US20110291992A1 - Optical Sensor Array - Google Patents

Optical Sensor Array Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110291992A1
US20110291992A1 US13/123,815 US200913123815A US2011291992A1 US 20110291992 A1 US20110291992 A1 US 20110291992A1 US 200913123815 A US200913123815 A US 200913123815A US 2011291992 A1 US2011291992 A1 US 2011291992A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
chiplet
display
light
sensor
according
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/123,815
Inventor
Jeremy Burroughes
Stephen Coats
Haydn Gregory
Euan Smith
Julian Carter
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Cambridge Display Technology Ltd
Original Assignee
Cambridge Display Technology Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to GBGB0819447.4A priority Critical patent/GB0819447D0/en
Priority to GB08194474 priority
Priority to GB09006172 priority
Priority to GB0900617A priority patent/GB2464562B/en
Application filed by Cambridge Display Technology Ltd filed Critical Cambridge Display Technology Ltd
Priority to PCT/GB2009/002509 priority patent/WO2010046643A2/en
Assigned to CAMBRIDGE DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY LIMITED reassignment CAMBRIDGE DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY LIMITED ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GREGORY, HAYDN, CARTER, JULIAN, SMITH, EUAN, BURROUGHES, JEREMY, COATS, STEPHEN
Publication of US20110291992A1 publication Critical patent/US20110291992A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L27/00Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate
    • H01L27/28Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including components using organic materials as the active part, or using a combination of organic materials with other materials as the active part
    • H01L27/32Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including components using organic materials as the active part, or using a combination of organic materials with other materials as the active part with components specially adapted for light emission, e.g. flat-panel displays using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED]
    • H01L27/3241Matrix-type displays
    • H01L27/3244Active matrix displays
    • H01L27/3269Including photosensors to control luminance
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L27/00Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate
    • H01L27/28Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including components using organic materials as the active part, or using a combination of organic materials with other materials as the active part
    • H01L27/32Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including components using organic materials as the active part, or using a combination of organic materials with other materials as the active part with components specially adapted for light emission, e.g. flat-panel displays using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED]
    • H01L27/3225OLED integrated with another component
    • H01L27/3227OLED integrated with another component the other component being a light sensitive element, e.g. inorganic solar cell, inorganic photodiode
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L27/00Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate
    • H01L27/28Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including components using organic materials as the active part, or using a combination of organic materials with other materials as the active part
    • H01L27/32Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including components using organic materials as the active part, or using a combination of organic materials with other materials as the active part with components specially adapted for light emission, e.g. flat-panel displays using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED]
    • H01L27/3241Matrix-type displays
    • H01L27/3244Active matrix displays
    • H01L27/3255Chiplets

Abstract

An optical sensor array comprises a photo-sensitive area formed by an array of chiplets having individual light-sensitive elements, each element configured to produce a signal or signals in response to incident light. The displacement of a chiplet from a predetermined position is derivable from the output signal or signals of the element or elements associated with the chiplet. The arrangement provides a method of measuring the displacement of at least one chiplet in an active display.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • Recent years have seen very substantial growth in the market for displays as the quality of displays improves, their cost falls, and the range of applications for displays increases. This includes both large area displays such as for TVs or computer monitors and smaller displays for portable devices.
  • The most common classes of display presently on the market are liquid crystal displays and plasma displays although displays based on organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are now increasingly attracting attention due to their many advantages including low power consumption, light weight, wide viewing angle, excellent contrast and potential for flexible displays.
  • The basic structure of an OLED is a light emissive organic layer, for instance a film of a poly (p-phenylenevinylene) (“PPV”) or polyfluorene, sandwiched between a cathode for injecting negative charge carriers (electrons) and an anode for injecting positive charge carriers (holes) into the organic layer. The electrons and holes combine in the organic layer generating photons. In WO90/13148 the organic light-emissive material is a conjugated polymer. In U.S. Pat. No. 4,539,507 the organic light-emissive material is of the class known as small molecule materials, such as (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (“Alq3”). In a practical device one of the electrodes is transparent, to allow the photons to escape the device.
  • A typical organic light-emissive device (“OLED”) is fabricated on a glass or plastic substrate coated with a transparent anode such as indium-tin-oxide (“ITO”). A layer of a thin film of at least one electroluminescent organic material covers the first electrode. Finally, a cathode covers the layer of electroluminescent organic material. The cathode is typically a metal or alloy and may comprise a single layer, such as aluminium, or a plurality of layers such as calcium and aluminium. In operation, holes are injected into the device through the anode and electrons are injected into the device through the cathode. The holes and electrons combine in the organic electroluminescent layer to form an exciton which then undergoes radiative decay to give light. The device may be pixilated with red, green and blue electroluminescent subpixels in order to provide a full colour display (for the avoidance of doubt, “pixel” as used herein may refer to a pixel that emits only a single colour or a pixel comprising a plurality of individually addressable subpixels that together enable the pixel to emit a range of colours).
  • Full colour liquid crystal displays typically comprise a white-emitting backlight, and light emitted from the device is filtered through red, green and blue colour filters after passing through the LC layer to provide the desired colour image.
  • A full colour display may be made in the same way by using a white or blue OLED in combination with colour filters. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that use of colour filters with OLEDs even when the pixels of the device already comprises red, green and blue subpixels can be beneficial. In particular, aligning red colour filters with red electroluminescent subpixels and doing the same for green and blue subpixels and colour filters can improve colour purity of the display (for the avoidance of doubt, “pixel” as used herein may refer to a pixel that emits only a single colour or a pixel comprising a plurality of individually addressable subpixels that together enable the pixel to emit a range of colours).
  • Downconversion, by means of colour change media (CCMs) for absorption of emitted light and reemission at a desired longer wavelength or band of wavelengths, can be used as an alternative to, or in addition to, colour filters.
  • One way of addressing displays such as LCDs and OLEDs is by use of an “active matrix” arrangement in which individual pixel elements of a display are activated by an associated thin-film transistor. The active matrix backplane for such displays can be made with amorphous silicon (a-Si) or low temperature polysilicon (LTPS). LIPS has high mobility but can be non-uniform and requires high processing temperatures which limits the range of substrates that it can be used with. Amorphous silicon does not require such high processing temperatures, however its mobility is relatively low, and can suffer from non-uniformities during use due to aging effects. Moreover, backplanes formed from either LIPS or a-Si both require processing steps such as photolithography, cleaning and annealing that can damage the underlying substrate. In the case of LIPS, in particular, a substrate that is resistant to these high-energy processes must be selected.
  • An alternative approach to patterning is disclosed in, for example, Rogers et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 2004, 84(26), 5398-5400; Rogers et al Appl. Phys. Lett. 2006, 88, 213101; and Benkendorfer et al, Compound Semiconductor, June 2007, in which silicon on an insulator is patterned using conventional methods such as photolithography into a plurality of elements (hereinafter referred to as “chiplets”) which are then transferred to a device substrate. The transfer printing process takes place by bringing the plurality of chiplets into contact with an elastomeric stamp which has surface chemical functionality that causes the chiplets to bind to the stamp, and then transferring the chiplets to the device substrate. In this way, chiplets carrying micro- and nano-scale structures such as display driving circuitry can be transferred with good registration onto an end substrate which does not have to tolerate the demanding processes involved in silicon patterning.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In one aspect, the invention provides a display comprising one or more chiplet sensors for sensing light incident on the chiplet
  • In one embodiment, the sensor is configured to generate a response to external light sources. The response may be an adjustment to compensate pixel brightness for ambient light conditions.
  • Alternatively, or additionally, the sensor is configured to generate a response to light emitted by the display.
  • The display may be a touch-screen display, and the display may be capable of receiving a digital communication such as an infra-red signal originating from an infra red controller or pointer.
  • In a second aspect, the invention provides an optical displacement sensor for a circuit comprising a plurality of chiplets, the sensor comprising a photo-sensitive area formed by an array of individual light-sensitive elements, each element configured to produce a signal or signals in response to incident light, and wherein the displacement of a chiplet from a predetermined position is derivable from the output signal or signals.
  • The sensor preferably comprises control circuitry for compensating positional variation derived from the displacement of the chiplet.
  • The plurality of individual light sensitive elements may be photodiodes and/or phototransistors.
  • The incident photons may originate from organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).
  • The sensor may be integrated with the chiplet.
  • A single chiplet sensor may serve multiple subpixels.
  • In another aspect, the invention provides a method of measuring the displacement of at least one chiplet in an active display, the method comprising:
  • detecting photons from one or more light sources and producing output signals based on the detection;
  • comparing the relative output signals to determine the position of the one or more light sources with respect to the chiplet.
  • In a further aspect, the invention provides method of compensating for variation of pixel emission brightness over time, wherein emission from a pixel or subpixel is detected by a chiplet and any variation in detected pixel emission brightness is adjusted.
  • Preferably, one chiplet sensor detects light emitted from a plurality of pixels or subpixels.
  • The chiplet may both drive one or more pixels or subpixels of the display and sense emission from these pixels or subpixels.
  • The light emitted from the display according to any of the above aspects of the invention may be coupled to the chiplet via an optical structure selected from one of a waveguide or a grating structure.
  • In a yet further aspect the invention provides a method of compensating for positional variations in chiplet drive circuitry arising during manufacture of a display comprising a plurality of chiplets and light sources driven by the chiplets, the method comprising:
  • providing a photon detection array positioned so as to detect positional output in light from the light sources and produce an output signal based on the detection;
  • comparing the output signal with a predetermined value representing the expected position of the light source to calculate the positional deviation;
  • controlling drive circuitry so as to drive the light sources in a manner which compensates for the detected deviation.
  • According to one embodiment of the present invention, an optical sensor is included in at least some chiplets. According to one embodiment, an array of photodiodes is used as the optical sensor to detect the position of the emitting OLED with respect to the chiplet through examination of the relative signals on photodiodes. According to one embodiment photodiodes are used together to detect the emission from the photodiode, correctly compensating for the relative amount of light falling on the sensors due to pixel to chiplet misalignment, and use the corrected signal to program the OLED for a particular light output.
  • Further advantages and novel features can be found in the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For a better understanding of the invention and as to how the same may be carried into effect, reference will now be made, by way of example only, to the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a device wherein the device is formed by firstly forming an anode on a substrate followed by deposition of an electroluminescent layer and a cathode;
  • FIG. 2A shows a chiplet-integrated optical sensor according to an embodiment of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 2B illustrates an alternative view of the arrangement shown in FIG. 2A.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION Chiplet Material
  • The chiplets may be formed from semiconductor wafer sources, including bulk semiconductor wafers such as single crystalline silicon wafers, polycrystalline silicon wafers, germanium wafers; ultra thin semiconductor wafers such as ultra thin silicon wafers; doped semiconductor wafers such as p-type or n-type doped wafers and wafers with selected spatial distributions of dopants (semiconductor on insulator wafers such as silicon on insulator (e.g. Si—SiO2, SiGe); and semiconductor on substrate wafers such as silicon on substrate wafers and silicon on insulator. In addition, printable semiconductor elements of the present invention may be fabricated from a variety of nonwafer sources, such as a thin films of amorphous, polycrystalline and single crystal semiconductor materials (e.g. polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, polycrystalline GaAs and amorphous GaAs) that is deposited on a sacrificial layer or substrate (e.g. SiN or SiO2) and subsequently annealed, and other bulk crystals, including, but not limited to, graphite, MoSe2 and other transition metal chalcogenides, and yttrium barium copper oxide.
  • The chiplets may be formed by conventional processing means known to the skilled person.
  • Preferably, each driver or LED chiplet is up to 500 microns in length, preferably between about 15-250 microns, and preferably about 5-50 microns in width, more preferably 5-10 microns.
  • Transfer Process
  • The stamp used in transfer printing is preferably a PDMS stamp.
  • The surface of the stamp may have a chemical functionality that causes the chiplets to reversibly bind to the stamp and lift off the donor substrate, or may bind by virtue of, for example, van der Waals force. Likewise upon transfer to the end substrate, the chiplets adhere to the end substrate by van der Waals force and/or by an interaction with a chemical functionality on the surface of the end substrate, and as a result the stamp may be delaminated from the chiplets.
  • Chiplet and Display Integration
  • The chiplets patterned with drive circuitry for addressing pixels or subpixels of a display may be transfer-printed onto a substrate carrying tracking for connection of the chiplets to a power source and, if required, drivers outside the display area for programming the chiplets.
  • To ensure accurate transfer onto a prepared end substrate, the stamp and end substrate may be registered by means known to the skilled person, for example by providing alignment marks on the substrate.
  • Alternatively, tracking for connection of the chiplets may be applied after the chiplets have been transfer printed.
  • In the case where the chiplets drive a display such as an LCD or OLED display, the backplane comprising the chiplets is preferably coated with a layer of insulating material to form a planarisation layer onto which the display is constructed. Electrodes of the display device are connected to the output of the chiplets by means of conducting through-vias formed in the planarisation layer.
  • Organic LED
  • In the case where the display is an OLED, the device according to the invention comprises a glass or plastic substrate 1 onto which the backplane (not shown) has been formed, an anode 2 and a cathode 4. An electroluminescent layer 3 is provided between anode 2 and cathode 4.
  • In a practical device, at least one of the electrodes is semi-transparent in order that light may be emitted. Where the anode is transparent, it typically comprises indium tin oxide. Preferably, the cathode is transparent in order to avoid the problem of light emitted from electroluminescent layer 3 being absorbed by the chiplets and other associated drive circuitry in the case where light is emitted through the anode. A transparent cathode typically comprises a layer of an electron injecting material that is sufficiently thin to be transparent. Typically, the lateral conductivity of this layer will be low as a result of its thinness. In this case, the layer of electron injecting material is used in combination with a thicker layer of transparent conducting material such as indium tin oxide.
  • It will be appreciated that a transparent cathode device need not have a transparent anode (unless, of course, a fully transparent device is desired), and so the transparent anode used for bottom-emitting devices may be replaced or supplemented with a layer of reflective material such as a layer of aluminium. Examples of transparent cathode devices are disclosed in, for example, GB 2348316.
  • Suitable materials for use in layer 3 include small molecule, polymeric and dendrimeric materials, and compositions thereof. Suitable electroluminescent polymers for use in layer 3 include poly(arylene vinylenes) such as poly(p-phenylene vinylenes) and polyarylenes such as: polyfluorenes, particularly 2,7-linked 9,9 dialkyl polyfluorenes or 2,7-linked 9,9 diaryl polyfluorenes; polyspirofluorenes, particularly 2,7-linked poly-9,9-spirofluorene; polyindenofluorenes, particularly 2,7-linked polyindenofluorenes; polyphenylenes, particularly alkyl or alkoxy substituted poly-1,4-phenylene. Such polymers as disclosed in, for example, Adv. Mater. 2000 12(23) 1737-1750 and references therein. Suitable electroluminescent dendrimers for use in layer 3 include electroluminescent metal complexes bearing dendrimeric groups as disclosed in, for example, WO 02/066552.
  • Further layers may be located between anode 2 and cathode 3, such as charge transporting, charge injecting or charge blocking layers.
  • The device is preferably encapsulated with an encapsulant (not shown) to prevent ingress of moisture and oxygen. Suitable encapsulants include a sheet of glass, films having suitable barrier properties such as alternating stacks of polymer and dielectric as disclosed in, for example, WO 01/81649 or an airtight container as disclosed in, for example, WO 01/19142. A getter material for absorption of any atmospheric moisture and/or oxygen that may permeate through the substrate or encapsulant may be disposed between the substrate and the encapsulant.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a device wherein the device is formed by firstly forming an anode on a substrate followed by deposition of an electroluminescent layer and a cathode, however it will be appreciated that the device of the invention could also be formed by firstly forming a cathode on a substrate followed by deposition of an electroluminescent layer and an anode.
  • FIG. 2A shows chiplet-integrated optical sensor according to an embodiment of the present invention. The chiplet 101 comprises a photo-sensitive area formed by an array of individual light-sensitive elements, each element configured to produce a signal or signals in response to an incident photon of light detected from a pixel 102. According to one example, the photosensitive area is formed by a plurality of photodiodes. By detecting such a signal or signals from a number of pixels 102, it is possible to determine the displacement of the chiplet 101 from a predetermined position 103. According to one embodiment, circuitry is arranged to detect the position of the emitting OLED with respect to the chiplet through examination of the relative signals arriving at photodiodes.
  • FIG. 2B illustrates an alternative view of the arrangement shown in FIG. 2A. As can be seen, a photon emitted from pixel 102 through glass substrate 104 is detected by the chiplet-integrated optical sensor 101 in the manner described in accordance with FIG. 2A.
  • Throughout this specification, the term “control circuit” is used to refer to circuitry for programming the drive circuitry; “drive circuitry” is used to refer to circuitry for directly driving pixels of the display; and “display area” is used to refer to area defined by pixels of the display and associated drive circuitry.
  • Those skilled in the art will appreciate that while this disclosure has described what is considered to be the best mode and, where appropriate, other modes of performing the invention, the invention should not be limited to the specific configurations and methods disclosed in this description of the preferred embodiment.

Claims (19)

1. A display comprising one or more chiplet sensors for sensing light incident on the chiplet.
2. A display according to claim 1 wherein the sense is configured to generate a response to external light sources.
3. A display a cording to claim 1 wherein the sensor is configured to generate a response to light emitted by the display.
4. A display according to claim 2 wherein the display is a touch-screen display.
5. A display according to claim 2 wherein the response is an adjustment to compensate pixel brightness for ambient light conditions.
6. A display according to claim 2 wherein the display is capable of receiving a digital communication.
7. The display according to claim 6 wherein the digital communication is from an infra-red signal originating from an infra red controller or pointer.
8. An optical displacement sensor for a circuit comprising a plurality of chiplets, the sensor comprising:
a photo-sensitive area formed by an array of individual light-sensitive elements, each element configured to produce a signal or signals in response to incident light, and wherein the displacement of a chiplet from a predetermined position is derivable from the output signal or signals.
9. The sensor according to claim 8 further comprising control circuitry for compensating positional variation derived from the displacement of the chiplet.
10. The sensor according to claim 8 wherein the plurality of individual light sensitive elements are photodiodes and/or phototransistors.
11. The sensor according to claim 8 wherein the incident photons originate from organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).
12. The sensor according to claim 8 wherein the sensor is integrated with the chiplet.
13. The sensor according to claim 8 wherein a single chiplet sensor serves multiple subpixels.
14. A method of measuring the displacement of at least one chiplet in an active display, the method comprising:
detecting photons from one or more light sources and producing output signals based on the detection; and
comparing the relative output signals to determine the position of the one or more light sources with respect to the chiplet.
15. A method of compensating for variation of pixel emission brightness over time wherein emission from a pixel or subpixel is detected by a chiplet and any variation in detected pixel emission brightness is adjusted.
16. A method according to claim 14 wherein one chiplet sensor detects light emitted from a plurality of pixels or subpixels.
17. A method according to claim 15 wherein the chiplet both drives and senses emission from one or more pixels or subpixels.
18. The sensor according to claim 1 wherein light is coupled to the chiplet via an optical structure selected from one of: a waveguide or a grating structure.
19. A method of compensating for positional variations in chiplet drive circuitry arising during manufacture of a display comprising a plurality of chiplets and light sources driven by the chiplets, the method comprising:
providing a photon detection array positioned so as to detect positional output in light from the light sources and produce an output signal cased on the detection;
comparing the output signal with a predetermined value representing the expected position of the light source to calculate the positional deviation;
controlling drive circuitry so as to drive the light sources in a manner which compensates for the detected deviation.
US13/123,815 2008-10-23 2009-10-21 Optical Sensor Array Abandoned US20110291992A1 (en)

Priority Applications (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GBGB0819447.4A GB0819447D0 (en) 2008-10-23 2008-10-23 Optical sensor array
GB08194474 2008-10-23
GB09006172 2009-01-15
GB0900617A GB2464562B (en) 2008-10-23 2009-01-15 Optical Sensor Array
PCT/GB2009/002509 WO2010046643A2 (en) 2008-10-23 2009-10-21 Optical sensor array

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110291992A1 true US20110291992A1 (en) 2011-12-01

Family

ID=40133709

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/123,815 Abandoned US20110291992A1 (en) 2008-10-23 2009-10-21 Optical Sensor Array

Country Status (8)

Country Link
US (1) US20110291992A1 (en)
JP (1) JP2012506567A (en)
KR (1) KR20110073609A (en)
CN (1) CN102239561B (en)
DE (1) DE112009002521A5 (en)
GB (2) GB0819447D0 (en)
TW (1) TW201023126A (en)
WO (1) WO2010046643A2 (en)

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8587501B2 (en) 2011-02-17 2013-11-19 Global Oled Technology Llc Electroluminescent display device with optically communicating chiplets
JP5701139B2 (en) * 2011-04-21 2015-04-15 株式会社ジャパンディスプレイ Display device
US8520114B2 (en) * 2011-06-01 2013-08-27 Global Oled Technology Llc Apparatus for displaying and sensing images

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6344641B1 (en) * 1999-08-11 2002-02-05 Agilent Technologies, Inc. System and method for on-chip calibration of illumination sources for an integrated circuit display
US6665009B1 (en) * 1998-05-20 2003-12-16 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. On-chip dead pixel correction in a CMOS imaging sensor
US20060044234A1 (en) * 2004-06-18 2006-03-02 Sumio Shimonishi Control of spectral content in a self-emissive display
US7474294B2 (en) * 2004-09-07 2009-01-06 Avago Technologies Ecbu Ip (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Use of a plurality of light sensors to regulate a direct-firing backlight for a display
US20110043541A1 (en) * 2009-08-20 2011-02-24 Cok Ronald S Fault detection in electroluminescent displays
US20110050658A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 White Christopher J Chiplet display with optical control
US20110050586A1 (en) * 2009-08-26 2011-03-03 Miller Michael E Flexible multitouch electroluminescent display

Family Cites Families (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP5110748B2 (en) * 2000-06-06 2012-12-26 株式会社半導体エネルギー研究所 Display device
US6655853B1 (en) * 2000-08-25 2003-12-02 Hrl Laboratories, Llc Optical bond-wire interconnections and a method for fabrication thereof
US6747290B2 (en) * 2000-12-12 2004-06-08 Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd. Information device
JP2002287900A (en) * 2000-12-12 2002-10-04 Semiconductor Energy Lab Co Ltd Information device
US6698077B2 (en) * 2000-12-27 2004-03-02 International Business Machines Corporation Display fabrication using modular active devices
JP3883854B2 (en) * 2001-11-29 2007-02-21 株式会社半導体エネルギー研究所 Display device, computer, navigation system, a game machine, and a portable information terminal
JP2005266616A (en) * 2004-03-19 2005-09-29 Ishikawa Seisakusho Ltd Optical display device and method for manufacturing the same
GB0408960D0 (en) * 2004-04-22 2004-05-26 Cambridge Display Tech Ltd Displays, drivers and related methods
WO2006117955A1 (en) * 2005-04-28 2006-11-09 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Display device and method for manufacturing same
EP1720149A3 (en) * 2005-05-02 2007-06-27 Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd. Display device
JP2006337997A (en) * 2005-05-02 2006-12-14 Semiconductor Energy Lab Co Ltd Display device
US7397065B2 (en) * 2006-05-02 2008-07-08 Tpo Displays Corp. Organic electroluminescent device and fabrication methods thereof
WO2008004290A1 (en) * 2006-07-05 2008-01-10 Hitachi Plasma Display Limited Flat panel display
KR101320021B1 (en) * 2006-10-17 2013-10-18 삼성디스플레이 주식회사 Light source, backlight assembly and liquid crystal display having the same

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6665009B1 (en) * 1998-05-20 2003-12-16 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. On-chip dead pixel correction in a CMOS imaging sensor
US6344641B1 (en) * 1999-08-11 2002-02-05 Agilent Technologies, Inc. System and method for on-chip calibration of illumination sources for an integrated circuit display
US20060044234A1 (en) * 2004-06-18 2006-03-02 Sumio Shimonishi Control of spectral content in a self-emissive display
US7474294B2 (en) * 2004-09-07 2009-01-06 Avago Technologies Ecbu Ip (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Use of a plurality of light sensors to regulate a direct-firing backlight for a display
US20110043541A1 (en) * 2009-08-20 2011-02-24 Cok Ronald S Fault detection in electroluminescent displays
US20110050586A1 (en) * 2009-08-26 2011-03-03 Miller Michael E Flexible multitouch electroluminescent display
US20110050658A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 White Christopher J Chiplet display with optical control

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CN102239561B (en) 2013-12-25
GB0900617D0 (en) 2009-02-25
WO2010046643A3 (en) 2011-06-30
CN102239561A (en) 2011-11-09
GB2464562A (en) 2010-04-28
WO2010046643A2 (en) 2010-04-29
GB0819447D0 (en) 2008-12-03
KR20110073609A (en) 2011-06-29
DE112009002521A5 (en) 2011-09-29
TW201023126A (en) 2010-06-16
GB2464562B (en) 2011-06-01
JP2012506567A (en) 2012-03-15

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7791271B2 (en) Top-emitting OLED device with light-scattering layer and color-conversion
US7834543B2 (en) Organic EL display apparatus and method of manufacturing the same
US8247968B2 (en) Electroluminescence display device having electrode power supply line
US6373455B1 (en) Electroluminescence device, electroluminescence apparatus, and production methods thereof
US7875889B2 (en) Active matrix type organic electroluminescent display device and method of manufacturing the same
US8094096B2 (en) Organic electroluminescence display device and manufacturing method thereof
US7623101B2 (en) Light emitting device and light emitting system
US7816677B2 (en) Organic light emitting device
US20050168142A1 (en) Organic light-emitting display device
EP2216840B1 (en) Organic light emitting diode display
US20040188685A1 (en) Thin film transistor and fabrication method thereof
US9716082B2 (en) Micro assembled hybrid displays and lighting elements
US7227306B2 (en) Organic electroluminescence display having recessed electrode structure
CN101976679B (en) Active matrix organic light emitting diode display with light feedback and compensation
CN101330094B (en) Organic light emitting diode display device and method of fabricating the same
US7336031B2 (en) Organic light emitting display having auxiliary common electrode
US20040183759A1 (en) Organic electronic device having improved homogeneity
US7279708B2 (en) Electroluminescence display device and method of manufacturing the same
US8344364B2 (en) Thin film transistor having a nano semiconductor sheet and method of manufacturing the same
US20130056784A1 (en) Organic Light-Emitting Display Device and Method of Fabricating the Same
JP2018010309A (en) Light emitting diode display with redundancy scheme, and method of manufacturing light emitting diode display with integrated defect detection test
GB2430801A (en) Dual substrate organic electroluminescent display
CN1658726A (en) Organic electro-luminescent display device and method of manufacturing the same
US20060113905A1 (en) Display device
CN100547799C (en) The thin film transistor array panel

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CAMBRIDGE DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY LIMITED, UNITED KINGD

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BURROUGHES, JEREMY;COATS, STEPHEN;GREGORY, HAYDN;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20110424 TO 20110729;REEL/FRAME:026773/0741

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION