US2600761A - Offshore drilling means - Google Patents

Offshore drilling means Download PDF

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US2600761A
US2600761A US63831A US6383148A US2600761A US 2600761 A US2600761 A US 2600761A US 63831 A US63831 A US 63831A US 6383148 A US6383148 A US 6383148A US 2600761 A US2600761 A US 2600761A
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barge
legs
leg
valve
drilling
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US63831A
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Erle P Halliburton
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Erle P Halliburton
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B17/04Equipment specially adapted for raising, lowering, or immobilising the working platform relative to the supporting construction
    • E02B17/08Equipment specially adapted for raising, lowering, or immobilising the working platform relative to the supporting construction for raising or lowering
    • E02B17/0809Equipment specially adapted for raising, lowering, or immobilising the working platform relative to the supporting construction for raising or lowering the equipment being hydraulically actuated
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B17/02Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor placed by lowering the supporting construction to the bottom, e.g. with subsequent fixing thereto
    • E02B17/021Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor placed by lowering the supporting construction to the bottom, e.g. with subsequent fixing thereto with relative movement between supporting construction and platform
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B2017/0056Platforms with supporting legs
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B2017/0056Platforms with supporting legs
    • E02B2017/0073Details of sea bottom engaging footing
    • E02B2017/0082Spudcans, skirts or extended feet

Description

June 17, 1952 E. P. HALLIBURTON 2,600,761

OFFSHORE DRILLING MEANS Filed Dec. 6, 1948 '7 Sheets-Sheet l wink/1 June 17, 1952 E. P. HALLIBURTON 2,500,761

OFFSHORE DRILLING MEANS Filed Dec. 6, 1948 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 I 11mm June 1952 E. .P. HALLIBURTON OFFSHORE DRILLING MEANS 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 6, 1948 June 17, 1952 Filed Dec. 6, 1948 E. P. HALLIBURTON OFFSHORE DRILLING MEANS 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 June 17, 1952 Filed Dec. 6, 1948 E. P. HALLIBURTON OFFSHORE DRILLING MEANS 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 June 17, 1952 E. P. HALLIBURTON 2,600,761

OFFSHORE DRILLING MEANS Filed Dec. 6, 1948 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 awe/Moo Patented June 17, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 14 Claims.

This invention relates to offshore drilling apparatus, and particularly to drilling rig supporting means adaptable for positioning over a drilling site which may be beneath a large and deep body of water.

Various structures have heretofore been proposed for use in transporting and supporting well drilling equipment in a manner intended to be suitable for drilling wells below unprotected deep water. Such structures in all cases, however, either constitute permanent developments which may not be moved from the drilling site after drilling operations are completed and which are extremely expensive or constitute structures which, although transportable after drilling, are impractical for the reason that said structures provide no satisfactory means for assuring stability of the structure over the drilling site, either against action of the sea or the wind. In all of the proposed designs, the only restraints provided to resist horizontal movement of the structure during the action of high waves and high winds are vertical members between the primary structure and the water bottom. It is self-evident that as the depth of water in which the proposed structure is to be used increases, the width of the supporting structure must increase in order to provide adequate resistance to upset or collapse the drilling platform. Consequently, truly deep water drilling requires that a tremendously large and heavy structure be built whereby to provide the sufficient base distance, and no provision exists in the prior art whereby this can be achieved in connection with a reasonably compact and light supporting structure.

It is consequently the principal object of this invention to provide a compact, reasonably light but strong structure adapted as adrilling platform and adapted to be stably supported over drilling sites submerged under considerable depths of water.

A further object of the invention is to provide said structure transportable to and from desired drilling sites and adapted to compose its supporting base over varying areas determined by the depth of the water encountered and therefore the distance between the base and top.

Another object of this invention is to provide said supporting base which preferably constitutes telescoping legs as retracted in relationship to the barge or platform itself during transporting, but extendible over any drilling site to form a base for the platform.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide means associated with the supporting structure whereby the barge or drilling platform may be raised from the surface of the sea whereby to be free of the bufieting action of the sea waves.

And yet another object of the invention is to provide portions of the supporting structure for the platform as integrally correlated to assure that the platform is supported evenly and is not tilted or disturbed from a horizontal plane during raising of the platform from the surface of the sea.

Further objects of the invention will appear hereinafter.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a barge or drilling platform embodying the present invention and having its supporting structure or legs in position for moving the barge;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of said barge or platform;

Figure 3 is an end elevational view thereof;

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 3 showing the apparatus having its supporting means or legs extending to the bottom;

Figure 5 is another view similar to Figures 3 and 4 but showing the barge or drilling platform raised from the surface of the sea and showing an oil well casing set in the well bore;

Figure 6 is a diagrammatic view showing the hydraulic system for controlling the positions of the barge supporting structure or legs;

Figure '7 is a view similar to Figure 6 showing the valves thereof in a different position;

Figure 8 is a further view similar to Figure 6 showing the valves in yet another position;

Figure 9 is a longitudinal section of one of the legs of the barge supporting apparatus;

Figure 10 is a transverse sectional view of a leg taken on the line lU-l 0 of Figure 9;

Figure 11 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through one of the hydraulic jacks which control the position of the barge supporting means or legs.

Figure 12 is a longitudinal sectional view of an enlarged lower portion of one of the barge supporting legs.

Figure 13 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line I 3l 3 of Figure 12; and v Figure 14 is a plan view of a proposed modification of the barge or drilling platform and associated apparatus.

Figure 15 is a side elevational view partly in section and partly diagrammatic, showing a mod: ification of the means for controlling the position of the legs.

Referring to the drawings, the general assembly of the structure incorporating this invention consists in a barge 28 which serves as a drilling platform, and is provided with a slot 22 through which drilling operations may take place, the said barge 29 supporting a derrick 24 which may or may not be erected prior to the time the barge reaches the drilling site. The barge is of course of sufiicient proportions to contain equipment and supplies for drilling wells and operating connected supporting apparatus, as well as ballast and trim tanks, and may also be equipped with motivating means whereby the barge may be driven to a suitable drilling site.

Attached pivotally to the barge are a plurality of paired telescoping legs 26, shown for clarity as 26 and 26a in some views, which form the principal supporting members once the barge has reached the drilling site. Said legs 25 are extended by hydraulic means hereinafterto befinished, the legs 28 are withdrawn or collapsed,

settling the barge or platform to the surface of the sea, and the barge then removed from the drilling site, it being noticed that the casing. 39 may clear the barge when, said barge is moved through, the slot 22.

Referring to the device more specifically, the barge 29 constitutes a floating and transportable drilling platform with a longitudinal slot 22 therein and having pairs of telescoping legs 26, each, leg pivotally attached to the side of the drilling platform by brackets 32 which form bearings to support the studs 34 extending from bosses 3.8. welded or otherwise affixed to the uppermost section of the legs 25'. Additionally supporting. the said legs 2.6 are trusse 38 which are pivotally attached to straps 38a afhxed to the barge and which are also welded or otherwise connected, to the upper sections of the said legs 26, it being noted that the pivot line for the trusses 38. is coaxial with the pivot line for the stud 34'.

Above the bosses 36 on the upper sections of the legs, 2.6 are studs 42' extending, from the leg sections. and, to which are, pivotally affixed the yokes 4:3 whichv are connected to piston rods 46 which lead through the. hydraulic jacks. 48 pivotally supported by the post 59, said hydraulic jacks 4.8. being. paired relation and controlling the. pivoting of the legs 26 with respect to the barge 29 in. manner to be hereinafter described.

The legs 26 comprise a plurality of telescoping sections being adapted to extend as best shown in Figure 9. Each section, said section forming tubes, is provided with suitable packingv means 52 whereby to prevent the passage of fluid from between the sections, and is. also provided, with suitable stops 54 to prevent over-extension. of the legs and stops 55 to prevent over-retraction thereof. The bottommost and smallest section 53 of each leg 25 is provided with a head 69, and below said head is rotatably carried a pin 62 carrying a collar 66 from Which extends a bracket 66 carrying rotatably another pin 68 which supports the foot 28, it being noted. that. each foot 28 is universally supported by each leg 26. It will be appreciated that the structure described shows but one form of a universal connection, and that other means might be used, such as ball and socket joints and the like.

Each foot 28 comprises a hollow, pontoon-like structure of considerable area whereby to distribute the weight of the structure over a sufiicient area to prevent penetration of the leg into the bottom, andis provided with transverse plates 19 and longitudinal plates 72 which penetrate into the bottom thereby to prevent any tendency in the feet to slip or skid over the said bottom. The top surface of the said feet 28 are provided with extending threaded studs 14 which are; inoperative when the legs 26 are extended but which are adapted to be received in bores in flanges ."9 upon brackets l8 extending from the barge itself when the legs 26 are retracted. Bolts 88 may be screwed over the studs 74 when said legs are so. retracted andthus is provided. additional supporting means for the feet and legs during transport. of they barge to and fromthe drilling site, it being noted that in hollow condition the feet 28 themselves serve aspontoon supports at the surface of the water..

In the preferred embodiment. of the invention, the; extension of the legs 26 and feet- 28 after removal of the bolts 80., the. positioningof said members, and the raising. .of the. barge from the surface of the water is all accomplished by hydraulicv means.

The top. of the. uppermost section of each leg 26. i provided. with a head 82 andafiixed thereto is a bearing-v 8A. which rotatably carries the uppermost section of a. telescoping. tubeBE, said tube extending through. the head 82 and being connected withv a conduit 88.. The tube 86 is provided. with packing means. 99 and is adapted to telescopically extend in conjunction withthe leg 25, a. key-way 92 being provided in said tube coacting with suitable keying means to prevent relative rotation between the. various sections of the tube. The lowermost. section of the tube 86 '3 opens into a three-way selector valve 94. whose operation will be hereinafter described,v and to the uppe portion. of said tube is. welded a handle 96 by which thev tube. may be turned. as a unit to control the said valve 94. The conduit 88 is sel'ectively connected to. awater. pump or to an. air pump, not. shown but which. may be accommodated on the deck of the barge.

The valve 94- comprises a valve body 98, integral with the lowermost section of the tube 86, and set within a valve housing Hill and turnable therein. Said valve body is provided with a slot I02, a passage I04 and a. passage I06, adapted to coordinate. for operational purposes with a conduit I08 leading through. the. valve housing, with a conduit. H8, a conduit H2 and a conduit ll l. For the purpose of lowering the legs 26 and feet 28, the valve body 98 is. turned to such position that the passage I06 connects with conduit H4 whereby pumping of water through the conduit 88,. tube 85, valve body 98, passage lot and conduit. H4v passes said fluid through a float valve. H6 supported within the foot 28 into the. interior of said foot 28. The foot 23 and various sections of the legs 26 will sink at a speed the function of the amount of water in each foot 28. Thus, the more water in each foot, the faster the foot and leg will sink; but if it is desired to slow the rate of sinking, air may be pumped through the conduit 88 and thereafter through, the means just set. forth to the foot 28. By means of a gooseneck II8 leading to ports I in the foot 28, water is thus expelled from said foot, the foot is rendered relatively more buoyant, andthe speed of descent is checked.

Again the rate of speed of descent may be increased considerably where-desired by filling the 1egs'26 themselves with fluid. A conduit I22. controlled by a valve I24 leads from a fluid pump to each leg 26 through a port in the head 82 for this purpose When it isdesired to fill a leg 26 with fluid, the tube 86 is rotated to turn the valvebody 98 to a position whereby the passage I04 registers with the conduit I I0, the said conduit IIO leading to a cylinder I26 whereby to force a piston carrying a valve I28 outwardly,

causing said valve to seat in a port in the chamber I38, said chamberIJ30 normally providing egress for fluid within the leg 26. After thus closing the leg 26,,fluid is forced into said leg I through the conduit I22 and under pressure aids in extending same, it being noted that a relief valve I3I is provided in the head 82 of each leg 26 whereby to bleed air from said leg.

After the foot 28 has reached the bottom, the legs25 will not have been extended fully, the remaining potential extension being availableto lift the barge or platform 20 from the surface of the water. This is done by applying more pressure to the fluid from the conduit I22 into the leg 26 and as fluid is forced thereinto the legs 26 will extend further, raising the barge 20. Such raising of the barge is accomplished under the control of the pairs of differential jacks 48 in manner to be hereinafter described.

After the barge has been lifted from the surface of the water and drilling has been completed and it is desired to move to a new site, the foregoing hydraulic system is adapted to assist in the raising of the legs and feet. The conduits I22 are opened to drain, thus relieving the fluid pressure within the legs' 26 and permitting the barge to settle back to the surface of the water. Thereafter, the tube 86, and thus the valve body 98, is turned to register the passage I04 with the conduit II2 so-that fluid pressure will force the valve I28 to open position with respect to the chamber I30, thus permitting free draining of the leg 26. It will be noted that by virtue of the slot I02 in the valve body 98, the inoperative side of the cylinder I26 is permitted to drain through a spring-loaded ball valve 132. After opening the leg 28, the valve body 98 is again rotated, this time again to register the passage I06 with the conduit I I4, whereupon air is forced into the tube 86 and into the foot 28, forcing the water therein out through the conduit H8 and ports I28. The buoyancy of the said foot will cause the sections of the leg 26 to telescope and retract to the surface, a draining of the fluid in said leg occurring through the chamber I30. It will be noted that the provision of the ports I20 at the bottom of the feet 28 not only provide a suction-breaking means at the bottom of said feet but also during the jetting'of the water in each foot, provide a means for washing away adhesive mud, sand, and the like. When the legs 26 are fully telescoped and the feet 28 have risen to the surface, the bolts '88 are threaded over the threaded studs I4, thereby fully supporting the feet and legs for transport of the barge. v

, The foregoing has described the means associated with the legs and feet for extending and retracting same. In order to control the angular disposition'of the legs with respect to the barge or platform 20, there is provided, as shown partially schematically in Figures 6, '7 and 8, pairs of jacks 48, each pair referred to for convenience as 48 and 48a, adapted each individually to control its respective leg and each pair adapted, if desired, to coordinate the .pivotal movement of facing pairs of said legs 28. As heretofore stated, each jack 48 is itself pivotally supported on a post 50 and connected through a piston rod 46 and yoke 44 to the uppermost section of each leg 26. Slidable in each jack 48 is a piston I34 connected to the piston rod 46. On either side of said piston I34 and leading from the jack 48 is a divided conduit, the conduit on the exterior side of said piston I34 in a jack 48 leading through one of a pair of two-position valve elements I36 and I36a commonly actuated in a single valve I38 to an open and closed position to the interior side of its matching jack 48a, through a conduit I40. Conversely, the divided conduit leading from the exterior side of the piston I34a in jack 48a passes by conduit 011 through the valve element I36a to the interior side of the jack 48. The exterior side of the jack 48 also leads through a conduit I42 to a fourposition selector valve I44 having three commonly actuated valve elements I46, I48 and I50, said valve I44 leading in turn to a fluid pump and to a reservoir. Similarly, the conduit I42a leading from the jack 48a leads to a comparable valve I44a having valve elements I46a, I48a, H501]. and said valve I44a leads to a fluid pump and reservoir. Conduits I52 and H321; lead, respectively, from the interior sides of jacks 48 and 48a to the valves I44 and MM.

Referring to Figures 6, '7 and 8 and particularly to Figure 6 and the jack 48, it will be seen that the disposition of the valve elements I46, I48 and I50 causes fluid to lead from the pump to the interior side of the jack 48 and with the valve I38 closed, the leg 28 is pivoted to move the foot 28 inwardly with respect to the barge 20 and independently of any other leg including its matching leg 28a. Again referring particularly to Figure 7 and the jack 48a, it will be seen that disposition of the valve elements M811, M811 and I50a pass fluid to the exterior of the jack 48a, and with the valve I38 closed pivots the leg 2811 so that the foot 28a moves outwardly from the barge 20.

It is to be noted that in both Figures 6 and '7 the legs 26 and 2611 are actuated independently, since the valve I38 is closed and since no communication exists between jacks through the conduits I40 and I48a. In Figure 6 it will benoted that due to the disposition of the elements of the valve I44a the leg 26a is locked against pivoting. In Figure 7, since communication is provided between the exterior and interior sides of the jack 68 through the valve element I48, free and unrestricted pivoting in either direction of the leg 26 is permitted.

Thus it will be seen by Figures 6 and 7 that with the valve I38 closed, the valve I44 and its duplicate, the valve IMa, permit in the various dispositions of their elements an independent controlling of the various legs whereby to pivot said legs to move a foot 28 inwardly with respect to the barge or outwardly with respect to the barge, permit a locking of the leg, or permit a terior and interior sides of matching jacks 48 and 48a through the conduits I40and-I40a, It

7, is contemplated that such communication willzbe permitted only when the valves I44: and I44a and their elements are in a position which, but. for

the-open position of valve I38, would, look their respective jacks; i. e., the position shown-of valve I44a= in Figure 6. Since the valve I38 is open and communication permitted-1 between. the conduits I 46 and. IBM, it will be seen that pivoting in either direction is permitted in the legs 26 or in-v the. legs. 26a, with the proviso that if the leg 2 26 be pivoted, a corresponding pivoting must take placein the leg, 26c and: suchpivoting, must be in the samedirection.

It, will be noted that there has not been shown in the drawings the various, pumps, valves, and 1 thelike heretofore described in connection with theapparatus. Said pumps, valves, and associated mechanism may be placed upon the barge or platform 28 in any suitable space and enclosed in, for example; the engine room or a separate control room. In addition to the trusses 36 and the like for supporting the legs 26, there have been provided various guy wires or cables and the like for the purpose of aiding in stabilizing the supporting structure. Thus there have been. provided cables I54 and I56 connected to the feet 28- and to winches (not shown) onthe barge 2!). itself. which may be used to in part control. theangular disposition of the feet 28 upon extension. of the legs 26. may be provided connecting. various pairs of feet 28. to prevent undesired spreading of the supporting, structure and to. minimizethe danger of collapse thereof. Again, to prevent undesired spreading of the feet in a longitudinal direction,

cables I60 are shown connecting the feet longitudinally. And finally, it will be appreciated that during drilling operations, any suitable bracing member I62, as a bolted-down beam, may be providedacross the slot 22 to add rigidity to the barge or platform.

In the-general operation of the drilling plat form or barge, the said barge is transported to the drilling site and the feet 28 unbolted. Thereafter, to attain the position shown in. Figure 4, the desired angular disposition of the legs is achieved by manipulation of the valves I44 and I444; and. application of fluid pressure to the jacks 48. and 48a, the valve I38 remaining closed during this operation. The legs 26 maythen be locked in their proper angular dispositions, as shown schematically in Figure 6, with respect to thejack 48a. For each leg, the handle 96 is then actuated to turn the valve body 98 and fluid is pumped through the conduit 88 and on into the feet 28 whereby said feet and the legs 26 sink to the'bottom. Thereafter the valve I 38 is opened and the valves I44 and mm being in normally locked position, each leg 26 is free to pivot with respect to the barge 26, but its matching leg must correspondingly pivot whereb the barge may be maintained during any pivoting in a horizontal plane. Upon. assuring that the chamber I36 is closed to prevent leakage of fluid from the legs 2.6, fluid is pumped into the said legs 26 and they are further extended to lift the barge 26 from the surface of the water, it being noted that in this operation the legs 26 will pivot outwardly but each pair in unison as the barge leaves the surface of the water. The valve I38 is then closed which provides a locking of the various jacks 48 and 48a and consequently the legs 26, and the barge and supporting structure is ready for any drilling operations desired.

After drilling completed and it is desired to move the barge, the valve I38 is first opened and Moreover, cablesv I56 Qli in .n)

. even the rate of ascent of fluid allowed to exit from the conduits I22 whereupon the legs will partially telescope and the barge settle to the surface of the water. For each leg, by the handle 96, the valve body 98' is turned to open the chamber I30 and thus vent each of the legs 26, and then turned again to connect each tube 86 with its foot 28. Air is pumped. into the feet 28 and their natural buoyancy causes a telescoping of the legs 26 and a withdrawal to the barge. The valves I 44 and I4'4a are adjusted to enable fluid pressure through the jacks 48 and 48a, to pivot the legs 26 to their upright. positions and the feet 28 thereupon bolted to the brackets 18, whereupon the barge can depart from the completed well.

It is obvious that various departures from themode of. operation above described are available. For example, in preparation for drilling, the legs on one side of the barge may be extended in a substantially vertical position until their feet 28 reach the bottom, whereupon the. jacks on theproper sidemay' be used to dispose said extended legs in the desired angular position, after which the legs on the other side may be disposed in their desired angular positions and thereafter lowered until their feet 28 rest upon the bottom. Again, as heretofore noted, judicious handling of the valve means 94 and associated pumps the rate of descent or may be used to control the feet 28 and the legs 26, and descent of the legs 26 may be speeded up by introducing fluid into time fluid is introduced into the feet 28.

Figure 14 shows a modification in the structure whereby, barge, the; barge itself is substantially square. In the modification shown, the legs and associated mechanism are mounted one on each side of the barge and the facing legs are integrated in control just. as; are the matching. legs in the preferred embodiment. The operation of this. modification, so far as concerns the respective pairs of legs, is precisely the same as the operation of the more narrowly shaped barge, and. like parts in the principal embodiment correspond to like parts on the modification. The principal advantage of the modification shown is well drilling is to be of such a nature as not to require heavier machinery, materials and the like, as in shallow well drilling, said embodiment provides a lighter, more compact and less ex.- pen sive structure.

Flgure 15 shows a modification in the struc-- ture-whereby, in order to control the angular disposition of the legs lic. jack system. Between each pair of legs 26' is provided a differential gearing mechanism which. comprises a conventional gear box I60 containing sun gears I62 and I64 and planetary gears I66 and I68, said planetary I12. Carried by the structure is the ring, gear I14 whichengages a pinion I'I6- aflixed to a shaftsaid legs 26 at the sameinstead of a long and narrow that where the- 26, a mechanical system i's used instead of the previously described hydraugears I66 and I68 being adapted to rotate freely on the shafts I70 and:

is driven by suitable power I62 is keyed to a shaft I62 which the gear box through a brake- I86 is controlled by a leveron the shaft I96 and in turn carries a cable 202 passing around a sheave 204 and connected on opposite sides to the upper portion of the leg 26. The sheave 264 is supported by truss means 206 rigidly afiixed to the brackets 32.

' Similarly, the sun gear I64 is keyed to shaft 208 passing through brake drum 2I0 to clutch 2I2 controlled by the lever 2I4. On the other side of said clutch is a shaft 2I6 carrying bevel gear 2I8 which engages a bevel gear 220 carried by the shaft 222. It will be noted that the bevel gear 228 is in opposite relationship to the bevel gear 2 I8 from that relationship between the bevel gears I92 and I94.

The shaft 222, supported in the diagrammatically shown bearings 224, carries a reel 226 which in turn carries a cable 228. The cable 228 passes around a sheave 230 which is carried by the truss 232 and. is connected to the leg 26a.

As with the prior described hydraulic jack system, the above mechanical system provides a differential means for controlling the angular disposition of the legs 26 and 26a in respect to the barge. If it be desired to move the leg independently of the leg 26a, the operator will lock the shaft 208 by means of the brake drum 2I0, thus rendering the leg 26a immovable and may then apply power in the direction desired to the shaft I18. By virtue of the ring gear- I14, the gear box I60 will rotate, rotating in turn the sun gear I62 and the shaft I82. With the clutch I86 engaged, this will drive the reel 200 and thus the cable 202 to dispose the leg 26 in its desired position. Of course it is appreciated that it is unnecessary during this operation to render the leg 26a immovable inasmuch as the clutch 2I2 can be disengaged. I v

It will thus be seen by the foregoing description that through the differential system described, either the leg 26 or the leg 26a may be angularly disposed independent of its matching leg. As heretofore described, however, it is desirable that means be afforded whereby angular movement of one leg be accompanied by an equivalent angular movement in the other leg as when the barge is ready to be lifted from the surface of the body of water over which drilling is to take place. This is accomplished by freeing the two brake drums I84 and 2I0 by engaging the two clutches I86 and 2I2, and by simply locking the shaft I18 by means of the brake drum I80. In this condition, when fluid is pumped into the legs 26 and 26a, in order to raise the barge with respect to the surface of the body of water, angular movement ineither one of the legs is accompanied by. equal angular movement in the other. Thus, when the leg 26 pivots counterclockwise, the reel 288 will cause the shaft I96 to turn, and through the bevel gears I94 and I92, the shaft I82 will likewise turn. Through the sun gear I62, the planetary gears I66 and I68 and the sun gear I64, the shaft 268 will turn in an opposite direction from the shaft I82, and through the bevel gears 2I8 and 220, cause the reel 226 to rotate. Rotation of the reel 226 drives the cable 228 to cause a clockwise pivoting of the leg 26a corresponding with the counterclockwise pivoting of the leg 28. It is, of course, apparent that looking legs 26 and 26a in desired angular disposition may be accomplished by locking the shafts I82 and 208 by the brake drums I84 and 2H], provided that the clutches I86 and 2I2 are engaged.

While there has been described what is at present considered a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it will be apparent to 10 those skilled in the art that various modifications and changes may be made without departing from the essence of the invention, and it is intended to cover herein all such modifications and changes as come within the true scope and spirit of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A barge for supporting well drilling struc ture over a body of water comprising: a barge body; telescoping supporting legs pivotally connected thereto, said legs, when extended being of sufficient length to lift said barge body above the surface of said water and to provide a base in excess of the width of said barge body; and an hydraulic system operable to pump fluid into said legs to extend said legs; and air pumps connected to said system whereby to evacuate said fluid fromsaid legs to permit floating retraction thereof.

2. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; pairs of facing extendable legs pivotally connected thereto, said legs, when extended, being of sufficient length to lift said barge body above the surface of said water and to provide a base in excess of the width of said barge body; and an hydraulic system operable to pump fluid into said legs to extend said legs.

3. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; extendable supporting legs pivotally connected thereto, said legs, when extended, being of sufiicient length to lift said barge body above the surface of said water and to provide a base in excess of the width of said barge body; and hydraulic jacks cooperatively associated with said legs to control the angular disposition of said legs in relation to said barge body.

l. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; extendable supporting legs pivotally connected thereto, said legs, when extended, being of sufficient length to lift said barge body above the surface of said water and to provide a base in excess of the width of said barge body; and differential gear linkage cooperatively associated with said legs to control the angular disposition of said legs' in relation to said barge body.

5. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; pairs of facing extendable legs pivotally connected thereto, the legs of each pair having each a predetermined angular disposition with respect to said barge body, and being restrained each to vary its angular disposition in response to any variance in the angular disposition of the other; and an hydraulic. system operable to pump fluid into said legs to extend said legs to provide supporting structure for said barge body of predetermined base width.

6. A barge for supporting well drilling struc each a predetermined angular disposition with respect to said barge body, and being differentially restrained each to vary its angular disposition in response to any variance in the angular disposition of the other; and an hydraulic system operable to pump fluid into said legs to extend said legs to provide supporting structure for said barge body of predetermined base width.

7. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; pairs of facing telescoping legs pivotally connected thereto, the legs of each pair having each a predetermined angular disposition with respect to said barge body, and being restrained each to vary its angular disposition in response to any variance in the angular disposition of the other, said leg pairs being extendable to suflicient length to provide a base of predetermined width for said barge body and to lift said barge body from said water; and an hydraulic system operable to pump fluid into said legs to extend said legs.

8. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; pairs of facing telescoping legs pivotally connected thereto, the legs of each pair having each a predetermined angular disposition with respect to said barge body, and being differentially restrained 'each to vary its angular disposition in response to any variance in the angular disposition of the other, said leg pairs being extendable to sufiicient length to provide a base of predetermined Width for said barge body and to lift said barge body from said water; and an hydraulic system operable to pump fluid into said legs to extend said legs.

9. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; pairs of facing telescoping legs pivotally connected thereto, the legs of each pair having each apredetermined angular dispositionwith respect to said. barge body, means adapted to restrain each leg to vary its angular disposition in response to v.any variance in the angular disposition of the other, said leg pairs being extendable to sufiicient length to provide a base of predetermined width for said barge body and to lift said barge body from said water, said means including differential hydraulic jacks; and an hydraulic system o erable to pump fluid into said legs to .extend said legs.

'10. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge y; p rs of facing telescoping legs pivotally connected here he legs of each pair having each a predetermined angular disposition with resp o said barge body, means adapted to restrain each leg to vary its angular disposition in response to any variance in the angula disposition of the other, .said'l g pairs bein eX- ten'dable to suflicient length to provide a base of predetermined width for said barge body and to .lift, said barge body from said water, said means including a difierentia'l'gear linkage; and an hydraulic system operable to pump fluid into said legs t xtend said legs.

11. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over "a body of water comprising: a barge body; pairs of facing extendible legs pivotally connected thereto, the legs of each pair having each a predetermined angular disposition with respect to said barge 'bodyfand being restrained each 'to vary said angular disposition in response Cir o any variance in the angular disposition of the other; and means or extending said legs to lift said barge body above said water and to provide a base for said barge body.

12. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; pairs of facing extendible legs pi votally connected thereto, the legs of each pair having each a predetermined angular disposition with respect to said barge body. and being differentially restrained each to vary said angular disposition in response to any variance in the angular disposition of the other; and mean for extending said legs to lift said barge body above said water and to rovide a base for said barge body.

13. A barge for-supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising: a barge body; pairs of facing extendible legs ivotally connected thereto, the legs of each pair havin each 'a predetermined angular disDOsition with respect to said barge body; hydraulic jacks cooperatively associated with the legs of each pair to restrain each leg to vary its angular-disposition in response to any variance in the a u ar disposition of the other; and means for extending said legs to lift said barge body above said Water and to rovide a base for said barge body.

14. A barge for supporting well drilling structure over a body of water comprising; a barge body; pairs of facing. extendible legs pivotally connected thereto, the legs of each pair having each a predetermined angular disposition with respect to said barge body; differential gear linkage cooperatively associated with the legs of each pair to restrain each leg to vary its angular disposition in response to any variance in the a gular disposition of the o h r; and me ns for eX- tending said legs to lift said barge body above said water and to provide a base for said barge body.

ERLE P. HALLIBURTON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED :STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 428,141 Robinson May 20,1890 1,718,006 Reno June 18,, 1929 1,892,125 Armstrong Dec. 27, 1932 2,237,387 Crites Apr. 8, 1941 2,248,051 Armstrong July 8, 1941 2,308,743 .Bulkley Jan. 19, 1943 2,327,118 MacKnight Aug. 17, 1943 2,334,992 'Crake Nov. 23, 1943 2,398,351 Baker Apr. 16, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 1,112 Great Britain 1912

US63831A 1948-12-06 1948-12-06 Offshore drilling means Expired - Lifetime US2600761A (en)

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US2667038A (en) * 1952-07-17 1954-01-26 Charles A D Bayley Subaqueous supporting structure for working platforms
DE1035593B (en) * 1954-05-26 1958-08-07 Joseph E Lucas Device for deep drilling under water and procedure for setting up the drilling site
US2846851A (en) * 1955-01-21 1958-08-12 Pelham George Fred Marine apparatus
US2863293A (en) * 1954-09-21 1958-12-09 Noble Drilling Corp Marine drilling rig
US2873581A (en) * 1954-08-16 1959-02-17 Raymond Int Inc Marine platform
US2909900A (en) * 1954-01-06 1959-10-27 De Long Corp Off-shore working assembly
US2921442A (en) * 1954-03-19 1960-01-19 Ocean Drilling Exploration Submergible barge
US2924947A (en) * 1955-01-07 1960-02-16 Peterson Ole Caisson
US2941370A (en) * 1956-01-19 1960-06-21 Western Gulf Oil Company Offshore platforms
US2961837A (en) * 1956-09-28 1960-11-29 Delong Corp Supporting leg assembly for marine platform
US2963868A (en) * 1954-03-15 1960-12-13 Sun Oil Co Seadrome
US2968930A (en) * 1955-10-12 1961-01-24 Offshore Structures & Service Mobile self-erecting marine platforms
US2984075A (en) * 1956-05-15 1961-05-16 De Long Corp Internal and external jack assembly for telescopic caissons
US2997852A (en) * 1954-12-30 1961-08-29 De Long Corp Apparatus and method for reecting a supporting structure over a body of water
US3011317A (en) * 1956-11-29 1961-12-05 Kerr Mc Gee Oil Ind Inc Submergible barge
US3062014A (en) * 1959-09-14 1962-11-06 Paul R Newcomb Underwater drilling apparatus
US3115013A (en) * 1956-09-05 1963-12-24 Joseph H Thornley Artificial island and method of constructing the same
US3171259A (en) * 1960-09-30 1965-03-02 Universal Drilling Company Inc Offshore drilling barge
US3204417A (en) * 1963-10-28 1965-09-07 Gunther And Shirley Company Underwater pipe laying apparatus
US3246476A (en) * 1963-12-05 1966-04-19 Kerr Mc Gee Oil Ind Inc Submersible vessel for submarine operations
US3289419A (en) * 1964-02-03 1966-12-06 Camco Inc Sea raft
US3306052A (en) * 1963-08-26 1967-02-28 Directo Corp Floatable structure and method of operating same
US3310108A (en) * 1963-12-09 1967-03-21 Fmc Corp Guiding apparatus for installing well equipment
US3392534A (en) * 1965-09-09 1968-07-16 Pan American Petroleum Corp Offshore drilling structure
US3456448A (en) * 1967-03-14 1969-07-22 Shell Oil Co Leg for supporting a marine structure
US3479828A (en) * 1967-04-28 1969-11-25 Shell Oil Co Platform leg
US3906564A (en) * 1972-12-15 1975-09-23 Us Navy Remotely controlled underwater instrument system
US3922868A (en) * 1974-08-27 1975-12-02 Reagan W Mcdonald Deep water platform construction
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US4109477A (en) * 1974-02-18 1978-08-29 Salzgitter Maschinen Ag Offshore driller rig
FR2411270A1 (en) * 1977-12-09 1979-07-06 Stevin Baggeren Bv Platform intended to rest on a seabed and equipped with shock absorbers
US4187038A (en) * 1976-08-27 1980-02-05 Taylor Woodrow Construction Limited Equipment for extracting oil or gas from under the sea bed and method of installing such equipment
US5018904A (en) * 1988-07-28 1991-05-28 Technic Geoproduction Sea-bed support device for the legs of a self-elevating oil-rig platform
FR2698605A1 (en) * 1992-12-02 1994-06-03 Doris Engineering Self-elevating work platform - has remotely controlled work machinery, cables for pulling down to sea bed, and stabilising legs
WO2002098725A2 (en) * 2001-06-01 2002-12-12 The Johns Hopkins University Telescoping spar platform and method of using same
FR2881447A1 (en) * 2005-01-28 2006-08-04 Satob Sa Marine platform for e.g. receiving hoisting engine, has elastically deformable main and secondary tie rods with tabs mounted with clearance between flanges of their respective forks
US20080199259A1 (en) * 2007-02-21 2008-08-21 Cannon James R Marine pile driving and boring apparatus
WO2009080102A1 (en) * 2007-12-20 2009-07-02 Strukton Betonbouw B.V. Apparatus for positioning a sinking tunnel section
EP2315881A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2011-05-04 Pluton Resources Ltd Drilling platform
US20120060742A1 (en) * 2010-09-13 2012-03-15 Hewitt Machine & Mfg. Inc. On board lift leg construction for pontoon boats with onboard engine
EP2796619A1 (en) * 2013-04-26 2014-10-29 BITEK Bergungsdienst GmbH Floating work platform with a lifting system and method for lifting and/or lowering such a floating work platform
EP2952631A1 (en) * 2009-03-13 2015-12-09 Saipem S.p.A. Device for sitting on the seabed for self-raising sea vessels

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Cited By (50)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2667038A (en) * 1952-07-17 1954-01-26 Charles A D Bayley Subaqueous supporting structure for working platforms
US2909900A (en) * 1954-01-06 1959-10-27 De Long Corp Off-shore working assembly
US2963868A (en) * 1954-03-15 1960-12-13 Sun Oil Co Seadrome
US2921442A (en) * 1954-03-19 1960-01-19 Ocean Drilling Exploration Submergible barge
DE1035593B (en) * 1954-05-26 1958-08-07 Joseph E Lucas Device for deep drilling under water and procedure for setting up the drilling site
US2873581A (en) * 1954-08-16 1959-02-17 Raymond Int Inc Marine platform
US2863293A (en) * 1954-09-21 1958-12-09 Noble Drilling Corp Marine drilling rig
US2997852A (en) * 1954-12-30 1961-08-29 De Long Corp Apparatus and method for reecting a supporting structure over a body of water
US2924947A (en) * 1955-01-07 1960-02-16 Peterson Ole Caisson
US2846851A (en) * 1955-01-21 1958-08-12 Pelham George Fred Marine apparatus
US2968930A (en) * 1955-10-12 1961-01-24 Offshore Structures & Service Mobile self-erecting marine platforms
US2941370A (en) * 1956-01-19 1960-06-21 Western Gulf Oil Company Offshore platforms
US2984075A (en) * 1956-05-15 1961-05-16 De Long Corp Internal and external jack assembly for telescopic caissons
US3115013A (en) * 1956-09-05 1963-12-24 Joseph H Thornley Artificial island and method of constructing the same
US2961837A (en) * 1956-09-28 1960-11-29 Delong Corp Supporting leg assembly for marine platform
US3011317A (en) * 1956-11-29 1961-12-05 Kerr Mc Gee Oil Ind Inc Submergible barge
US3062014A (en) * 1959-09-14 1962-11-06 Paul R Newcomb Underwater drilling apparatus
US3171259A (en) * 1960-09-30 1965-03-02 Universal Drilling Company Inc Offshore drilling barge
US3306052A (en) * 1963-08-26 1967-02-28 Directo Corp Floatable structure and method of operating same
US3204417A (en) * 1963-10-28 1965-09-07 Gunther And Shirley Company Underwater pipe laying apparatus
US3246476A (en) * 1963-12-05 1966-04-19 Kerr Mc Gee Oil Ind Inc Submersible vessel for submarine operations
US3310108A (en) * 1963-12-09 1967-03-21 Fmc Corp Guiding apparatus for installing well equipment
US3289419A (en) * 1964-02-03 1966-12-06 Camco Inc Sea raft
US3392534A (en) * 1965-09-09 1968-07-16 Pan American Petroleum Corp Offshore drilling structure
US3456448A (en) * 1967-03-14 1969-07-22 Shell Oil Co Leg for supporting a marine structure
US3479828A (en) * 1967-04-28 1969-11-25 Shell Oil Co Platform leg
US3906564A (en) * 1972-12-15 1975-09-23 Us Navy Remotely controlled underwater instrument system
US4109477A (en) * 1974-02-18 1978-08-29 Salzgitter Maschinen Ag Offshore driller rig
US3922868A (en) * 1974-08-27 1975-12-02 Reagan W Mcdonald Deep water platform construction
US3977201A (en) * 1975-03-19 1976-08-31 Bittner Robert B Method and apparatus for preventing buckling of pipeline as it is being assembled and laid on the ocean floor
US4187038A (en) * 1976-08-27 1980-02-05 Taylor Woodrow Construction Limited Equipment for extracting oil or gas from under the sea bed and method of installing such equipment
FR2411270A1 (en) * 1977-12-09 1979-07-06 Stevin Baggeren Bv Platform intended to rest on a seabed and equipped with shock absorbers
US5018904A (en) * 1988-07-28 1991-05-28 Technic Geoproduction Sea-bed support device for the legs of a self-elevating oil-rig platform
GB2221237B (en) * 1988-07-28 1993-03-31 Technip Geoproduction Support on the sea-bed for the legs of a self-elevating oil-rig platform for drilling at sea, and platforms including application of these
FR2698605A1 (en) * 1992-12-02 1994-06-03 Doris Engineering Self-elevating work platform - has remotely controlled work machinery, cables for pulling down to sea bed, and stabilising legs
WO2002098725A2 (en) * 2001-06-01 2002-12-12 The Johns Hopkins University Telescoping spar platform and method of using same
WO2002098725A3 (en) * 2001-06-01 2003-05-22 Univ Johns Hopkins Telescoping spar platform and method of using same
FR2881447A1 (en) * 2005-01-28 2006-08-04 Satob Sa Marine platform for e.g. receiving hoisting engine, has elastically deformable main and secondary tie rods with tabs mounted with clearance between flanges of their respective forks
US20080199259A1 (en) * 2007-02-21 2008-08-21 Cannon James R Marine pile driving and boring apparatus
WO2009080102A1 (en) * 2007-12-20 2009-07-02 Strukton Betonbouw B.V. Apparatus for positioning a sinking tunnel section
US20100310318A1 (en) * 2007-12-20 2010-12-09 Strukton Civiel Projecten B.V. Positioning a sinking tunnel section
US8496406B2 (en) * 2007-12-20 2013-07-30 Strukton Civiel Projecten B.V. Positioning a sinking tunnel section
EP2315881A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2011-05-04 Pluton Resources Ltd Drilling platform
EP2315881A4 (en) * 2008-06-23 2013-06-26 Pluton Resources Ltd Drilling platform
EP2952631A1 (en) * 2009-03-13 2015-12-09 Saipem S.p.A. Device for sitting on the seabed for self-raising sea vessels
US8430045B2 (en) * 2010-09-13 2013-04-30 Hewitt Machine & Mfg., Inc. On board lift leg construction for pontoon boats with onboard engine
US20120060742A1 (en) * 2010-09-13 2012-03-15 Hewitt Machine & Mfg. Inc. On board lift leg construction for pontoon boats with onboard engine
EP2796619A1 (en) * 2013-04-26 2014-10-29 BITEK Bergungsdienst GmbH Floating work platform with a lifting system and method for lifting and/or lowering such a floating work platform
DE102013104278A1 (en) * 2013-04-26 2014-10-30 BITEK Bergungsdienst GmbH Floating work platform with a lifting system and method for lifting or lowering such a buoyant work platform
DE102013104278B4 (en) 2013-04-26 2018-05-09 BITEK Bergungsdienst GmbH Floating work platform with a lifting system and method for performing underwater work

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