JP2005512063A - Contact structure, manufacturing method thereof, and contact assembly using the same - Google Patents

Contact structure, manufacturing method thereof, and contact assembly using the same Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2005512063A
JP2005512063A JP2003549932A JP2003549932A JP2005512063A JP 2005512063 A JP2005512063 A JP 2005512063A JP 2003549932 A JP2003549932 A JP 2003549932A JP 2003549932 A JP2003549932 A JP 2003549932A JP 2005512063 A JP2005512063 A JP 2005512063A
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JP
Japan
Prior art keywords
contactor
carrier
contact
upper end
adapter
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
JP2003549932A
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Japanese (ja)
Inventor
エドワード アルダズ,ロバート
エイ コウリー,セオドア
チョウ,ユ
ユ,ディヴィッド
Original Assignee
株式会社アドバンテスト
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Priority to US10/007,292 priority Critical patent/US6676438B2/en
Priority to US10/014,630 priority patent/US6641430B2/en
Application filed by 株式会社アドバンテスト filed Critical 株式会社アドバンテスト
Priority to PCT/JP2002/012508 priority patent/WO2003048788A1/en
Publication of JP2005512063A publication Critical patent/JP2005512063A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R13/00Details of coupling devices of the kinds covered by groups H01R12/70 or H01R24/00 - H01R33/00
    • H01R13/02Contact members
    • H01R13/22Contacts for co-operating by abutting
    • H01R13/24Contacts for co-operating by abutting resilient; resiliently-mounted
    • H01R13/2442Contacts for co-operating by abutting resilient; resiliently-mounted with a single cantilevered beam
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01RMEASURING ELECTRIC VARIABLES; MEASURING MAGNETIC VARIABLES
    • G01R1/00Details of instruments or arrangements of the types included in groups G01R5/00 - G01R13/00 and G01R31/00
    • G01R1/02General constructional details
    • G01R1/06Measuring leads; Measuring probes
    • G01R1/067Measuring probes
    • G01R1/073Multiple probes
    • G01R1/07307Multiple probes with individual probe elements, e.g. needles, cantilever beams or bump contacts, fixed in relation to each other, e.g. bed of nails fixture or probe card
    • G01R1/07364Multiple probes with individual probe elements, e.g. needles, cantilever beams or bump contacts, fixed in relation to each other, e.g. bed of nails fixture or probe card with provisions for altering position, number or connection of probe tips; Adapting to differences in pitch
    • G01R1/07378Multiple probes with individual probe elements, e.g. needles, cantilever beams or bump contacts, fixed in relation to each other, e.g. bed of nails fixture or probe card with provisions for altering position, number or connection of probe tips; Adapting to differences in pitch using an intermediate adapter, e.g. space transformers
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01RMEASURING ELECTRIC VARIABLES; MEASURING MAGNETIC VARIABLES
    • G01R3/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for the manufacture or maintenance of measuring instruments, e.g. of probe tips
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R12/00Structural associations of a plurality of mutually-insulated electrical connecting elements, specially adapted for printed circuits, e.g. printed circuit boards [PCBs], flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures, e.g. terminal strips, terminal blocks; Coupling devices specially adapted for printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures; Terminals specially adapted for contact with, or insertion into, printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures
    • H01R12/70Coupling devices
    • H01R12/71Coupling devices for rigid printing circuits or like structures
    • H01R12/712Coupling devices for rigid printing circuits or like structures co-operating with the surface of the printed circuit or with a coupling device exclusively provided on the surface of the printed circuit
    • H01R12/714Coupling devices for rigid printing circuits or like structures co-operating with the surface of the printed circuit or with a coupling device exclusively provided on the surface of the printed circuit with contacts abutting directly the printed circuit; Button contacts therefore provided on the printed circuit
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R2201/00Connectors or connections adapted for particular applications
    • H01R2201/20Connectors or connections adapted for particular applications for testing or measuring purposes

Abstract

  Contact structure for making electrical contact with the contact target. This contact structure is composed of a contactor carrier and a plurality of contactors. The contactor carrier has a sliding layer for locking each contactor to the contactor carrier. Each contactor has an upper end with a notch that engages the sliding layer, a lower end that serves as a contact point to provide electrical contact with the contact target in a direction opposite to the upper end, and an upper end And an inclined body portion provided between the lower end and functioning as a spring. In another aspect, the contactor is first mounted on the contactor adapter, which is then attached to the contactor carrier.

Description

  The present invention relates to a contact structure, a manufacturing method thereof, and a contact assembly configured using the contact structure. In particular, the present invention relates to a structure of a contact structure having a large number of contactors in the vertical direction, and manufacturing such a large number of contactors in a horizontal direction on a semiconductor wafer, removing the contactors from the semiconductor wafer, a contact probe assembly, and a probe card. The present invention relates to a method for mounting a contactor vertically on a substrate to form a contact structure such as an IC chip or other contact mechanism.

In testing a high-speed and high-density electronic component such as an LSI or VLSI circuit, it is necessary to use a high-performance contact structure such as a probe card having a large number of contactors. As another application, for example, a contact structure may be used as a lead of an IC package or the like.
The present invention relates to a contact structure used for testing of LSI and VLSI chips, semiconductor wafers, etc., burn-in of semiconductor wafers and dies, or testing and burn-in of packaged semiconductor devices and printed circuit boards, etc., and a method of manufacturing the same. It is. Furthermore, the present invention can be applied to the formation of leads and terminal pins of IC chips, IC packages, and other electronic devices. However, in the following, for convenience of explanation, the present invention will be described primarily in the context of semiconductor wafer testing.

  When the semiconductor device under test is a semiconductor wafer, a semiconductor test system such as an IC tester is used in connection with a substrate handler such as an automatic wafer prober in order to automatically test the semiconductor wafer. Such an example is shown in FIG. 1, in which a semiconductor test system generally has a test head 100 formed as a separate housing. The test head 100 is connected to the test system main body by a cable bundle 110. The test head 100 and the substrate handler 400 are mechanically and electrically connected to each other by a manipulator 500 driven by a motor 510. The semiconductor wafer to be tested is automatically supplied to the test position of the test head 100 by the substrate handler 400.

  In the test head 100, a test signal generated by the semiconductor test system is supplied to the semiconductor wafer under test. An output signal as a result of the test signal is generated from the semiconductor wafer to be tested (IC circuit formed on the semiconductor wafer) and transmitted to the semiconductor test system. The semiconductor test system verifies whether an IC circuit formed on the semiconductor wafer functions correctly by comparing an output signal from the semiconductor wafer with expected value data.

  1 and 2, the test head 100 and the substrate handler 400 are connected to each other via the interface unit 140. The interface unit 140 includes a performance board 120, which is a printed circuit board having circuit connections specific to the electrical wiring shape of the test head, and coaxial cables, pogo pins, and connectors. The test head 100 has a large number of printed circuit boards (pin electronics) 150, which correspond to the number of test channels (test pins) of the semiconductor test system. Each of the printed circuit boards 150 has a connector 160 for connecting to a corresponding contact terminal (connection terminal) 121 provided on the performance board 120.

  A frog ring 130 is further connected to the performance board 120 in order to accurately determine a contact position with respect to the substrate handler 400. The frog ring 130 has a number of contact pins 141, such as ZIF connectors or pogo pins. These contact pins 141 are connected to the contact terminals 121 of the performance board 120 via the coaxial cable 124.

  As shown in FIG. 2, the test head 100 is disposed on the upper part of the substrate handler 400 and is mechanically and electrically connected to the substrate handler 400 via the interface unit 140. In the substrate handler 400, the semiconductor wafer 300 to be tested is mounted on the chuck 180. In this example, the probe card 170 is provided on the upper portion of the semiconductor wafer 300 to be tested. The probe card 170 has a large number of probe contactors (also referred to as “cantilevers” or “needles”) in order to contact a contact target (contact target) such as a circuit terminal or contact pad of an IC circuit on the semiconductor wafer 300 to be tested. 190.

  The electrodes (contact pads) of the probe card 170 are electrically connected to contact pins 141 provided on the frog ring 130. Further, the contact pin 141 is connected to the contact terminal 121 on the performance board 120 via the coaxial cable 124. Each contact terminal 121 is connected to a corresponding printed circuit board 150 in the test head 100. These printed circuit boards 150 are connected to the main body of the semiconductor test system via a cable bundle 110 having a large number of internal cables such as several hundred.

  Under this configuration, the probe contactor (needle) 190 contacts the surface (contact target) of the semiconductor wafer 300 on the chuck 180, applies a test signal to the semiconductor wafer 300, and outputs a result output signal from the semiconductor wafer 300. Receive. The result output signal from the semiconductor wafer 300 to be tested is compared with an expected value in the semiconductor test system to verify whether the circuit on the semiconductor wafer 300 is functioning correctly.

  FIG. 3 shows a bottom view of the probe card 170 of FIG. In this example, the probe card 170 has an epoxy ring on which a plurality of probe contactors 190 called needles or cantilevers are mounted. In FIG. 2, when the chuck 180 on which the semiconductor wafer 300 is mounted moves upward, the tip of the contactor 190 comes into contact with a contact pad or bump (contact target) on the semiconductor wafer 300. The other end of the needle (contactor) 190 is connected to a wire 194, and the wire 194 is further connected to a transmission line (not shown) formed on the probe card 170. The transmission line is connected to a plurality of electrodes (contact pads) 197, and the electrodes 197 are further connected to the pogo pins 141 in FIG.

  In general, the probe card 170 is a multi-layer substrate composed of a large number of polyimide substrates including a ground layer, a power layer, a signal transmission line layer, and the like. As is well known in this technical field, each signal transmission line has a dielectric impedance and permeability of the polyimide substrate, an inductance and a capacitance of the signal path in the probe card 170, etc. so as to have a characteristic impedance such as 50 ohms. The parameters are designed. Therefore, the signal transmission line is an impedance-matched signal path, and establishes a high frequency transmission band that can supply current to the semiconductor wafer in a steady state and instantaneous high peak current even in a transient state. ing. In the probe card 170, capacitors 193 and 195 are provided between the power layer and the ground layer for noise removal.

  FIG. 4 shows an equivalent circuit of the probe card 170 of FIG. As shown in FIGS. 4A and 4B, the signal transmission line on the probe card 170 extends from the electrode 197 to the strip line 196 (impedance matched), the wire 194, and the needle 190. Since the wire 194 and the needle 190 are not impedance matched, these portions act equivalently as an inductor L in the high frequency band, as shown in FIG. 4C. Since the total length of the wire 194 and the needle 190 is, for example, about 20-30 mm, the test of the high frequency performance of the device under test is greatly limited by this equivalent inductor.

  Other elements that limit the frequency band of the probe card 170 are the power contactor and the ground contactor shown in FIGS. 4D and 4E. If the power line can supply sufficient current to the device under test, the frequency band in testing the device under test is not so limited. However, the series-connected wire 194 and the needle (contactor) 190 (FIG. 4D) for power supply and the series-connected wire 194 and the needle 190 for grounding power and signal are equivalent to the inductor. The current is greatly limited.

  Further, a capacitor 193 and a capacitor 195 are provided between the power line and the ground line in order to eliminate the surge pulse or noise on the power line and verify the correct performance of the device under test. The capacitor 193 has a relatively large value such as 10 microfarads, and can be disconnected from the power line with a switch if necessary. Capacitor 195 takes a relatively small capacitance value, such as 0.01 microfarad, and is fixedly mounted near the DUT. These capacitors function to remove high frequency components in the power line. As a result, these capacitors limit the high frequency performance of the probe contactor.

  Therefore, the above-mentioned most widely used probe contactor has a frequency band limited to about 200 MHz, which is insufficient for testing recent semiconductor components. In the semiconductor industry, it is considered that in the near future, the probe contactor will need a frequency band corresponding to the frequency band of the performance of the tester itself, which is currently 1 GHz or more. In order to improve test throughput, it is desirable that a probe card can handle a large number of semiconductor components such as memory devices at the same time.

  In the prior art, the probe card and the probe contactor as shown in FIG. 3 are manufactured by hand, and therefore the quality varies. Such quality variations appear as variations in size, frequency band, contact force (contact force), contact resistance (contact resistance), and the like. Another factor that decreases the reliability of contact performance (contact performance) in the prior art probe contactor is that the probe contactor and the semiconductor wafer to be tested have different temperature expansion coefficients. Therefore, when the temperature changes, the contact position is displaced, which adversely affects contact force (contact force), contact resistance (contact resistance), frequency band, and the like. Thus, there is a need for a new concept contact structure that can meet the demands of next generation semiconductor test technology.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a contact structure having a high frequency band, a high pin count, a high contact performance (contact performance) and a high reliability and having a large number of contactors in electrical contact with a contact target. is there.
It is still another object of the present invention to provide a contact structure that can easily assemble a large number of contactors and contactor carriers using a locking mechanism having a sliding layer.
It is still another object of the present invention to provide a contact structure that can easily assemble a large number of contactors and contactor carriers using a contactor adapter.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a contact structure for establishing an electrical connection suitable for testing a large number of semiconductor components in parallel and simultaneously in applications such as testing of semiconductor devices. is there.
Still another object of the present invention is to form a large number of contactors on a silicon substrate in a two-dimensional manner when forming a contact structure, remove the contactors, and three-dimensionally mount them on the contact substrate. It is to provide a method.

  In the present invention, the contact structure is formed by a number of contactors manufactured on a flat surface of a substrate such as a silicon substrate or a dielectric substrate by using a photolithography technique. The contact structure of the present invention can be applied to testing and burn-in of semiconductor devices such as LSI and VLSI chips, semiconductor wafers and dies, package ICs, printed circuit boards and the like. The contact structure of the present invention may further be used as part of an electronic device such as an IC lead or pin.

  The first aspect of the present invention is a configuration of a contact structure for electrical connection with a contact target. The contact structure of the present invention includes a contactor carrier and a plurality of contactors. Each contactor has a notch that constitutes a locking mechanism and has a vertically extending upper end, and functions as a contact point for extending in the opposite direction to form an electrical connection with the contact target. A lower end and an inclined body portion provided between the upper end and the lower end and functioning as a spring are configured.

  The second aspect of the present invention is a contact structure composed of a contactor carrier and a plurality of contactors. The contactor is mounted on the contactor carrier via a contactor adapter. Each contactor has an upper end that extends vertically, a lower end that extends in a direction opposite to the upper end and serves as a contact point to form an electrical connection with the contact target, and an upper end and a lower end. And an inclined body part that functions as a spring.

  Yet another aspect of the present invention is a method for forming a contact structure by forming a number of contactors two-dimensionally on a silicon substrate and removing the contactors. Various manufacturing methods can be used to form the contactor on the plane of the substrate. The contactor is removed from the substrate and mounted on the contactor carrier.

  Yet another aspect of the present invention is a probe contact assembly having the contact structure of the present invention. The probe contact assembly includes a contactor carrier having a plurality of contactors, a probe card for mounting the contactor carrier and establishing electrical communication between the electrodes provided on the surface and the contactors, and a plurality of contact pins. When mounted on the probe card, the probe card and the semiconductor test system are configured by a pin block for interfacing. Each contactor has the configuration described above in the first aspect of the present invention.

  According to the present invention, the contact structure has a large number of contactors, and each contactor can be easily fixed to the contactor carrier using the shift lock mechanism constituted by the sliding layer. Furthermore, the contact structure has a high frequency band, and can achieve uniform quality, high reliability, long life, and low price. Further, since the contactor is formed on the same substrate material as the component under test, it is possible to compensate for a position error caused by a change in temperature.

  Furthermore, in the contact structure manufacturing process of the present invention, it is possible to manufacture a large number of contactors on a silicon substrate in a horizontal direction using a relatively simple technique. After the contactor is removed from the substrate and mounted vertically on the contactor carrier, the contactor is assembled by sliding the top layer of the contactor carrier into a cutout on the upper end of the contactor. The contact structure manufactured according to the present invention has low cost, high efficiency, high mechanical strength and high reliability.

  The specific contents of the present invention will be described with reference to FIGS. The description of the present invention includes terms such as “horizontal” and “vertical”. The inventor uses these terms to describe the relative positional relationship of the components related to the present invention. Therefore, in the present invention, the interpretation of the terms “horizontal” and “vertical” should not be limited to absolute meanings such as horizontal of the horizon or vertical due to gravity.

  An embodiment of a contact structure according to the present invention is shown in FIGS. 5A and 5B. In this example, each contact structure is composed of a contactor carrier 20 and a number of contactors 30. In semiconductor test applications, the contact structure is aligned on a semiconductor device such as, for example, a semiconductor wafer 300 under test. When the semiconductor wafer 300 to be tested moves upward, the lower end of the contactor 30 contacts the contact pad 320 on the semiconductor wafer 300 to establish an electrical connection.

  5A and 5B, the contact structure 20 includes a system carrier 22 and a sliding layer (shift lock plate) 25. The sliding layer 25 slides (shifts) on the system carrier 22 to lock the contactor 30 on the contactor carrier 20 (shift lock mechanism). 5A shows a state before the contactor 30 is locked onto the contactor carrier 20, and FIG. 5B shows a state where the sliding layer 25 is moved and the contactor 30 is locked to the contactor carrier 20. FIG. The contactor carrier 20 is preferably made of a dielectric such as silicon, polyimide, ceramic, or glass. Each of the system carrier 22 and the sliding layer 25 has a through hole for mounting the contactor 30.

  In the example of FIGS. 5A and 5B, each contactor 30 includes an upper end (base portion) 33, an inclined body portion (spring portion) 32, and a lower end (contact portion) 35. In order to lock each contactor to the contactor carrier 20, a notch (lock groove) 39 for receiving the sliding layer 25 is formed in the upper end 33 of the contactor. Each contactor 30 is preferably provided with a stopper 38 in order to be fixed to the contactor carrier 20. That is, the stopper 38 engages with the lower surface of the system carrier 22 to limit the upward movement of the contactor 30. Further, the stopper 38 functions to securely lock the contactor 30 to the contactor carrier 20 by cooperation with the sliding layer 25 when the sliding layer 25 is engaged with the notch 39.

  The inclined body portion 32 extends obliquely from the upper end 33 to the lower end 35. The upper end 33 and the lower end 35 function as contact points in order to establish electrical communication with other elements. In semiconductor test applications, the upper end 33 contacts a test system probe card and the lower end 35 contacts a contact target such as a contact pad 320 on the semiconductor wafer 300.

  In order to mount the contactor 30 on the contactor carrier 20, first, the contactor 30 is inserted into through holes provided in the sliding layer 25 and the system carrier 22. For this purpose, the sliding layer 25 is moved in the horizontal direction on the surface of the system carrier 22 such that the longitudinal axis of the sliding layer 25 and the through hole of the system carrier 22 are aligned at the same position. Therefore, in the example of FIG. 5A, the sliding layer 25 has moved to the right side. In the example of FIG. 5B, after all the contactors 30 are inserted into the through holes of the system carrier 22 and the sliding layer 25, the sliding layer 25 is moved horizontally to the left so as to engage with the notch 39 of the contactor 30. . In this way, all contactors 30 are locked to the contactor carrier 20.

  FIG. 5C shows another example of the contact structure of the present invention. In this example, the contactor carrier 20 includes a system carrier 22, an upper carrier 24, a sliding layer 25, an intermediate carrier 26, and a lower carrier 28. Contactor carrier 20 is preferably constructed from a dielectric such as silicon, polyimide, ceramic or glass. The system carrier 22 supports the upper carrier, the intermediate carrier, and the lower carrier, and forms a predetermined space therebetween.

  Each of the upper carrier 24, the intermediate carrier 26, and the lower carrier 28 is provided with a through hole for mounting the contactor 30. The sliding layer 25 is configured to be movable in the horizontal direction on the upper carrier 24. As described above with reference to FIGS. 5A and 5B, a through hole for inserting the contactor 30 is also formed in the sliding layer 25. After each contactor 30 is inserted into the through hole of the upper carrier 24 and the sliding layer 25, the sliding layer 25 is moved to the left, and the contactor 30 is engaged with the notch 39 of the contactor 30 to engage the sliding layer 25. Lock it. This mechanism and process will be described in more detail later with reference to FIGS. 12A-12C.

  In the example of FIG. 5C, each contactor 30 has a cantilever shape as a whole, and includes an upper end (base portion) 33, an inclined body portion (spring portion) 32, a linear body portion 36, and a lower end (contact portion). ) 35 and a return unit 37. Each of the contactors 30 is formed with a notch 39 at its upper end 33 for receiving the sliding layer 25 on the upper carrier 24. Also preferably, stoppers 34 and 38 are provided on each contactor in order to securely mount each contactor 30 on the contactor carrier 20. The stopper 38 limits the upward movement of the contactor 30 by contacting the upper carrier 24, and the stopper 34 limits the downward movement of the contactor 30 by contacting the intermediate carrier 26.

  The inclined body portion 32 extends from the upper end 33 to the linear body portion 36. The linear body portion 36 extends downward between the inclined body portion 32 and the lower end 35. The upper end 33 and the lower end 35 function as contact points and establish electrical communication with other elements. In semiconductor test applications, the upper end 33 contacts a test system probe card and the lower end 35 contacts a contact target such as a contactor pad 320 of the semiconductor wafer 300.

  The return portion 37 extends from the lower end 35 so as to return upward, and is arranged in parallel with the linear body portion 36. That is, a gap (gap) S is formed between the return portion 37 and the linear body portion 36 in the vicinity of the position where it is inserted into the through hole of the lower carrier 28. With this configuration, a sufficient width is secured in the through hole of the lower carrier 28, and flexibility when the contactor 30 is deformed is secured. This is effective when the contactor 30 is pushed against the contact target and will be described later with reference to FIGS. 7B and 7C.

  The contactor 30 is mounted on the contactor carrier 20 through a through hole provided in the contactor carrier 20. In this example, each of the upper carrier 24, the sliding layer 25, the intermediate carrier 26, and the lower carrier 28 has a through hole for mounting the contactor 30. The upper end 33 protrudes from the upper surface of the upper carrier 24 and the lower end 35 protrudes from the lower surface of the lower carrier 28. The sliding layer 25 is configured to be movable on the upper carrier 24 so as to engage with a notch 39 formed in the upper end 33 of the contactor 30, thereby locking each contactor 30 on the contactor carrier 20. .

  The intermediate part of the contactor 30 is loosely coupled to the intermediate carrier 26. For this reason, the upper end of the contactor 30 is locked to the upper carrier 24, but its intermediate part and lower end can be moved somewhat. Accordingly, when the contact structure is pressed against a contact target such as the contact pad 320 of the semiconductor wafer 300, the contactor 30 is easily deformed and performs the following spring operation.

The inclined body portion (spring portion) 32 of the contactor 30 performs a spring function, and generates a spring force when the upper end of the contactor 30 is fixed to the probe card and the lower end of the contactor 30 is pressed against the contact target. The lower end (contact point) 35 of the contactor 30 preferably has a sharp shape so that the surface of the contact pad 320 can be scraped off. The scuffing effect of the contact point 35 is promoted by the elasticity of the spring function. By such a scraping action, the contact point 35 scrapes the metal oxide surface of the contact pad 320 and makes electrical contact with the conductive material of the contact pad 320, so that the contact performance (contact performance) is further improved.

  The basic concept for manufacturing such a contactor of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 6A and 6B. As shown in FIG. 6A, in the present invention, the contactor 30 is manufactured on the plane of the silicon substrate 40 in the horizontal direction, ie, two-dimensionally. Thereafter, the contactor 30 is removed from the substrate 40 and mounted in the vertical direction, that is, three-dimensionally, on the contactor carrier 20 shown in FIGS. 5A to 5C. In general, the substrate 40 is a silicon substrate, but it can also be composed of other dielectric substrates.

  As described above, in the example of FIGS. 6A and 6B, the contactor 30 is manufactured in the horizontal direction on the plane of the silicon substrate 40. In FIG. 6B, the contactor 30 is transferred from the substrate 40 to the adhesive member 90. The adhesive member 90 is, for example, an adhesive tape, an adhesive film, an adhesive plate, or the like (hereinafter collectively referred to as “adhesive tape”). Alternatively, the contactor 30 is removed from the substrate without using the adhesive tape 90. In a further process, the contactor 30 on the adhesive tape 90 is then removed from the adhesive tape and used in a vertical or three-dimensional manner to the contactor carrier 20 as shown in FIGS. 5A-5C using a pick and place mechanism. Installed.

  FIG. 7A shows a specific example of the contactor 30 of the present invention used in the contact structure of FIGS. 5A and 5B. 7B and 7C show a specific example of the contactor 30 of the present invention used in the contact structure of FIG. 5C. FIG. 7B is a front view of a state where the contactor 30 is not pressed by the contact target, and FIG. 7C is a front view of a state where the contactor 30 is pressed by the contact target.

  As described above with reference to FIGS. 5A and 5B, the contactor 30 of FIG. 7A includes an upper end (base portion) 33 having a cut 39, an inclined body portion (spring portion) 32, and a lower end (contact point). ) 35. 7B and 7C, the contactor 30 includes an upper end (base portion) 33 having a cut 39, an inclined body portion (spring portion) 32, a linear body portion 36, a lower end portion (contact portion) 35, and a return portion. 37. Each contactor 30 is provided with a notch 39 at its upper end 33, and each contactor 30 is locked to the contactor carrier 20 by receiving the sliding layer 25 in the notch 39.

  In a semiconductor test application, as shown in FIG. 13, the upper end 33 contacts a probe card of the test system, and the lower end 35 contacts a contact target such as a semiconductor wafer to be tested. When the contactor 30 of FIG. 5C is mounted on the contact carrier 20, its upper end 33 protrudes from the upper surface of the upper carrier 24 of the contactor carrier 20 and its lower end 35 protrudes from the lower surface of the lower carrier 28 of the contactor carrier 20. To do.

  As shown in the front view of FIG. 7B, the inclined body portion 32 and the straight body portion 36 are narrower than the upper end 33 or the lower end 35, thereby increasing flexibility and promoting spring action. To do. The air gap (gap) S between the return portion 37 and the linear body portion 36 further promotes the spring operation as shown in FIG. 7C. That is, the gap S promotes horizontal movement in the linear body portion 36 and the inclined body portion 32 as shown in FIG. 7C. Therefore, when the contactor 30 is pushed against the contact target by the increase in flexibility due to the narrow width of the inclined body portion 32 and the linear body portion 36 and the gap S formed in the lower end 35, the inclined body portion 32 and The linear body portion 36 can be easily deformed.

  8A to 8L are conceptual views showing an example of a manufacturing process for manufacturing the contactor 30 of the present invention. In FIG. 8A, a sacrificial layer 42 is formed on the substrate 40. The substrate 40 is generally a silicon substrate, but may be implemented by a dielectric substrate such as a glass substrate or a ceramic substrate. The sacrificial layer 42 is made of silicon dioxide (SiO 2) formed by a deposition process such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The sacrificial layer 42 functions to separate the contactor 30 from the silicon substrate in a later stage of the manufacturing method.

  Next, as shown in FIG. 8B, an adhesion promoter (adhesion promoting) layer 44 is formed on the sacrificial layer 42 by, for example, vapor deposition. Examples of the constituent material of the adhesion promoter layer 44 include chromium (Cr) and titanium (Ti) having a thickness of 200 to 1000 angstroms, for example. The adhesion promoter layer 44 has a function of promoting adhesion of the conductive layer 46 shown in FIG. 8C to the silicon substrate 40. Examples of the constituent material of the conductive layer 46 include copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) having a thickness of 1000 to 5000 angstroms, for example. The conductive layer 46 has a function of establishing electrical conduction in an electroplating process used in a later stage.

  In the next step, as shown in FIG. 8D, a photoresist layer 48 is formed on the conductive layer 46, and the photomask 50 is accurately aligned thereon for exposure to ultraviolet rays. The photomask 50 represents a two-dimensional image of the contactor 30 generated on the photoresist layer 48. In this process, positive or negative reaction photoresists can be used, as is well known in the art. For example, when a positive reaction resist is used, the portion of the photoresist blocked by the opaque portion of the photomask 50 is cured (solidified) after exposure. Examples of the constituent material of the photoresist include Novolak, PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate), SU-8, and photosensitive polyimide. Next, when the exposed portion of the photoresist is dissolved and removed in the development process, a gap, that is, a pattern “A” is left in the photoresist layer 48 shown in FIG. 8E. Accordingly, a pattern having the image (shape) of the contactor 30, that is, the gap “A” as shown in the top view of FIG. 8F is formed on the photoresist layer 48.

  In the photolithography process described above, as is well known in the art, the photoresist layer 48 can be exposed using not only ultraviolet rays but also electron beams or X-rays. Furthermore, the shape image (pattern A) of the contactor 30 can be directly formed on the photoresist layer 48 by an electron beam, an X-ray, a light source (laser), or the like.

  Next, as shown in FIG. 8G, in order to form the contactor 30, copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), aluminum (Al), rhodium (Rh), palladium (Pd), tungsten (W), etc. A metal or alloy such as nickel cobalt (NiCo) is deposited (e.g., deposited by electroplating) on the pattern "A" of the photoresist layer 48. As will be described later, a conductive material different from the conductive layer 46 is preferably used as the contactor material in order to distinguish the etching characteristics from each other. Next, the excessive plating portion of the contactor 30 as shown in FIG. 8G is removed by a polishing (planarization) process as shown in FIG. 8H.

  When the thickness of a part of the contactor is different from the others, the above-described process can be repeated twice or more to form the conductive layer. That is, after forming the first-layer contactor (conductive material), if necessary, the steps shown in FIGS. 8D to 8H are performed in order to form a second layer or more layers on the first-layer contactor. repeat.

  In the next step, as shown in FIG. 8I, the photoresist layer 48 is removed by a resist removal process. Generally, it is removed by a wet chemical method, but as another example of removing the photoresist, a removal method based on acetone or a removal method by plasma dioxide may be used. Next, as shown in FIG. 8J, the sacrificial layer 42 is removed by etching in order to separate the contactor 30 from the silicon substrate. Further, as shown in FIG. 8K, an etching process is further performed to separate the contactor 30 from the adhesion promoter layer 44 and the conductive layer 46, respectively.

  In the etching process for separating the contactor 30, the etching conditions are set so that only the adhesion promoter layer 44 and the conductive layer 46 are etched without etching the contactor 30. That is, in order to etch only the conductive layer 46 without etching the contactor 30 as described above, the conductive material of the contactor 30 and the material of the conductive layer 46 are made different. Finally, as shown in the perspective view of FIG. 8L, the contactor 30 is separated from all other materials. In the example of the manufacturing process of FIGS. 8A to 8L described above, only one contactor 30 is shown for the sake of brevity. However, in the actual manufacturing process, as shown in FIGS. Manufactured.

9A to 9D are conceptual views showing another example of the method for manufacturing the contactor of the present invention. In this example, in order to transfer the contactor 30 from the silicon substrate 40 to the adhesive tape, the adhesive tape 90 is used in the manufacturing process. 9A to 9D show only the latter stage of the manufacturing process related to the adhesive tape among the manufacturing processes.
FIG. 9A shows a manufacturing step equivalent to FIG. 8I and shows a process in which the photoresist layer 48 is removed by a resist removal method. 9A, the adhesive tape 90 is brought into contact with the upper surface of the contactor 30 so that the contactor 30 adheres to the adhesive tape 90. As described above with reference to FIG. 6B, in the embodiment of the present invention, other adhesive members such as an adhesive film and an adhesive plate are also included in the concept of the adhesive tape 90. Other members that attract the contactor 30 such as a magnetic plate, a magnetic tape, and an electrically charged plate or tape are also included in the concept of the adhesive tape 90.

In the process shown in FIG. 9B, the sacrificial layer 42 is removed from the substrate 40 by etching in order to separate the contactor 30 from the silicon substrate 40. Further, as shown in FIG. 9C, the etching process is performed again to separate the contactor 30 from the adhesion promoter layer 44 and the conductive layer 46.
As described above, in order to etch only the conductive layer 46 without etching the contactor 30, the material of the contactor 30 and the material of the conductive layer 46 must be different from each other. In the manufacturing method shown in FIGS. 9A to 9C, only one contactor is shown for the sake of brevity, but in the actual manufacturing process, a large number of contactors 30 are manufactured simultaneously. Accordingly, as shown in the top view of FIG. 9D, a large number of contactors 30 are simultaneously separated from the silicon substrate or another material substrate and transferred to the adhesive tape 90.

  FIGS. 10A to 10N are conceptual views showing still another example of the manufacturing method of the contactor 30 of the present invention in which the contactor is transferred from the substrate to the adhesive tape. First, in FIG. 10A, an electroplating seed layer (conductive layer) 342 is formed on a silicon substrate 340 or a dielectric substrate made of a material such as polyimide or glass. The seed layer 342 is made of, for example, copper (Cu) or nickel (Ni) having a thickness of 1000 to 5000 angstroms. Next, as shown in FIG. 10B, a chrome inconel layer 344 is formed on the seed layer 342 using, for example, a sputtering process.

  In the next stage, FIG. 10C, a conductive substrate 346 is formed on the chromium inconel layer 344. The conductive substrate 346 is made of, for example, a nickel-cobalt (NiCo) alloy having a thickness of 100 to 130 micrometers. After the conductive substrate 346 is made nonconductive (passivated), a photoresist layer 348 having a thickness of 100 to 120 micrometers is formed on the conductive substrate 346 as shown in FIG. 10D. Further, as shown in FIG. 10E, the photomask 350 is accurately aligned to expose the photoresist layer 348 with ultraviolet light. A two-dimensional image of the contactor 30 generated on the surface of the photoresist layer 348 is printed on the photomask 350.

In the development process, when the exposed portion of the resist is dissolved and removed, the photoresist layer 348 of FIG. In the photoresist layer, a plating (plating) pattern on which an image (shape) of a contactor included in the photomask 350 is printed is formed. In the process of FIG. 10G, the conductive material for the contactor is electroplated on the plating pattern of the photoresist layer 348 to a thickness of 50-60 micrometers. An example of the conductive material is a nickel-cobalt (NiCo) alloy. The nickel-cobalt alloy as the contactor material does not have a large adhesive force with the conductive substrate 346 made of nickel-cobalt.
If the contactor has two or more different thicknesses, the above process is repeated to produce a contactor having two or more conductive layers. That is, after forming the first-layer contactor (conductive material), if necessary, in order to form a second layer or more layers on the first-layer contactor, the steps of FIGS. 10D to 10G are performed. Repeated.

In the next step, as shown in FIG. 10H, the photoresist layer 348 is removed by a resist stripping method. In FIG. 10I, the conductive substrate 346 is peeled away from the chromium inconel layer 344 on the substrate 340. The conductive substrate 346 is a thin substrate to which the contactor 30 is attached with a relatively weak adhesive force. A top view of the conductive substrate 346 having the contactor 30 is shown in FIG. 10J.
FIG. 10K shows a process in which an adhesive tape (intermediate plate) 90 is placed on the upper surface of the contactor 30 for adhesion. The adhesive force between the adhesive tape 90 and the contactor 30 is stronger than the adhesive force between the contactor 30 and the conductive substrate 346. Therefore, when the adhesive tape 90 is removed from the conductive layer 346, the contactor 30 is transferred from the conductive substrate 346 to the adhesive tape 90 as shown in FIG. 10L. FIG. 10M is a top view of the adhesive tape 90 having the contactor 30, and FIG. 10N is a cross-sectional view of the adhesive tape 90 having the contactor 30.

FIG. 11A and FIG. 11B are conceptual diagrams showing an example of a method of picking up the contactor 30 from the adhesive tape 90 (pick) and mounting it on the contactor carrier 20 (place). This “pick and place” action shown in FIGS. 11A and 11B is advantageous for a contactor manufactured by the manufacturing method of the present invention using an adhesive tape as described in FIGS. 9A to 9D and FIGS. 10A to 10N. Applicable. FIG. 11A is a front view showing the operation of the first half of the pick and place mechanism 80. FIG. 11B is a front view showing the latter half of the operation of the pick and place mechanism 80.
In this example, the pick and place mechanism 80 picks up the contactor 30 (pick), a transfer mechanism 84 for placing it (place), and movable arms 86 and 87 for moving the transfer mechanism 84 in the XYZ directions. And tables 81 and 82 whose positions can be adjusted in the XYZ directions, and a monitor camera 78 having a CCD image sensor or the like, for example. The transfer mechanism 84 includes a suction arm 85 that performs suction (suction: pick operation) and release (suction stop: place operation) of the contactor 30. The suction force (suction force) is generated by a negative pressure such as a vacuum, for example. The suction arm 85 rotates at a predetermined angle such as 90 degrees.

  In the operation of the pick and place mechanism 80, the adhesive tape 90 having the contactor 30 and the contactor carrier 20 having the bonding position 32 (or through hole) are disposed on the tables 81 and 82 of the pick and place mechanism 80, respectively. As shown in FIG. 11A, the transfer mechanism 84 picks up the contactor 30 from the adhesive tape 90 by the suction force of the suction arm 85 (pick). After picking up the contactor 30, the suction arm 85 rotates, for example, 90 degrees as shown in FIG. 11B. Accordingly, the direction of the contactor 30 is changed from the horizontal direction to the vertical direction. This redirection feature is only an example, and those having ordinary skill in the art will understand that there are many other ways to change the direction of a contactor. The transfer mechanism 84 places the contactor 30 on the contactor carrier 20. After each contactor 30 is inserted into the through hole of the contactor carrier 20 and the sliding layer, the sliding layer is slid and locked to the contactor carrier 20.

  12A-12C are conceptual diagrams illustrating the process of assembling and locking the contactor 30 onto the contactor carrier 20 using the sliding layer (shift lock plate) 25. FIG. The sliding layer 25 engages with a cut 39 formed in the upper end 33 of the contactor 30. As shown in FIG. 12A, the contactor carrier 20 is composed of a system carrier 22 and a sliding layer 25 on the upper surface thereof. The vertical holes of the through hole 29 of the sliding layer 25 and the through hole 23 of the system carrier 22 coincide with each other. A sbaser 27 may be provided in a space between the sliding layer 25 and the system carrier 22 to determine the position of the sliding layer 25 before locking.

  Then, as shown in FIG. 12B, the contactor 30 is inserted into the through hole 23 of the system carrier 22 and the through hole 29 of the sliding layer 25. The notch 39 of the contactor 30 is disposed on the contactor carrier 20 at the same height as the sliding layer 25. A stopper 38 formed in the middle of the contactor 30 engages with the lower surface of the system carrier 22 to prevent the contactor 30 from moving upward.

  When all the contactors 30 are inserted into the through holes, the spacer 27 is removed from the contactor carrier 20. Thereby, the sliding layer 25 returns to the left side by a spring force, for example. Accordingly, the sliding layer 25 engages with a notch 39 formed in the upper end 33 of the contactor 30 as shown in FIG. 12C. By inserting the sliding layer 25 into the notch 39, the contactor 30 and the contactor carrier 20 can be easily and reliably assembled (shift lock). Further, when the contactor carrier 20 does not have a mechanism for returning the sliding layer 25 by the spring force as described above, the sliding layer is manually moved to the left side, and the gap at the position opposite to that in FIG. The position of the sliding layer 25 can be maintained by inserting the sbaser 27 into the bottom.

  FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view showing an example of an overall assembly structure for constituting a probe contact assembly using the contact structure of the present invention. The probe contact assembly is used as an interface between a device under test (DUT) and a test head of a semiconductor test system, as shown in FIG. In this example, as shown in FIG. 13, the probe contactor assembly includes a probe card 260 and a pogo pin block (frog ring) 130 in addition to the contact structure.

  The contact structure is formed by a contactor carrier 20 and a plurality of contactors 30 mounted on the contactor carrier 20. Each upper end (base portion) of the contactor protrudes from the upper surface of the contactor carrier 20 as a contact pad. The lower end (contact part) 35 protrudes from the lower surface of the contactor carrier 20. The contactor of the present invention has a cantilever-shaped inclined body portion (spring portion) inclined upward from the contactor carrier 20 between the upper end 33 and the lower end 35. Contactor 30 is preferably loosely attached to contactor carrier 20 so that it can be slightly displaced in the vertical and horizontal directions when pushed against semiconductor wafer 300 or probe card 260.

  The probe card 260, the pogo pin block 130, and the contact structure are mechanically and electrically connected to each other to form a probe contact assembly. Therefore, an electrical path from the contact point of the contactor 30 to the test head 100 (FIG. 2) is formed via the cable 124 and the performance board 120. Therefore, when the semiconductor wafer 300 and the probe contact assembly are pressed together, electrical communication is established between the DUT (contact pad 320 of the wafer 300) and the test system.

  The pogo pin block (frog ring) 130 is equivalent to the pogo pin block of FIG. 2, and has a large number of pogo pins that interface between the probe card 260 and the performance board 120. A cable 124 such as a coaxial cable is connected to the upper end of the pogo pin, and a signal is transmitted to the printed circuit board (pin electronics card) 150 of the test head 100 of FIG. The probe card 260 has a number of electrodes (electrodes) 262 and 265 on its upper and lower surfaces. When the probe contact assembly is assembled, the base portion 33 of the contactor 30 contacts the electrode 262. The electrodes 262 and 265 are connected to a connection trace 263 for fanning out (enlarging) the pitch of the contact structure so as to match the pitch (interval) of the pogo pins of the pogo pin block 130. Since the contactor 30 is loosely inserted into the through hole on the contactor carrier 20, the inclined body portion 32 of the contactor 30 is elastic against the electrode 262 and the contact pad 320 when pressed against the semiconductor wafer 300. To generate dynamic contact force.

  FIG. 14 is a sectional view showing another example of the probe contact assembly using the contact structure of the present invention. The probe contact assembly is used as an interface between the device under test (DUT) and the test head, as shown in FIG. In this example, the probe contact assembly has a conductive elastomer 250, a probe card 260, and a pogo pin block (frog ring) 130 provided on top of the contact structure. As described above, since the contactor 30 has the inclined body portion 32 and exhibits its spring action, such a conductive elastomer is generally not necessary. However, even in that case, the conductive elastomer is effective in correcting the non-uniformity of the gap (planarity) between the probe card 260 and the contact structure.

  The conductive elastomer 250 is provided between the contact structure and the probe card 260. When the probe contact assembly is assembled, the base portion 33 of the contactor 30 contacts the conductive elastomer 250. An example of the conductive elastomer 250 is a flexible sheet having many conductive wires in the vertical direction. For example, the conductive elastomer 250 includes a plurality of rows of metal filaments and a silicon rubber sheet. The metal filament (wire) is embedded in the vertical direction of FIG. 14, that is, perpendicular to the horizontal sheet of the conductive elastomer 250. For example, the pitch between metal filaments is 0.05 mm or less when the thickness of the silicon rubber sheet is about 0.2 mm. Such conductive elastomers are manufactured by Shin-Etsu Polymer and are available on the market.

  A second embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIGS. 15-19. FIG. 15 shows a cross-sectional view of a contact structure according to a second embodiment of the present invention. The contact structure includes a contactor carrier 420, a contactor adapter 425, and a plurality of contactors 430. In semiconductor test applications, the contact structure is aligned on a semiconductor component such as, for example, the semiconductor wafer 300 under test. When the semiconductor wafer 300 to be tested moves upward, the lower end of the contactor 430 contacts the contact pad 320 on the semiconductor wafer 300 to establish an electrical connection.

  The contactor carrier 420 and the contactor adapter 425 are made of a silicon substrate or a dielectric substrate such as polyimide, ceramic, or glass. The contactor 430 is made of a conductive material or is coated with a conductive material. Two or more contactors 430 are attached to the contactor adapter 425, and each contactor adapter 425 is attached to the contactor carrier 420. A plurality of contactors 430 are mounted on each contactor adapter 425, and the contactor adapter 425 is attached to the contactor carrier 420 by a method described in detail later with reference to FIGS. 17A to 17D.

  In FIG. 15, each contactor 430 includes an upper end (base portion) 433, an inclined body portion (spring portion) 432, and a lower end (contact portion) 435. A stopper 438 is provided at a predetermined distance from the upper end 433 of each contactor 430 so that each contactor 430 can be securely mounted on the contactor adapter 425. That is, the upper end 433 and the stopper 438 form a cut 439 (see FIGS. 16A to 16C) in the contactor 430 that matches the groove 427 of the contactor adapter 425. That is, the distance between the upper end 433 and the stopper 438 is substantially the same as the thickness of the contactor adapter 425. The notch 439, the contactor adapter 425, and the contactor carrier 420 form a locking mechanism for easily and securely mounting the contactor 430 on the contactor carrier 420.

  The inclined body 432 of the contactor 430 extends in an oblique direction from the upper end 433 to the lower end 435 of the contactor 430. The upper end 433 and the lower end 435 of the contactor 430 function as contact points (contact points) for forming electrical communication with other elements. In semiconductor test applications, the upper end 433 is a base for contacting a test system probe card, and the lower end 435 is for contacting a contact target such as a contact pad 320 on the semiconductor wafer 300. It is a contact point.

  As described above, the contactor 430 is mounted on the contactor carrier 420 via the contactor adapter 425. Each of the upper end 433 and the lower end 435 of the contactor 430 protrudes from the upper surface and the lower surface of the contactor adapter 425. The inclined body portion (spring portion) 432 of the contactor 430 performs a spring function, and generates a spring force when the lower end 435 of the contactor 430 is pressed against a contact target such as the contact pad 320. The lower end (contact point) 435 of the contactor 430 preferably has a sharp shape so that the surface of the contact pad 320 can be scraped off. The elasticity of the spring function promotes the scraping effect of the contact point 435. By such a scraping action, the contact point 435 scrapes the metal oxide surface of the contact pad 320 and makes electrical contact with the conductive material of the contact pad 320, so that the contact performance (contact performance) is further improved.

16A to 16C show a configuration example of the contactor 430 of the present invention. As described above with reference to FIG. 15, the contactor 430 includes an upper end (base portion) 433, an inclined body portion (spring portion) 432, and a lower end (contact point) 435. The notches 439 are formed from the upper end 433 of the contactor 430 and the stopper 438 so that each contactor 430 fits well with the groove formed in the contactor adapter 425.
In the example of FIG. 16A, the inclined body portion 432 is a linear beam extending in an oblique direction, and promotes a spring operation. In the example of FIG. 16B, the inclined body portion 432 has a shape bent in a zigzag shape at an intermediate portion thereof, and promotes the spring operation. In the example of FIG. 16C, the cut 439 is formed only on one side of the upper end 433 of the contactor 430. Thus, the contactor 430 can be used in the contact structure of the present invention as long as the contactor 430 has a configuration that can be correctly coupled to the contactor adapter 425.

  The inclined body 432 of the contactor 430 preferably promotes the spring action by making the width (or thickness) smaller than the upper end 433. Thus, since the width of the inclined body portion 432 is narrow, it can be easily deformed when the contactor 430 is pushed against the contact target. As described above with reference to FIGS. 6 and 8-10, the contactor 430 is fabricated horizontally on the horizontal surface of the silicon substrate. In order to form different thicknesses in a part of the contactor 430, a deposition process (for example, in the manufacturing process of FIGS. 8 to 10) for forming the contactor 430 with a conductive material is repeated a plurality of times.

  17A to 17D are conceptual diagrams showing a process of easily and reliably assembling the contactor 430 to the contactor carrier 420 using the contactor adapter 425 in the present invention. As shown in FIG. 17A, the contactor 430 is provided with cuts (indentations) 439 on both sides of the upper end 433 thereof. The notch 439 has a predetermined length (a distance between the upper end 433 and the stopper 438) so that the notch 439 can be securely attached to the contactor adapter 25.

  As shown in FIG. 17B, the contactor adapter 425 includes a groove 427 and a stopper 426. The notch 439 of the contactor 430 and the groove 427 of the contactor adapter 425 are formed so as to surely match each other. That is, the width and thickness of the notch 439 of the contactor 430 are the same as the width and thickness of the groove 427 of the contactor adapter 425. Further, the distance between the upper end 433 of the contactor 430 and the stopper 438 is formed to be the same as the thickness of the contactor adapter 425. Further, the contactor adapter 425 includes a stopper 426 for mounting on the contactor carrier 420.

  In FIG. 17C, the contactor 430 is mounted on the contactor adapter 425 such that the notch 439 of the contactor 430 is aligned with the groove 427 of the contactor adapter 425. When the contactor 430 is mounted in the groove 427, the contactor 430 and the contactor adapter 425 are aligned so as to be flush with the front surface of FIG. 17C. An adhesive (not shown) may be used to more securely bond the contactor 430 and the contactor adapter 425 to each other.

  In FIG. 17D, a contactor adapter 425 carrying a plurality of contactors 430 is inserted into the contactor carrier 420. In the example of FIG. 17D, the contactor carrier 420 includes a plurality of slots 424 for inserting a contactor adapter 425 on which the contactor 430 is mounted. Each slot 424 has a step (stopper) 428 for engaging with the stopper 426 of the contactor adapter 425. By inserting the contactor adapter 425 having the contactor 430 into the slot 424 of the contactor carrier 420, the contactor 430 and the contactor carrier 420 are easily and reliably coupled to each other. The stopper 426 of the contactor adapter 425 is in contact with the step 428 formed in the slot 424 to define the vertical position of the contactor 430.

  FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view showing an example of an overall assembly structure for forming a probe contact assembly using the contact structure of the present invention. The probe contact assembly is used as an interface between a device under test (DUT) and a test head of a semiconductor test system, as shown in FIG. In this example, as shown in FIG. 18, the probe contactor assembly includes a probe card 260 and a pogo pin block (frog ring) 130 in addition to the contact structure.

  The contact structure includes a contactor carrier 420 and a plurality of contactors 430 mounted on the contactor carrier. The upper end (base portion) 433 of each contactor protrudes from the upper surface of the contactor carrier 420. The lower end (contact part) 435 of the contactor 430 protrudes from the lower surface of the contactor carrier 420. The contactor 430 is inserted into the slot 424 (FIG. 17D) on the contactor carrier 420 via the contactor adapter 425. As described above, the inclined body portion (spring portion) 432 extends in an oblique direction between the upper end 433 and the lower end 435. The inclined body portion 432 generates a spring-like contact force when pressed against the semiconductor wafer 300.

  The probe card 260, the pogo pin block 130, and the contact structure are mechanically and electrically connected to each other to form a probe contact assembly. Accordingly, an electrical path from the contact point of the contactor 430 to the test head 100 (FIG. 2) is formed via the cable 124 and the performance board 120. Therefore, when the semiconductor wafer 300 and the probe contact assembly are pressed together, electrical communication is established between the DUT (contact pad 320 of the wafer 300) and the test system.

  The pogo pin block (frog ring) 130, the probe card 260, and the cable 124 are the same as those shown in FIGS. 13 and 14, and the printed circuit board (pin electronics card) 150 of the test head 100 of FIG. Send a signal to When the probe contact assembly is assembled, the upper end 433 of the contactor 430 contacts the electrode 262. Since the contactor 430 mounted on the contactor carrier 420 has the inclined body portion 432, the contactor 430 is easily deformed when pressed against the semiconductor wafer 300, and generates an elastic contact force against the contact pad 320. To do.

  FIG. 19 is a sectional view showing another example of the probe contact assembly using the contact structure of the present invention. The probe contact assembly is used as an interface between the device under test (DUT) and the test head, as shown in FIG. In this example, the probe contact assembly includes a conductive elastomer 250, a probe card 260, and a pogo pin block (frog ring) 130 provided on top of the contact structure. When the probe contact assembly is assembled, the upper end 433 of the contactor 430 contacts the conductive elastomer 250. As described above with reference to FIG. 14, the conductive elastomer is a flexible sheet such as silicon rubber having a number of conductive wires 252 in the vertical direction.

  According to the present invention, the contact structure has a high frequency band that satisfies the test requirements of next generation semiconductor technology. In the first embodiment, the contact structure can be easily and reliably formed by using the shift lock mechanism for fixing the contactor to the contactor carrier by the slide plate. In the second embodiment, the contact structure can be easily and reliably formed by mounting the contactor on the contactor carrier using the contactor adapter. Since a large number of contactors can be manufactured simultaneously on a substrate without using manual work, the contact performance (connection performance) can achieve uniform quality, high reliability, and long life.

  Although only preferred embodiments are specified, various forms and modifications of the present invention are possible based on the above disclosure without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention within the scope of the appended claims.

FIG. 1 is a conceptual diagram showing a structural relationship between a semiconductor test system having a test head and a substrate handler. FIG. 2 is a developed view showing in more detail the structure for connecting the test head of the semiconductor test system to the substrate handler via the interface unit. FIG. 3 is a bottom view showing an example of a prior art probe card having an epoxy ring for mounting a plurality of probe contactors. 4A to 4E are circuit diagrams each showing an equivalent circuit of the probe card of FIG. FIGS. 5A to 5C are conceptual diagrams showing examples of the structure of the contact structure of the present invention having contactors manufactured in a horizontal direction on a silicon substrate and then vertically mounted on a contactor carrier. 6A to 6B are conceptual diagrams showing the basic concept of the manufacturing method of the present invention in which a number of contactors are formed on a flat surface of a silicon substrate and removed by a subsequent process. FIGS. 7A to 7C are diagrams showing specific examples of the contactor of the present invention, FIGS. 7A and 7B are front views of the contactor when not pressed against the contact target, and FIG. 7C is a contact target. It is a front view of a contactor in the state where it was pushed to. 8A to 8L are conceptual views showing an example of the manufacturing process of the present invention for manufacturing the contactor of the present invention. 9A to 9D are conceptual views showing another example of the manufacturing process of the present invention for manufacturing the contactor of the present invention. 10A to 10N are conceptual diagrams showing an example of a process for manufacturing the contactor of the present invention on the surface of the substrate and then moving the contactor to the intermediate plate. FIGS. 11A and 11B are conceptual diagrams showing an example of a pick-and-place mechanism for picking up a contactor (pick) and placing it on a contactor carrier (place) in order to constitute the contact structure of the present invention. . 12A-12C are conceptual diagrams illustrating the process of assembling or locking the contactor to the contactor carrier of the present invention. FIG. 13 is a sectional view showing an example of a probe contact assembly that uses the contact structure of the present invention and is used as an interface between a semiconductor component under test and a semiconductor test system. FIG. 14 is a sectional view showing another example of a probe contact assembly that uses the contact structure of the present invention and is used as an interface between a semiconductor component under test and a semiconductor test system. FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view showing a configuration example of a contact structure of the present invention having a contactor, a contactor carrier, and a contactor adapter. 16A to 16C are front views showing examples of the shape of the contactor of the present invention. 17A to 17D are perspective views showing examples of contact structures of the present invention, in which FIG. 17A is a contactor, FIG. 17B is a contactor adapter, FIG. 17C is a contactor adapter on which the contactor is mounted, and FIG. 17D is FIG. It is a perspective view of the contactor carrier which mounts this contactor adapter. FIG. 18 is a sectional view showing a configuration example of a probe contact assembly that uses the contact structure of the present invention and is used as an interface between a semiconductor component to be tested and a semiconductor test system. FIG. 19 is a cross-sectional view showing another configuration example of a probe contact assembly that uses the contact structure of the present invention and is used as an interface between a semiconductor component to be tested and a semiconductor test system.

Claims (24)

  1. In the contact structure to make electrical connection with the contact target:
    Each extends vertically and has a top end with cuts to form a locking mechanism, and extends in a direction opposite to the top end and serves as a contact point to make electrical contact with the contact target A straight portion having a lower end, a return portion that is parallel to the straight portion from the lower end and forms a predetermined gap therebetween, and an inclination that is formed between the upper end and the lower end and functions as a spring A plurality of contactors formed of a conductive material,
    A contactor carrier having a sliding layer on an upper surface thereof for mounting a plurality of contactors, and configured to engage the sliding layer with a cutout of the contactor after the contactor is inserted into a through hole;
    A contact structure, wherein the upper end of each contactor protrudes from the upper surface of the contactor carrier, and the lower end of each contactor protrudes from the lower surface of the contactor carrier.
  2.   The contactor carrier comprises an upper carrier having the upper surface, a lower carrier having the lower surface, and an intermediate carrier provided between the upper carrier and the lower carrier. The contact structure of claim 1 for making electrical connection with a contact target.
  3.   The contact structure according to claim 2, wherein the contactor carrier has a system carrier that supports the upper carrier, the intermediate carrier, and the lower carrier, respectively, to form an electrical connection with the contact target.
  4.   3. The contact target according to claim 2, wherein each of the upper carrier, the intermediate carrier, and the lower carrier is formed with a through hole for mounting a contactor. Contact structure.
  5.   The contactor includes a first stopper that engages with the upper carrier and restricts upward displacement of the contactor, and a second stopper that engages with the intermediate carrier and restricts downward displacement of the contactor. The contact structure according to claim 1 for forming an electrical connection with a contact target.
  6.   The contactor further includes a linear body portion having a contact point at a lower end thereof, and a return portion that returns in parallel from the bottom of the linear body portion and forms a predetermined gap therebetween. The contact structure according to claim 1 for forming an electrical connection with the contact structure.
  7. In the contact structure to make electrical connection with the contact target:
    Made of conductive material, each serving as a contact point to provide electrical communication with the contact target, in the direction opposite to the upper end, with a vertically extending upper end having cuts to form a locking mechanism A plurality of contactors formed by a lower end, and an inclined body portion formed between the upper end and the lower end and functioning as a spring;
    A plurality of vertical grooves, contactor adapters for mounting the contactors by matching the notches of the contactor and the grooves;
    A contactor carrier having a slot for mounting a plurality of contactor adapters mounted with the contactor;
    The contactor adapter having the contactor mounted thereon is inserted into the slot of the contactor carrier, the upper end of each contactor projects from the upper surface of the contactor carrier, and the lower end of each contactor A contact structure characterized by protruding.
  8.   The contactor has a stopper that comes into contact with the lower surface of the contactor adapter when the contactor matches the groove of the contactor adapter, and the incision is formed between the upper end of the contactor and the stopper. 8. A contact structure according to claim 7 for forming an electrical connection.
  9.   The said cut is formed on both sides of the contactor, and the width between the cuts is the same as the width of the groove of the contactor adapter. The contact structure described.
  10.   The said cut is formed on one side of the contactor, the width of the cut being the same as the width of the groove of the contactor adapter, according to claim 1, for making an electrical connection with the contact target. Contact structure.
  11.   The contactor adapter has a stopper for engaging with a step formed in a slot of the contactor carrier, and specifies the vertical position of the contactor when the contactor adapter is inserted into the slot. The contact structure according to claim 7 for forming an electrical connection with a contact target.
  12. The manufacturing method for forming the contact structure is:
    (A) forming a sacrificial layer on the surface of the substrate;
    (B) forming a photoresist layer on the sacrificial layer;
    (C) developing a pattern of the contactor image on the surface of the photoresist layer;
    (D) forming a contactor made of an electrically conductive material in the pattern of the photoresist layer by depositing a conductive material, each contactor having an upper end having a notch for forming a locking mechanism, and an upper portion thereof; It consists of a lower end that functions as a contact point in the direction opposite to the end, and an inclined body that is provided between the upper end and the lower end and functions as a spring.
    (E) removing the photoresist layer;
    (F) removing the sacrificial layer to separate the contactor from the silicon substrate;
    (G) mounting a contactor on a contactor carrier having a sliding layer and a through-hole, engaging the sliding layer and the notch of the contactor to lock the contactor to the contactor carrier;
    It is comprised by these, The manufacturing method of the contact structure characterized by the above-mentioned.
  13.   The contact structure according to claim 12, further comprising the step of depositing an adhesive tape on the contactor and bonding the adhesive tape to the upper surface of the contactor after the step of depositing the conductive material. Manufacturing method.
  14.   The step of mounting the contactor on the contactor carrier includes a step of removing the contactor from the adhesive tape by using a pick-and-place mechanism having a suction force to attract the contactor, changing the direction of the contactor, and attaching the contactor to the contactor carrier. The method for manufacturing a contact structure according to claim 13, comprising:
  15. The manufacturing method for forming the contact structure is:
    (A) forming a conductive substrate made of a conductive material on the base substrate;
    (B) forming a photoresist layer on the conductive substrate;
    (C) aligning a photomask having an image of a contactor on the photoresist layer and exposing the photoresist layer through the photomask;
    (D) developing a pattern of the contactor image on the surface of the photoresist layer;
    (E) forming a contactor made of an electrically conductive material in the pattern of the photoresist layer by depositing a conductive material, each contactor having an upper end having a notch for forming a locking mechanism, and an upper portion thereof; It consists of a lower end that functions as a contact point in a direction opposite to the end, and an inclined body that is provided between the upper end and the lower end and functions as a spring.
    (F) removing the photoresist layer;
    (G) peeling off the conductive substrate having the contactor from the base substrate;
    (H) a step of bringing the adhesive tape into contact with the contactor on the conductive substrate and bonding the contactor to the adhesive tape. The adhesive force between the adhesive tape and the contactor is between the conductive substrate and the contactor. Is greater than the adhesive strength of
    (I) separating the contactor on the adhesive tape from the conductive substrate by peeling off the conductive substrate;
    (J) mounting the contactor on a contactor carrier having a sliding layer and a through-hole, engaging the sliding layer and the notch of the contactor, and locking the contactor to the contactor carrier;
    It is comprised by these, The manufacturing method of the contact structure characterized by the above-mentioned.
  16. In a probe contact assembly for forming an electrical connection with a contact target,
    A contactor carrier comprising a sliding layer, and a plurality of contactors locked and mounted by the sliding layer;
    A probe card for mounting the contactor carrier and establishing electrical communication between the electrode and the contactor;
    A pin block having a plurality of contact pins for interfacing between the probe card and a semiconductor test system when attached to the probe card;
    The contactor extends vertically and has an upper end with a notch to form a locking mechanism, and extends in the opposite direction to form electrical contact with the contact target. A probe contact assembly comprising: a linear body portion having a lower end that functions as a contact point; and an inclined body portion that is formed between the upper end and the lower end and functions as a spring.
  17.   The contactor carrier has an upper surface and a lower surface for mounting the plurality of contactors, the upper end of each contactor projects from the upper surface of the contactor carrier, and the lower end of each contactor is the lower surface of the contactor carrier 17. A probe contact assembly according to claim 16, for making electrical connection with a contact target, characterized in that it protrudes from the contact target.
  18.   The contactor carrier comprises an upper carrier having the upper surface, a lower carrier having the lower surface, and an intermediate carrier provided between the upper carrier and the lower carrier. The probe contact assembly of claim 16 for making electrical connection with a contact target.
  19.   The contact carrier as claimed in claim 18, wherein each of the upper carrier, the middle carrier, and the lower carrier is formed with a through hole for mounting a contactor. Probe contact assembly.
  20. In a probe contact assembly for forming an electrical connection with a contact target,
    A contactor carrier configured to insert a contactor adapter having a plurality of contactors into the slot by engaging the contactor so that the notch of the contactor matches the groove of the contactor adapter;
    A probe card for mounting the contactor carrier and establishing electrical communication between the electrode and the contactor;
    A pin block having a plurality of contact pins for interfacing between the probe card and a semiconductor test system when attached to the probe card;
    A contact point for forming an electrical connection with the contact target in a direction opposite to the upper end and a vertically extending upper end having a notch for mating with a groove in the contactor adapter A probe contact assembly comprising: a lower end that functions as an upper portion; and an inclined body portion that is formed between the upper end and the lower end and functions as a spring.
  21.   The contactor has a stopper that contacts the lower surface of the contactor adapter when the contactor matches the groove of the contactor adapter, and the notch is formed between the upper end of the contactor and the stopper. 21. The probe contact assembly of claim 20, for forming a mechanical connection.
  22.   21. The method for forming an electrical connection with a contact target according to claim 20, wherein the notches are formed on both sides of the contactor, and the width between the notches is the same as the width of the groove of the contactor adapter. The probe contact assembly as described.
  23.   21. The method of claim 20, wherein the cut is formed on one side of the contactor, and the width of the cut is the same as the width of the groove of the contactor adapter. Probe contact assembly.
  24.   The contactor adapter has a stopper for engaging with a step formed in a slot of the contactor carrier, and specifies the vertical position of the contactor when the contactor adapter is inserted into the slot. 21. The probe contact assembly of claim 20, for making electrical connection with a contact target.
JP2003549932A 2000-02-14 2002-11-29 Contact structure, manufacturing method thereof, and contact assembly using the same Withdrawn JP2005512063A (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/007,292 US6676438B2 (en) 2000-02-14 2001-12-03 Contact structure and production method thereof and probe contact assembly using same
US10/014,630 US6641430B2 (en) 2000-02-14 2001-12-08 Contact structure and production method thereof and probe contact assembly using same
PCT/JP2002/012508 WO2003048788A1 (en) 2001-12-03 2002-11-29 Contact structure and production method thereof and probe contact assembly using same

Publications (1)

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JP2005512063A true JP2005512063A (en) 2005-04-28

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JP (1) JP2005512063A (en)
KR (2) KR100924623B1 (en)
TW (1) TW200301360A (en)
WO (1) WO2003048788A1 (en)

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KR101363485B1 (en) * 2013-08-12 2014-02-18 주식회사 프로이천 Test needle and probe block having the same and method for manufacturing test needle
KR101406270B1 (en) * 2006-10-16 2014-06-12 폼팩터, 인코포레이티드 Making and using carbon nanotube probes
JP2016099337A (en) * 2015-07-27 2016-05-30 株式会社日本マイクロニクス Contact inspection device
JP2016109664A (en) * 2014-11-26 2016-06-20 株式会社日本マイクロニクス Probe and contact inspection device
KR101662951B1 (en) * 2015-06-14 2016-10-14 김일 Probe Card with a Push Plate

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KR100806379B1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-02-27 세크론 주식회사 Probe, and probe card including the same
TWI381168B (en) * 2009-09-02 2013-01-01 Au Optronics Mfg Shanghai Corp Universal probe module
TWI425718B (en) * 2011-06-21 2014-02-01 Nat Chip Implementation Ct Nat Applied Res Lab Socket structure stack and socket structure thereof
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KR101907270B1 (en) * 2016-09-05 2018-10-12 주식회사 코엠테크 Vertical probe module with anti-rotation function for wire probes
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KR101406270B1 (en) * 2006-10-16 2014-06-12 폼팩터, 인코포레이티드 Making and using carbon nanotube probes
KR101363485B1 (en) * 2013-08-12 2014-02-18 주식회사 프로이천 Test needle and probe block having the same and method for manufacturing test needle
JP2016109664A (en) * 2014-11-26 2016-06-20 株式会社日本マイクロニクス Probe and contact inspection device
KR101662951B1 (en) * 2015-06-14 2016-10-14 김일 Probe Card with a Push Plate
JP2016099337A (en) * 2015-07-27 2016-05-30 株式会社日本マイクロニクス Contact inspection device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
TW200301360A (en) 2003-07-01
KR100888128B1 (en) 2009-03-11
KR100924623B1 (en) 2009-11-02
KR20040070199A (en) 2004-08-06
KR20090026815A (en) 2009-03-13
WO2003048788A1 (en) 2003-06-12

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