JP5168891B2 - Electric vehicle charging power management system - Google Patents

Electric vehicle charging power management system Download PDF

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JP5168891B2
JP5168891B2 JP2006319619A JP2006319619A JP5168891B2 JP 5168891 B2 JP5168891 B2 JP 5168891B2 JP 2006319619 A JP2006319619 A JP 2006319619A JP 2006319619 A JP2006319619 A JP 2006319619A JP 5168891 B2 JP5168891 B2 JP 5168891B2
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charging
house
electric vehicle
expected
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JP2008136291A (en
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隆志 橋本
寿郎 村松
美帆 木戸
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日産自動車株式会社
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Description

  The present invention relates to an electric vehicle charging power management system used when charging a battery of an electric vehicle.

  2. Description of the Related Art Conventionally, a charging system that charges a battery of an electric vehicle using electric power supplied from the outside into a house is known (see, for example, Patent Document 1). In such a charging system, when a normal 100 [V] power source and a 200 [V] power source that is a midnight power source are supplied to the house, charging is performed by a 200 [V] power source during the midnight power supply time period. In a time zone that is not the midnight power supply time zone, charging is performed by a 100 [V] power source.

JP-A-8-228406

  However, conventionally, the charging power is controlled by sensing only the state of the battery of the electric vehicle (SOC, etc.), so in the time zone in which charging is performed using a normal 100 [V] power source, When the power load increases, there is a problem that the power load of the entire house exceeds the maximum contract power and the breaker falls.

According to the first aspect of the present invention, the electric vehicle charging power management for branching the electric power supplied to the house from the outside to the in-house electric power load and the electric vehicle side and charging the electric vehicle capacitor with the electric power branched to the electric vehicle side. In the system, detection means for detecting power to the power load in the house, calculation means for calculating the expected power consumption in the house based on the power consumption history information of the power load in the house generated based on the detection result of the detection means, The control means for controlling the charging power so that the sum of the expected power consumption in the house calculated by the computing means and the charging power to the battery does not exceed the allowable value of the power supplied to the house from the outside, The computing means calculates the expected in-home power consumption in a predetermined time zone based on the power consumption history information, and the control means subtracts the estimated in-home power consumption based on the power consumption history information from the allowable value. There a vehicle charging predicted electric power, a charge required power value from the electric vehicle, compared with the electric power by subtracting the power detected by the detecting means from the allowable value, and sets the lowest power to charge power, the control means In addition, when the special charge power time zone with a low electricity charge is included in the time period from the charge start time to the charge end time, the total of the expected power consumption in the house and the charge power to the capacitor in the special charge power time zone The charging power is controlled so that the electric power is a value larger than that outside the special charge power time zone and becomes a constant value .
The invention according to claim 2 is an electric vehicle charging power management in which electric power supplied to the house from the outside is branched to the electric power load in the house and the electric vehicle side, and the electric vehicle capacitor is charged with the electric power branched to the electric vehicle side. Applies to the system. And detecting means for detecting power to the in-house power load, generating means for generating power consumption history information of the in-house power load based on the detection result of the detecting means, and a predetermined time zone based on the power consumption history information. First calculating means for calculating the predicted in-home power consumption, first setting means for setting the charging end time based on usage history information of the electric vehicle, predicted in-home power consumption and charging power to the battery When the total electric power is kept constant and charged until the charging end time, the second setting means for setting the constant total electric power for the battery to be fully charged, and the total electric power is supplied from the outside to the house When the amount of power when charging power is controlled so as to be equal to the allowable value of power and charged until the charging end time is greater than the amount of power required to fully charge the battery, the total power is the second power Set by setting means Characterized in that a control means for controlling the charging power to be equal to the total power constant values.
According to a third aspect of the present invention, electric vehicle charging is performed by branching electric power supplied to the house from the outside to the in-house electric power load and the electric vehicle side, and charging the electric vehicle capacitor with the electric power branched to the electric vehicle side. Applies to power management systems. And detecting means for detecting power to the in-house power load, generating means for generating power consumption history information of the in-house power load based on the detection result of the detecting means, and a predetermined time zone based on the power consumption history information. The calculation means for calculating the expected power consumption in the house, the input means for inputting and setting the charging end time, and the total power of the expected power consumption in the house and the charging power to the battery are kept constant and charged until the charging end time. In this case, the second setting means for setting a constant value of the total power for the battery to be fully charged and the charging power are controlled so that the total power becomes equal to the allowable value of the power supplied to the house from the outside. When the amount of power when charging until the charging end time is larger than the amount of power required to fully charge the battery, the charging power is set equal to the constant total power set by the second setting means. The Characterized in that a Gosuru control means.
According to a fourth aspect of the present invention, there is provided an electric vehicle charging power management for branching electric power supplied to a house from outside to an in-house electric power load and an electric vehicle side, and charging the electric vehicle capacitor with the electric power branched to the electric vehicle side. In the system, detection means for detecting power to the residential power load, generation means for generating power consumption history information of the residential power load based on the detection result of the detection means, and generation based on the detection result of the detection means The calculation means for calculating the predicted power consumption in the house based on the power consumption history information of the in-house power load, and the sum of the predicted power consumption in the house calculated by the calculation means and the charging power to the battery from the outside Control means for controlling the charging power so as not to exceed the allowable value of the power supplied to the battery, and the computing means is based on the power consumption history information, and the expected in-house power consumption in a predetermined time zone. The control means is detected by the detection means from the expected vehicle charging power obtained by subtracting the expected residential power consumption based on the power consumption history information from the allowable value, the required charging power value from the electric vehicle side, and the allowable value. And the control means, the control means, the total power of the expected power consumption in the house and the charging power before the storage amount of the battery reaches a predetermined value, The charging power is controlled to be larger than the total power after the storage amount of the battery reaches the predetermined value, and the total power of the expected power consumption in the house and the charging power before the storage amount of the storage battery reaches the predetermined value is The charging power is controlled to be a constant value.

According to the present invention, the sum of the predicted in-house power consumption calculated based on the power consumption history information of the in-house power load and the charge power to the electric vehicle storage battery is the allowable power supplied to the house from the outside. Since the charging power is controlled so as not to exceed the value, the risk of the breaker falling due to increase / decrease in power consumption in the house due to time, season, etc. is avoided, and charging to the electric vehicle capacitor is performed. It can be done efficiently and reliably.

Hereinafter, the best mode for carrying out the present invention will be described with reference to the drawings.
-First embodiment-
FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing a first embodiment of a vehicle charging power management system according to the present invention, which shows a device configuration on the house 10 side and a device configuration on the electric vehicle 30 side. A grid power 1 from an electric power company is connected to a switchboard 11 on the house 10 side via a power meter 2. The power supplied to the house 10 is branched by the switchboard 11 and provided in the house 10 with various electrical devices in the house 10 (herein, these devices are referred to as the in-house power load 12). The electric vehicle charger 20 is supplied. The electric vehicle charger 20 is provided with a charging paddle 25 connected to the inlet 35 of the electric vehicle 30 during charging.

  A power detection device 13 is set between the switchboard 11 and the in-house power load 12. The electric vehicle charger 20 includes a charge controller 21, a converter 22, and the above-described charging paddle 25. The charge controller 21 constantly senses the power load status of the in-house power load 12 via the power detection device 13. In addition, the charge controller 21 receives signals regarding the battery state and the paddle connection state from the electric vehicle 30 side via the communication antenna 26, calculates charge power for the electric vehicle 30, and sends the control signal to the electric vehicle 30 side. Send to.

  The converter 22 includes an AC / DC conversion inverter 23 and a DC / high frequency AC conversion inverter 24, and a charging paddle 25 is connected to the DC / high frequency AC conversion inverter 24. The charging paddle 25 performs power transmission by electromagnetic induction between the charging paddle 25 and the inlet 35 on the electric vehicle 30 side. The charging paddle 25 and the inlet 35 connected to each other constitute a transformer, and the charging paddle is provided with one coil constituting the transformer.

  The electric vehicle 30 is provided with a battery 32 as a power storage mechanism, a battery controller 31 and a high frequency AC / DC conversion inverter 33. The high frequency AC / DC conversion inverter 33 converts the high frequency AC to DC when the battery 32 is charged. The battery 32 is connected to the inlet 35 via a high frequency AC / DC conversion inverter 33.

  The inlet 35 performs power transmission by electromagnetic induction between the charging paddle 25 and includes the other coil constituting the transformer. The inlet 35 is provided with a switch 34 that detects the connection between the inlet 35 and the charging paddle 25. The switch 34 is activated when the charging paddle 25 is inserted into the inlet 35 and becomes capable of transmitting power, and outputs a paddle connection signal to the battery controller 31.

  The battery controller 31 monitors the state of the battery 32 (specifically, SOC: charge amount, power storage mechanism temperature, etc.), and sends the paddle connection signal and the battery state from the switch 34 via the communication antenna 36 on the housing side. It transmits to the charge controller 21. Further, the battery controller 31 receives the electric vehicle charging control signal from the residential charging controller 21 via the communication antenna 36, and controls the high-frequency AC / DC conversion inverter 33.

<Operation description>
FIG. 2 is a flowchart for explaining the operation of the vehicle charging power management system according to the first embodiment, and this program is executed by the CPU of the charger 20. In step S1, whether or not the charging paddle 25 is connected to the inlet 35 is determined based on the presence or absence of a paddle connection signal transmitted from the battery controller 31 to the charger 20 via the antennas 26 and 36. The process of step S1 is repeated until the connection of the charging paddle 25 is detected. When the connection is detected, the process proceeds to step S2.

  In step S2, a self-check is performed to determine whether the entire system is normal. In step S3, it is determined whether or not the result of the self check in step S2 is OK (normal). If it is determined to be OK in step S3, the process proceeds to step S4. If not, the process proceeds to step S511 to stop the charging emergencyly, and then a system fail signal is transmitted in step S512 to lock the system. .

  When the process proceeds from step S3 to step S4, the battery state and the required charging power value WVd are read from the battery controller 31 of the electric vehicle 30 to the charge controller 21 in step S4. The required charging power value WVd is determined based on the acceptable power information in consideration of the temperature environment of the battery 32 at that time and the chargeable power capacity of the charger 20.

  In step S5, it is determined whether or not the obtained SOC in the battery state is less than 100% (full charge). If it is determined in step S5 that SOC <100%, the process proceeds to step S6. If not, the process proceeds to step S51, and it is further determined whether or not the SOC is 100% (full charge). If it is determined in step S51 to be 100% (full charge), the process proceeds to step S11, and the process proceeds to a sequence in which the charging operation is normally terminated.

  On the other hand, if it is determined in step S51 that it is not 100% (full charge), the process proceeds to step S511 to stop charging urgently, and then proceeds to step S512 to transmit a system fail signal to perform system lock. . As a situation where such a fail signal is transmitted, for example, due to some unforeseen situation (such as a sudden change in the temperature environment of the battery 32), the SOC of the battery 32 at that time exceeds 100%, The case where it becomes an overcharge state etc. can be considered.

  If it is determined in step S5 that the SOC is less than 100%, the process proceeds to a normal charging sequence in and after step S6. In step S <b> 6, the power load value WH in the house detected by the power detection device 13 is read into the charge controller 21. In step S7, the charge request power value WVd read from the battery controller 31 in step S4 is less than the value obtained by subtracting the residential power load value WH from the maximum contract power WA, which is the allowable power value on the house side (WA−WH). It is determined whether or not there is.

  If the required charging power value WVd from the electric vehicle 30 is less than the value obtained by subtracting the residential power load value WH from the maximum contract power WA (WA−WH), charging is possible with the required power from the electric vehicle 30. It can be judged that there is. Therefore, if it is determined in step S7 that WVd <(WA−WH), the process proceeds to step S8, and the charging power WV is set as WV = WVd.

  On the other hand, when it is determined in step S7 that the required charging power value WVd is equal to or greater than (WA−WH), the charging power value WVd based on the required power from the electric vehicle 30 in addition to the power load in the house. If the battery 32 is charged, the maximum contracted power WA is exceeded on the house 10 side, and the breaker falls. In this case, since the upper limit of the charging power that can be supplied to the electric vehicle 30 from the house 10 side is (WA−WH), the process proceeds from step S7 to step S71, and the charging power WV is set to WV = WA−WH.

  In step S9, the converter 22 is controlled to control the charger 20 with the charging power value WV set in step S8 or step S71, and at the same time, charging for instructing the charging power value WV to the battery controller 31 on the electric vehicle 30 side. A power value signal is transmitted. The battery controller 31 of the electric vehicle 30 that has received this charge power value signal recognizes the charge power value as WV, controls the high frequency AC / DC inverter 33, and supplies the obtained DC power to the battery 32. In this manner, the battery 32 mounted on the electric vehicle 30 is charged by the charger 20 on the house 10 side.

  In step S10, when a “charge stop” command is input to the charger 20 in some form, the process proceeds to step S11 to shift to a charge end sequence. On the other hand, if NO is determined in step S10, the process returns to step S4. The “charge stop” command here is a signal based on an operation performed by the user judging that “the battery is not fully charged but wants to use an electric vehicle”, and more specifically, a charge stop switch A signal generated by an operation (not shown), a detection signal of the switch 34 when the charging paddle 25 is manually pulled out, and the like can be given.

  Thus, in the first embodiment, the sum of the charging power value WV to the battery 32 and the residential power load value WH consumed by the residential power load 12 exceeds the maximum contracted power WA in the entire house. Since charging is controlled so as not to occur, the risk that the sum (power consumption of the entire house) exceeds the maximum contract power WA and the breaker falls can be avoided.

-Second Embodiment-
FIG. 3 is a diagram for explaining a second embodiment of the present invention, and is a block diagram similar to FIG. The vehicle charge power management system shown in FIG. 3 differs from the system shown in FIG. 1 in that the power history acquisition device 27 and the expected charge power calculation device 28 are provided on the house 10 side. Is the same as FIG. Below, it demonstrates centering on a different part from the system of FIG.

  As shown in FIG. 3, the power detection device 13 is connected to the charge controller 21 of the electric vehicle charger 20 via the power history acquisition device 27 and the expected charging power calculation device 28. The power history acquisition device 27 has a time and date management function, and records the power load history information in the house 10 obtained by the power detection device 13 in the form of a time series map in units of one day (24 hours). save. This time-series map is created in units of one day (24 hours). Each time-series map consists of four types (season, spring, summer, autumn and winter) and three types on weekdays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. Categorize into one of the splits. These databases are updated daily, and power load maps that have passed a predetermined period are sequentially deleted.

  The expected charging power calculation device 28 also has the same time and date management function as the power history acquisition device 27. Then, from the database of the power history acquisition device 27 described above, the stock of the in-house power load map in the category to which the charging day belongs is taken out, and a weighted average with higher weight is given to the map nearest to the time, Create a map of expected power load in the house. FIG. 4 illustrates an image of categorizing the power load map history, and also shows the weighting when creating the predicted power load map in the house.

  Further, when the expected charge power calculation device 28 obtains the charge start signal and the SOC information of the battery 32 in the electric vehicle 30 via the charge controller 21, the expected charge from the charge start to the charge end time with the maximum contract power WA as the upper limit. Calculate the power profile. FIG. 5 is a diagram for explaining an example of a method for creating an expected charging power profile from an in-house expected power load map using the charging start time t1 as a trigger.

  FIG. 5A shows an in-house expected power load map, where the vertical axis represents the predicted power value and the horizontal axis represents the time of the day. The in-house expected power load map is time-series data regarding the predicted value of power consumed in the house, and is represented as a line graph in FIG. Of course, this is only an expected value, and the actual in-house power load value WH detected by the power detection device 13 does not always coincide with this in-house expected power load value.

  Since the maximum contract power WA is an allowable value of the power that can be consumed by the entire house, as shown in FIG. 5A, the difference between the maximum contract power WA and the predicted power load value in the house (vehicle charge power expected value) is This is the upper limit of the power value that can be used for charging the battery 32. The area of the hatched portion between the broken line and the maximum contracted power WA line represents the amount of power, and this amount of power is the amount of power required to bring the battery 32 from the current SOC to a fully charged state. The charging end time t2 is calculated so as to be equal.

  FIG. 5B is a diagram showing an expected charging power profile, in which the vehicle charging power expected value at each time from the charging start time t1 to the charging end time t2 is plotted. The charge controller 21 controls the converter 22 based on the expected charge power profile calculated by the expected charge power calculation device 28, and uses the finally calculated charge power control signal via the communication antenna 26 for the electric vehicle 30. To the side.

  6 and 7 are flowcharts for explaining the operation of the vehicle charging power management system according to the second embodiment. Steps that perform the same processing as in the flowchart shown in FIG. In steps S1 and S2, the same processing as in FIG. 2 is performed, and in step S3, it is determined whether or not the self-check result is OK (normal). If it is determined NO (not OK) in step S3, as in the case of the first embodiment, the process proceeds to step S511 to urgently stop charging, and then a system fail signal is transmitted in step S512. To lock the system.

  On the other hand, if YES is determined in the step S3, that is, if the result of the self check is OK, the process proceeds to a step S20. In step S <b> 20, the charging start signal transmitted from the battery controller 31 on the electric vehicle 30 side to the house 10 side is sent to the expected charging power calculation device 28 via the charging controller 21. Thereafter, the process proceeds to step S21, and after the battery state is read from the battery controller 31 of the electric vehicle 30 to the charge controller 21, in step S5, it is determined whether or not the SOC of the battery 32 is less than 100% (full charge). judge.

  If it is determined in step S5 that SOC <100%, the process proceeds to step S22. If not, the process proceeds to step S51, and it is further determined whether the SOC is 100% (full charge). If it is determined in step S51 that it is 100% (full charge), the process proceeds to step S52, and the process proceeds to a sequence in which the charging operation is normally terminated. On the other hand, if it is determined in step S51 that it is not 100% (full charge), the process proceeds to step S511 to stop charging urgently, and then proceeds to step S512 to transmit a system fail signal to perform system lock. .

  If it is determined in step S5 that the SOC is less than 100%, the process proceeds to step S22 to shift to a normal charging sequence. In step S22, based on the stock of the in-house power load map of the category corresponding to the day of charging acquired by the power history acquisition device 27, the predicted in-house power load map (see FIGS. 4 and 5A). Creation is performed by the expected charging power calculation device 28. Furthermore, in step S23, from the charge start time to the charge end time based on the generated predicted power load map in the house, the SOC of the battery 32 acquired from the electric vehicle 30 side, and the maximum contract power WA in the house 10. The expected charging power profile (see FIG. 5B) is created by the expected charging power calculation device 28. This expected charging power profile is transmitted to the charging controller 21.

  In step S24, the charge controller 21 reads the vehicle charge power expected value WVp at that time from the calculated expected charge power profile, and the vehicle side charge request power value WVd from the battery controller 31 and the house side from the power detection device 13 Read each of the power load values WH. Note that the required charging power value WVd is, as in the first embodiment described above, the acceptable power information taking into account the temperature environment of the battery 32 at that time and the chargeable power capacity of the charger 20. To be determined.

  In step S7 of FIG. 7, it is determined whether or not the required charging power value WVd from the electric vehicle 30 side is less than the value obtained by subtracting the current residential power load value WH from the maximum contract power WA (WA−WH). To do. If it is determined in step S7 that WVd <(WA−WH), the process proceeds to step S25. In step S25, it is determined whether the required charging power value WVd is smaller than the predicted vehicle charging power value WVp calculated by the predicted charging power amount calculation device 28. If YES (WVd <WVp) is determined in step S25, the process proceeds to step S8, and the vehicle charging power WV is set to WVd. Conversely, if NO (WVd ≧ WVp) is determined, the process proceeds to step S27 to charge the vehicle. Set power WV to WVp.

  On the other hand, if it is determined in step S7 that WVd ≧ (WA−WH), the process proceeds to step S26. In this case, if the battery 32 is charged at the vehicle-side charge request power value WVd in addition to the in-house power load value WH at that time, the maximum contract power WA is exceeded on the house 10 side and the breaker falls. Will end up.

  Therefore, in step S26, it is determined whether or not the vehicle charging power expected value WVp based on the past in-house power load history is less than the current power available on the house side (WA-WH). If it is determined in step S26 that WVp <(WA−WH), the process proceeds to step S27 to set the vehicle charging power WV to WVp. On the other hand, if it is determined that WVp ≧ (WA−WH), the process proceeds to step S28. Go ahead and set the vehicle charging power WV to WA-WH.

  As described above, the final vehicle charging power WV is calculated by comparing the charging required power value WVd and the vehicle charging power expected value WVp based on the past in-house power load history or the current residential-side suppliable power value (WA−WH). Depending on the relationship, the required charging power value WVd (step S8), the vehicle charging power expected value WVp (step 27), and the house-side suppliable power value WA-WH (step S28) are set.

  Here, the situation in each of steps S8, S27, and S28 will be described. First, when YES is determined in step S25 and the process proceeds to step S8, the required charging power value WVd requested from the battery 32 of the electric vehicle 30 is the predicted vehicle charging power value WVp based on the past in-house power load history. In addition, it is in a state where it is lower than the current power supply (WA-WH) that can be supplied by the house. In such a case, the vehicle charging power WV is set to the charging required power value WVd that is the lowest value.

  For example, since the SOC of the battery 32 is close to 100% (full charge), (a) the charging power is not so much required, or (b) the power load on the house 10 side is small at midnight, etc. There is a margin, and the charge power is affected by the chargeable power capacity of the charger 20, or (c) the performance of the battery 32 deteriorates in a relatively low temperature environment such as winter, and the charge-acceptable power In the lowered state, WV = WVd is set as in step S8.

  On the other hand, when the process proceeds from step S26 to step S27, WVp <(WA−WH) ≦ WVd, and the vehicle charging power expected value WVp based on the past in-house power load history is obtained from the battery 32 on the electric vehicle 30 side. This is a state where it is lower than both the required charging required power value WVd and the current residential-side suppliable power value (WA-WH). In other words, the charging required power value WVd is not as large as the predicted value WVp, and the actual residential power consumption WH is also smaller than the predicted residential power load. When the process proceeds from step S25 to step S27, WVp ≦ WVd <(WA−WH). In such a case, the vehicle charging power WV is set to the vehicle charging power expected value WVp in step S27.

  As such a state, for example, the power load value WH in the house 10 is relatively high, and the breaker in the house 10 falls when it corresponds to the charge request power value WVd required from the battery 32 on the electric vehicle 30 side. This situation corresponds to this. Further, there is a possibility that a relatively high power load may occur on the house 10 side based on the past power load history in the house, and the breaker in the house 10 corresponds to the charge required power value WVd required from the battery 32. An example of a case where the image falls is considered as an example.

  Further, when the process proceeds from step S26 to step S28, both of the required charging power value WVd requested from the battery 32 and the vehicle charging power expected value WVp based on the past in-house power load history are the current housing side. It is in a state where the supplyable power value (WA-WH) is exceeded. For example, if the power load in the house 10 is an unprecedented height that corresponds to the charging power required by the battery 32, the breaker in the house 10 will fall rather than fall in the house 10. This is a case where the prediction of the charging power based on the past power load history is not valid. In such a case, the vehicle charging power management must be passively performed with a considerably low power so as not to exceed the maximum contract power WA.

  If the charging power WV of the electric vehicle 30 is thus set, the process proceeds to step S9. In step S9, the converter 22 of the charger 20 is controlled by the set charging power value WV, and a charging power value signal WV is transmitted to the battery controller 21 on the electric vehicle 30 side. On the electric vehicle 30 side, the battery 32 is charged by controlling the high-frequency AC / DC inverter 33 based on the charging power value WV.

  The subsequent steps S10 and S11 are the same as those in the first embodiment (FIG. 2). That is, when a charge stop command is input, the process proceeds to step S11 to shift to a charge end sequence. When no charge stop command is input, the process returns to step S21.

  As described above, in the second embodiment, an in-house expected power load map is created based on the in-house power consumption history information, and the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is calculated based on the in-house expected power load map. calculate. Then, the vehicle charge power expected value WVp, the charge request power value WVd from the electric vehicle 30 side, and the housing suppliable power (WA-WH) at that time are compared, and the power value that is the lowest value is obtained. Charging was done. Therefore, as compared with the case where the electric vehicle charging power is controlled in a passive manner corresponding to the detected electric power load value in the house as in the first embodiment, the power consumption is increased in the second embodiment. Since the charging power is actively controlled using the in-house predicted power load map based on the history information, the risk of the breaker falling can be avoided more reliably.

[Modification 1]
FIG. 8 is a diagram showing a first modification of the second embodiment. In 2nd Embodiment mentioned above, when transmitting charging power from the house 10 side to the electric vehicle 30, electric power transmission was performed by the electromagnetic induction using the charging paddle 25 and the inlet 35. FIG. On the other hand, in the modification 1 shown in FIG. 8, electric power transmission by alternating current power using the charge plug 25b and the inlet 35b was performed. In this case, the converter 22 of the charger 20 is constituted by an AC / AC conversion inverter 23b. The in-house power load detection device 13b is a non-contact type detection device, and performs detection by installing a clamp meter at a necessary part of the power line, for example.

  On the other hand, the inverter 33b on the electric vehicle 30 side is constituted by an AC / DC conversion inverter, and converts the AC power from the charger 20 side to DC to charge the battery 32. In this modification, since the power transmission form is alternating current, the charging plug 25b and the inlet 35b do not need to form a transformer. Therefore, it is possible to use a connection form of a conventional two-pole or three-pole outlet type. Similarly, information transmission between the charge controller 21 and the battery controller 31 can also be performed in a wired manner by connection using the connector 26b on the house 10 side and the connector 36b on the electric vehicle 30 side. Other configurations and system control flowcharts are the same as those in the second embodiment described above.

[Modification 2]
FIG. 19 is a diagram illustrating a second modification of the second embodiment. The above-described charging end time t2 shown in FIG. 5 is a charging end time calculated on the assumption that the sum of the in-house expected power load value and the vehicle charging power expected value is equal to the maximum contract power WA. Therefore, as shown in FIG. 19, if the sum of the predicted power load value in the house and the predicted vehicle charge power value is a value WC smaller than the maximum contract power WA, ΔW = You can have a margin of only WA-WC. In this case, the charging end time is delayed from t2 to t3 by the amount that the sum is lowered from WA to WC.

  In this way, when the allowance ΔW is provided, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp obtained based on the map of FIG. 19 is set as the actual charging power WV, and the residential power load exceeding the expected residential power load value is set. The generation of the value WH can be handled with a margin allowance ΔW. In this case, since the charging power WV is controlled so that the sum of the expected power load value in the house and the charging power WV becomes a constant value WC, the power load of the entire house during the charging period is leveled to the constant value WC. Is done. Of course, when the in-house power load value WH becomes larger than the fixed value WC, even if the charging power WV = 0 at that time, the power load of the entire house temporarily exceeds WC.

  In the above-described example, the WC is set in advance for the maximum contract power WA, and the charging end time t2 is calculated based on the WC. However, when information about the charging end time is acquired by some method, The charging end time may be set based on the information, and the WC value may be obtained from the set charging end time. As information regarding the charge end time, for example, there is a use start time of the electric vehicle 30 in one day. The charge controller 21 receives the vehicle use history information from the electric vehicle 30 side via the communication antenna 26, estimates the vehicle use start time of the day from the vehicle use history information, and determines from the estimated time. A predetermined time before is set as the charging end time.

  Further, the charging end time in the current charging may be set based on the operation history of the charging controller 21 (charging start time, charging end time). Furthermore, when the configuration is such that the user can set the charging end time, WC may be set from the charging end time that has been input and set. In any case, the setting of the value WC is valid only when the set charging end time is later than the charging end time t2 of FIG.

[Modification 3]
FIG. 20 is a diagram illustrating a third modification of the second embodiment. In the third modification, it is assumed that a special fee contract (such as a late-night power contract) is concluded in the house 10 and the fee is lower than usual in the time zone where the special fee is applied. When the special charge time zone is included in the charge time zone, the charging power is positively increased to reduce the total electric cost.

  In the example shown in FIG. 20, the time zone between time t4 and time t5 is a special charge time zone. In this time zone, the sum of the charging power WV and the estimated power in the house is the maximum contract power WA. The charging power WV is controlled as follows. On the other hand, in the charging time zone outside the special charge time zone, the total power is set to WD (<WC) so that the charging amount is the same as when charging control is performed with a constant total power WC (FIG. 19). . As described above, the cost can be further reduced as compared with the case of the modification 2 by increasing the charging power in the special charge time zone where the power charge is low.

-Third embodiment-
FIG. 9 is a diagram for explaining a third embodiment of the present invention, and is a block diagram similar to FIG. The power management system for charging a vehicle shown in FIG. 9 is an expansion of the function of the system of the second embodiment described above, and is different in that an interface 29 is further provided on the house 10 side. Other configurations are the same as those in FIG. 3, and the following description will focus on differences from the system in FIG.

  The interface 29 connected to the charge controller 21 includes the SOC and charging power of the battery 32 from time to time, the expected full charge time, the expected time when the SOC reaches a preset SOC set value P, and the power at the house 10 side. A display unit for displaying a load (power consumption in a house) and the like is provided. By displaying these pieces of information on the interface 29, the current power management state in the electric vehicle 30 and the house 10 can be notified to the user. Furthermore, the interface 29 has an input unit that allows the user to input a desired “charging end time” from the house 10 side when charging the electric vehicle 30, so that the user's needs can be dealt with more carefully. Can do.

  FIGS. 10-12 is a flowchart explaining operation | movement of the electric power management system for vehicle charging in 3rd Embodiment. Note that the same reference numerals are assigned to the steps for performing the same processing as in the flowchart (FIGS. 6 and 7) of the second embodiment. The processing from step S1 to step S5 in the flowchart of FIG. 10 and the processing in the case where NO is determined in step S5 and the process proceeds to step S51 are exactly the same as those in FIG.

  If it is determined as YES (SOC <100%) in step S5, the process proceeds to step S30. In step S30, the in-house power load value WH at the present time is read from the power detection device 13 on the house 10 side. In step S31, it is determined whether or not the “charge end time” is input by the user. If it is determined that the “charging end time” is input, the process proceeds to step S22. If it is determined that there is no input, the process proceeds to step S333 in FIG.

  In step S22, as in the case of the second embodiment described above, based on the stock of the home power load map of the category corresponding to the day of charging, the home expected power load map (FIG. 4, FIG. )) Is created by the expected charging power calculation device 28. In the subsequent step S32, the vehicle charging power expected initial value WVp0 is calculated based on the current time (corresponding to the charging start time), the charging end time, the SOC of the battery 32, and the in-house predicted power load map calculated in step S22. .

  Here, in the charging time period from the current time to the input charging end time, the sum of the predicted power load on the house and the power load on the electric vehicle 30 side obtained from the predicted power load map in the house is shown in FIG. ), The vehicle initial charging power initial value WVp0 at each time is calculated so as to be a constant value WB. FIG. 13B illustrates a profile of an expected charge power initial value indicating a time series of the vehicle charge power expected initial value WVp0 from the charge start time to the charge end time.

  By the way, the hatched portion in FIG. 13A represents the amount of power required to fully charge the battery 32 and is determined by the SOC at the start of charging. For this reason, the value of the constant value WB differs depending on the input charging end time, and when the charging time zone is set to be extremely short, the value WB may become larger than the maximum contract power WA. In such a case, the calculated vehicle charging power expected initial value WVp0 becomes too large, and the vehicle charging power expected initial value WVp0 cannot always be charged.

  Therefore, in step S33, it is determined whether or not the calculated vehicle charging power expected initial value WVp0 is less than the house-side suppliable power (WA-WH) at that time. If it is determined in step S33 that the vehicle charging power expected initial value WVp0 exceeds the house-side suppliable power (WA-WH), the process proceeds to step S331 to display a display requesting the user to review the “charging end time”. 29.

  In step S <b> 332, it is determined whether or not the “charging end time” has been re-input by the user via the input unit of the interface 29. If it is determined in step S332 that re-input has occurred, the process returns to step S32, and the vehicle charge power expected initial value WVp0 is calculated again based on the re-input “charge end time”. On the other hand, if there is no re-input, the process proceeds to step S333, and the vehicle charging power expected initial value WVp0 is calculated so that the total power load in the charging time zone becomes the maximum contract power WA. Thereafter, the process proceeds to step S34.

  As described above, the process proceeds from step S332 to step S333 as follows: (a) In order to realize the system simply, the system itself may not have an input mechanism, or (b) the input mechanism may be provided. In order to provide convenience to the user, there is a case where charging is performed even if the charging end time is not input unless there is a particular request.

  In step S34, the expected charging power calculation device 28 creates an expected charging power profile for the battery 32 (time series of the predicted vehicle charging power WVp in the charging time zone). FIG. 14 shows a table used when an expected charging power profile is created. Based on the predicted vehicle charging power initial value WVp0 and the table of FIG. 14, the predicted vehicle charging power value WVp is determined. In the example shown in FIG. 14, eight cases are classified by considering three items of “power supply time zone”, “in-house expected power load (state)”, and “SOC” of the battery 32.

  The process of step S34 will be described in detail with reference to FIG. The “power supply time zone” is basically divided into two categories: “midnight power time zone” and “other than midnight power time zone (daytime)”. If the house 10 has a midnight power contract, the total electric cost is reduced by setting the charging power of the battery 32 in the electric vehicle 30 to be actively increased in the midnight power supply time period. be able to.

  As for “estimated power load in the house (state)”, as shown in FIG. 13, in the predicted power load map in the house calculated by the predicted charging power calculation device 28, each time zone other than midnight and midnight It is divided into a time zone expected to be “minimum value WHmin” and a time zone expected to be “exceeding WHmin”. The state where the expected power load in the house is “WHmin” is a state in which the power equipment in the house consumes only the standby power, such as during the time when all the residents are asleep. It can be determined that a case where large power is unexpectedly consumed as a load is rare.

  Therefore, if the expected power load in the house is in the state of the minimum value WHmin by this item setting, it is possible to efficiently charge the battery 32 by increasing the charging power compared to other states. . In addition, when any one of household devices is used, the residential power load exceeds the minimum value WHmin.

  The item “SOC” is basically classified into two depending on whether the SOC of the battery 32 is “less than the set value P” or “more than the set value P”. Here, the set value P (%) is the amount of electric power required to travel the distance with respect to the distance (commuting, shopping, etc.) required per charge during normal use of the electric vehicle 30. It corresponds to the SOC. Then, until the SOC of the battery 32 in the electric vehicle 30 reaches the set value P, even if it is necessary to use the electric vehicle 30 suddenly by actively increasing the charging power, the travel distance required for it is increased. It can be ensured.

  On the other hand, in normal use of the electric vehicle 30, it is considered that the amount of electric power exceeding the SOC set value P is not necessary, so that charging is performed very actively in the region where the SOC is P% to 100% (full charge). First, charging is controlled mainly during the midnight (special charge) time zone and the time zone when the expected power load in the house is “WHmin”. By performing such control, it becomes easy to flexibly respond to unexpected electricity demands in the house, reducing the total electricity cost, and efficient power management can be performed.

  Each case in FIG. 14 will be described. Case 1 is a case where the power supply time zone is midnight (special charge time zone), the expected power load in the house is the minimum value WHmin, and the SOC of the battery 32 is less than the set value P%. In this case, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is set to (WA−WH).

  For example, the case where all the residents are sleeping at midnight, the electric power load in the house is minimum, and the electric vehicle 30 has not yet stored the electric energy up to the SOC set value P is applicable. In such a case, the possibility of sudden power demand in the house is low, and in addition, since power is supplied at low cost, the battery 32 is used in the quick charge mode using the maximum contract power WA. Charge actively.

  Case 2 is a case where the SOC of the battery 32 has already secured the set value P even if the power supply time zone is midnight (special charge time zone). Case 3 is a case where the expected power load in the house exceeds WHmin even at midnight (special charge time zone), and the SOC of the battery 32 is less than the set value P. In these cases, the vehicle charging power predicted value initial value WVp0 calculated in step S32 is used as the vehicle charging power predicted value WVp.

  Case 4 is a case where the expected power load in the house exceeds WHmin and the SOC of the battery 32 exceeds the set value P even when the power supply time zone is midnight (special power time zone). . In this case, the expected vehicle charging power value WVp is set to the higher of the initial value WVp0 and the value (WA−WH−s).

  Here, the value s is a constant set in advance, and is set so as to be able to cope with an unexpectedly large amount of unexpected power taken out in the expected electric power load map in the house. For power capacity in ordinary housing (contract power conversion level 40-60 [A]), about 1-2 [kW] (AC 100 [V] 10-20 [A] on a single phase basis) As a guide. That is, in case 4, since the SOC of the battery 32 is not less than the set value P at midnight, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is set to a value that can flexibly respond to an unexpected power demand in the house.

  In any of cases 5, 6 and 7, that is, when the power supply time zone is other than midnight (daytime) and the expected power load in the house is WHmin, or even if the expected power load in the house exceeds WHmin When the SOC of the battery 32 has not reached the set value P, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is set to the initial value WVp0.

  Case 8 is a case where the power supply time zone is other than midnight (daytime), the in-house expected power load is larger than the minimum value WHmin, and the SOC of the battery 32 exceeds the set value P. In this case, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is set to the smaller of the initial value WVp0 and the value (WA−WH−s). The value s is the same as in case 4. In Case 8, since the power load in the house is considerably high and the SOC of the battery 32 exceeds the set value P, the power supply is given priority in the house, and charging to the battery 32 is set to be relatively low. I have to.

  In step S <b> 34, the expected charging power calculation device 28 creates such an expected charging power profile (time series of the vehicle charging power expected value WVp until the charging end time) based on FIG. 14 and transmits it to the charging controller 21. . In step S35, the current SOC, the expected arrival time to the SOC set value P based on the expected charging power profile, the expected full charge end time, and the like are displayed on the display unit of the interface 29.

  In step S36, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp from the predicted charging power profile and the vehicle-side charging required power value WVd from the battery controller 31 are read into the charging controller 21, respectively. As with the first and second embodiments described above, the vehicle-side required charging power value WVd is acceptable power information taking into account the temperature environment of the battery 32 at that time, and the charger 20 can be charged. It is determined based on the power capacity. The processing from step S7 to step S9 following step S36 is the same as that in the second embodiment (see FIG. 7) described above, and the description thereof is omitted here.

  In step S37, the charging power value WV finally determined in step S9 and the current residential power load value WH read in step S30 are displayed on the display unit of the interface 29.

  In step S38, the set charging power value WV is compared with the vehicle charging power expected initial value WVp0 calculated in step S32 or step S333, and the vehicle side charging required power value WVd read in step S36. It is determined whether or not charging power value WV satisfies the conditions “WV <WVd” and “WV <WVp0”. If both conditions are satisfied (YES), there is a possibility that the battery 32 will not be fully charged (SOC = 100%) by the end time of charging. Therefore, if “YES” is determined in the step S38, the process proceeds to a step S381, and the interface 29 in the house 10 is used to request the user to reduce the power load in the house. For example, the request is displayed on the display unit of the interface 29. The subsequent steps S10 and S11 are the same as those in the second embodiment (see FIG. 7) described above, and a description thereof is omitted here.

[Modification]
FIG. 21 is a diagram illustrating a modification of the third embodiment. In the third embodiment described above, cases 1 to 8 are classified according to “supply time zone”, “in-house expected power load”, and “SOC of battery 32” as shown in FIG. However, in the modification shown in FIG. 21, only the “SOC of the battery 32” is considered, and the charge control method is changed depending on whether the SOC is “less than the set value P” or “more than the set value P”. That is, as shown in FIG. 21 (a), when the SOC is less than the set value P, the total of the in-house predicted power addition value and the vehicle charging power predicted value is set to be the power W1. On the other hand, in the region where the SOC is P% to 100% (full charge), the total is set to be electric power W2 (<W1). Then, based on FIG. 21A, an expected charging power profile as shown in FIG. 21B is set.

  That is, until the SOC of the battery 32 reaches a value P corresponding to the amount of power necessary for the distance (commuting, shopping, etc.) required per charge, the charge power is actively increased to W1. The battery is charged so that the SOC reaches the set value P in a shorter time. The power value W1 may be the maximum contract power WA, or may be a value with a slight margin with respect to the maximum contract power WA.

  In the third embodiment described above, as shown in steps S7, S27, and S29 in FIG. 11, the charging power value WV is not necessarily (WA-WH), and should correspond to an increase in the load in the house. In some cases, it was set to WVd or WVp. However, in this modification, even if the in-house power load value WH becomes unexpectedly large, the charging power WV is set so that the sum of the vehicle charging power expected value and the in-house predicted power load value becomes a constant value W1. Is controlled. Then, after the SOC of the battery 32 reaches the set value P, the charging power is lowered to a value W2 having a margin. For example, W2 is set such that the total power is constant until the charging end time.

  By performing such control, even when it becomes necessary to use the electric vehicle 30 suddenly, a necessary travel distance is ensured. Instead of the set value P, the amount of power consumed per trip is calculated using the amount of power required by the user in daily life (for traveling back and forth to a predetermined location, etc.) Also good. This secured power amount is calculated based on the travel history of the electric vehicle 30.

  As described above, in the third embodiment described above, as shown in FIG. 14, in a plurality of cases 1 to 8 based on the SOC of the battery 32, the charging time zone, and the expected power load value in the house. By dividing, charging control can be performed more finely, and power management can be performed with a margin according to the load state in the house.

  Further, an interface 29 for notifying each information collected and processed by the charge controller 21 is provided in the house, and “expected full charge time”, “presence / absence of charge reduction control of the battery 32”, “housing and vehicle charging” are provided. The information about the power load such as “the power load of the battery” and “the amount of power stored in the battery 32 (SOC)” is displayed on the display unit of the interface 29. Therefore, since the user can grasp the charging status in real time, the power management with more flexibility is realized such as stopping the charging to the electric vehicle 30 when the necessary amount of charging power is obtained. can do. Furthermore, when it is suggested that the battery 32 may not be fully charged by the end of charging based on the expected power load in the house, the user can be notified of the power load in the house using the interface 29 in the house 10. Since the reduction is requested, more effective charging can be performed. It should be noted that a display requesting a reduction in the power consumption in the house is also made when the power consumption in the house is extremely larger than the expected value and the SOC of the battery 32 may not reach the predetermined value P by the end time of charging. May be displayed on the display unit of the interface 29.

-Fourth embodiment-
FIG. 15 is a block diagram for explaining a fourth embodiment of the present invention. The configuration of the block diagram of FIG. 15 is a configuration in which a travel history acquisition device 37 and a reserved power amount calculation device 38 are further added to the electric vehicle 30 side of the block diagram of FIG. 9 described above. Other configurations are the same as those in FIG. 9, and the following description will focus on differences from the system in FIG.

  The travel history device acquisition device 37 is connected to a reserved power amount calculation device 38, and the reserved power amount calculation device 38 is connected to a battery controller 31. The reserved power amount calculation device 38 receives the state parameters (SOC, battery temperature, etc.) of the battery 32 and the paddle connection signal from the battery controller 31, and transmits those information to the travel history acquisition device 37. The travel history acquisition device 37 includes (a) a travel distance and date / time until one connection is made after the charging paddle 25 is disconnected, and (b) a state parameter transmitted from the secured power amount calculation device 38. Are recorded as a travel history of the electric vehicle 30.

  Further, the secured power amount calculation device 38 receives the travel history from the travel history acquisition device 37, and the power consumption required for one trip by the user in the daily life area (for traveling back and forth to a predetermined location). Learn as a quantity and record it as the amount of power reserved. Further, the SOC value of the battery 32 corresponding to the secured power amount is calculated as “SOCF”, and the SOCF value is transmitted to the charge controller 21 on the house 10 side.

<Operation description>
FIGS. 16, 17 and 12 are flowcharts for explaining the operation of the vehicle charging power management system in the fourth embodiment. FIG. 12 is a flowchart showing the processing subsequent to FIG. 17, but the processing of this portion is the same as that of the third embodiment, and will be described with reference to FIG. Also in the flowcharts of FIGS. 16 and 17, the same reference numerals are assigned to the same processing steps as those of the flowcharts shown in FIGS.

  The processing from step S1 to step S20 of the flowchart of FIG. 16 is the same as that of the flowchart of FIG. If the transmission process of the charge start signal with respect to the estimated charge energy calculation apparatus 28 in step S20 is completed, the process proceeds to step S40. In step S <b> 40, the “reserved power amount” and the “SOCF” are calculated in the reserved power amount calculation device 38 and “SOCF” is transmitted to the charge controller 21. The processing from step S21 to step S333 in FIG. 17 subsequent to step S40 is the same as that in the third embodiment, and thus the description thereof is omitted here, but the vehicle charging power expected initial value WVp0 is calculated by these processing. .

  Next, in step S41 of FIG. 17, the expected charging power calculation device 28 creates an expected charging power profile (WVp time series in the charging time zone) for the battery 32. FIG. 18 shows a table for creating an expected charging power profile in the fourth embodiment, which is the same as the table shown in FIG. 14 in the third embodiment. In step S41, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is determined based on the vehicle charging power predicted initial value WVp0 and the table of FIG.

  As shown in FIG. 18, the vehicle charging power is classified into eight cases by taking into consideration three items of “power supply time zone”, “estimated power load in the house (state)”, and “SOC of battery 32”. The expected value WVp is determined. The item “power supply time zone” is the same as that in the third embodiment (FIG. 14) described above, and is divided into “midnight power time zone” and “other than midnight power time zone (daytime)”. Divided.

  The “estimated power load in the house (state)” is the same as in the third embodiment, and each time zone other than midnight and midnight is further expected to be the “minimum value WHmin” and “exceeding WHmin” ”And the expected time zone. Therefore, if the expected power load in the house is in the WHmin state by this item setting, it is possible to efficiently charge the battery 32 by increasing the charging power compared to other states.

  Regarding the “SOC” of the battery 32, the SOC read from the electric vehicle 30 side in step S21 is compared with the SOCF corresponding to the secured power amount, and the two are determined depending on whether the read SOC is “less than SOCF” or “SOCF or more”. Classify. Then, until the SOC of the battery 32 reaches the SOCF corresponding to the secured power amount, even if it is necessary to suddenly use the electric vehicle 30 by actively increasing the charging power, the “one trip in normal times” It is possible to ensure that the “mile travel distance” is secured.

  On the other hand, in normal use of the electric vehicle 30, it is considered that the amount of electric power exceeding the SOCF is not so much required, so the SOC is not actively charged in the region where the SOC is SOCF% to 100% (full charge). (Special charge) Charge control is performed mainly in the time zone and the time zone where the expected power load in the house is “WHmin”. By performing such control, it becomes easy to flexibly respond to unexpected electricity demands in the house, reducing the total electricity cost, and efficient power management can be performed.

  Each case of FIG. 18 will be described. Case 1 is a case where the power supply time zone is midnight (special charge time zone), the in-house expected power load is the minimum value WHmin, and the SOC of the battery 32 is less than SOCF. In this case, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is set to (WA−WH).

  Case 1 is, for example, that all residents are sleeping at midnight, so that the electric power load in the house is also minimal, and the electric vehicle 30 has not yet stored electric energy up to the secured electric energy (electric energy equivalent to SOCF). Cases apply. In such a case, the possibility of sudden power demand in the house is low, and in addition, since power is supplied at low cost, the battery 32 is used in the quick charge mode using the maximum contract power WA. Charge actively.

  Case 2 is a case where the SOC of the battery 32 has already secured the SOCF equivalent to the “reserved power amount” even if the power supply time zone is midnight (special charge time zone). Case 3 is a case where the expected electric power load in the house exceeds WHmin even at midnight (special charge time zone), and the SOC of the battery 32 is less than SOCF. In these cases, the vehicle charging power predicted value initial value WVp0 is set as the vehicle charging power predicted value WVp.

  Case 4 is a case where the expected power load in the house exceeds WHmin and the SOC of the battery 32 exceeds SOCF even when the power supply time zone is midnight (special power time zone). In this case, the expected vehicle charging power value WVp is set to the higher of the initial value WVp0 and the value (WA−WH−s).

  Here, the value s is a preset constant, and is set in the same manner as in the third embodiment. In other words, assuming an unexpectedly large amount of power taken out in the expected power load map in the house, the power capacity in a normal house (40 to 60 [A] level in terms of contract power) is 1 to As a guideline, it is about 2 [kW] (10 to 20 [A] based on AC 100 [V] single phase).

  In the case 4, the power is supplied at low cost at midnight, but the battery 32 stores power energy up to the amount of reserved power and has a relatively high power load in the house. Therefore, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is set to a value that can flexibly cope with an unexpected power demand in the house.

  In any of cases 5, 6 and 7, that is, when the power supply time zone is other than midnight (daytime) and the expected power load in the house is WHmin, or even if the expected power load in the house exceeds WHmin When the SOC of the battery 32 does not reach the SOCF corresponding to the “reserved power amount”, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is set to the initial value WVp0.

  Case 8 is a case where the power supply time zone is other than midnight (daytime), the expected power load in the house is WHmin, and the SOC of the battery 32 exceeds SOCF. In this case, the vehicle charging power expected value WVp is set to the smaller of the initial value WVp0 and the value (WA−WH−s). The value s is the same as in case 4. In Case 8, it is considered that the electric power load in the house is quite high and the electric energy up to SOCF is already stored in the battery 32. Accordingly, the power supply is given the highest priority in the house, and the charging of the battery 32 is set to be relatively low.

  In step S <b> 41, the expected charge power amount calculation device 28 creates such an expected charge power profile (WVp time series up to the charge end time) based on FIG. 18 and transmits it to the charge controller 21. In step S42, the current SOC, the expected arrival time to SOCF based on the predicted charging power profile, the expected full charge end time, and the like are displayed on the display unit of the interface 29. Since the process after step S36 following step S42 is the same as that of the above-mentioned 3rd Embodiment, description is abbreviate | omitted here.

  As described above, in the fourth embodiment, the SOCF corresponding to the “reserved electric energy” is used instead of the predetermined value P in the third embodiment as a value for managing the SOC. Therefore, the same effects as those of the third embodiment can be obtained with respect to charge management. If the power consumption in the house is extremely large compared to the expected value and the SOC of the battery 32 may not reach the predetermined SOCF by the end of charging, a display requesting reduction of the power load in the house is displayed. You may make it display on the display part of the interface 29. FIG.

  In the above-described embodiment, the electric vehicle 30 refers to all of the vehicles having at least one electric motor (motor) driving means and a battery (power storage mechanism). That is, it goes without saying that the electric vehicle 30 includes a power storage mechanism even if it is a fuel cell vehicle (FCV) or a hybrid vehicle.

  The battery 32 used as the power storage mechanism is, of course, a chargeable / dischargeable secondary battery represented by “lithium ion secondary battery”, “nickel metal hydride secondary battery”, etc. And “hybrid capacitors” having different materials and structures, including positive and negative electrodes. In addition, the present invention is not limited to the above embodiment as long as the characteristics of the present invention are not impaired.

It is a block diagram explaining the 1st Embodiment of this invention. It is a flowchart explaining operation | movement of the electric power management system for vehicle charging. It is a block diagram explaining the 2nd Embodiment of this invention. It is a figure explaining the electric power load map in a house. (A) is a figure which shows the estimated electric power load map in a house, (b) is a figure which shows an estimated charging power profile. It is a flowchart explaining operation | movement of the electric power management system for vehicle charging in 2nd Embodiment. It is a flowchart which shows the process following the flowchart of FIG. It is a block diagram which shows the 1st modification of 2nd Embodiment. It is a block diagram explaining the 3rd Embodiment of this invention. It is a flowchart explaining operation | movement of the electric power management system for vehicle charging in 3rd Embodiment. It is a flowchart which shows the process following the flowchart of FIG. 12 is a flowchart illustrating processing subsequent to the flowchart of FIG. 11. (A) is a figure which shows the calculation method of charging electric power initial expected value WVp0, (b) is a figure which shows the anticipating charging electric power profile which is a time series of electric charging electric power initial value WVp0. It is a figure which shows the table used when producing an estimated charging power profile. It is a block diagram explaining the 4th Embodiment of this invention. It is a flowchart explaining operation | movement of the electric power management system for vehicle charging in 4th Embodiment. It is a flowchart which shows the process following the flowchart of FIG. It is a figure which shows the table at the time of creating an estimated charging power profile. It is a block diagram which shows the 2nd modification of 2nd Embodiment. It is a block diagram which shows the 3rd modification of 2nd Embodiment. It is a figure which shows the modification of 3rd Embodiment.

Explanation of symbols

  1: grid power, 12: house power load, 10: house, 13: power detection device, 20: charger, 21: charge controller, 27: power history acquisition device, 28: expected charge power calculation device 28, 29: Interface, 30: electric vehicle, 31: battery controller, 32: battery

Claims (7)

  1. In the electric vehicle charging power management system for branching the electric power supplied to the house from the outside to the electric power load in the house and the electric vehicle side, and charging the electric vehicle capacitor with the electric power branched to the electric vehicle side,
    Detecting means for detecting power to the residential power load;
    Calculation means for calculating the predicted power consumption in the house based on the power consumption history information of the power load in the house generated based on the detection result of the detection means;
    Control means for controlling the charging power so that the sum of the expected power consumption in the house calculated by the computing means and the charging power to the battery does not exceed an allowable value of power supplied to the house from the outside. And
    The calculation means calculates the expected power consumption in a house in a predetermined time zone based on the power consumption history information,
    The control means includes: an estimated vehicle charging power obtained by subtracting the expected residential power consumption based on the power consumption history information from the allowable value; a charging request power value from the electric vehicle side; and the detecting means based on the allowable value. Compared with the power obtained by subtracting the power detected by, the lowest power is set as the charging power,
    The control means further includes the expected power consumption in the house and the battery in the special charge power time zone when a special charge power time zone with a low electricity charge is included in the time zone from the charge start time to the charge end time. The electric vehicle charging power management system , wherein the charging power is controlled so that the total power with the charging power is a constant value greater than that outside the special charge power time zone .
  2. In the electric vehicle charging power management system for branching the electric power supplied to the house from the outside to the electric power load in the house and the electric vehicle side, and charging the electric vehicle capacitor with the electric power branched to the electric vehicle side,
    Detecting means for detecting power to the residential power load;
    Generating means for generating power consumption history information of the residential power load based on the detection result of the detecting means;
    First computing means for calculating the expected power consumption in the house in a predetermined time zone based on the power consumption history information;
    First setting means for setting a charging end time based on use history information of the electric vehicle;
    When the total power of the expected power consumption in the house and the charging power to the battery is held constant and charged until the charging end time, a constant value of the total power for setting the battery to be fully charged is set. Two setting means;
    The amount of power when charging until the charging end time is controlled so that the total power becomes equal to the allowable value of the power supplied to the house from the outside is necessary to fully charge the battery. Electric vehicle charging comprising control means for controlling charging power so that the total power becomes equal to a constant value of the total power set by the second setting means when the amount of power is greater than the amount of power Power management system.
  3. In the electric vehicle charging power management system for branching the electric power supplied to the house from the outside to the electric power load in the house and the electric vehicle side, and charging the electric vehicle capacitor with the electric power branched to the electric vehicle side,
    Detecting means for detecting power to the residential power load;
    Generating means for generating power consumption history information of the residential power load based on the detection result of the detecting means;
    Calculation means for calculating the expected power consumption in the house in a predetermined time zone based on the power consumption history information;
    Input means for inputting and setting the charging end time;
    When the total power of the expected power consumption in the house and the charging power to the battery is held constant and charged until the charging end time, a constant value of the total power for setting the battery to be fully charged is set. Two setting means;
    The amount of power when charging until the charging end time is controlled so that the total power becomes equal to the allowable value of the power supplied to the house from the outside is necessary to fully charge the battery. An electric vehicle charging power management system comprising: control means for controlling charging power so as to be equal to a constant value of total power set by the second setting means when the amount of power is larger than the amount of power.
  4. In the electric vehicle charging power management system for branching the electric power supplied to the house from the outside to the electric power load in the house and the electric vehicle side, and charging the electric vehicle capacitor with the electric power branched to the electric vehicle side,
    Detecting means for detecting power to the residential power load;
    Generating means for generating power consumption history information of the residential power load based on the detection result of the detecting means;
    Calculation means for calculating the predicted power consumption in the house based on the power consumption history information of the power load in the house generated based on the detection result of the detection means;
    Control means for controlling the charging power so that the sum of the expected power consumption in the house calculated by the computing means and the charging power to the battery does not exceed an allowable value of power supplied to the house from the outside. And
    The calculation means calculates the expected power consumption in a house in a predetermined time zone based on the power consumption history information,
    The control means includes: an estimated vehicle charging power obtained by subtracting the expected residential power consumption based on the power consumption history information from the allowable value; a charging request power value from the electric vehicle side; and the detecting means based on the allowable value. Compared with the power obtained by subtracting the power detected by, the lowest power is set as the charging power ,
    The control means is configured such that the total power of the estimated power consumption in the house and the charging power before the storage amount of the capacitor reaches a predetermined value is greater than the total power after the storage amount of the capacitor reaches the predetermined value. The charging power is controlled as described above, and the charging power is controlled so that the total power of the expected power consumption in the house and the charging power before the storage amount of the battery reaches a predetermined value becomes a constant value. Electric vehicle charging power management system.
  5. In the electric vehicle charging power management system according to claim 4 ,
    Based on the travel history of the electric vehicle, the travel required power amount calculating means for calculating the required travel power amount per charge,
    The electric vehicle charging power management system, wherein the control means controls the charging power using the required traveling electric energy as the predetermined value.
  6. In the electric vehicle charging power management system according to claim 4 or 5 ,
    An electric vehicle charging power management system comprising: a display unit for displaying a charging state including information indicating whether or not a storage amount of the battery has reached the predetermined value.
  7. In the electric vehicle charging power management system according to claim 6 ,
    An expected charge power amount calculating means for calculating an expected charge power amount at a charge end time based on the expected power consumption in the house;
    Electric vehicle charging comprising: presenting means for presenting warning information when the expected charging power calculated by the expected charging power calculating means is below the predetermined value or full charge Power management system.
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