WO2013091844A1 - Tobacco-containing article - Google Patents

Tobacco-containing article

Info

Publication number
WO2013091844A1
WO2013091844A1 PCT/EP2012/005252 EP2012005252W WO2013091844A1 WO 2013091844 A1 WO2013091844 A1 WO 2013091844A1 EP 2012005252 W EP2012005252 W EP 2012005252W WO 2013091844 A1 WO2013091844 A1 WO 2013091844A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
tobacco
plant parts
mm
aromatic plant
containing article
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/EP2012/005252
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Jan Fuhrmann
Regine Wolfgramm
Gitta Jünemann
Original Assignee
Reemtsma Cigarettenfabriken Gmbh
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24BMANUFACTURE OR PREPARATION OF TOBACCO FOR SMOKING OR CHEWING; TOBACCO; SNUFF
    • A24B13/00Tobacco for pipes, for cigars, e.g. cigar inserts, or for cigarettes; Chewing tobacco; Snuff
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24BMANUFACTURE OR PREPARATION OF TOBACCO FOR SMOKING OR CHEWING; TOBACCO; SNUFF
    • A24B15/00Chemical features or treatment of tobacco; Tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/18Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/28Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances
    • A24B15/30Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances by organic substances
    • A24B15/302Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances by organic substances by natural substances obtained from animals or plants
    • A24B15/303Plant extracts other than tobacco
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24DCIGARS; CIGARETTES; TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS; MOUTHPIECES FOR CIGARS OR CIGARETTES; MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS OR MOUTHPIECES
    • A24D1/00Cigars; Cigarettes
    • A24D1/002Cigars; Cigarettes with additives, e.g. for flavouring

Abstract

A tobacco-containing article (like a cigarette or other smokable products) comprises tobacco and aromatic plant parts, which do not derive from the tobacco plant, wherein the amount of the aromatic plant parts is in the range of from 0.5% by weight to 25% by weight, related to the total weight of the tobacco and the aromatic plant parts. The aromatic plant parts can have a size, defined by a screening method, in the range of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm or of from 0.2 mm to 6 mm. Suitable substances for the aromatic plant parts are, e.g., spearmint, peppermint, anise, rosemary, wintergreen, ginger, lemon myrtle, lavender, mate, avocado, ground coffee beans.

Description

Tobacco-containing article

The invention relates to a tobacco-containing article and to a method of manufacturing a tobacco-containing article.

Tobacco-containing articles, like cigarettes, cigarillos, cigars or fine-cut products for self-made cigarettes and snus products, are often aromatised by means of flavourants, as e.g. menthol. Generally, such flavourants provide an intense flavour and are added in relatively small amounts, preferably as a liquid, e.g. during the preparation and saucing of the tobacco . A disadvantage of this kind of conventional flavouring is the volatility and tendency to loss of many flavourants.

It is also known to insert at least one flavour capsule into a tobacco-containing article, which can be broken by the con- sumer in order to release on demand the flavourant contained in the capsule. In this way, it is possible to use volatile flavourants, but the tobacco-containing article in question is more expensive . It is an object of the invention to provide a tobacco- containing article which can offer to the consumer new taste and flavour experiences but, nevertheless, involves moderate manufacturing expenses only. This object is achieved by a tobacco-containing article having the features of claim 1. Claim 19 relates to a method of manufacturing such a tobacco-containing article. Advantageous versions of the invention follow from the dependant claims. The tobacco-containing article according to the invention comprises tobacco and aromatic plant parts which do not derive from the tobacco plant. The amount of the aromatic plant parts is in the range of from 0.5% by weight to 25% by weight, re- lated to the total weight of the tobacco and the aromatic plant parts.

In advantageous embodiments of the invention, the aromatic plant parts have a size in the range of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm or in the range of from 0.2 mm to 6 mm. The size of the aromatic plant parts is defined by a screening method, which is described in detail further below. Shortly, the aromatic plant parts are submitted to a series of vibrating screens according to DIN ISO 3310-1 having generally square meshes of decreasing sizes. If the aromatic plant parts have a size in a given range, virtually all of them will pass a screen having the upper limit of the range as the nominal mesh size, whereas the aromatic plant parts will not pass a screen having the lower limit of the range as the nominal mesh size. Aromatic plant parts passing a mesh diagonally may have a greater length than the nominal mesh size, but they are included by definition. On the other hand, the material used for the aromatic plant parts may include some dust which even passes the smallest mesh size. This dust, by definition, is considered as not being a constituent of the aromatic plant parts. Its contribution is generally small. For a given advantageous embodiment, the total size range of the aromatic plant parts is embedded in one of the above ranges, but may have a smaller or even much smaller extension (spread of sizes) . All lower limits of greater than 0.1 mm and all upper limits of less than 10 mm of such spread are expressly disclosed herewith.

The amount of the aromatic plant parts is provided as a weight related to the total weight of the tobacco and the aromatic plant parts. Therefore, any major dependency on the actual moisture of the aromatic plant parts or of the tobacco cancels out. In case the amount of the aromatic plant parts is to be measured with a high precision, the weight ratio shall be determined after equilibration of the aromatic plant parts and of the tobacco for 2 days- at 22 °C and at a relative humidity of 58-60%.

The tobacco- containing article according to the invention is an aromatised tobacco- product, in which the aromatic plant parts are natural constituents and not artificial or concentrated aromas. This provides for a natural, maybe somewhat subliminal taste . experience . The addition of artificial flavours, which otherwise would have to be added as alcoholic extracts, is not required, thus avoiding alcoholic constituents. Generally, the relative amount of the aromatic plant parts is greater than that of a conventional concentrated aroma substance, but not so great as to provide an obtrusive taste.

Since the aromatic plant parts are relatively large, e.g. in the range of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm or from 0.2 mm to 6 mm, they generally contain material in addition to any flavourants, e.g. in a plant cell structure, which is able to keep the flavourants and to reduce flavour loosening effects. This may result in a slightly increased flavour shelf life of the respec- tive tobacco-containing article, compared to a conventional tobacco-containing article treated with a liquid aroma concentrate.

Due to the presence of a significant amount of aromatic plant parts in addition to the tobacco; the relative amount of tobacco is smaller than in a conventional tobacco product. In a cigarette, cigarillo or cigar, this results in a dilution effect regarding tobacco nicotine and other constituents as, e.g., ammonia or nitrate. Examples are provided further below. When the pH is increased because of the aromatic plant parts, the taste is generally stronger, although less nicotine is presen .

The aroma of the side-stream smoke of, e.g., a cigarette can also be positively influenced and optimised, depending on the selection of the aromatic plant parts.

The visual appearance of the aromatic plant parts, which in many applications are leaves or leaf parts, implies a natural product and a natural aromatisation . The tobacco-containing article in question can generate a pleasant smell, even before consumption.

In advantageous embodiments of the tobacco-containing article according to the invention, the aromatic plant parts comprise, e.g., spearmint, peppermint, anise, rosemary, wintergreen, ginger, lemon myrtle, lavender, mate, avocado, ground coffee beans, sage, herbs, teas, or any mixtures thereof. For example, spearmint or peppermint causes a pleasant aroma. A detailed (but not exclusive) list of plants delivering suitable aromatic plant parts is given further below.

In the tobacco-containing article, at least part of the tobacco and of the aromatic plant parts can be included in a combined mixture. That means, e.g. cut tobacco parts and aromatic plant parts (e.g., in the size range of from 0.2 mm to 6 mm or of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm) are mixed together to form a combined and preferably generally homogeneous mixture.

It is also possible that at least part of the tobacco comprises reconstituted tobacco. Sheets of reconstituted tobacco can be cut to form cut reconstituted tobacco, which can be mixed, e.g., with aromatic plant parts and also with natural cut tobacco. Moreover, it is conceivable to make a reconstituted product from aromatic plant parts, e.g. in a way similar to one of the known processes of manufacturing reconstituted tobacco, so that at least part of the aromatic plant parts in the tobacco- containing article comprises a reconstituted product. A sheet of this reconstituted product can be cut to the desired size of the aromatic plant parts, e.g., in the range of from 0.2 mm to 6 mm or of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm.

In another embodiment, a reconstituted product is used which contains a mixture of tobacco parts and of aromatic plant parts. Such reconstituted product can also be produced in a manner analogous to conventional reconstituted tobacco. In this way, at least part of the tobacco and at least part of the aromatic plant parts are included in a combined reconstituted product, which can be cut to the desired size.

In an advantageous embodiment of the invention, at least part of the aromatic plant parts is provided in the form of granules, preferably of a size in the range of from 0.2 mm to 5 mm or from 0.5 mm to 2.5 mm. Such granules can be made of pressed aromatic plant parts and optionally additional water, without further additives. Granules comprising aromatic plant parts as well as tobacco are also conceivable.

In another advantageous embodiment of the invention, the tobacco-containing article includes a cut top-loaded sheet product, in which a base layer comprises or is made of reconstituted tobacco, wherein the base layer is provided on one side with aromatic plant parts. WO 03/082030 A discloses a method of manufacturing a top- loaded sheet product, in this case a top-loaded cigarette filler, in which a base layer on a basis of a fine fraction of tobacco and cellulose fibres is provided on one side with a fraction of course tobacco, wherein the assembly is subjected to a drying treatment. In an analogous manner, a base layer comprising reconstituted tobacco can be provided on one side with aromatic plant parts, and after drying this top-loaded sheet product is cut to pieces of the desired size.

It is also conceivable that the tobacco-containing article includes a cut top-loaded sheet product,, in which a base layer comprises reconstituted aromatic plant parts, wherein the base layer is provided on one side with aromatic plant parts ; This cut top-loaded sheet product constitutes at least part of the aromatic plant parts. It can be mixed with tobacco and/or reconstituted tobacco and optionally with additional aromatic plant parts. If the aromatic plant parts are included in a reconstituted sheet product, the size of the aromatic plant parts in the range of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm or of from 0.2 mm to 6 mm is to be understood as the size of the aromatic plant part pieces used in the manufacturing process of the reconstituted sheet product. A reconstituted product is produced as generally known in the art .

In case the amount of natural aromas present in the aromatic plant parts is not sufficient for a specific design of a to- bacco-containing article, at least one flavourant in addition to the aromatic plant parts can be added, preferably as a liquid. An example is the addition of menthol to achieve a super- aromatisation . Typically, the aromatic plant parts can have a moisture of from 5% to 35%, preferably of from 5% to 20% or of from 7% to 12%, related to the total of the dry weight of the respective aromatic plant parts plus the moisture. After admixture to tobacco, moisture generally equilibrates between the aromatic plant parts and the tobacco, e.g. within a closed packaging. Cigarettes typically have a moisture of from 7% to 14%. Snus typically has a moisture in the order of 35%.

Concerning the tobacco in the tobacco-containing article, all kinds of conventional tobaccos and tobacco blends, optionally including reconstituted tobacco, can be used. Examples are an American blend or a Virginia blend.

The tobacco-containing article according to the invention is provided as a cigarette, e.g., as a full-flavour cigarette having a tar level depending on regulatory ceilings, as a light cigarette having a tar level of up to 7 mg or as an ultralight cigarette having a tar level of up to 2 mg, or as a cigarillo or as a cigar. In such embodiments, the tobacco and the aromatic plant parts are contained in the rod of the cigarette, cigarillo or cigar, respectively. This does not exclude, however, that a filter also includes tobacco and/or aromatic plant parts. In different embodiments of the invention, the tobacco- containing article is provided in the form of pipe tobacco or in the form of fine-cut for self-made cigarettes, packaged in a suitable enclosure. Self-made cigarettes are known as "RYO" (roll -your-own) , which means that the consumer takes a portion of fine-cut comprising tobacco and aromatic plant parts from a package, puts it on a cigarette paper (optionally with an additional filter) , rolls the cigarette paper about the fine-cut and glues the seam of the cigarette paper. Another type of self-made cigarettes is "MYO" (make-your-own) , wherein fine- cut is taken from a package and filled into some apparatus which, upon operation by the consumer, automatically or semi- automatically forms a finished smoking article.

If the tobacco-containing article is provided as a cigarette, cigarillo or cigar and comprises a rod, e.g. the rod of a cigarette, the rod (which comprises tobacco and aromatic plant parts) can be wrapped by a low-sidestream cigarette paper having a base weight in the range of from 35 g/m2 to 60 g/m2, having a porosity of less than 15 CU and including a filler. The filler comprises CaC03 of at least 30% and/or MgO of at least 3% and/or Mg(OH)2 of at least 3%, the percentages being percent per weight of the respective compound, related to the total weight of the low-sidestream cigarette paper. 1 CU = 1 Coresta unit = 1 ml/ (cm2 · min · kPa) .

The tobacco-containing article could also, be provided in the form of snus, a product consumed by placing it under the lip for some period of time. Preferably, the snus comprising tobacco and aromatic plant parts is prepared in a grinded and sieved form. The snus parts can have a size range of, e.g., from 0.1 mm to 1.5 mm or from 0.1 mm to 0.8 mm.

In many applications, including embodiments already explained above, the tobacco-containing article comprises cut tobacco and/or cut sheet products. Generally, the cut width of the tobacco or the respective sheet product can be that of cut tobacco in conventional tobacco-containing articles, e.g., 0.2 mm to 0.75 mm for fine cut tobacco, greater than 1.5 mm for pipe tobacco, or 0.6 mm to 0.9 mm for typical cigarettes. Such widths can also be suitable to the aromatic plant parts, when used in cut leaf form or cut sheet form.

In an advantageous method of manufacturing a tobacco- containing article according to the invention, after cutting tobacco, aromatic plant parts, which do not derive from the tobacco plant and which have a size in the desired range, e.g., in the range of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm or in the range of from 0.2 mm to 6 mm, are added to the tobacco in an amount in the range of from 0.5% by weight to 25% by weight, related to the total weight of the tobacco and the aromatic plant parts. That means that the tobacco or at least part of the tobacco is cut independently of the aromatic plant parts. Generally, it is conceivable that uncut, large aromatic plant parts are already added to tobacco parts like leaves, ribs or stems or to a reconstituted tobacco sheet before the cutting step is performed. It is advantageous, however, when the aromatic plant parts are admixed relatively late in the process because they might release a strong aroma which tends to contaminate the manufacturing equipment .

For example, aromatic plant parts (preferably cut ones) can be added during treatment of the cut tobacco, e.g., during blending or flavouring. . In the following, the invention is described in more detail, also by means of examples.

Screening method

In order to define reproducible sizes of the aromatic plant parts, a screening method is used. This method is performed in analogy to DIN V 10376 of February 2005 ("Analysis of tobacco and tobacco products - Determination of size of the fillers of cigars and cigarillos by means of sieve analysis").

To this end, the aromatic plant parts to be examined are moisture-conditioned at a relative humidity of (70 ± 2)% and at a temperature of (22 ± 1) °C for 48 h. If the particles were too dry, they would break during sieving, which would deliver erroneous results.

The moisture-conditioned aromatic plant parts are submitted to a stack of vibrating screens according to DIN ISO 3310-1 hay- ing meshes of decreasing sizes. If the aromatic plant parts have a size distribution in a given range, virtually all of them will pass a screen having the upper limit of the range as the nominal mesh size, whereas the aromatic plant parts will not pass a screen having the lower limit of the range as the nominal mesh size. Individual aromatic plant parts passing a mesh diagonally may have a greater length than the nominal mesh size, but they are included by definition. On the other hand, the material used for the aromatic plant parts may include some dust which even passes the smallest mesh size. This dust, by definition, is considered as not being a constituent of the aromatic plant parts. Its contribution is generally small .

Further details of the method follow from DIN V 10376. As already mentioned, the present screening method is performed in analogy thereto, with the following differences.

For screening leaves, the screening machine performs horizontal vibrations of 15 mm with a frequency of 270/min for 5 minutes (instead of 10 minutes). Mesh sizes of 1.18 mm, 2.36 mm and 4 mm are used. For screening granulates, the screening machine runs for 1 minute, and mesh sizes of 1.6 mm, 1.4 mm, 1.2 mm, 1.0 mm, 0.8 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.25 mm and 0 mm are used.

If a size distribution is to be determined with a higher accuracy, a stack of several screens can be used. In case the number of screens exceeds the capability of the screening machine, the size distribution can be determined sequentially.

Examples for aromatic plant parts

Generally, a large variety of plant species can be used as sources for the aromatic plant parts according to the invention. Spearmint, peppermint, anise, rosemary, wintergreen, ginger, lemon myrtle, lavender, mate, avocado, ground coffee beans, sage as well as herbs and teas in general have already been mentioned above. Depending on the plant species, the appropriate plant parts may derive from leaves, blossoms, fruits, roots, bark, etc. Mixtures of aromatic plant parts from different species are conceivable as well.

The following Table 1 includes a plurality of plant species which may be particularly useful for the purposes of the invention:

Table 1 Examples for plant species as source for aromatic plant parts

English Name Latin Name

Anise Pimpinella anisum

Apple Malus sylvestris

Avocado Persea americana

Bearberry Arctostaphylos uva ursi

Black current (folia) Ribes nigrum

Cinnamon (cortex) Cinnamomu spec .

Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara

Damask rose (flores) Rosa centifolia

Damiana leaves (folia) Turnera diffusa

Dandelion blooms Taraxacum officinalis

Elder (flores) Sambucus nigra

Eucalyptus Eucalyptus globulus

German chamomile (flores) Matricaria chamo illa

Ginger Zingiber officinale

Gingko biloba Gingko biloba

Hazelnut Corylus avellana

Honeysuckle Lonicera spec.

Hop blooms (glandulae) Humulus lupulus

Jasmine (flores) Jas inum officinale

Lady's mantle Alchemilla vulgaris Lavender (flores) Lavandula officinalis

Lemon myrtle Backhousia citriodora

Marshmallow herb (folia) Althaeae officinalis

Mate (folia) Ilex paraguariensis

Melissa (folia) Melissa officinalis

Mint leaves Mentha crispata

Mullein (folia) Verbascum densiflorum

Orange blossom (flores) Citrus aurantium

Papaya Carica papaya

Passionflower (herba) Passiflora incarnata

Peppermint Mentha piperita

Red clover (flores) Trifolium pratense

Red willow Cornus amomum

Robinia blossom (flores) Robinia pseudoacacia

Rose petals Rosa spec .

Rosemary (folia) Rosmarinus officinalis

Sage Salvia officinalis, S. triloba

Sculicap Scutellaria spec.

Spearmint Mentha spicata

Summer savory (herba) Satureja hortensis

Teas e.g., from Camellia sinensis

Valerian root (radix) Valeriana officinalis

Vervain (herba) Verbena odqrata-

Wine leaves Vitis vinifera

Wintergreen Gaultheria procumbens

Yerba buena Clinopodium douglasii

Yerba santa Eriodictyon cal fornica

Example 1 : Spearmint Spearmint (Mentha spicata) contains some (but not much) menthol, as well as carvone, pulegone, limonene and esters. After equilibration at 22 °C and 60% relative humidity, a sample of spearmint leaves had a relative moisture of 10.0%. Here and in the following, all relative moisture contents are related to the total of the dry weight (determined after oven treatment at 82°C for 3 h; "Horo" method) and the moisture.

From this sample, a mixture with American blend tobacco was prepared, which contained 10% by weight of spearmint leaves and 90%. by weight of tobacco. After equilibration at 30°C and 75% relative humidity, the mixture had a relative moisture of 18.5%. Under the same equilibration conditions, the pure tobacco had a relative moisture of 19.1% and the pure spearmint sample a relative moisture of 13.7%. The size distribution of the leaves of two' different samples of spearmint leaves was determined by means of the screening method described above, using mesh sizes of 1.18 mm, 2.36 mm and 4 mm. In the first sample, about 2.6% by weight of the leaves did not pass the 4 mm mesh screen, about 27.3% by weig- ht did not pass the 2.36 mm mesh screen, about 57.2% by. weight did not pass the 1.18 mm mesh screen, and about 12.9% by weight passed the 1.18 mm mesh screen, the peak size being slightly more than 1.18 mm. In the second sample, the corresponding numbers were 10.2%, 63.1%, 24.8% and 2.0%, respec- tively, and the peak was at a leaf size of about 2 mm.

Example 2 : Peppermint Peppermint (Mentha piperita) contains menthol, menthone, cineol, tanning agents and flavonoids.

A sample of granulated peppermint, after equilibration at 22 °C and 60% relative humidity, had a relative moisture of 8.6%. The size distribution of the granules of this sample was determined by the screening method described above. Table 2 presents the fraction of the total sample of 402.34 g retained by a screen of a given mesh size (mesh sizes of 1.6 mm, 1.4 mm, 1.2 mm, 1.0 mm, 0.8 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.25 mm and 0 mm).

Table 2 Size distribution in a sample of granulated peppermint

Figure imgf000015_0001

Table 2 shows that essentially all of the granules have a size in the range of from 0.25 mm to 1.2 mm. The contribution of the particles passing the 0.25 mm mesh (dust) is negligible. The distribution peaks at about 0.5 mm.

Example 3: Spearmint, peppermint

As Example 3, two other samples of spearmint and peppermint were investigated. In both samples, the aromatic plant parts had a granular form. After equilibration at 22°C and 60% relative humidity, the spearmint sample had a relative moisture of 7.5% and the peppermint sample of 8.5%. The size distributions of the granules, obtained as described above, are shown in Table 3.

Table 3 Size distributions in a sample of granulated spear- mint and in a sample of granulated peppermint

Figure imgf000016_0001

In. both samples, the granules essentially have sizes in the range of from 0.25 mm to 1.2 mm, peaking somewhere between 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm .

Example 4 ·. Mixture of tobacco and spearmint In Example 4, one of the spearmint samples of Example 1 (that with the peak size of about 2 mm) was used to prepare virtually homogeneous mixtures of spearmint leaves and American blend tobacco. From mixtures containing 2%, 5%, 10% and 20% spearmint by weight (related to the total weight of spearmint and tobacco; designated by. MSI, MS2 , MS3 , and MS4 , respectively), filter cigarettes of 7.8 mm diameter with a cellulose acetate filter plug of 21 mm length and a tobacco/spearmint rod of 62 mm length were made. Some constituents of the tobacco/spearmint mixtures were analyzed. Moreover, properties of the cigarettes including smoke data (according to DIN ISO 4387/A) were measured. The results for the samples MSI, MS2, MS3, and MS4 as well as for a control sample CS (American blend tobacco without spearmint) are summarised in Table 4. The abbreviations used in Table 4 are explained at the end of Table 5 below.

It is evident from Table 4 that the tobacco nicotine (i.e. the relative amount of nicotine in the mixture of tobacco and spearmint) decreases with increasing amount of spearmint in the mixture. There is also the tendency that smoke nicotine decreases when the contribution of spearmint increases.

Moreover, with increasing amount of spearmint, the hardness of the cigarette decreases somewhat (not shown in Table 4) .

Table 4 Data for . cigarettes made f rom mixtures of Ame blend tobacco and spearmint

Sample CS MS1 MS2 MS3 MS4

Physical Data Units

Blend AB AB + 2% AB + 5% AB + 10% AB + 20% mint mint mint mint

7.8 x 7.8 x 7.8 x 7.8 x 7.8 x

Format mm

(62+21 ) (62+21) (62+21 ) (62+21 ) (62+21)

Cigarette weight mg 844 845 847 842 825

Oven Horo moisture % 12.0 12.1 11.9 11.7 11.4

Diameter mm 7.80 7.80 7.82 7.83 7.83

Pressure drop filter mmWG 67.9 67.9 68.5 68.9 67.9

Pressure drop open Pdo* mmWG 82 80 79 81 82

Press, drop closed Pdc** mmWG 129 124 123 26 129

Ventilation % 46.1 46.7 47.0 46.8 46.1

Tobacco Data Units

Tobacco nicotine % d.b. 2.30 2.29 2.19 1.98 1.80

Ammonia % d.b. 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.16 0.15

Nitrate % d.b. 1.02 1.09 0.99 0.94 0.92

Chloride % d.b. 0.77 0.81 0.77 0.80 0.77

Sacchrose (HPLC) % d.b. 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.8

Glucose (HPLC) % d.b. 2.9 2.8 2.6 2.6 2.4

Fructose (HPLC) % d.b. 4.2 4.2 3.9 3.9 3.6

Ash % d.b. 15.6 15.6 15.5 15.5 15.1

Tobacco pH 5.43 5.40 5.47 5.53 5.60

Acid equivalents *** 11.7 11.5 10.9 10.0 9.0

Propylene glycol % d.b. 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9

Smoke Data (DIN ISO 4387/A) Units

Smoke nicotine mg Cig. 0.65 0.65 0.64 0.63 0.58

WTPM mg/Cig. 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.0

NFDP mg/Cig. 6.5 6.5 6.6 6.8 6.6

Puff number 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.0

CO mg/Cig. 7.2 6.9 6.9 7.4 7.1 Table 5 Data for cigarettes made from mixtures of American blend tobacco and black tea

Sample CS TS1 TS2 TS3 TS4

Physical Data Units

AB + 2% AB + 5% AB + 10% AB + 20%

Blend AB

black tea black tea black tea black tea

7.8 x 7.8 x 7.8 x 7.8 x 7.8 x

Format mm

(62+21 ) (62+21) (62+21) (62+21) (62+21 )

Cigarette weight mg 844 847 846 847 842

Oven Horo moisture % 12.0 11.8 11.7 11.5 10.9

Pressure drop open Pdo* mmWG 82 79 79 78 75

Press, drop closed Pdc** mmWG 129 125 122 119 111

Ventilation % 46.1 47.3 46.7 45.9 44.6

Tobacco Data Units

Tobacco nicotine % d.b. 2.30 2.20 2.24 2.11 1.89

Ammonia % d.b. 0.17 0.17 0.16 0.16 0.15

Nitrate % d.b. 1.02 1.02 1.13 0.96 0.95

Chloride % d.b. 0.77 0.76 0.75 0.70 0.68

Sacchrose (HPLC) % d.b. 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.6 1.5

Glucose (HPLC) % d.b. 2.9 2.6 2.6 2.7 2.4

Fructose (HPLC) % d.b. 4.2 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.5

Tobacco pH 5.43 5.47 5.48 5.46 5.45

Acid equivalents 11.3 11.3 11.0 11.0 10.5

Propylene glycol % d.b. 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9

Smoke Data (DIN ISO 4387/A) Units

Smoke nicotine mg/Cig. 0.65 0.63 0.65 0.68 0.70

WTPM mg/Cig. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.4 9.1

NFDPM mg/Cig. 6.5 6.7 6.8 7.1 7.7

Puff number 7.3 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.6

CO mg Cig. 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.0 6.9 Explanations to Tables 4 and 5

CS: Control sample

MS1-MS4: Spearmint samples 1-4

TS1-TS4: Black tea samples

Cigarette format: Standard King Size Cigarette with a cigarette paper of 60 Coresta

* Pressure drop measured with open filter wrapper perforation

** Pressure drop measured with closed filter wrapper perforation

*** in mg KOH/g tobacco d.b.

AB: American Blend

d.b.: dry base

mmWG: millimeter Water Gauge (ISO 10185)

HPLC: High Performance Liquid Chromatography

WTPM: Wet Total Particulate Matter (ISO 10185)

NFDPM: Nicotine Free Dry Particulate Matter (ISO 10185)

Cig.: Cigarette

Example 5: Mixture of tobacco and black tea In Example 5, virtually homogeneous mixtures of American blend tobacco and black tea (loose leaves) were prepared. From mixtures containing 2%, 5%,. 10% and 20% black tea by weight (related to the total weight of black tea and tobacco; designated by TS1, TS2, TS3, and TS , respectively), filter cigarettes of 7.8 mm diameter with a cellulose acetate filter plug of 21 mm length and a tobacco/black tea rod of 62 mm length were made. Some constituents of the tobacco/black tea mixtures were analyzed. Moreover, properties of the cigarettes including smoke data (according to DIN ISO 4387/A) were measured. The results for the samples TS1, TS2 , TS3, and TS4 as well as for a control sample CS (American blend tobacco without black tea) are summarised in Table 5. The abbreviations used in Table 5 are explained at the end of the table. Table 5 shows that the tobacco nicotine (i.e. the relative amount of nicotine in the mixture of tobacco' and black tea) decreases with increasing amount of black tea in the mixture.

Example 6 : Storage behaviour

The relative losses of flavour constituents from filter cigarettes made from mixtures of American blend tobacco and spear- mint according to Example 4 were investigated. To this end, cigarette boxes containing cigarettes comprising the mixtures MSI and MS3 were stored for six months under different conditions, i.e. as a closed box in a refrigerator, as a closed box at room temperature and as an opened box at room temperature. Spearmint aroma constituents were determined by gas chromatography before and after six months of storage.

Table 6 shows, for both mixtures MSI and MS3 , averages of the absolute amounts of the spearmint aroma constituents before storage and of the relative losses (related to the initial amounts) after six months of storage.

Table 6 Aroma constituents in cigarettes containing American blend tobacco and spearmint according to Example 4 , initially and relative loss after 6 months of storage

Spearmint Initial 6 m. 6 m. 6 m. Initial 6 m. 6 m. 6 m. constituent amount refrig. room room amount refrig. room room pg/Cig. clos. clos. open pg/Cig. clos. clos. open loss% loss% loss% loss% loss% loss%

MS1 MS3

Pulegone 23.7 16.5 18.3 43.0 150.0 19.2 13.6 41.2

Carvone 103.1 24.8 22.0 31.0 555.6 23.8 18.1 45.6 The results in Table 6 exhibit the following trends: The relative losses of spearmint constituents from closed boxes stored at room temperature and from closed boxes stored in a refrigerator are similar. In case of opened packs stored at room temperature, the relative losses are significantly higher. For cigarettes with a greater spearmint contribution, the relative losses tend to be somewhat higher. Moreover, migration of the spearmint constituents during the storage period resulted in some aroma accumulation in the cigarette filters (data not shown in Table 6) .

Example 7: Mixture of tobacco and lemon myrtle

In Example 7, lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) was used to prepare virtually homogeneous mixtures of lemon myrtle leaves and American blend tobacco. From mixtures containing 2%, 5%, 10% and 20% lemon myrtle by weight (related to the total weight of lemon myrtle and tobacco), designated by LM1, LM2, LM3 and LM , respectively, filter cigarettes of 7.8 mm diameter with a cellulose acetate filter plug of 25 mm length and a tobacco/lemon myrtle rod of 58 mm in length were made. Some constituents of the tobacco/lemon myrtle mixtures were analysed. Moreover, properties of the cigarettes including smoke data (according to DIN ISO 4387/A) were measured. The results for the samples LM1 , LM2 , LM3 and LM4 as well as for a control sample CS (American blend tobacco Without lemon myrtle) are summarised in Table 7. The abbreviations used in Table 7 are explained at the end of Table 7.

It is evident from Table 7 that the tobacco nicotine (i.e. the relative amount of nicotine in the mixture of tobacco and lemon myrtle) decreases with increasing amount of lemon myrtle in the mixture. Any decrease of smoke nicotine was not observed . Table 7 Data for cigarettes made from mixtures of American blend tobacco and lemon myrtle

Figure imgf000023_0001

Explanations to Tables 7 and 8

CS: Control Sample

LM1-LM4: Lemon Myrtle samples 1-4 G1-G3: Ginger samples 1-3

* Pressure drop measured with open filter wrapper perforation

** Pressure drop measured with closed filter wrapper perforation

*** in mg KOH/g tobacco d.b.

AB: American Blend

d.b.: dry base

mmWG: millimeter Water Gauge (ISO 10185)

HPLC: High Performance Liquid Chromatography

WTPM: Wet Total Particulate Matter (ISO 10185)

NFDPM: Nicotine Free Dry Particulate Matter (ISO 10185)

Cig.: Cigarette

Example 8 : Mixture of tobacco and ginger

In Example 8, ginger (Zingiber officinale) was used to prepare virtually homogeneous mixtures of dried ginger rhizome particles and American blend tobacco. From mixtures containing 2%, 5%, and 10% ginger by weight (related to the total weight of ginger and tobacco) , designated by Gl, G2 and G3 , respectively, filter cigarettes of 7.9 mm diameter with a cellulose acetate filter plug of 27 mm length and a tobacco/ginger rod of 56 mm in length were made. Some constituents of the tobacco/ginger mixtures were analysed. Moreover, properties of the cigarettes including smoke data (according to DIN ISO 4387/A) were measured. The results for the samples Gl, G2 and G3 as well as for a control sample CS (American blend tobacco without ginger) are summarised in Table 8. The abbreviations used in Table 8 are explained at the end of Table 7 above.

It is evident from Table 8 that the tobacco nicotine (i.e. the relative amount of nicotine in the mixture of tobacco and ginger) decreases with increasing amount of ginger in the mixture. Any decrease of smoke nicotine was not observed. Table 8 Data for cigarettes made from mixtures of American blend tobacco and ginger

Figure imgf000025_0001

Example 9: Mixture of tobacco and lavender

Cigarettes containing 2% and 5% of lavender {Lavandula offici- nalis) blossoms (related to the total weight of lavender and tobacco) were produced according to Example 4. The cigarettes were smoked by an expert panel to evaluate their taste properties. While the 2%-lavender sample was judged to have a slightly soapy and perfume-like taste, lavender taste was clearly identified in the 5%-sample.

Both versions were also machine-smoked in an experimental stainless-steel chamber. After smoking was finished, the air in the closed chamber was thoroughly mixed by fans. A trained smell panel was asked to evaluate the smoke in the chamber us- ing a standard questionnaire. It was found that smoke intensity remained unchanged compared to a standard cigarette while the smoke smell was judged to be less intense and more pleasant for the 2%-lavender sample. A similar effect was noted for the 5%-sample, but in contrast to the 2%-sample, a distinct lavender smell was also recognized.

Example 10: Tobacco/lavender with low-sidestream paper Cigarettes containing 2% lavender blossoms (related to. the total weight of lavender and tobacco) were produced according to Examples 4 and 5, but instead of a conventional cigarette paper, a low-sidestream (LSS) cigarette paper was used. The paper had a porosity of 6 CU, a base weight of 45 g/m2 and a filler content of 45% calcite. 1 CU = 1 Coresta unit = 1 ml/ (cm2 · min · kPa) .

The smoke smell in an experimental chamber was evaluated as in Example 9. The panel found that not only smoke intensity was reduced compared to a conventional cigarette but also the smoke smell was more pleasant and less irritating.

Claims

Claims
Tobacco-containing article, comprising
- tobacco and
- aromatic plant parts, which do not derive from the tobacco plant,
- wherein the amount of the aromatic plant parts is in the range of from 0.
5% by weight to 25% by weight, related to the total weight of the tobacco and the aromatic plant, parts, and
- wherein the tobacco-containing article is provided as one of the following tobacco-containing articles: a cigarette, a cigarillo, a cigar, pipe tobacco, fine-cut for self-made cigarettes.
Tobacco-containing article according to claim 1, characterised in that the aromatic plant parts have a size, defined by a screening method, in the range of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm.
Tobacco-containing article according to claim 2, characterised in that the aromatic plant parts have a size in the range of from 0.2 mm to 6 mm.
Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 3, characterised in that the aromatic plant parts comprise at least one of the substances selected from the following list: spearmint, peppermint, anise, rosemary, wintergreen, avocado, ground coffee beans.
Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 4, characterised in that at least part of the tobacco and of the aromatic plant parts are included in a combined mixture .
6. Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 5, characterised in that at least part of the tobacco comprises reconstituted tobacco.
7. Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 6, characterised in that at least part of the aromatic plant parts comprises a reconstituted product.
8. Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 5, characterised in that at least part of the tobacco and of the aromatic plant parts are included in a combined reconstituted product .
9. Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 8, characterised in that at least part of the aromatic plant parts is provided in the form of granules, preferably of a size in the range of from 0.2 mm to 5 mm or from 0.5 mm to 2.5 mm.
10. Tobacco-containing article according to claim 9, characterised in that at least part of the granules consists of pressed aromatic plant parts and optionally additional water, without further additives.
11. Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 10, characterised by a cut top-loaded sheet product, in which a base layer comprises reconstituted tobacco, wherein the base layer is provided on one side with aromatic plant parts.
12. Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 11, characterised by a cut top-loaded sheet product, in which a base layer comprises reconstituted aromatic plant parts, wherein the base layer is provided on one side with aromatic plant parts. Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 12, characterised by at least one flavourant in addition to the aromatic plant parts, preferably added as a liquid.
Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 13, characterised in that the tobacco comprises an American blend or a Virginia blend.
Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 14, characterised in that the aromatic plant parts have a moisture of from 5% to 35%, preferably of from 5% to 20% or from 7% to 12%, related to the dry weight of the respective aromatic plant parts plus the moisture.
Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 15, characterised in that the aromatic plant parts comprise at least one of the substances selected from the following list: lavender, mate.
Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 16, characterised in that the aromatic plant parts comprise at least one of the substances selected from the following list: ginger, lemon myrtle.
Tobacco-containing article according to anyone of claims 1 to 17, characterised in that the tobacco-containing article comprises a rod, which is wrapped by a low-sidestream cigarette paper having a base weight in the range of from 35 g/m2 to 60 g/m2, having a porosity of less than 15 CU and comprising a filler, wherein the filler comprises at least one of the compounds selected from the following list: CaC03 of at least 30%, MgO of at least 3%, Mg(OH)2 of at least 3%, the percentages being percent per weight of the respective compound, related to the total weight of the low-sidestream . cigarette paper.
9. Method of manufacturing a tobacco-containing article according to claim 1, wherein, after cutting tobacco, aromatic plant parts, which do not derive from the tobacco plant and which, preferably, have a size defined by a screening method in the range of from 0.1 mm to 10 mm or in the range of from 0.2 mm to 6 mm, are added to the tobacco in an amount in the range of from 0.5% by weight to 25% by weight, related to the total weight of the tobacco and the aromatic plant parts.
Method according to claim 19, characterised in that aromatic plant parts are added during treatment of the cut tobacco .
PCT/EP2012/005252 2011-12-21 2012-12-17 Tobacco-containing article WO2013091844A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
EP20110010068 EP2606751A1 (en) 2011-12-21 2011-12-21 Tobacco-containing article
EP11010068.2 2011-12-21

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
ES12805599T ES2610212T3 (en) 2011-12-21 2012-12-17 Article containing snuff
EP20120805599 EP2793623B1 (en) 2011-12-21 2012-12-17 Tobacco-containing article
RU2014129553A RU2604460C2 (en) 2011-12-21 2012-12-17 Tobacco composition
JP2014547760A JP2015502161A (en) 2011-12-21 2012-12-17 Tobacco-containing articles

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2013091844A1 true true WO2013091844A1 (en) 2013-06-27

Family

ID=47428558

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/EP2012/005252 WO2013091844A1 (en) 2011-12-21 2012-12-17 Tobacco-containing article

Country Status (5)

Country Link
EP (2) EP2606751A1 (en)
JP (1) JP2015502161A (en)
ES (1) ES2610212T3 (en)
RU (1) RU2604460C2 (en)
WO (1) WO2013091844A1 (en)

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4694842A (en) * 1983-09-21 1987-09-22 Kouzou Kobayashi Tea-containing tobacco
EP0426459A2 (en) * 1989-10-31 1991-05-08 Philip Morris Products Inc. Wrapper for a smoking article
US5107865A (en) * 1987-09-03 1992-04-28 Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation Smoking articles
US5135010A (en) * 1991-08-09 1992-08-04 Fan Sophie S M Herbal smoking materials
US5271419A (en) * 1989-09-29 1993-12-21 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Cigarette
WO2002087365A1 (en) * 2001-05-01 2002-11-07 Williams Jonnie R Smokeless tobacco product
WO2003028491A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-04-10 U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company Tobacco mint plant material product
WO2003082030A1 (en) 2002-03-29 2003-10-09 B.V. Deli-Htl Tabak Maatschappij Method for manufacturing a top loaded cigarette filler
WO2005041699A2 (en) * 2003-11-03 2005-05-12 U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company Flavored smokeless tabacco and methods of making
US20060191548A1 (en) * 2003-11-07 2006-08-31 Strickland James A Tobacco compositions
US20110236442A1 (en) * 2010-03-26 2011-09-29 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Solid oral sensorial products including stain inhibitor
US20110247640A1 (en) * 2010-04-08 2011-10-13 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Smokeless Tobacco Composition Comprising Tobacco-Derived Material and Non-Tobacco Plant Material

Family Cites Families (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4256126A (en) * 1978-08-02 1981-03-17 Philip Morris Incorporated Smokable material and its method of preparation
JPS6023830B2 (en) * 1981-05-11 1985-06-10 Nippon Senbai Kosha
US5105836A (en) * 1989-09-29 1992-04-21 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Cigarette and smokable filler material therefor
JPH09511148A (en) * 1995-01-28 1997-11-11 ハー・エフ・ウント・ペーハー・エフ・レームツマ・ゲーエムベーハー・ウント・コンパニー Method of manufacturing a smokable tobacco products
JP3924948B2 (en) * 1997-09-22 2007-06-06 株式会社オーシロ Tobacco taste modifiers
EP1178741A2 (en) * 1999-02-26 2002-02-13 H.F. & Ph.F. Reemtsma GmbH Smokable product
US6298860B1 (en) * 1999-09-15 2001-10-09 Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc. Process for improving the ash characteristics of a smoking article
WO2003041521A3 (en) * 2001-11-09 2003-08-28 Xuling Shi Method and composition for mentholation of charcoal filtered cigarettes
JP2003289843A (en) * 2002-03-30 2003-10-14 Yoko Akahori Tobacco having low irritation and method for producing the same
CN101262786B (en) * 2005-05-25 2015-04-08 美国无烟烟草有限责任公司 Tobacco compositions
US8424541B2 (en) * 2007-07-16 2013-04-23 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Tobacco-free oral flavor delivery pouch product
CN101919580A (en) * 2009-06-15 2010-12-22 福建中烟工业公司 Method for preparing tea flavored low-tar cigarette

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4694842A (en) * 1983-09-21 1987-09-22 Kouzou Kobayashi Tea-containing tobacco
US5107865A (en) * 1987-09-03 1992-04-28 Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation Smoking articles
US5271419A (en) * 1989-09-29 1993-12-21 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Cigarette
EP0426459A2 (en) * 1989-10-31 1991-05-08 Philip Morris Products Inc. Wrapper for a smoking article
US5135010A (en) * 1991-08-09 1992-08-04 Fan Sophie S M Herbal smoking materials
WO2002087365A1 (en) * 2001-05-01 2002-11-07 Williams Jonnie R Smokeless tobacco product
WO2003028491A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-04-10 U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company Tobacco mint plant material product
WO2003082030A1 (en) 2002-03-29 2003-10-09 B.V. Deli-Htl Tabak Maatschappij Method for manufacturing a top loaded cigarette filler
WO2005041699A2 (en) * 2003-11-03 2005-05-12 U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company Flavored smokeless tabacco and methods of making
US20060191548A1 (en) * 2003-11-07 2006-08-31 Strickland James A Tobacco compositions
US20110236442A1 (en) * 2010-03-26 2011-09-29 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Solid oral sensorial products including stain inhibitor
US20110247640A1 (en) * 2010-04-08 2011-10-13 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Smokeless Tobacco Composition Comprising Tobacco-Derived Material and Non-Tobacco Plant Material

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
ES2610212T3 (en) 2017-04-26 grant
EP2793623A1 (en) 2014-10-29 application
RU2014129553A (en) 2016-02-10 application
EP2793623B1 (en) 2016-10-19 grant
RU2604460C2 (en) 2016-12-10 grant
EP2606751A1 (en) 2013-06-26 application
JP2015502161A (en) 2015-01-22 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3067068A (en) Tobacco-like composition
US7810507B2 (en) Smokeless tobacco composition
US6668839B2 (en) Smokeless tobacco product
US20090025739A1 (en) Smokeless Tobacco Composition
US20050115580A1 (en) Flavored smokeless tobacco and methods of making
US20080202536A1 (en) Oral pouch product with flavored wrapper
US20040123873A1 (en) Nontobacco moist snuff composition
US6834654B2 (en) Smokeless tobacco product
RU2403831C1 (en) Smokeless tobacco product (snus) production method (versions)
RU2142729C1 (en) Tobacco or like article containing natural substances with antioxidant effect and tobacco article manufacture method
US5417229A (en) Organoleptic bite composition for human consumption
US20100300464A1 (en) Moist botanical pouch processing and moist oral botanical pouch products
US20040255965A1 (en) Reconstituted tobaccos containing additive materials
US4991596A (en) Smoking article
US20110083688A1 (en) Moist smokeless tobacco product with textured coating
WO2002080707A1 (en) Chewable flavor delivery system
US3820548A (en) Method of making a tobacco substitute material
RU2294674C2 (en) Tobacco product comprising mint-based plant material
CN101461566A (en) Atomized liquid of electronic smoke
EP1889550A1 (en) Multi-component filter providing multiple flavour enhancement
CN101548797A (en) Cigarette and preparation method thereof
US4832059A (en) Citrus-flavored tobacco articles
WO2008150130A1 (en) The cigarette filters comprising natural herb material and its cigarette
US20110315154A1 (en) Smokeless tobacco composition
US5076295A (en) Cigarette filter

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application

Ref document number: 12805599

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1

DPE1 Request for preliminary examination filed after expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed from 20040101)
REEP

Ref document number: 2012805599

Country of ref document: EP

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref document number: 2012359201

Country of ref document: AU

Date of ref document: 20121217

Kind code of ref document: A

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref document number: 2014547760

Country of ref document: JP

Kind code of ref document: A

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref document number: 2014129553

Country of ref document: RU

Kind code of ref document: A