US20130053225A1 - Multi-functional, structurally corrective neck exerciser - Google Patents

Multi-functional, structurally corrective neck exerciser Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20130053225A1
US20130053225A1 US13/221,582 US201113221582A US2013053225A1 US 20130053225 A1 US20130053225 A1 US 20130053225A1 US 201113221582 A US201113221582 A US 201113221582A US 2013053225 A1 US2013053225 A1 US 2013053225A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
neck
exercise device
user
pair
recited
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/221,582
Inventor
Donald W. Meyer
Original Assignee
Donald W. Meyer
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Donald W. Meyer filed Critical Donald W. Meyer
Priority to US13/221,582 priority Critical patent/US20130053225A1/en
Publication of US20130053225A1 publication Critical patent/US20130053225A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/02Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices using resilient force-resisters
    • A63B21/055Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices using resilient force-resisters extension element type
    • A63B21/0552Elastic ropes or bands
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/0004Exercising devices moving as a whole during exercise
    • A63B21/00043Exercising devices consisting of a pair of user interfaces connected by flexible elements, e.g. two handles connected by elastic bands
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/40Interfaces with the user related to strength training; Details thereof
    • A63B21/4027Specific exercise interfaces
    • A63B21/4033Handles, pedals, bars or platforms
    • A63B21/4035Handles, pedals, bars or platforms for operation by hand
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/40Interfaces with the user related to strength training; Details thereof
    • A63B21/4041Interfaces with the user related to strength training; Details thereof characterised by the movements of the interface
    • A63B21/4043Free movement, i.e. the only restriction coming from the resistance
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/025Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for the head or the neck

Abstract

Provided is an exercise device for exercising the neck and spine of a user. The exercise device comprises a neck band defining a pair of opposed end portions, with the neck band being disposable adjacent a rear side of a neck of the user. The exercise device further includes a pair of extension members. Each extension member defines a distal end portion and a proximal end portion connected to a respective one of the pair of opposed end portions of the neck band. Each extension member is extendable between an extended position and a retracted position. The distance along the extension member between the distal end portion and the neck strap increases as the extension member is moved from the retracted position toward the extended position.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • Not Applicable
  • STATEMENT RE Federally Sponsored Research/Development
  • Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND
  • It is widely recognized that the human spine functions as a central support to the center of the human body, much like a column, as the name “spinal column” suggests. The human spine includes a number of vertebrae which are vertically stacked with vertebral disks disposed between adjacent vertebrae. A spinal cavity is formed in each vertebra such that when the vertebra are stacked, the spinal cavities are aligned to form the spinal canal, which receives the spinal cord. Nerves branch out from the spine between the stacked vertebrae and extend throughout the body.
  • A condition that is commonly experienced by individuals is a loss of lateral curvature in the spine, particularly a loss or reversal of lateral curvature in the cervical region of the spine. If the spine becomes distorted, increased compression (or load) may occur between vertebral bodies which may cause the disc between two vertebral bodies to posteriorly stick out or bulge. This in turn may exert pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots extending through the adjacent area. The individual may develop symptoms such as pain, tingling or numbness of the arms, hands, legs or feet.
  • Several treatment methods and devices have been developed to address the above-described condition and its associated symptoms. An exemplary treatment method is spinal traction which involves using a device to pull and stretch the spinal column along its longitudinal or y-axis in a straight (or axial) fashion.
  • Although intermittent axial traction methods may be effective in rehabilitating the intervertebral disc, they typically involve large-scale equipment with electric motors and their associated power supply devices, computerized control devices, etc. As such, it is generally impractical for procurement of intermittent traction devices for personal use. Moreover, even if an individual is able to purchase an intermittent traction device, such devices are typically difficult to operate. Thus, technical knowledge is generally a prerequisite for proper control and operation. In this regard, it may be impractical for an individual patient to operate an intermittent traction device. Another disadvantage which may be associated with axial traction is that it may straighten out and diminish the normal lateral curvatures and thus may be structurally counter-productive.
  • Other traction devices that apply strong transverse anterior spinal loads to restore normal lateral spinal curvatures while also stretching out the intervertebral discs have been developed that consists of a complex network of bulky weights, chains, pulleys, springs, ropes or the like. Furthermore, these devices may require attachment to a support surface, such as a wall. Consequently, a patient is typically required to visit a hospital, rehab facility, or physical therapy clinic to have access to transverse or axial traction equipment. Furthermore, because the devices are extremely heavy or commonly anchored to a wall or floor, they cannot be easily moved or transported. This imposes a significant burden on the individual and makes it difficult for the individual to receive regular traction therapy.
  • A portable home device that would apply a strong anterior load into the posterior cervical region while the patient actively applies extension-based range of motion exercise is a new and unique concept within the healing arts. Exercise straps have been invented that recommend a “gentle” resistance to various neck range of motion exercises and assist in stretching the neck musculature (See Neck Exercising Method, U.S. Pat. No. 5,498,218). This device was generally not designed to provide a strong progressive anterior load into the user's cervical spine. A more recent exercise device (See Device and Method for Cervical Curvature Restoration, U.S. Patent Application No. 20090254010) uses a spring-like design to apply a relatively strong extension resistance to the posterior neck muscles, but again recommends only a mild anterior load (4-6 lbs.) be applied into the posterior cervical region. In fact, this device was designed to generally prevent a strong anterior pull from being applied into the neck by the posterior spring assembly. Research has shown that strong (20-50 lbs.) posterior to anterior spinal loads are typically required to adequately elongate the cervical discs and other anterior soft tissues to restore spinal lateral curvatures. This much force has also generally been found to be necessary to properly decompress, re-hydrate and rehabilitate the degenerated intervertebral disc.
  • While existing neck treatment and exercise devices may function in a satisfactory manner for their intended purpose, there remains a need for a neck exercise and stretching device that applies a progressive, strong (20-50 lbs.) anterior spinal load and is simplified to allow a person to operate the device at the their home or office, and thus, does not require that the person visit a specialized facility. The present invention addresses this particular need, as will be discussed in more detail below.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • According to an aspect of the present invention there is provided an exercise device for exercising the neck and spine of a user. The exercise device comprises a neck band defining a pair of opposed end portions, with the neck band being disposable adjacent a rear side of a neck of the user. The exercise device further includes a pair of extension members, wherein each extension member defines a distal end portion and a proximal end portion connected to a respective one of the pair of opposed end portions of the neck band. Each extension member is extendable between an extended position and a retracted position. The distance along the extension member between the distal end portion and the neck strap increases as the extension member is moved from the retracted position toward the extended position.
  • The neck exercise device is specifically configured and adapted to be lightweight, highly portable, and easy to use thereby allowing an individual to perform neck exercises using the device in the user's home, office, etc. In this regard, the exercise device of the present invention alleviates the burden of traveling to specialized rehab facilities to gain access to neck stretching and exercise devices. Furthermore, the adaptability of the device may allow the patient to deliver force to the lower, middle and/or upper anterior neck structure while the patient performs neck extension exercises.
  • According to one aspect of the present invention, the neck exercise device includes a pair of connectors connected to respective ones of the pair of end portions of the neck band. Each connector is connectable to a respective one of the pair of extension members to connect the respective extension member to the respective one of the pair of neck band end portions. Each connector may include a pair of loops through which a respective extension member may be threaded for connecting the extension member to the neck band. Each extension member may define a pair of opposed end portions, wherein the end portions are enlarged relative to the remainder of the extension member to mitigate removal of the extension member from the pair of loops.
  • Each extension member may be grippable by the user when using the exercise device to provide resistance as the user extends the extension member between the retracted position and the extended position. The extension members may further be configured to provide variable resistance to the user as they transition between the retracted and extended positions. Along these lines, the extension members may provide approximately 20-50 pounds of resistance as they are extended.
  • The present invention is best understood by reference to the following detailed description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • These and other features and advantages of the various embodiments disclosed herein will be better understood with respect to the following description and drawings, in which like numbers refer to like parts throughout, and in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a front view of a neck exercise device shown in a retracted position and an extended position in phantom;
  • FIG. 2 is a front view of the neck exercise device, wherein a portion of an outer sheath has been cutaway to show an inner strap;
  • FIG. 3 is a side view of vertebral disks C1-C7 defining the cervical vertebrae; and
  • FIG. 4-10 illustrate various exercises which may be performed using the neck exercise device.
  • Common reference numerals are used throughout the drawings and detailed description to indicate like elements.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The detailed description set forth below is intended as a description of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention, and is not intended to represent the only form in which the present invention may be constructed or utilized. The description sets forth the functions and sequences of steps for constructing and operating the invention. It is to be understood, however, that the same or equivalent functions and sequences may be accomplished by different embodiments and that they are also intended to be encompassed within the scope of the invention.
  • Referring now to the drawings, wherein the showings are for purposes of illustrating a preferred embodiment of the present invention only, and not for purposes of limiting the same, there is shown an exercise device 10 specifically configured and adapted to exercise the neck and spine of a user. More specifically, the exercise device 10 is configured to provide progressive resistance that tractions the normal lordosis into the cervical spine while active extension exercises of the entire cervical spine are performed. Thus patients that suffer from loss of the normal spinal curvature may use the device 10 to restore curvature to their cervical spine.
  • The exercise device 10 is lightweight, compact, and is easy to use for quick exercise sessions in the home or office. The exercise device 10 applies a strong rehabilitative stretching of the anterior cervical structures and may also help to stretch out thinning degenerated discs. In addition, the exercise device 10 may break up scar tissue and allow the discs to absorb surrounding blood to rehydrate. The exercise device 10 may further be used to strengthen deep anterior cranial-cervical flexors, which may improve head posture and reduce chronic neck pain and headaches.
  • The exercise device 10 includes a medial neck band 12 defining a pair of opposed end portions 14, 16 defining a length “B” therebetween. The exercise device 10 also includes a pair of extension members 18, 20 connected to respective ones of the pair of end portions 14, 16. Each extension member 18, 20 defines a distal end portion 22, 24 and a proximal end portion 26, 28, wherein the respective proximal end portions are configured to be connectible to the respective end portions 14, 16 of the neck band 12.
  • Each extension member 18, 20 is selectively extendable between an extended position and a retracted position relative to the neck band 12. In this regard, the extension members 18, are preferably formed from a resilient material, such as rubber, to withstand repeated movement between the extended and retracted positions. Referring now specifically to FIG. 1, each extension member 18, 20 is shown in the retracted position and is also shown in phantom in the extended position. The extension members 18, 20 may be biased toward the retracted position. Each extension member 18, 20 additionally defines a length L1, L2 as the distance between the distal end portion 22, 24 of the respective extension member 18, 20 and the respective end portion 14, 16 of the neck band 12. The lengths L1, L2 are selectively and independently adjustable relative to the neck band 12 as the user performs the exercises using the exercise device 10. More specifically, the lengths L1, L2 increase as the respective extension member 18, 20 is moved from the retracted position toward the extended position. Conversely, the lengths L1, L2 decrease as the respective extension members 18, 20 are moved from the extended position toward the retracted position. As the lengths L1, L2 are increased, the extension members 18, 20 provide progressively increasing resistance to the user. Conversely, as the lengths L1, L2 decrease, the resistance provided by the extension members 18, 20 progressively decreases. According to one embodiment, the device 10 may impart a force that varies from 20-50 pounds as the extension members 18, 20 are moved from the retracted position toward the extended position.
  • Exemplary exercises which may be performed using the exercise device 10 are shown in FIGS. 4-10, and will be described in more detail below. However, the exercise device 10 is generally used by placing the neck band 12 behind the user's neck and gripping the extension members 18, 20 with the user's hands and extending the user's arms in front of the user to increase the lengths L1, L2, while the neck band 12 remains generally stationary adjacent the user's neck.
  • According to one embodiment, the neck band 12 may include an outer sheath 30 and an inner strap 32 disposed within the outer sheath 30. The outer sheath 30 may be configured to rest against the user's neck as the user performs the exercises, and thus, may be formed from a material which provides comfort to the user. In this regard, the outer sheath 30 may be padded and may be capable of absorbing moisture. The inner strap 32 may extend through the outer sheath 30 and link the two extension members 18, 20 together. The inner strap 32 may be configured to withstand opposing resistive forces when the extension members 18, 20 are extended simultaneously. Along these lines, the inner strap 32 may be relatively inextensible, or less extendable than the extension members 18, 20 such that the length of the inner strap 32 does not substantially increase or decrease during use. According to one embodiment, the inner strap 32 is formed from a woven nylon material, although leather or other materials known by those skilled in the art may also be used.
  • Connectors may be coupled to the strap 32 adjacent the end portions 14, 16 of the neck band 12 for connecting the neck band 12 to the respective extension member 18, 20, as described in more detail below. In the embodiment depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2, the connectors include a pair of loop 34 a, 34 b attached at each end portion of the strap 32, although other connectors, such as clips, etc., may be used without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.
  • The exemplary extension members 18, 20 each include an extendable band 36, 38, wherein each band 36, 38 terminates at opposed ends 36 a, 36 b, 38 a, 38 b. According to one embodiment, the extension member 18 is connected to the neck band 12 by passing the ends 36 a, 36 b under and around loop 34 a and then under loop 34 b. When the band 36 is pulled, the band 36 is compressed between the loops 34 a, 34 b to secure the band 36 to the loops 34 a, 34 b. The tension within the band 36 maintains the compression between the loops 34 a, 34 b to maintain the connection between the band 36 and the loops 34 a, 34 b. One embodiment of the band 36 may include enlarged ends 36 a, 36 b to mitigate inadvertent disengagement between the band 36 and the loops 34 a, 34 b.
  • The extension member 20 is connected to the loops 34 a, 34 b at the end portion 16 in similar fashion. More specifically, the ends 38 a, 38 b are passed under and around the loop 34 a and then under the loop 34 b such that a compressive force maintains the band 38 between the loops 34 a, 34 b. The ends 38 a, 38 b may also be enlarged to mitigate inadvertent disengagement between the band 38 and the loops 34 a, 34 b.
  • Each extension member 18, 20 may include a respective handle 40, 42 coupled to the bands 36, 38. In this regard, each handle 40, 42 defines a tubular configuration which is adapted to fit over the bands 36, 38. The handles 40, 42 may be formed from a grippable material, such as rubber or foam material. The handles 40, 42 may also include gripping members connected thereto to facilitate gripping by the user.
  • Although the foregoing describes extension members 18, 20 formed from a band of extendable material, it is contemplated that other embodiments of the device 10 may include extension members that include springs, pistons, or other resistance members, without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.
  • With the basic structural attributes of the exercise device 10 being described above, the following discussion focuses on exemplary uses of the exercise device 10. Referring now specifically to FIG. 4, there is shown a user performing a basic neck pump exercise. The user grips the handles 40, 42 and positions the device 10, such that the outer sheath 30 of the neck band 12 resides behind the user's neck. The user's elbows are raised and the user's palms face outward to begin the exercise. The user then slowly extends both arms forward moving the extension members 18, 20 from their respective retracted positions toward their respective extended positions. As the user extends their arms, the user's head and neck are relaxed to allow the neck to be pulled forward as the user extends their hands, which results in the user tilting their head back relative to their neck. This results in the user arching their neck to restore the curvature within the cervical spine. The user may attempt to fully extend their arms to pull the lower neck into a fully forward flexed position. The exercise device 10 is configured such that if any neck or upper back pain is felt during the extension of the arms, the user may stop at that point. Over time, the user may be able to extend their arms farther without experiencing pain.
  • Once the lower neck is pulled into full forward flexion, the user may actively pull their head into full extension, thereby completely stretching out the front neck soft tissues. The user may only pull their head into full extension if it can be accomplished in a pain free manner. If pain is experienced prior to full extension, the user may be advised to stop at that point. The user's fully extended hands can be slightly moved backward and forward with the head extensions to create a “pumping” motion to the exercise. In this regard, the extension members 18, 20 may be “pumped” or moved between the extended position and a partially retracted position.
  • The above-described basic neck pump exercise may be started with the exercise device 10 pulling into the lower neck region. After three to four repetitions, the interior or front angle of pull may be adapted to pull on the middle neck region, as shown in FIG. 5. In other words, to exercise the lower neck region, the user extends their hands in a manner which is lower than that shown in FIG. 5. The user may again change the angle of pull after three to four repetitions to pull into the upper neck region. In this regard, the angle of extension, or angle of pull may exercise different portions of the user's neck. By extending the user's arms in a low position, the user exercises the lower portion of the neck. By extending the user's arms to a higher position, the user exercises a middle portion of the neck. By extending the user's arms still higher, the user may exercise the upper neck region. Thus, the single exercise device 10 may provide a comprehensive and complete exercise for the various regions of the user's neck.
  • The basic neck pump exercise described above, may be modified or adapted to perform additional exercises. For instance, a neck pump and hold exercise is performed in a manner similar to the basic neck pump exercise described above, with the primary distinction being that the user holds the full arm and head extension for 5-10 seconds. The user then relaxes the arms and head and the repeats the exercise. The exercise may be performed 3-4 times in the lower, middle and upper neck regions similar to the basic neck pump exercise.
  • Another version of the basic neck pump exercise is a multi-stage neck pump exercise that progresses in a vertical direction along the neck. More specifically, given that there are six inter-vertebral joints in the neck (See FIG. 3), the neck pump exercise may be performed in a six step process, starting at the lower neck region and moving up to the upper neck region with 3-4 repetitions at each level. The user's arms are raised higher and higher as the user works their way up their neck.
  • Another variation is the neck pump exercise with full lateral bend stretching. This exercise is commenced by performing the basic neck pump exercise into the lower neck region. After the user has fully extended their head, the user moves their head into left and right full lateral flexion, or side bends, two to three times each way (see FIG. 6). If pain is felt as the user bends their head to each side, the user may stop at that point. The user should be able to go farther and farther without pain over time. This exercise may be performed three to four times and repeated in the middle and upper neck regions.
  • Another exercise variation is the neck pump exercise with full rotation stretching. This exercise is started by performing the basic neck pump exercise into the lower neck region. After the user has fully extended their head, the head is moved into left and right full rotation two to three times each way. This exercise is performed three to four times and is repeated in the middle and upper neck regions. If pain is felt along the way, the user may stop at that point.
  • Referring specifically to FIGS. 9 and 10, there is shown a head-neck flexion pump exercise wherein the user places the neck band 12 of the exercise device 10 into the upper neck region adjacent the base of the user's skull. The user then tucks their chin adjacent to their neck and holds the chin-tuck position and retracts or moves their head straight backward against the resistance of their hands pulling the exercise device 10 slightly forward. The user's hands can be slightly moved backward and forward with their head retractions to create a “pumping” motion to the exercise. This exercise may be repeated ten to twelve times, and is especially effective for those that suffer chronic upper neck and/or headache pain.
  • Another exercise that may be performed is an upper thorax flexion pump, which is started by performing the basic neck pump exercise in the lower neck region. Once the user has fully extended their arms, the user flexes or arches their upper back while at the same time keeping their head level. This upper back stretch may be held for five to 10 seconds and then may be relaxed. The user's fully extended hands can be slightly moved backward and forward with the upper thorax flexion to create a “pumping” motion to the exercise. This may be repeated ten to twelve times as needed.
  • The exercise device 10 may also be used to perform a standing shoulder internal rotation exercise. This exercise is started by standing and placing the exercise device 10 behind the user's buttocks with the palms of the user facing outward. The user's arms are then rotated inwardly until the user's thumbs meet in front of the user's body, while at the same time keeping the user's arms straight and head extended. This position is held for five to 10 seconds and then the user may relax. This exercise may be repeated ten to twelve times.
  • The standing shoulder internal rotation exercise, as well as the upper thorax flexion pump exercise, is preferably performed by individuals who have a flattened upper thorasic (back) region and/or retracted shoulders. Those exercises should generally not be performed if the user has an increased side curvature of the upper back region.
  • As a general rule of thumb, the user's hand grip position depends on the user's upper back. More specifically, if the user's upper back region defines a flattened appearance, or “anterior saucering” from the side view, the user will typically also have slightly retracted shoulders and should use an internal rotation hand positioning during the exercises. The configuration of the exercise device 10 allows for such adaptability to accommodate various users and their respective needs. For instance, to use the internal rotation hand positioning, the user would start by holding the exercise device behind the user's neck, as shown in FIG. 4. As the user straightens out their arms, the user rotates their arms into the center of this motion. By the time the user has fully extended their arms, the knuckles of their hands should meet in front of them (see FIG. 6).
  • If the user's upper back region from the side view appears to have a normal amount of backward curvature, then the user may perform the exercises with a normal grip, which is shown in FIG. 9.
  • As mentioned above, the exercise device 10 is specifically configured and adapted to allow the user to target one particular region of the neck. Therefore, if x-ray analysis or further diagnosis from a doctor or therapist identifies a particular region needing more attention than others, the exercise device 10 may be used to focus on the problematic region (i.e., lower neck region, middle neck region, or upper neck region).
  • Although the foregoing describes specific exercises and repetitions, those skilled in the art will understand that the foregoing is exemplary in nature only and is not intended to limit the scope of the present invention. As such, different exercises may be performed and the number of repetitions may vary without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.
  • Additional modifications and improvements of the present invention may also be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. Thus, the particular combination of components and steps described and illustrated herein is intended to represent only certain embodiments of the present invention, and is not intended to serve as limitations of alternative devices and methods within the spirit and scope of the invention.

Claims (20)

1. An exercise device for exercising the neck and spine of a user, the exercise device comprising:
a neck band defining a pair of opposed end portions, the neck band being disposable adjacent a rear side of a neck of the user; and
a pair of extension members, each extension member defining a distal end portion and a proximal end portion connected to a respective one of the pair of opposed end portions of the neck band, each extension member being extendable between an extended position and a retracted position, the distance along the extension member between the distal end portion and the neck strap increasing as the extension member is moved from the retracted position toward the extended position.
2. The exercise device as recited in claim 1, further comprising a pair of connectors connected to respective ones of the pair of end portions of the neck band, each connector being connectable to a respective one of the pair of extension members to connect the respective extension member to the respective one of the pair of end portions.
3. The exercise device as recited in claim 2, wherein each connector includes a pair of loops connected to the neck band, the proximal end portion of the respective one of the pair of extension members connected to the respective connector being threaded through the pair of loops to connect the extension member to the connector.
4. The exercise device as recited in claim 1, wherein each extension member is configured to be grippable by the user and to provide resistance as the user extends the extension member from the retracted position to the extended position.
5. The exercise device as recited in claim 4, wherein each extension member is configured to provide variable resistance.
6. The exercise device as recited in claim 1, wherein the pair of extension members are independently moveable between the extended and retracted positions.
7. The exercise device as recited in claim 1, wherein the extension members are formed from an elastic material.
8. The exercise device as recited in claim 1, wherein the neck band is formed from a substantially inelastic material.
9. The exercise device as recited in claim 1, wherein each extension member defines a loop when the extension member is connected to the neck band.
10. A neck exercise device configured for use by a user to stretch the neck of the user, the neck exercise device comprising:
an elongate neck engagement member configured to be disposable adjacent the neck of the user, the neck engagement member defining a first end portion and an opposing second end portion;
a first resistance strap connectable to the first end portion of the neck engagement member, the first resistance strap being extendable relative to the neck engagement member between a retracted position and an extended position; and
a second resistance strap connectable to the second end portion of the neck engagement member, the second resistance strap being extendable relative to the neck engagement member between a retracted position and an extended position;
the elongate neck engagement member applying a force to the neck of the user as at least one of the first and second resistance straps are moved from the retracted position toward the extended position.
11. The neck exercise device of claim 10 wherein as least one of the first resistance strap and the second resistance strap defines a pair of enlarged end portions connectable to the elongate neck engagement member.
12. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 11, further comprising a pair of connectors connected to respective ones of the first and second end portions, each connector being connectable to a respective one of the first and second resistance straps to connect the respective resistance strap to the respective one of the first and second end portions.
13. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 12, wherein each connector includes a pair of loops connected to the neck engagement member, the enlarged end portions of each resistance strap being threaded through the loops of a respective connector to connect the resistance strap to the neck engagement member.
14. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 10, wherein each resistance strap is configured to be grippable by the user and to provide resistance as the user extends the resistance strap from the retracted position to the extended position.
15. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 14, wherein each resistance strap is configured to provide variable resistance.
16. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 10, wherein the first resistance strap is independently moveable relative to the second resistance strap.
17. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 10, wherein the first and second resistance straps are formed from an elastic material.
18. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 10, wherein the neck engagement member is formed from a substantially inelastic material.
19. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 10, wherein first and second resistance straps each defines a loop when connected to the neck engagement member.
20. The neck exercise device as recited in claim 10, wherein the neck engagement member includes an outer sheath and an inner strap disposed within the outer sheath.
US13/221,582 2011-08-30 2011-08-30 Multi-functional, structurally corrective neck exerciser Abandoned US20130053225A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/221,582 US20130053225A1 (en) 2011-08-30 2011-08-30 Multi-functional, structurally corrective neck exerciser

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/221,582 US20130053225A1 (en) 2011-08-30 2011-08-30 Multi-functional, structurally corrective neck exerciser

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20130053225A1 true US20130053225A1 (en) 2013-02-28

Family

ID=47744544

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/221,582 Abandoned US20130053225A1 (en) 2011-08-30 2011-08-30 Multi-functional, structurally corrective neck exerciser

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20130053225A1 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140024508A1 (en) * 2012-07-17 2014-01-23 Robert S. Hinds Exercise device with elastic members and webbing
US9204987B1 (en) * 2010-04-16 2015-12-08 Joan Breibart Device for enhancing awareness of head positioning
US9205299B1 (en) * 2012-02-01 2015-12-08 Raashed Hall Power push up
US20160001120A1 (en) * 2013-10-24 2016-01-07 Ronald Williams Resistance band having hand adapters and handles

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4733862A (en) * 1987-04-20 1988-03-29 Miller Jack V Elastic resistance exerciser
US6921357B2 (en) * 2003-02-12 2005-07-26 Jack Basting Tensile exercise device

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4733862A (en) * 1987-04-20 1988-03-29 Miller Jack V Elastic resistance exerciser
US6921357B2 (en) * 2003-02-12 2005-07-26 Jack Basting Tensile exercise device

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9204987B1 (en) * 2010-04-16 2015-12-08 Joan Breibart Device for enhancing awareness of head positioning
US9205299B1 (en) * 2012-02-01 2015-12-08 Raashed Hall Power push up
US20140024508A1 (en) * 2012-07-17 2014-01-23 Robert S. Hinds Exercise device with elastic members and webbing
US9333385B2 (en) * 2012-07-17 2016-05-10 Pivotal 5, Llc Exercise device with elastic members and webbing
US20160001120A1 (en) * 2013-10-24 2016-01-07 Ronald Williams Resistance band having hand adapters and handles
US9468789B2 (en) * 2013-10-24 2016-10-18 Ronald Williams Resistance band having hand adapters and handles

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
McGill et al. Exercises for spine stabilization: motion/motor patterns, stability progressions, and clinical technique
JP5314596B2 (en) Abdominal exercise device
JP3750868B2 (en) Physical fitness good maintenance, rehabilitation and treatment stretch therapy instrument for the
Anderson et al. Introduction to Pilates-based rehabilitation
FI86510C (en) Redskap Foer traening of bukmusklerna.
Norris Abdominal muscle training in sport.
US6461284B1 (en) Spherical back exerciser apparatus
US6419650B1 (en) Device for providing accupressure back massage
US7628734B1 (en) Exercising and physiotherapy system
US8323157B2 (en) Method of using an exercise device having an adjustable incline
US9079064B2 (en) Strengthening and rehabilitation exercise apparatus
US6203473B1 (en) Stretching and exercise apparatus
US5577995A (en) Spinal and soft tissue mobilizer
US5462518A (en) Therapeutic spinal traction apparatus and multipurpose exercise systems and methods
CN101107049B (en) Training equipment
US7361128B2 (en) Exercising apparatus
US5871425A (en) Abdominal exercise device
US6015370A (en) Combined therapeutic exercise apparatus for the back
Fusco et al. Physical exercises in the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: an updated systematic review
US5232425A (en) Pivotable abdominal exercise device
US5653665A (en) Apparatus to provide relief for back pain
US5498218A (en) Neck exercising method
US6371894B1 (en) Medical device for physical therapy treatment
US6293893B1 (en) Physical fitness accessory
US6368255B1 (en) Device for stretching and yoga

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION