means for giving said mountings a series of swinging movements in the first of which said combs move into registry with said yarns and bend them partially about said pair of weft shots and in the second of which said combs turn the free ends of said yarns toward each other to complete the looping of said yarns about said shots.
8. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, said means including a pair of combs lying on opposite sides of said pair of breast plates, means for swinging said combs into operative position in registry with said yarns, said combs in this movement engaging said yarns and bending them partially around said shots and a second means for moving said combs toward each other to complete the looping of said yarns about said pair of weft shots.
9. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, said means including a pair of combs lying on opposite sides of said pair of breast plates, means for moving both combs into operative position in registry with said yarns, and a separate means for each comb operating to cause said combs to approach each other and loop said yarns about said pair of weft shots.
10. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, said means including a pair of combs, each comb being mounted in swinging arms, means for swinging said combs into operative registry with said yarns, said combs partially bending said yarns about said shot in said movement, and means for moving said combs toward each other to complete the looping of said yarns about said shot.
11. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, said means including a pair of combs, each comb being mounted in swinging arms, means for swinging said arms to bring said combs into operative relation to said yarns, said combs in this movement partially bending the yarns about said shot, and means for moving said arms to cause said combs to approach each other and complete the looping of said yarns about said shot.
12. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft'therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, said means including a pair of combs, each comb being mounted in swinging arms, a rock shaft and connections between said shaft and arms, means for rocking said shaft to move said arms to bring said combs into operative position in registry with said yarns, said combs in said movement engaging the yarns and bending them partially around said shots and means individual to each comb and including a cam, for moving said combs toward each other to complete the looping of said yarns about said weft shots, the means for giving said combs their two movements being separate and distinct.
13. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a weft shot in each plane, said means including a pair of combs lying on opposite sides of said warps, a swinging mounting for each comb, means for swinging said mountings to bring said combs into operative position in registry with said pile yarns, said combs in said movement engaging the yarns and bending them partially around said shots and means distinct from said swinging means for moving said mountings to cause said combs to approach each other to complete the looping of the yarns about said shots.
14. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a weft shot in each plane, said means including a pairof combs lying on opposite sides of said warps, a swinging mounting for each comb, means for swinging said mountings to bring said combs into operative position in registry with said pile yarns, and means individual to each comb for swinging said mountings to cause said combs to complete their looping action.
, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for-inserting lengths of pile yarnsthrough said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a weft shot in each plane, said means including a pair of combs lying on opposite sides of said warps, a swinging, mounting for each comb, a connection between said mountings, a rock shaft connected to one mounting, means for rocking said shaft to cause it to swing both mountings, said combs in such movement engaging the yarns and moving them partially around said shots and means distinct from said rocking means for giving said combs a movement toward each other to complete the looping of said yarns about said shots.
16. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps drawn from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for actuating said needles, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns through said warps, spaced breast plates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, means for looping said lengths of 'pile'yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, each pile yarn having a portion extending from one plane to the other, and means for severing the connecting portions of said pile yarns to divide the double fabric into two single ones, said means including a holder carrying a knife, a flexible connector attached to the holder, a drum to which the connector is attached, and means for rotating said drum alternately in opposite directions, said rotating means being driven from said needle actuating means and giving a cutting movement of said knife for each movement of said needles both forward and back.
17. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddle mechanism for manipulating warps from said beams to form sheds in two planes, needles movable simultaneously to insert shots of weft in the sheds in said planes, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns drawn from supplies between said warps, cooperating knives for severing said-yarns from their supplies, mountings for said knives, means for adjusting said mountings toward and away from said supplies, said adiusting means providing the sole control of the lengths of the yarns to be inserted, means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, spaced breastplates between which the fabric produced leaves the weaving point, and means for varying the space between said breastplates.
18. In a loom for.weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots'of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns drawn from supplies between said warps, cooperating knives for severing said pile yarns from said supplies, means for looping the ends of the severed lengths of pile yarns about shots of weft one in each plane, spaced breastplates between which the fabric woven leaves the weaving point, means for varying the spacing between said breastplates, and means for adjusting the position of said knives relative to said supplies to vary the lengths of pile yarns cut thereby from said supplies.
19. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddles movable to manipulate warps from said beams to form separate sheds in spaced planes, needles simultaneously movable through said sheds to insert shots of weft therein, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns drawn from supplies between said warps, cooperating knives for severing said pile yarns from said supplies, means for looping the ends of the severed lengths of pile yarns about shots of weft one in each plane, spaced breastplates between which the fabric woven leaves the weaving point, means for varying the spacing between said breastplates, and additional means for adjusting the positions of both knives relative to said supplies to vary the lengths of pile yarns cut thereby from the supplies.
20. In a loom for weaving double pile fabrics, the combination of warp beams, heddle mechanism for manipulating warps from said beams to form sheds in two planes, needles movable simultaneously to insert shots of weft in the sheds in said planes, means for inserting lengths of pile yarns drawn from supplies between said warps, cooperating knives for severing said yarns from said supplies, means for varying the position of said knives relative to said supplies to vary the length of the severed portions of said yarn, said means providing the sole control of the length of the severed portions of said yarns, means for looping said lengths of pile yarns about a shot of weft in each plane, a,.fixed breastplate along which the fabric moves as it leaves the weaving point, a movable breastplate on the opposite side of said fabric, said movable breastplate being adjustable to vary the spacing between said breastplates and means for adjusting said movable breastplate.
ARTHUR W. SHUTTLEWORTH.
US618839A 1932-06-23 1932-06-23 Loom Expired - Lifetime US1965395A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100282357A1 (en) * 2007-04-23 2010-11-11 Brintons Limited Yarn tuft holder
US10711376B2 (en) * 2016-05-04 2020-07-14 Innotec Lightweight Engineering & Polymer Technology Gmbh Circular weaving machine and method for producing a hollow profile-like fabric

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100282357A1 (en) * 2007-04-23 2010-11-11 Brintons Limited Yarn tuft holder
US8387667B2 (en) * 2007-04-23 2013-03-05 Brintons Carpets Limited Yarn tuft holder
US10711376B2 (en) * 2016-05-04 2020-07-14 Innotec Lightweight Engineering & Polymer Technology Gmbh Circular weaving machine and method for producing a hollow profile-like fabric

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