EP0022589B1 - A package for use in a beverage dispenser - Google Patents

A package for use in a beverage dispenser Download PDF

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Publication number
EP0022589B1
EP0022589B1 EP19800200611 EP80200611A EP0022589B1 EP 0022589 B1 EP0022589 B1 EP 0022589B1 EP 19800200611 EP19800200611 EP 19800200611 EP 80200611 A EP80200611 A EP 80200611A EP 0022589 B1 EP0022589 B1 EP 0022589B1
Authority
EP
European Patent Office
Prior art keywords
package
cap
concentrate
body
characterised
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
EP19800200611
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Other versions
EP0022589A3 (en
EP0022589A2 (en
Inventor
Edward Lewis Jeans
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Mondelez UK Holdings and Services Ltd
Original Assignee
Mondelez UK Holdings and Services Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to GB7924162 priority Critical
Priority to GB7924162 priority
Priority to US140685 priority
Priority to US140698 priority
Priority to US14069880A priority
Priority to US14068580A priority
Priority claimed from AT80200611T external-priority patent/AT26814T/en
Priority claimed from DE19803072096 external-priority patent/DE3072096D1/en
Application filed by Mondelez UK Holdings and Services Ltd filed Critical Mondelez UK Holdings and Services Ltd
Publication of EP0022589A2 publication Critical patent/EP0022589A2/en
Publication of EP0022589A3 publication Critical patent/EP0022589A3/en
Publication of EP0022589B1 publication Critical patent/EP0022589B1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Application status is Expired legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/0042Details of specific parts of the dispensers
    • B67D1/0057Carbonators
    • B67D1/0069Details
    • B67D1/0071Carbonating by injecting CO2 in the liquid
    • B67D1/0072Carbonating by injecting CO2 in the liquid through a diffuser, a bubbler
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/0015Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught the beverage being prepared by mixing at least two liquid components
    • B67D1/0021Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught the beverage being prepared by mixing at least two liquid components the components being mixed at the time of dispensing, i.e. post-mix dispensers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/0042Details of specific parts of the dispensers
    • B67D1/0043Mixing devices for liquids
    • B67D1/0051Mixing devices for liquids for mixing outside the nozzle
    • B67D1/0052Mixing devices for liquids for mixing outside the nozzle by means for directing respective streams together
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/0042Details of specific parts of the dispensers
    • B67D1/0057Carbonators
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/0042Details of specific parts of the dispensers
    • B67D1/0057Carbonators
    • B67D1/0069Details
    • B67D1/007Structure of the carbonating chamber
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/0042Details of specific parts of the dispensers
    • B67D1/0078Ingredient cartridges
    • B67D1/0079Ingredient cartridges having their own dispensing means
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/08Details
    • B67D1/12Flow or pressure control devices or systems, e.g. valves, gas pressure control, level control in storage containers
    • B67D1/14Reducing valves or control taps
    • B67D1/1405Control taps
    • B67D1/1438Control taps comprising a valve shutter movable in a direction parallel to the valve seat, e.g. sliding or rotating
    • B67D1/1444Control taps comprising a valve shutter movable in a direction parallel to the valve seat, e.g. sliding or rotating the valve shutter being rotated
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/08Details
    • B67D1/0801Details of beverage containers, e.g. casks, kegs
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/0042Details of specific parts of the dispensers
    • B67D1/0081Dispensing valves
    • B67D2001/0087Dispensing valves being mounted on the dispenser housing
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/08Details
    • B67D1/0801Details of beverage containers, e.g. casks, kegs
    • B67D2001/0812Bottles, cartridges or similar containers
    • B67D2001/0814Bottles, cartridges or similar containers for upside down use
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/08Details
    • B67D1/0801Details of beverage containers, e.g. casks, kegs
    • B67D2001/0812Bottles, cartridges or similar containers
    • B67D2001/0814Bottles, cartridges or similar containers for upside down use
    • B67D2001/0815Bottles, cartridges or similar containers for upside down use with integral venting tube
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D2210/00Indexing scheme relating to aspects and details of apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught or for controlling flow of liquids under gravity from storage containers for dispensing purposes
    • B67D2210/00028Constructional details
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D2210/00Indexing scheme relating to aspects and details of apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught or for controlling flow of liquids under gravity from storage containers for dispensing purposes
    • B67D2210/00028Constructional details
    • B67D2210/00031Housing
    • B67D2210/00034Modules
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D2210/00Indexing scheme relating to aspects and details of apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught or for controlling flow of liquids under gravity from storage containers for dispensing purposes
    • B67D2210/00028Constructional details
    • B67D2210/00031Housing
    • B67D2210/00039Panels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D2210/00Indexing scheme relating to aspects and details of apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught or for controlling flow of liquids under gravity from storage containers for dispensing purposes
    • B67D2210/00028Constructional details
    • B67D2210/00047Piping
    • B67D2210/00049Pipes
    • B67D2210/00052Pipes with flow tranquilisers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D2210/00Indexing scheme relating to aspects and details of apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught or for controlling flow of liquids under gravity from storage containers for dispensing purposes
    • B67D2210/00028Constructional details
    • B67D2210/00047Piping
    • B67D2210/0006Manifolds

Description

    Background of the invention
  • This invention relates in general to the dispensing of beverages and more particularly to a package for use in a beverage dispenser and the combination of such a package and a beverage dispenser.
  • Consumers throughout the world consume large quantities of carbonated beverages. Typically, carbonated beverages which are consumed in the home are supplied to the consumer in either cans or bottles. Typically, cans are supplied in 12 ounce (0.35 I) sizes and bottles in sizes up to two litres. A carbonated beverage is made up of carbonated water to which there is mixed a juice or syrup. A good tasting beverage requires good water, the proper level of carbonation and the proper proportions between the syrup and carbonated water. Thus, in the production of bottles or cans of carbonated beverages under factory conditions, the equipment used includes a carbonator for carbonating the water, a concentrate, i.e., a juice or syrup, a dispenser for dispensing the concentrate in the proper quantities and mixing it with the carbonated water, and a filling device for filling it into the bottles. Also included is a chiller unit for chilling the water to be carbonated. Carbonation is carried out by bringing carbon dioxide and water into contact with each other in such a manner that the carbon dioxide dissolves into the water. Typically the water is over carbonated since in the step of dispensing into the bottles or cans, a certain amount is lost. Systems can be operated in which the water and syrup are mixed prior to or after carbonation.
  • In addition to bottled and canned carbonated beverages, carbonated beverages are also dispensed at restaurants, and at soda fountains and the like. The devices used for such dispensing are known as post mix dispensers, and include the same basic elements as one finds in a carbonation plant. In other words, they include means for chilling the water, carbonating equipment for carbonating the water, a juice or syrup dispenser for dispensing metered amounts of concentrate and a tap for dispensing the mixture of concentrate and water into a glass or cup. Typically, mixing of the concentrate and water is carried out at the tap.
  • It is felt that there is a need for domestic versions of such dispensers, because if carbonated beverages are purchased in cans, for example, each time a can is used the contents of the whole can must be consumed. Any of the beverage left over for any period of time will lose its carbonation. Large reclosable containers to some extent overcome this problem. However, even though these containers are reclosable, after a period of time, carbonated beverages in these containers, will lose their carbonation. Thus, the ability to in effect make carbonated beverages in the quantities needed in the home would be of great advantage. However, for an in-home dispenser to be practical, and economically feasible, it must be relatively inexpensive and easy to operate.
  • Until recently, there has been very little attention given to in-home carbonated beverage dispensers, and in the in-home beverage dispensers which have been proposed, concentrate and carbonated water generally are mixed in ratios left to the judgement of the user. Thus someone making a drink would have to judge how much syrup to dispense into a given container, dispense that syrup and then add carbonated water or vice versa. Obviously, consistent consecutive beverages are not thus obtained. Possibly, because of difficulties in using this type of device, in-home dispensers for carbonated beverages have not become as popular as it is felt they could.
  • In addition to carbonated beverages, large amounts of juices and other fruit drinks and large amounts of hot beverages are also consumed. In many instances, such beverages are also made by mixing a concentrate with a diluent and the present invention can be applied to the dispensing of such beverages.
  • The present invention relates to a system in which the concentrate for the dispenser is supplied in packages so that users, instead of carrying bottles and cans of carbonated beverage from stores to their homes, can simply carry the packages of concentrate, which on a volume for volume basis will provide many more drinks than bottles or cans containing the same volume of carbonated beverage. The consumer therefore does not have to transport large quantities of water from store to home, which of course is a considerable saving. As alluded to above many factors influence the creation of an efficient in-home dispensing system and the packages therefore. These factors include, but are not limited to, the size of the dispenser, the cost of producing a drink from the dispenser, as compared with the cost of buying the equivalent drink from a supermarket or drug store, the number of flavours of drink which can be dispensed from the machine, the ease with which concentrate packages can be removed and replaced, the prevention of leakage and dripping of concentrate, the ability to dispense the beverage in a continuous manner, the designing of the system so that certain sanitary conditions are met, and the keeping to a minimum cleaning of the device to keep it in a sanitary condition.
  • There is already known from U.S. Patent No. 3,685,694 a system in which the concentrate for the dispenser is supplied in packages so that users, instead of carrying bottles or cans of carbonated beverages from stores to their homes, can simply carry the packages of concentrate, but such system proposes that the dispenser be provided with spikes onto which the package is impaled. One spike serves for the supply of carbon dioxide to the package to pressurise same whilst another spike serves as an outlet to enable the discharge of concentrate from the package. The spikes are connected to tubes or passageways leading from a carbon dioxide supply bottle on the one hand and a displacing valve on the dispenser on the other hand. In this system there is a need to ensure apparatus leading between the spikes and package, which is difficult as the package will be under internal pressure, and it is then necessary from time to time to clean the concentrate of tubes or passages, and dispensing valves.
  • It is perhaps because of the many difficulties which face in-home dispensers, that they have not been more widely used. The present invention provides a system for in-home drinks dispensing which, it is believed, either overcomes, or goes a long way to overcoming, all of the aforesaid difficulties.
  • The system firstly provides a package for the concentrate to be used in the dispenser, and secondly the combination of dispenser and the said package.
  • A general object of the present invention is to provide an economical, efficient dispensing system (packages and package/dispenser combination), for beverages which are made by mixing a diluent with a concentrate, in particular for carbonated beverages. Furthermore, by the use of such packages and combination dispensing any of a plurality of different carbonated beverages such as cola, diet cola, quinine water, orange, rootbeer, etc., in an efficient manner, should be possible. In addition, such a system should also be adaptable to dispensing still beverages such as fruit drinks or juices, and hot in addition to cold beverages. Although reference has been made herein to in-home use of the system the system and packages according to the invention can be used anywhere, where post mix dispensing of beverages is required, such as in restaurants, bars, soda fountains, etc.
  • Summary of the invention
  • In accordance with the present invention there is provided a package for use in a beverage dispenser comprising:
    • a body for containing a quantity of flavouring concentrate to be dispensed and having a bottom, side wall means and a top;
    • a cap closing the top of the body;
    • a seal region defined by a first seal element in the top of the body and a second seal element on the cap which sealingly engages said first seal element to prevent except when required the concentrate from passing the seal region; and
    • means mounting the cap on the body for movement relative to the body to enable the first and second seal elements to be displaced relatively to permit the concentrate to flow past the seal region when the package is in inverted condition; characterised by aperture means in the cap enabling the concentrate which flows past the seal region to flow from the cap to be caught in a drinking vessel; and
    • means in the package opening into the interior of the body of the package at a location spaced from said cap and forming a passage to enable the fluid communication of the interior of the body of the package to a pressurizing fluid or atmosphere for driving or enabling this flow of concentrate from the aperture means in a predetermined fashion when the first and second seal elements are displaced relatively.
  • The package of the invention therefore provides an excellent means of distributing concentrate for beverages. If the diluent is water, then if a person has a suitable dispenser, and a supply of water at its place of use it is not necessary to transport large quantities of water as between the store or supermarket and the places of use of the concentrate, typically in a domestic dwelling.
  • The package is preferably designed so that no concentrate will flow or drip therefrom when the package is lifted from the dispenser, and to this end, the means whereby the fluid communication can be established may comprise a flexible split seal, acting as a one-way valve, which is opened only when the package is in place on the dispenser by means of a suitable projecting member of the dispenser, and closed automatically when the container is removed from the dispenser.
  • By providing the outlet aperture in the cap, the package can be arranged so that the concentrate which flows therefrom is caught directly in the vessel from which the beverage is consumed, which represents a considerable advantage, as there will be no dilute beverage in contact with the dispenser, and the need for cleaning of the dispenser will be much reduced.
  • The invention also provides the combination of a package as aforesaid and a dispenser and in accordance with this aspect of the invention there is provided the combination of a dispenser for dispensing beverages and a disposable package as aforesaid, the said dispenser comprising a holder for holding the said package in inverted condition, a movable component of said holder for displacing the cap relative to the body, to cause flow of concentrate therefrom whereby the concentrate is disposed into space and can be caught in a drinking vessel.
  • The total unit is disposed on a base and is enclosed by a plastic cover designed to allow easy heat evacuation. It is particularly compact, attractive, sanitary and inexpensive.
  • Although the combination of the present invention is disclosed primarily as a unit for dispensing carbonated beverages and also as an in-home dispensing unit, it is not limited to such functions. Obviously, as will become evident, the combination, with appropriate modification, can also be used in restaurants, soda fountains and the like. Furthermore, in addition to dispensing carbonated beverages in which carbonated water is mixed with a concentrate such as a flavouring syrup, quinine concentrate or the like, the combination of the present invention may also be used for dispensing still beverages and for dispensing hot beverages. In other words, it is generally adaptable to dispensing any beverage in which a concentrate is mixed with a diluent. The diluent need not be still water or carbonated water although in most cases it will. As alluded to the above, by disposing the metering valve for the concentrate within the package and disposing the package above the dispensing valve, the concentrate need not touch any part of the dispensing apparatus. What this means is that dilute concentrate which, particularly when it is something like syrup, can result in the growth of mold, never contacts the dispenser. This maintains sanitary conditions. Furthermore, the container is particularly adapted to filling in a near sterile condition which may be of particular importance with respect to some types of hot and still drinks. In operation, when pressurised by a pressurising gas, which could be an inert gas such as nitrogen where carbonation is desired, the gas may be used to maintain near sterile conditions and to maintain flavour integrity in the apparatus over periods of time. In such a case, this pressurized gas would, of course, also pressurize the water supply. In other words, the various features of the present invention which give it its simplicity and compactness will be of advantage in dispensing other types of beverages, i.e., still cold and hot beverages, in addition to cold carbonated beverages.
  • Embodiments of packages according to the invention and a dispenser/package combination will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:-
    • Fig. 1 is a block diagram of the dispensing system of the package/dispenser combination of the present invention;
    • Fig. 2a is a front perspective view of a dispenser of the package/dispenser combination of the present invention;
    • Fig. 2b is a rear perspective view of the dispenser of Fig. 2a;
    • Fig. 3 is a plan view of the dispenser according to Figs. 2a and 2b;
    • Fig. 4 is a plan view of the valve of Fig. 6 partially cut away showing the valve integral with a manifold;
    • Fig. 5 is a sectional elevation view of the pressure reducing valve of Fig. 4, the section being taken on line 5-5 in Fig. 4;
    • Fig. 6 is an exploded perspective view of a rotary valve of the dispenser of Fig. 2a;
    • Figs. 6a, 6b and 6c are diagrammatic presentations illustrating the three possible positions of the valve of Fig. 6;
    • Fig. 7 is a section along the lines 7-7 of Fig. 4;
    • Fig. 8 is a section along the lines 8-8 of Fig. 4;
    • Fig. 9 is a section along the lines 9-9 of Fig. 4 illustrating the diluent flow channels;
    • Fig. 10 is a section along the lines 10-10 of Fig. 4 showing the valve of Figs. 4 and 6 in the dispensing condition;
    • Fig. 10a is a section along the lines 11-11 of Fig. 4 illustrating the camming action within the package;
    • Fig. 10b is an unfolded view of the camming slot of Fig. 10a;
    • Figs. 11 and 12 respectively show two alternative, modified arrangements of the package;
    • Fig. 13 shows a further modified form of the package sealing arrangement;
    • Fig. 14 shows a further embodiment of the package according to the invention;
    • Fig. 15 shows the package of Fig. 14 when in the open condition;
    • Fig. 16 is a sectional elevation of a package according to another embodiment of the invention;
    • Fig. 17 is a sectional elevation of the package shown in Fig. 16, but in the dispensing condition;
    • Fig. 18 is a sectional elevation of a package according to yet another embodiment of the package invention;
    • Fig. 19 is a cross sectional view, the section being on line 19-19 of Fig. 20, through an alternate embodiment of the package in which the package valve comprises relatively rotatable parts each containing an opening which can be aligned.
    • Fig. 20 is a cross section through the view of Fig. 19;
    • Fig. 21 is a cross sectional view, similar to Fig. 19, the section being on lines 21-21 in Fig. 22 of another embodiment of the package in which two holes are lined up to open a valve to carry out dispensing in response to linear movement;
    • Fig. 22 is a cross section through the embodiment of Fig. 21;
    • Fig. 23 is a cross sectional view of an embodiment of the package of the present invention utilizing a conventionally threaded bottle and cap in which rotation without opening is accomplished by means of a slotted rotating part in the dispensing valve;
    • Fig. 24 is an unfolded view of the inside of the rotating valve part shown in Fig. 23, showing the shape of the slot;
    • Figs. 25a-c are cross sectional views through the rotating part and cap of Fig. 23 showing the operation of this embodiment of the invention; and
    • Fig. 26 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the valve adapted as a sink dispenser.
    Detailed description of the invention
  • The present invention will be described in detail in connection with an in-home beverage dispenser particularly adapted for carbonated beverages. However, the various aspects of the present invention are also useful in other environments, such as in restaurants, soda fountains, etc. Furthermore, in addition to being useful for preparing carbonated drinks, the package dispenser combination of the present invention can also be used for making still drinks, for example, for mixing a fruit juice concentrate with water to make a juice, and also for making hot drinks by mixing hot water with a suitable concentrate.
  • Thus, Fig. 1 is a generalized block diagram of a system which uses packages according to the present invention. The system includes a water source 11. In more general terms, this is a source of diluent which is later mixed with a concentrate. Although it will, in most cases, be water, other diluents might be used. Shown in connection with the water source is an inlet 13. The inlet 13 may be an inlet which is plumbed into the plumbing of the location where the dispenser is used or may simply be an opening in the water tank which permits refilling. The water from the water source is shown passing through a heat exchanger 15. Shown associated with the heat exchanger 15 is a cooling unit 17 and a heating unit 18. Cooling can be supplied to the heat exchanger 15 by opening a valve 19 and heating or cooling will be associated directly with the water source or water tank 11. In general terms, the heat exchanger 15 and associated cooling 17 and heating 18 simply comprise means for adjusting the temperature of the diluent. At the outlet of the heat exchanger 15 is a carbonator 23. Carbonator 23 is supplied with carbon dioxide from a tank 25 through a reducing valve 26, a line 27 and, a manifold 29. When the carbonator is in use, carbonated water is supplied over line 33 to the manifold 29. The manifold 29 supplies this water or other diluent to dispensing valves 35 and 36 in accordance with the present invention. Still water is applied over a line 34 to a mixing valve 31 which has a second inlet supplied with carbonated water from line 33 and permits supplying to dispensing valve 36 any desired proportions or mixture of still and/or carbonated water. Also located at the dispensing valves 35 and 36 are packages 37 filled with a concentrate which is to be mixed with the diluent. As will be more fully described, the metering valve for concentrate is in the container 37 and is coupled to and cooperates with the dispensing valves 35 and 36. That is, the package 37 with the concentrate includes valving means to meter the amount of concentrate in response to a relative movement of two parts of the package brought about by the dispensing valve 35 or 36. The supply of carbon dioxide over line 27 is also used to pressurize the concentrate in the packages 37 after being coupled through a reducing valve 39. Also shown is a line 40 coupling carbon dioxide to water source 11 to supply the diluent at a constant pressure. As with the means for changing the temperature of the diluent the carbonator may also be built into the water container as is the case in the embodiment to now be described. In that case, water source 11 is also the carbonator. Furthermore, although carbon dioxide is shown as the pressurizing gas, in embodiments where carbonation is not desired, it may be replaced by any inert gas such as nitrogen.
  • The dispensing system
  • The embodiment of the dispenser illustrated in perspective view of Figs. 2a and 2b includes a supporting structure 41 which is preferably of molded plastic. Structure 41 includes a base 43 and an upstanding T-shaped portion 45. The T-shaped portion 45 includes a top wall 47 front and rear walls 49 and 51, respectively, and a central divider 53. At the one end of the unit, as best seen in Fig. 2b, mounted to the base 43 is a cooling unit 55. Shown in the cooling unit 55 are ventilation openings 57 which communicate with additional ventilation openings 59 formed in the base 43. Disposed atop the cooling unit 55 is a diluent tank, e.g., a water supply and carbonator tank 61 to be described in more detail below. Surrounding this portion of the unit is a cover 63 which has a depending flange portion 65 which engages corresponding lip 67 on the central portion 45. The carbonator is adapted to be easily removed and refilled with water when necessary. As an alternative to a cooling unit 55, a heating unit, or combined heating and cooling unit, can be provided to permit the possibility of dispensing either cold or hot drinks.
  • At the other end of the dispenser, supported on the base 43, is a tank of a pressurizing gas, e.g., a carbon dioxide tank, 68 shown in phantom. The carbon dioxide tank or bottle 68 is connected to a reducing valve 69 by means of a quick disconnect clamp 71 to permit ease of replacement of the carbon dioxide bottle 68 which may be a conventional commercial unit. Extending through the dividing wall 53 and secured to a bracket 73 thereon by means of screws or bolts 75 is a manifold 77 which will be described in detail below. The manifold 77 distributes the pressurizing gas and diluent, e.g., carbon dioxide and carbonated water. The front portion of the manifold 77 is visible on Fig. 2a. Integral with the manifold are two dispensing valves 79A and 79B to be described in detail below. Disposed above each of the dispensing valves 79A and 79B is a package 81 containing therein a concentrate to be mixed with the diluent supplied from the diluent tank 61. Below valves 79A and 79B is a removable tray 82, retained magnetically for example, for catching any spillage. Tray 82 may be removed and rinsed periodically. Again, although disclosed hereinafter as supplying carbonated water, it will be recognized that, by disconnecting the carbonator apparatus, still beverages can be dispensed, and, by heating instead of cooling the diluent, hot drinks can also be dispensed. As will become more evident below, the packages 81 are particularly adaptable to packaging and storing all types of concentrate in a sanitary manner.
  • Covering the carbon dioxide tank 68 is a second cover 83, which similarly has a depending flange 85 engaging a lip on the T-shaped central structure 45.
  • Fig. 3 is a plan view of the dispenser of Figs. 2a and 2b with the covers 63 and 83 removed and the T-shaped center section 45 also removed for clarity of presentation. In this view, the carbon dioxide bottle 68 is visible along with its quick disconnect clamp 71 and reducing valve 69. The reducing valve is semi-rigidly mounted and coupled by tubing 87 to the manifold 77. Portions of valves 79A and 79B which are molded integrally with the manifold are also shown. Also shown in cross section is the carbonator tank 61. The carbonator tank contains a coupling 89 which permits a quick disconnect with the manifold 77.
  • Reducing valve 69 reduces the carbon dioxide pressure to .275 N/m2 C02 at this pressure is fed through a passage 91 in the manifold 77 to the disconnect coupling 89. From that point it flows through tubing 90 to a restrictor 93, and thence to a diffuser 95. Carbonated water is removed from the carbonator tank through a line 97 extending to the bottom of tank 61 and leading to the coupling 89 whence it enters a passage 99 in the manifold. This passage connects with two smaller passages 101 and 103, which lead to outlets 105 and 107, in the portion of the valves which is integral with the manifold. At each of the outlets an 0-ring seal 109 is provided. Carbon dioxide is also fed through a further pressure reducing valve 111 which is built into the manifold, where the pressure is reduced to 0.034 N/m2. From valve 111 the carbon dioxide flows in a passage 113 to which are connected two passages 115 and 117, which lead to elongated openings 119 and 121 in the portion of the manifold which comprises part of the valve. Again, in each case an 0-ring seal 123 of neoprene or the like is inserted. Although the manifold 77 can be made of various materials, a plastic is preferred. With such plastic the manifold can be molded and any necessary machining carried out to form the various passageways.
  • The manifold
  • The manifold 77 and the dispensing valves are shown in more detail in Fig. 4. At the inlet for carbon dioxide, a threaded fitting 125 is provided in the manifold. As illustrated, this communicutes with a channel 127 which is connected directly to ths passage 91. This is seen in more detail in Fig. 5 which is a cross section through the reducing valve. Inserted into appropriate bores 129 and 131 on the left side of the manifold 77, are tubular fittings 133 and 135. These are press fitted into their respective bores 129 and 131. Each contains, threaded therein, a check valve, i.e., a Schrader type valve, 137a and 137b respectively. The fittings 133 and 135 insert into the quick disconnect coupling 89 in the carbonator tank 61 and are sealed by O-rings 136. Within a bore 130 in the coupling 89, mating with the fitting 129, is disposed an anvil 139 followed by a check valve 141 which is blown open by carbon dioxide pressure from the line 91. In a bore 137 of the coupling 89 which mates with the fitting 135 is inserted another Schrader valve 143. The valve 143 abuts against the valve 137b opening both valves when the quick disconnect coupling 89 is attached to the manifold. Similarly, an anvil similar to anvil 139 opens the valve 137a. In this manner, when the carbonator is disconnected from the manifold, there is a check valve in both passages of the manifold and in both passages into the carbonator to prevent release of pressure. The coupling 89 also contains, at its inside, threaded bores 144 and 146 for connecting lines 90 and 97 of Fig. 3. The stub connections 104, 118 are for connection to a remote dispensing valve.
  • The pressure reducing valve 111 is shown in more detail in the cross section of Fig. 5 which is taken along the line 5-5 of Fig. 4. Carbon dioxide at a pressure of 40 psi reaches the channel 91 through the inlet passage 127 shown on Fig. 4. After passing through the pressure reducing valve, gas at .034 N/M 2 is fed to the channel 113 by means of an outlet passage comprising a bore 145 in the manifold. The manifold in an area above the bore 145 contains a large bore 147. Extending down from the bore 147 and in the center thereof is a smaller bore 149. This bore intersects with the passage 91 containing the .275 N/m2 CO2, The upper portion of bore 149 is threaded and contains a guide and valve seat 151. Guide 151 guides a tube 153 attached to a diaphragm 155 by means of a supporting plate 157. The diaphragm is secured in place between a body member 159 which is inserted into the bore 147 and a cover piece 161, body member 159 may be integral with the manifold. The actual valving which carries out the pressure reducing takes place between the guide 151 which forms a valve seat and a valve member 163 containing in its central portion a gasket 165. The valve member 163 abuts and seals to the end of the rod 153 and is biased outward by a spring 167. The spring tends to bring the valve member 163 with its gasket 165 into engagement with the seat on the guide 151. Spacing between the member 163 and the guide and valve seat 151 determines the pressure of the gas which reaches a chamber 169 from whence it flows out the outlet bore 145. On the cover piece 161 is mounted an adjustment knob 171, having thereon a threaded rod 173 which acts on a nut 175 which is prevented from rotating by being contained in a suitable recess in the cover piece 161. Thus, rotation of the knob 171 results in linear up and down motion of the rod 173. A flange 176 secured to the rod acts upon a biasing spring 177 which is disposed between the flange 176 and the disc 157 at the diaphragm 155. This arrangement with the spring 177, the pressure of which is adjustable by the knob 171 and the diaphragm, coupled to the tube 153 which operates the valve member 163, results in the seating and unseating of the valve member 163 on the seat of guide 151 such as to maintain the pressure in the chamber 169 in accordance with the biasing pressure set with the spring 177. In this manner, by adjusting the knob 171 the desired pressure of 0.034 N/rn2 is obtained at the outlet 145.
  • The dispensing valves and concentrate packages
  • The construction of the dispensing valves 79A and 79B shown in Fig. 2a can best be understood first with reference to Figs. 6, 6a, 6b and 6c, in addition to Fig. 4. In the illustrated embodiment, each valve is made up of four basic parts, which form a holder for a concentrate package as will be described. These include a base portion 181 which is molded as part of the manifold 77. However, it should be recognised that such base portions can be made separately with appropriate connections for carbon dioxide pressure line 117 and water inlet line 103.
  • Since both valves are identical, only the right hand valve 79B will be described in detail. The base portion 181 of the valve is a member containing a large cylindrical bore 182. At the bottom of this bore is located the inlet opening 121 for the carbon dioxide with its 0-ring seal 123 and the inlet opening 107 for the diluent, e.g., carbonated water, with its 0-ring seal 109. Also located in the base portion is a vent hole 183, an opening 185 through which the concentrate, e.g., a syrup, will be dispensed in a manner to be described below, and a drain passage 187 for the residue of diluent, e.g., carbonated water, after it has passed through the valve. Inserted into the bore 182 is a central rotatable valve member 189. It is supported within the bore 182 for rotation therein in response to operation of a handle 191 and seals against 0- rings 109 and 123. Overlying the central rotatable member is an adjustment disc 193. The adjustment disc remains essentially fixed but is adjustable to take into account different environmental conditions in metering of the concentrate. This adjustment is accomplished by an adjusting screw 195. As can best be seen from reference to Figs. 4 and 6, the adjusting screw includes a knob 196 on the end of a shaft 198. The shaft passes through and is rotatable within a threaded plugs 197. The threaded plug 197 is screwed into a cover portion 201 of the valve which fits over and retains in place central member 189 and adjusting disc 193. Near the end of the shaft 198 is a worm gear 199 which is secured thereto. When inserted into the cover portion 201, the end 203 of the shaft 198 is supported for rotation in a bore 207, as best seen in Fig. 4. The worm gear 199 is exposed through an opening 194 and engages appropriate teeth 209 on the adjustment disc 193 permitting a limited degree of rotation thereof. Once adjusted by the adjustment screw 195, however, the disc 193 remains fixed.
  • As shown in Fig. 6, package 81 includes a necked body 238 and a cap 230. The body may be of a transparent or translucent material so that the contents can be viewed when the package is in use, and a user can see at glance the level of the contents of the package. Dispensing of the concentrate from the package 81 is in response to a relative rotation of its cap 230 with respect to tabs 211 on the neck of the bottle 238. This opens a valve in package 81 and carries out a metering action in a manner to be described more fully below. To accomplish this rotation, the cap 230 also contains a tab 213. The tab 213 engages in a notch 215 in the valve member 189. The tabs 211 engage in notches 217 in the adjustment disc 193. The central valve member 189 is arranged to rotate a given amount to open the metering valve within the container by rotating cap 230 which is engaging the notch 215 in the central valve member 189. Fine adjustment of this metering is possible by means of the adjusting screw 195 which increases or decreases the initial setting of the position of the cap 230 relative to the body 238 so as to vary the rate of flow of concentrate from the package upon a pre-set and subsequent rotation of the cap 230.
  • The dispensing valve performs three separate functions. It performs a function of venting the package, a function of pressurizing the package with the low pressure carbon dioxide and a function of causing the simultaneous dispensing of concentrate and diluent. The central valve member 189 contains a central bore 219 in and at the bottom of which there is provided a cylindrical member 221, containing a partial bore 232 in the upper portion thereof, and supported by three struts 223. One of the struts 223 contains therein a passage 225 (Figs. 6a; 6b), which communicates with the bore 232. The other end of the passage 225 is brought through to the bottom of the central valve member 189 and at a location permitting alignment with vent hole 183 and outlet 121 in the base member 181 of the valve. As best seen from Figs. 7 and 8 inserted within the bore 232 is tubular member 227. This tubular member communicates with a tube 229 (Fig. 7) extending to the bottom of the package 81 (which will be the top with the package 81 in the inverted position shown) for the purposes of venting and pressurizing, in a manner to be more fully described below.
  • With reference to Fig. 6a, the position of the valve with the handle 191 fully to the left is shown. In this position packages are inverted into and removed from the equipment and the passage 225 is aligned with the vent hole 183 permitting venting of the package 81 through tube 229, a tubular member 227 (Fig. 7) in bore 232, passage 225 and vent hole 183. This corresponds to the cross sectional view of Fig. 7.
  • In the position shown in Fig. 6b, which is a quiescent position of a package in the dispenser, the interior of the package is pressurized but there is no flow of concentrate or diluent from the dispenser, and the package cannot be removed from the dispenser, handle 191 is centered, the passage 225 is overlying the opening 121 and is sealed by the 0-ring seal 123. This admits the low pressure carbon dioxide to the passage 225 from whence it can flow through the tubular member 227 into the package through tube 229, to pressurize the package with a constant pressure. In this position, the diluent outlet 107 with its seal 109, is still covered by the bottom of central valve member 189. This corresponds to the cross section of Fig. 8.
  • Finally, in the position shown in Fig. 6c, which is the dispensing position in which concentrate and diluent flow from the dispenser, and the package cannot be removed, handle 191 is all the way to the right, and an inlet opening 231 in central valve member 189 is aligned with the opening 107 to permit a flow of diluent, e.g., carbonated water, through and out of the valve. At this time, because of the elongated opening 121, the passage 225 is still in communication with the carbon dioxide supply to maintain pressurization of the package. This corresponds to the cross section of Fig. 9 and 10. Movement of the handle 191 to the right takes place against the biasing force of a spring 233 which is arranged to return the handle 191 to its middle position.
  • Once pressurized, if it is desired to remove the package with the concentrate and replace it with another, it is only necessary to move the handle 191 to the position shown in Fig. 6a, to vent the package 81 to permit relieving the pressure therein and allow removal.
  • The cross section of Fig. 10 shows the passage 225 still aligned with the opening 121 during dispensing. The passages for the carbonated water in this position, i.e., the position also shown in Fig. 6c, is illustrated by Fig. 9. Shown is the passage 103 which communicates with the opening 107 which is surrounded by the 0-ring seal 109; sealing against the rotary valve member 189 and communicating with the passage 231 therein. The diluent thus flows into a pressure reducing chamber 235, and thence out of a spout 237, which is carried by member 189. It will be appreciated that spout 237 therefore moves with member 189 and because it projects under the base 181 the base is provided with a lobe cut-out 237A (Fig. 4) to permit the spout so to move. The spout is directed at an angle to cause mixing of the diluent and concentrate in a manner to be seen more clearly below in connection with Fig. 10. Chamber 235 is designed for minimum agitation of the diluent to prevent excessive loss of carbon dioxide. The dimensions of chamber 235 and spout 237 are such that an adequate flow of diluent is maintained, and that with a predetermined diluent pressure, the outlet flow rate is sufficient to obtain the necessary mixing with the concentrate without excessive foaming. When the handle 191 returns to the position shown in Fig. 6b, the passage 231 overlies the drain passage 187 which has a downward slope. Thus, any diluent remaining in chamber 235 can drain into a glass or cup placed below.
  • Referring now to Figs. 8 and 10, it will be seen that the body 238 has a plug 239 in its neck. The plug contains a central bore 241 having a sloped portion, i.e., of somewhat conical shape, 243 at its inner end. There is a central passage 245 through the inner end of the plug. The plug is of generally cylindrical shape and is press fitted into the neck 247 of the body 238. Alternatively, it can be molded as part of the body 238. At its outer end, the plug contains a circumferential flange 249 which extends beyond the neck 247 of the body. Placed over the neck of the body is the cap 230. The cap contains, in its central portion, a cylindrical shaped member 251 which terminates in a conical section 252 at its inner end. Conical section 252 abuts against the tapered conical section 243 of the plug 239. Inwardly extending member 251 contains at the inner end thereof, a bore 253 into which is inserted the dip tube 229. The dip tube extends through the opening 245 in the plug with a spacing. At the outer end of the cap, in the center thereof, is a larger bore 255 extending into member 251 and communicating with bore 253. At the inner end of this bore a check valve 257 is disposed. In the case of the present embodiment, the check valve is in the form of a split seal valve. However, any other type of check valve can be used. The split seal check valve is held in place by a cylindrical insert 259. The fitting 227 which is surrounded by an O-ring seal 260 to seal inside the cylindrical insert 259 in cap 230, is inserted into the center of the insert 259 and acts against the check valve 257 to open it permitting carbon dioxide to flow into the package through the dip tube 229. In the portion of the package above the plug 239, the concentrate will be contained. The cooperation between the plug 239 and the inward projecting member 251 on the cap perform the valving action needed to dispense a metered amount of concentrate. The conical surface 243 of plug 229 forms a valve seat for the conical tip 252 of member 251. It can be seen, that movement of the member 251 away from the plug 239 will permit a flow of concentrate around the dip tube 229 and into the area between the member 251 and the plug 239.
  • What happens when such movement occurs is illustrated by Fig. 10. As shown by the arrows 261, concentrate flows around the dip tube 229 and into a space 263 between the plug 239 and the member 251. At the same time, the flange 249 has been lifted away from the cap 230 and an opening 265 formed in the cap is exposed. In the closed condition, a double seal is provided. First there is the seal between conical surfaces 252 and 243. Second is the seal provided by the flange 249 over opening 265. With the cap 230 moved downward, concentrate can now flow through opening 265 under the pressure which is maintained in the package because of the C02 and drop, through a gap between the struts 223 shown in Fig. 4, and Fig. 6C, into a cup 267, placed below the dispensing valve. The flowing concentrate 269 flows essentially straight down. The diluent, e.g., the carbonated water, flows from the spout 237 at an angle intersecting the flow of concentrate in free space and mixing with it prior to reaching the cup 267.
  • As noted above, the valve within package 81 is opened in response to rotation of its cap 230 with respect to its body 238 brought about by rotation of central valve member 189 with respect to adjustment disc 193 which, once adjusted by adjusting screw 195, remains fixed during operation. The manner in which the rotary motion of the central valve member 189 brings about a separation of the plug 239 and the cap 230 is best illustrated by Figs. 10a and 10a. In Fig. 10a the insertion of the tabs 211 into the slots 217 in the adjustment ring 193 is illustrated. As described above, this holds bottle 238 fixed. Furthermore, the manner in which the tab 213 on the cap 230 is inserted into the slot 215 to cause the cap 230 to rotate with central valve member 189 is also evident. The relationship between these parts is also illustrated in Fig. 6 and Fig. 4.
  • As illustrated in Fig. 10a, the neck 247 of bottle 238 contains a pair of opposed projecting nibs 271. These projecting nibs fit into cam slots or grooves 273 formed on opposite sides of the inside of cap 230.
  • A view of a portion of the cap 230 unfolded is shown in Fig. 10b. In this figure, the shape of the slots 273 is evident. The slot contains a horizontal portion 275 followed by a sloping or angled portion 277. It can be seen that, as the central valve member 189 is rotated, it carried with it the cap 230 because of the insertion of the tab 213 in the slot 215. Rotation while the nibs are in the horizontal area 275 of the slot will result in no relative linear up or down motion between the cap 230 and the bottle 238, and thus the valve formed by the plug 239 and the member 251 remains closed. Travel in the horizontal portion 275 takes place between the positions of central valve member 189 shown in Fig. 6a and 6b. However, with further rotation to the position shown in 6c the nibs 271 will begin to move into the angled portion 277 causing the projection 251 to move away from the insert 239, in order to reach the position shown in Fig. 10, to dispense the concentrate at a preset metered flow rate. It will be arranged that the nibs 271 will be in a position in the said straight portions 275 intermediate the ends thereof when the package is in the dispenser and the rotary valve is in the position shown in Fig. 6a to enable ring 193 to be adjusted in both directions but that movement of the rotary valve to the Fig. 6b position will not cause the nibs 271 to ride up the angled portion 277. Also, the angled portions 277 should be of sufficient length that the nibs lie between the ends of the angled portions 277 when the dispenser is in the Fig. 6c position, again to permit the adjustment of said ring 193.
  • Also shown in cross section on Fig. 10a is the worm gear 198 of the adjustment screw 195 of Figs. 4 and 6. It is evident, that the dispensing action, i.e., the opening of the valve in the package takes place because of a relative movement between the cap 230 and the body 238. During normal operation, the body 238 is held fixed because of the insertion of the tabs 211 in the slots 217 in the adjustment ring 193. Thus, during normal dispensing, the starting position i.e. when in the position of Fig. 6b of the nibs 271 in slots 273 and the degree of rotation of the cap 230 by means of the tab 213 in the slot 215 in the central valve member 189 determines the degree of opening of the valve i.e. the amount of travel of nibs 271 in sloping portions 277. This total amount of rotation of cap 230 is fixed, in that movement of the lever 191 of Fig. 6c is limited by the spring 233. Normally, for a given concentrate, the nibs 271 will be positioned, as explained herein, during manufacture so that when the package is inserted in the valve, movement of the member 189 between the Figs. 6a and 6c position, will give the desired amount of valve opening based on the viscosity of the concentrate and on a standard ambient temperature, e.g., 20°C, without any adjustment of the adjustment screw 195. However, if the drink dispenser is operated under ambient conditions where a higher or lower temperature exists, this will affect the flow rate for a given opening of the valve. For example, although in the temperature climates a temperature close to 20°C. will normally be maintained in wintertime, in the summertime temperatures considerably higher may occur. The higher temperatures in many cases will lower the viscosity of the concentrate and too much concentrate may be dispensed. The adjustment screw 195 is utilized to solve this problem. If the user finds that too much or too little concentrate is being dispensed, the adjustment screw can be turned. This rotates the adjustment ring 193 and in effect causes a relative rotation between the cap 230 and body 238 to bias .the nibs 271 in one direction or the other. In turn, this means that for a given rotation of the central valve member 189 the nibs 271 will move up the angled or sloped portion 277 a greater or lesser extent. This in turn will control the degree to which the valve is opened. To enable the adjustment to take place, the said slots 277 must, as explained herein, be of sufficient length.
  • The operation of the dispenser and package
  • The operation of the dispenser will now be explained. With reference to Fig. 3 a carbon dioxide bottle 68 will be in place and the carbonator 61 will be filled with water which has been carbonated by passing carbon dioxide through it, the carbon dioxide being passed through the diffuser 95. The carbonator will be at the pressure of 0.275 N/m2 to which the regulating valve 69 is set, i.e., this pressure will be maintained in the head space above the water in carbonator 61. Furthermore, the water in the carbonator will have been cooled by the cooling means 55 shown on Fig. 2b. Low pressure, 0.034 N/m2 carbon dioxide will be available in the passage 113, and, because of the pressurization of the carbonator 61, carbonated water under pressure will be available in the passage 99. Thus, at each of the valves a supply of carbon dioxide will be available at the outlets 119 or 121 and a supply of carbonated water at the outlets 105 and 107. Packages of the desired concentrates are then inserted into the dispenser. For example, the concentrates may comprise a syrup for making soft drinks such as cola, orange soda, root beer, etc., or can comprise, for example, an additive to make quinine water and so forth. In an alternate embodiment where water was not carbonated, the concentrate could be a fruit juice concentrate, or, where it was desired to make a hot drink, for example, a coffee, tea or hot chocolate concentrate.
  • With the valve in the Fig. 6a position, the package 81 with the concentrate is inserted into the valve or valves (the illustrated embodiment includes two valve mechanisms' however, a single valve or more than two could be provided). It is inserted so that the tabs 211 are in the slots 217 and the tab 213 inserted into the slot 215, as best seen from Figs. 6 and 11. As it is inserted the member 227 will open the check valve 257 (Fig. 8). At this point, the handle 191 will be in the position shown in Fig. 6a. This will bring the dip tube 229 which is in communication with the inside of the container in communication with the vent hole 183 through the passage 225 shown on Fig. 6a.
  • Next, the handle is moved to the position shown in 6b. Now the passage 225 is lined up with the outlet 123 and carbon dioxide passes to the fitting 227 and through the check valve 257 and the dip tube 229 into the bottle 218 to pressurize it. During this movement between the position of Figs. 6a and 6b, the nibs 271 move in the straight section 275 of the slot 273 in the cap 230 shown in Figs. 10a and 10b.
  • When it is desired to dispense a drink, the handle 191 is pushed to the right from the Fig. 6b position to that shown in Fig. 6c against the force of the return spring 233. In this position, the channel 225 is still lined up with the opening 121 and the container remains pressurized. The water outlet 231 lines up with the opening 107 and carbonated water is dispensed from the spout 237 shown on Figs. 9 and 10. The nibs 271 have now moved into the slanted section 277 of the slot 273 in the cap 230. This results in the cap being moved away from the bottle so that the member 251 moves away from the plug 239 opening the metering valve for the concentrate which now flows in the direction of the arrows 261 shown on Fig. 10 into the space 263 and thence out the hole 265 in the cap and down toward a cup 267 in a stream 269. The downward flowing stream 269 intersects the stream 270 of carbonated water in free space causing the two to mix intimately as they are dispensed into the cup 267. When the desired amount of drink has been dispensed, the handle 191 is released and returns to the position shown on Fig. 6b. The package remains pressurized, but the flow of concentrate is stopped because of the closing of the valve therein and the flow of carbonated water stopped because of the movement of the outlet 231 away from the opening 107.
  • Any water left in chamber 235 or inlet 231 of Fig. 9 can drain both through spout 237 and drain outlet 187 to completely drain all diluent. From this point on, additional drinks can be dispensed simply by moving the handle 191 to the position shown in Fig. 6c.
  • Assume for the moment that the two concentrate packages 81 contain respectively cola and diet cola. Assume it is now desired to dispense quinine water. One of the packages 81 must thus be removed and replaced with another containing a quinine water concentrate. The packages 81 to be removed is, of course, pressurized. To relieve the pressure in the package 81 the handle 191 is moved to the position shown in Fig. 6a. In this position, the package is now vented, venting taking place through the passage 225 and the vent opening 183. With the pressure relieved on the concentrate package 81 it may now be removed. As it is removed, referring to Fig. 8, it is evident that once it is lifted upward and the fitting 227 is no longer acting against the check valve 257, the check valve 257 will close. This prevents any possibility of the concentrate getting into or dripping out of the dip tube 229. The new package is then put into place after which the steps described above are followed.
  • Typically, the cola concentrate will be a relatively thick syrup whereas the quinine water concentrate will be relatively thin. This requires different degrees of opening of the valve made up by the member 251 and plug 239. The necessary metering which must be carried out is accomplished by adjusting the positioning of the tabs 213 with respect to slot 273 on the cap 230 during manufacture. In other words, in the rest position, referring to Fig. 10b, for a cola syrup the nib will be relatively close to the angled section 277, but not so close as to cause flow of concentrate from the container when the rotary valve is in the Fig. 6b position. On the other hand, for something like quinine water it will be placed further to the left so that, with movement of the valve to the Fig. 6c position, the nibs 271 will only ride up on the angle portion a small amount. Alternatively, this control can be obtained by using different angles on the angle portion 277.
  • The various advantages both with respect to construction and operation of the dispensing combination including the dispenser and container should be evident. It can be made essentially of all plastic parts which are easily molded, other materials can of course be used. For example, the body 238 may be made of glass or metal. By forming the dispensing valve in one piece with the manifold and through the design of a manifold which essentially carries the supply of materials to the valve, the need for numerous tubes and the disadvantages associated therewith is avoided. The design of the valving in the package permits presetting at the factory with the adjustment screw on the manifold giving the fine adjustment necessary to take care of temperature variations or personal taste. Furthermore, it is important to note, when referring to Fig. 10 that the concentrate passes directly from the package into the cup. It has been well established, that mold growth is likely to occur with dilute syrup. With the disclosed dispensing arrangement the syrup is diluted only after leaving the dispenser. This offers great advantage over most prior art dispensers in which mixing took place within the machine and which could lead to unsanitary conditions.
  • It is possible to design the package according to different methods and several alternative constructions are illustrated in Figs. 11 to 18.
  • Referring to Figs. 11 and 12, in these drawings are shown two alternative sealing constructions to the seal arrangement 243/253 shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 10.
  • In the arrangement of Fig. 11 the dip tube 28X is provided with a reduced diameter valve portion 80X, and where the portion 80X widens to the larger diameter at the lower end thereof, it engages in a sealing fashion against an injection moulded plug 82X, sealingly and friction fitted in the package neck 12X. In use, when the cap 18X is rotated as described previously and moves away from the body 10X, the reduced diameter portion 80X moves to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 11, so that the concentrate can flow past the plug 82X, and the reduced diameter portion 80X of tube 28X and out of aperture 32X to meet the flowing carbonated water.
  • In the arrangement shown in Fig. 12, the tube 28X has a flexible bulbous portion 90X which sealingly engages the shoulder 13X of the package neck 12X, and when the cap 18X is rotated, as described previously, relative to the body 10X, the bulbous portion 90X changes shape as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 12, whereby the syrup can flow past the tube 28X and past the now deformed bulbous portion 90X and flow out aperture 32X. When the cap 18X is once more rotated in the opposite direction, in either the Figs. 11 or 12 embodiment, sealing is once more established between the tube 28X and the shoulder in the case of Fig. 11 embodiment or the bulbous portion 90X and shoulder 13X in the case of Fig. 12 embodiment.
  • The arrangement shown in Fig. 13 is essentially similar to that shown in Fig. 11 in that the tube 28X is again provided with a restriction 80X but in this case, the plug 82X, in the closed condition of the package, frictionally and sealingly engages the larger diameter portion of the tube 28X at the lower end thereof. As the cap 18X is rotated in a dispensing action (movement from the Fig. 6b to the 6c position), the apertured region of the plug 82X encircles the restriction 80X, creating fluid communication between the interior of the package and the outlet aperture 32X, so that syrup can flow from the package whilst carbonated water also flows as previously described. In each of the embodiments illustrated in Figs. 11 and 13, the cap 18X is not easily removable by virtue of the upper portion of the tube 28X being of enlarged diameter.
  • Turning now to Figs. 14 and 15, the embodiment of the invention of the package illustrated in these Figs. is different from the previously described arrangements, in that the cap is integral with the package body, but the operation of the package bears similarity to the operation of the arrangement described in Fig. 12. In the Figs. 14 and 15 arrangement, the body is again illustrated by numeral 10X, but numeral 120X illustrates an integral combined neck and cap, this cap being integrally connected to the container body 10X by means of an inwardly waisted portion 122X which sealingly engages a bulbous portion 90X of the tube 28X which again as shown is integral with the cap 120X. Again, the outlet aperture 32X is provided in the cap, but in addition the cap has outwardly directed integral bayonet pins 124X which slide through slots or keyways 41X and 43X in the members 193 and 191 (refer to Fig. 6) which replace slots 217 and 215. The slots 41X extend through the entire width of the member 193 whilst slots 43X extend only as far as circumferential cam slots 45X. Fig. 14 shows the arrangement immediately after the package has been inserted in the dispenser. When the member 191 is rotated so as to effect discharge of concentrate from the package as described herein by virtue of the pins 124X engaging in the circumferential cam slots 45X, the cap 120X is forced downwardly in Figs. 14 and 15 as indicated by arrow 126X causing the cap 120X to move away from the body 10X, the member 193 preventing any bodily movement of the package in a downwards direction. This action has the effect of lowering the tube 28X, and also of opening up the waisted portion 122X as shown clearly in Fig. 15 so that there is established a path of fluid communication as indicated by the arrows in Fig. 15 between the interior of the package and the outlet 32X, which condition will prevail when, as described herein, the other components of the dispenser cause discharge of the carbonated water simultaneously to produce a carbonated beverage in a container. The advantage of the package illustrated in Figs. 14 and 15 is that it can be sold as a completely sealed unit, outlet 32X being for example covered by means of a tear strip or rip cap, or it may be provided simply by forming a hole in the container before use in the machine to provide the outlet 32X. When the member 191 is rotated in the opposite direction by the spring 233, i.e., to terminate the flow of syrup and carbonated water, the resiliency of the waisted portion 122X assists in returning the cap 120X to the Fig. 14 position in which the bulbous portion 90X once more closes the interior of the package body from the outlet 32X, and flow of syrup ceases. It is appreciated that other embodiments of the invention based upon the principle described with reference to Figs. 14 and 15, can be devised. For example, the bulbous portion 90X may lie above the waisted portion 122X or indeed the tube 28X can be of a construction as shown in Fig. 11 or Fig. 13.
  • Instead of providing a split seal or other type of one way valve in conjunction with the dip tube 229, 28X or it is possible to provide the inner end of such tube with a "blow-off cap" such as shown in Fig. 7 which keeps the dip tube closed until it is used. Cap 9 is not present when a one way valve is used. As an alternative, cap 9 may be made of flexible material such as rubber with a slit to act as a check valve, which could be advantageously used in near sterile conditions to maintain an inert atmosphere. In such cases there may be a check valve in the carbon dioxide line which is opened only in response to a package being inserted in the dispenser.
  • In the already described embodiments of the invention, as related to the package, a propellent gas (C02) is used to drive the concentrate from the package through the outlet aperture, when the cap is displaced. it is also possible to arrange within the scope of the invention for the package to be a "gravity feed" dispensing device, and the embodiments of the invention of the package shown in Figs. 16 to 18 are the so-called gravity feed arrangements.
  • Referring to the embodiment shown in Figs. 16 and 17, the body of the package is represented by numeral 200X, and like the previous embodiments is provided with a reduced diameter neck portion 202X, the mouth of which forms a seal. The cap 204X is connected to the neck in a fashion similar to that already described, and is provided with a central tube 206X having a sealing shoulder 208X which, in the closed position of the package shown in Fig. 16, sealingly engages the reduced diameter neck portion 202X.
  • In addition, the said tube 206X is closed by means of a check valve in the form of a split seal 210X which, in the in-use position shown in Fig. 16 is opened by a venting nipple 212X in much the same manner as the Figs. 1 to 11 embodiment. As shown, in the in use position nipple 212X is sealed by 0-ring seal 217X to a cylindrical insert in cap 204X, which retains the split seal in place. The cap, similar to the previous embodiments, has a discharge outlet 214X for the dispensing of the flavouring concentrate therefrom.
  • The package described is operated in a manner similar to the described except that there is no supply of propellent gas to the inside of the package 200X. When the package is in the transportation condition, the split seal 210X is of course closed and the cap 204X closes the body 200X. When the package is to be used it is inverted as shown in Figs. 16 and 17, and is fitted to the appropriate part in the dispenser, and at the time of fitting the nipple 212X opens valve 210X. If now the cap 204X is rotated relative to the body 200X to cause the shoulder 208X to unseat from the neck portion 202X, the flavouring concentrate can run past the shoulder 208X and out of the aperture 214X. At the same time, as shown in Fig. 17 which shows the open position of the package, air is drawn into the interior of the package through the nipple 212X as represented by the bubbles 216X in Fig. 17 to make up for the liquid which flows from aperture 214X as indicated by arrow 218X in Fig. 17. Because of this arrangement, in fact the liquid is dispensed from aperture 214X under the influence of a constant head represented by the head H shown in Fig. 16, because at the top of the tube 206X there exists, and always exist, atmospheric pressure, and indeed in the head space, 220X in the package there exists a subatmospheric pressure, represented by the symbol-px which is less than atmospheric pressure.
  • The advantage of the construction shown in Figs. 16 and 17 is that no propellant source connection is required, and the package can much more readily be removed from the machine. Additionally, it is not necessary to vent the package prior to removal of same.
  • There is one possible difficulty with the arrangement of Figs. 16 and 17, which arises if the package is used in an environment in which there are significant temperature fluctuations. For example, if the temperature of the said environment increased, then the pressure in the head space 220X will increase due to expansion of the gas therein. This could cause back-flow of syrup through the vent tube 212X, which would be undesirable. In a modification therefore, as shown in Fig. 18, the package is provided with an internal compensating vessel 222X, which is an inverted, closed cup, integral with the reduced neck portion 202X,. but provided with a compensating aperture 224X, connecting the interior of the compensating vessel with the interior of the package body 200X. It is to be noted that the compensating vessel 222X and the reduced neck portion 202X are integral, but form a separate unit from the body 200X. The unit is in fact frictionally and sealingly engaged in the neck of the body 200X. The mode of the operation of the package shown in Fig. 18 is that when the package is closed, as shown in Fig. 18, the liquid inside the body 200X flows through aperture 224X and fills up the inverted compensating vessel to the level 226X which is coincident with the uppermost point of the aperture 224X. Atmospheric pressure prevails at said level 226X by virtue of the connection to atmosphere through the nipple 212X which means that the sum of the pressures hx being the head of liquid above the said liquid 226X and the pressure in the head space 220X will equal atmospheric. The liquid will therefore be dispensed from around the tube 206X, when the package is open for the dispensing of liquid through the aperture 214X. With this arrangement, if there is a change in temperature, for example to cause the gas in the head space 200X to expand, this expansion is accommodated for by an increase of the level 226X within the compensating chamber, and there will be no unwanted discharge of liquid through the vent tube 212X.
  • The packages according to the invention have particular application in the dispensing of carbonated beverages from small dispensers as described herein, and designed for in-home use, and a further and particular advantage of the invention is that the package and its contents can be removed from the equipment at any time, and the rotary valve can receive a further package containing concentrate of a different flavour. The packages are preferably designed to be of the throw-away variety, and to this end the components thereof are preferably constructed from plastics material.
  • Various modifications may be made without parting from the scope of the invention, and the examples described are only specific embodiments of constructions of packages.
  • Figs. 19-25c illustrate some possible modifications of the present invention with respect to the valving action. In these embodiments, operation in all other respects than discussed will be the same as previously described. Only the parts of the valving mechanism which are different will be discussed in detail.
  • Fig. 19 illustrates a particularly simple embodiment of the invention. Shown is a package with a body e 505 with tabs 507 thereon for insertion in a rotary valve, of the type previously described in connection with Fig. 4 for example. On the end of the neck of the body, which terminates in a planar annular portion 509, is snapped a cap 511 with a tab 513 adapted to insert in a slot in a rotatable valve member of the type described above. The cap is shown as having a dip tube 514 extending therefrom to permit the introduction of the pressurizing gas in the manner described above. Cap 511 has a hole or opening 519 therethrough which forms the dispensing outlet. The annular surface of the body also contains a hole 521 better seen in Fig. 20. As is evident from an examination of Fig. 20, rotation of the tab 513 in the direction of arrow 523 through a predetermined angle will result in the alignment of the holes 519 and 521 to bring about dispensing. Control of the amount dispensed can be brought about by controlling the size of the opening 521 and/or preferably by the overlap of the openings 521 and 519. With this embodiment, it is noted that adjustment through the use of an adjustment ring although possible cannot be carried out as well as in the embodiments previously described.
  • Fig. 21 illustrates a further embodiment of the present invention employing a package with a body 605. On the end thereof is a cap 611 quite similar to the cap 511 shown in Fig. 19. The cap however, contains a semi-cylindrical projecting portion 613 along one side thereof. This forms a channel 615 which constitutes the dispensing outlet. Extending through the wall of the cap and leading into the channel 615 is an opening 617. The neck of the body 605 also contains an opening 619. Movement of the cap in the direction of the arrow 621 results in alignment of the two holes to permit the concentrate to be dispensed through the openings 619 and 617 and the channel 615. A key 622 on bottle 605 inserts in a keyway 623 on cap 611 to prevent rotation.
  • Fig. 23 illustrates an embodiment in which a package body 705 has a conventional thread 707 on its neck. Screwed onto the thread 707 is a cap 709, of the same general type described in connection with Figs. 8 to 10, the primary difference being that the cap and neck contain matching threads rather than cooperating nibs and slots. In all other respects, the construction of the body and cap will be essentially the same. In other words, an insert in the body neck will be provided and the cap will have a projecting portion cooperating with the insert to form a valve. As previously described, an opening is formed into the cap to permit the dispensing of the liquid. The body 705 possesses tabs 711 and is inserted into appropriately shaped slots 714 in a fixed part of the rotary valve mechanism. Similarly, as in the previously discussed embodiments, the cap 709 contains a tab 713. This slides into a slot 715 in the rotatable valve member 189a. However, slot 715, unlike the slots in the previous embodiment, permits movement of the rotary valve member 189a with respect to the cap 709 between positions corresponding to the positions of Figs. 6a and 6b. This is accomplished by forming the slot 715 so as to have a vertical portion 717 to allow insertion of the cap of the package and a horizontal portion 719. A further vertical portion 721 is provided for a reason to be described below. Thus, initial rotation of the rotating valve member 189a will result in no movement of the cap. The tab 713 will slide in the horizontal portion of the slot 719. Positions corresponding to those of Figs. 6a and 6b are shown by Figs. 25a and 25b. In the view of Fig. 25a, the tab 713 is at the bottom of the vertical slot 717. During the first part of the motion, the tab slides in the slot 719 until it comes into abutment with the edge 723. This corresponds to the position of Fig. 6b. Now, further rotation of the rotating part 189a will carry the tab 713 with it and will begin to unscrew the cap 709 from the body neck to open the valve in the manner described above. This is indicated by the position shown in Fig. 26c. When this occurs, as the cap is unscrewed it will move downward, and the tab will move downward into the vertical portion 721. Now, when it is desired to return the valve to the closed position, the surface 725 will act against the other side of the tab 713 screw to the cap 709 back onto the neck of the package, by means of the threads 707, to close the valve. Further rotation will disengage tab 713 from slot 721 and allow it to slide in slot 719. In this embodiment, and in other embodiments, it is possible to form the necessary slots in the cap or body respectively and to dispose and to place the necessary tabs on the valve parts. It will be recognized that equivalent operation will be obtained.
  • Finally, in the various embodiments, it is generally indicated that dispensing is accomplished by rotating a handle such as the handle 191 of Figs. 6a-6c. In many instances, it might be desired to simply press a glass, into which dispensing is to take place, against an actuator such as is common in water dispensing apparatus in restaurants. The present invention can be adapted to such simply by providing conventional . means for converting motion of this nature into the rotary motion needed to rotate the rotating valve member 189 of the valve. It is believed that such linkages are well within the scope of those skilled in the art and will not be described in detail herein. Modifications of the nature just described and other modifications can be made without departing from the spirit of the present invention.
  • In each embodiment there is control of the degree of opening of the package valve. Control of the degree of opening the valve is necessary for a number of reasons. In the first place, different concentrates will have different viscosities. Thus, assuming the use of diluent at a predetermined constant rate and where, to get a properly flavoured drink, a certain amount of concentrate must be mixed with that diluent, different degrees of openings will be necessary in order to accommodate the different flow characteristics of different concentrates due to their different viscosities, that flow being under essentially constant pressure. Secondly, changes in environmental conditions, particularly temperature can effect the viscosity and may require further adjustment. Finally, although standards have been set with respect to the mixing of a diluent and concentrate such as the mixing of a syrup and carbonated water, which standards are used in making bottled drinks, personal tastes do differ and someone using the package of the present invention in a dispenser may wish to adjust it to his own personal taste.
  • The last two types of adjustments mentioned are adjustments which must be done at the dispenser. The first type of adjustment i.e., adjustment to take into account different viscosities can be accomplished either through proper dimensioning of the package parts or through a combination of dimensioning of the package parts and an adjustment in the dispensing valve in the dispenser with which the package is used Providing such control by means of dimensioning at the package is thought to be preferable. This is because it requires no further adjustment by the user other than to accommodate that variation. The dispensing valve with which the package cooperates can then be constructed so as to bring about a pre-established amount of movement of the first and second parts with respect to each other utilizing the means provided on the package for effecting the movement of these first and second parts. In such a case, these means for effecting the movement will be so constructed and dimensioned that for this pre-established amount of movement the separation of the two valve parts will give the desired degree of opening forthe particular concentrate contained within the package. Alternatively, the packages may well be dimensioned identically and the dispensing valve with which it cooperates made adjustable in order to allow different amounts of motion depending on the concentrate in use. This, of course, would require a step on the part of the user of setting the valve for the particular concentrate to be used. It would, however, simplify manufacture of the packages since all could be identical.
  • Although certain embodiments of the present invention are disclosed in which the means for introducing an essentially constant head pressure include means for introducing ambient air at a constant head pressure, the preferred embodiment is one in which dispensing takes place under the pressure of a pressurizing gas. In such a case, it is necessary that means be provided for supplying the pressurizing gas to the package after it has been inserted into the dispensing valve of the dispenser. Although, it would be possible for this to be a separate connection to the package fed through a separate line and shutoff valve, in the embodiments of the present invention disclosed in detail, pressurizing takes place under control of the same valve which controls the dispensing operation. This valve, which as previously indicated, cooperates with the means for effecting movement of the first and second parts, in the case of a pressurizing gas, of necessity, includes a first position where the pressurizing gas supply is cut off, a second position where the pressurizing gas supply is available, and the dispensing valve has acted on the means for effecting movement of the first and second parts with respect to each other to open the valve in the package and is at the same time opening a passage for the supply of diluent to be mixed with the concentrate in the package. Since the dispensing valve is operatively coupled to the package in each of these positions it is necessary that movement of this valve between the first position where the pressurizing gas is not available, i.e., shut off, permitting insertion and removal of the package, and the second position, where the pressurizing gas is pressurizing the concentrate but dispensing has not yet taken place, requires that there be provisions either in the valve or in the package for permitting this movement without opening the valve in the package. In the preferred embodiment, this is accomplished by cooperating surfaces of the two valve parts in the package. However, an alternate embodiment is disclosed in which such is accomplished within the dispensing valve.
  • The first and second valve parts can take any one of a number of different forms. For example, the two valve parts may comprise two disc-like members rotatable with respect to each other, each disc containing an opening therein, one opening in communication with the volume of concentrate in the container and the other opening in communication with the outlet. The degree of overlap of two openings and/or the size of the smaller of the two openings will determine the flow rate of concentrate. Thus, for example in such an embodiment the opening in the second valve part which contains the outlet could be made relatively large and the opening in the other package part could be made of a size to meter the desired amount of concentrate. Movement of the two openings into alignment with each other, in response to a preset degree of movement of the two package parts with respect to each other, would thus result in metering the desired amount of concentrate. The disadvantage of an embodiment of this nature is that it does not easily permit additional control to take into account temperature variations or the taste of the user. Similarly, rather than utilizing rotating movement in which two holes are aligned by rotation one can carry out a linear movement of for example a cap with respect to the neck of a package body each containing therein a hole. Again, the movement would be of a predetermined amount to align the two holes to cause flow of the concentrate.
  • An alternative embodiment for the dispenser is illustrated in Fig. 26. In some cases it may be desired to have the dispensing valve at a sink. In such a case the remainder of the above described dispenser would be disposed below the sink. In such a case, the valve would, of course, not be part of the manifold 73. Rather, referring, for example, to Fig. 4, the lines 113 and 99 would be brought out from the manifold through suitable fittings 104 and 118 similarto fittings 129 and 131, described above, containing check valves. A quick disconnect coupling such as the coupling 89 may mate to these fittings with tubing extending from the coupling to inlets at the rotary valve 76c. Valve 76C is disposed on the end of an angled arm 502 with a package 81 placed thereon. The arm is supported for rotation above a sink 504. For example, the opening in the sink normally used for a spray attachment can be used. When not in use, the arm 502 may be rotated counterclockwise to move the dispensing valve and package out of the way into a locked position. When it is desired to dispense, the arm 502 is moved to the position shown and dispensing will take place over the sink so that any spillage or drips will be caught in the sink. Preferably, the arm 502 and at least the visible parts of the valve 76C in this case will be made of a material to match the sink fittings. Operation of the valve 76C in conjunction with the package 81 in all other respects will be the same as described above.
  • In this embodiment, and in the previously described embodiments, the rate of flow of the diluent can be controlled either by dimensioning of the size of the diluent tubing or passages e.g., passages 103, or by the insertion of a limiting orifice, for example, at the inner end of the stub 131.

Claims (19)

1. A package for use in a beverage dispenser comprising:
a body (238) for containing a quantity of flavouring concentrate to be dispensed and having a bottom, side wall means and a top; a cap (230) closing the top of the body (238);
a seal region (243) defined by a first seal element in the top of the body and a second seal element (251) on the cap which sealingly engages said first seal element (243) to prevent except when required the concentrate from passing the seal region; and
means (271, 273) mounting the cap (230) on the body for movement relative to the body to enable the first and second seal elements (243, 251) to be displaced relatively to permit the concentrate to flow past the seal region when the package is in inverted condition;
characterised by aperture means (265) in the cap (230) enabling the concentrate which flows past the seal region to flow from the cap (230) to be caught in a drinking vessel; and
means (229) in the package opening into the interior of the body of the package at a location spaced from said cap (230) and forming a passage (229) to enable the fluid communication of the interior of the body of the package to a pressurizing fluid or atmosphere for driving or enabling this flow of concentrate from the aperture means (265) in a predetermined fashion when the first and second seal elements (239, 252) are displaced relatively.
2. A package according to Claim 1, characterised in that the passage (229) is in the cap (230) and includes a check valve (260) which can be opened by a member (227) to establish said fluid communication.
3. A package according to Claim 1 or 2 characterised by a quantity of concentrate to be dispensed contained in the body.
4. A package according to any preceding Claim characterised in that the body has a neck (247) at the top on which the cap (230) is rotatably mounted, and including cam projections (271) and grooves (273) mounting the cap (230) on the neck, said cam projections (231) and grooves (273) permitting an initial purely rotational movement of the cap (230) on the neck followed by a helical movement of the cap (230) on the neck which effects the relative displacement in the form of a separation of the seal elements (239, 252).
5. A package according to any preceding Claim, characterised in that the passage (229) comprises a tube (229) integral with and extending from the cap (230) into the interior of the package.
6. A package according to Claim 5, characterised in that on the inner end of the tube (229) is a blow-off cap (9), an intermediate portion (251) of the tube (229) having a shoulder defining the second seal element (252), and the outer end being openable through the cap (230).
7. A package according to Claim 5 or 6, characterised in that the package includes a compensating vessel (222X) comprising a closed, inverted cup into which the said tube extends and the interior of the body (200X) communicates with the interior of the compensating vessel through an aperture (224X) at the top edge of the compensating vessel (222X).
8. A package according to any preceding Claim, characterised in that the body has first drive means (507) and the cap has second drive means (513) for engagement with receiving members of a dispenser with which the package is to be used.
9. A package according to any preceding Claim, characterised in that the body (238) has a neck at the top thereof which is closed by the said cap (230) and the first sealing element (239) is defined internally of the neck by a reduced cross-section, conical neck portion (239).
10. The combination of a dispenser for dispensing beverages and a disposable package according to Claim 1, said dispenser being characterised by a holder (181, 189, 193, 201) for holding the said package in inverted condition, a movable valve member (189) of said holder for displacing the cap (230) relative to the body (238), to cause flow of concentrate therefrom whereby the concentrate is dispensed into space . and can be caught in a drinking vessel.
11. The combination according to Claim 10, characterised in that the dispenser includes diluent outlet means (237) enabling the dispensing of diluent from said outlet means, whereby diluent is dispensed from the outlet simultaneously with the dispensing of the concentrate and can be caught therewith in the drinking vessel.
12. The combination according to Claim 11, characterised in that the diluent is carbonated water, said dispenser including a carbonator (61) and a supply (68) of carbon dioxide under pressure, a carbon dioxide valve (227) engageable with the package cap when the package is in position in the dispenser to pressurize the interior of the package, the supply of carbon dioxide also serving to propel the diluent carbonated water, to the diluent outlet.
13. The combination according to Claim 10,11 or 12, characterised in that the movable valve member (189) is rotatable to effect the relative displacement between the cap and body.
14. The combination according to Claim 13, characterised in that the movable valve member (189) is rotatable to effect the relative displacement between the cap and body, and the cap has external projection means (513), which engage recess means (215) in said valve member (189) to establish a drive connection therebetween, and there is a cam (271) and cam groove (273) connection between the cap (230) and body (238) whereby upon initial turning of the said valve member (189) the cap (230) is moved in a purely rotary movement followed by helical movement which displaces the cap relative to the body to open the sealing elements (239, 252).
15. The combination according to Claim 14, characterised in that during the secondary movement of said valve member (189) enabling the dispensing of the carbonated water connection is made to connect the carbonator (61) and the carbonated water outlet (237), which remains so connected during the helical movement of the cap.
16: The combination according to Claim 15, characterised in the package is adapted to be fitted to the holder (181, 189, 193, 201) when the holder is in a first position, and in said first position the interior of the package is vented to atmosphere, and the valve member (189) is adjustable to second and third positions, and in the second position the interior of the package is connected to the supply of carbon dioxide gas to pressurize the package, but there is no flow of concentrate from the package, nor a flow of diluent from the diluent outlet, whilst in the third position the supply of carbon dioxide gas is connected to the interior of the package, the package seal is open so that concentrate flows from the package, and diluent flows from the diluent outlet (237).
17. The combination according to Claim 16, characterised in that the holder (181,189,193,201) and diluent outlet (237) are arranged so that the concentrate and diluent flows, when the valve member (189) is in the third position, intersect in free space.
18. The combination according to any of Claims 10 to 17, characterised in that the dispenser has two holders (181, 189, 193, 201) each adapted to receive one of said packages, the movable valve members-(189) of said holders being received in a common manifold plate (77) which contains passages for the propellent gas supplies, when provided, the diluent supplies, and vent passages when provided.
19. The combination according to any of Claims 10 to 17, characterised in that the or each package has a split seal in the cap (230) through which said fluid communication is established, the said seal being opened by a member (227) upon the package being placed in operative position on the holder (181, 189, 193, 201).
EP19800200611 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 A package for use in a beverage dispenser Expired EP0022589B1 (en)

Priority Applications (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB7924162 1979-07-11
GB7924162 1979-07-11
US14069880A true 1980-04-16 1980-04-16
US14068580A true 1980-04-16 1980-04-16
US140685 1980-04-16
US140698 1980-04-16

Applications Claiming Priority (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AT80200611T AT26814T (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 A container for use in a getraenkeausgabeeinrichtung.
DE19803072063 DE3072063D1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Liquid dispensers
AT84113306T AT31709T (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Fluid dispensing apparatus.
DE19803072168 DE3072168D1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Beverage dispenser
DE19803072096 DE3072096D1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Beverage dispenser

Related Child Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP83105649.4 Division-Into 1980-06-26
EP84113017.2 Division-Into 1980-06-26
EP84113306.9 Division-Into 1980-06-26

Publications (3)

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EP0022589A2 EP0022589A2 (en) 1981-01-21
EP0022589A3 EP0022589A3 (en) 1982-04-07
EP0022589B1 true EP0022589B1 (en) 1987-04-29

Family

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Family Applications (5)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP19840113306 Expired EP0159399B1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Liquid dispensers
EP87109913A Withdrawn EP0250003A1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Beverage dispenser
EP19800200611 Expired EP0022589B1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 A package for use in a beverage dispenser
EP19830105649 Expired EP0100414B1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Beverage dispenser
EP19840113017 Expired EP0175815B1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Beverage dispenser

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP19840113306 Expired EP0159399B1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Liquid dispensers
EP87109913A Withdrawn EP0250003A1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Beverage dispenser

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP19830105649 Expired EP0100414B1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Beverage dispenser
EP19840113017 Expired EP0175815B1 (en) 1979-07-11 1980-06-26 Beverage dispenser

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EP (5) EP0159399B1 (en)
DE (1) DE3071958D1 (en)
ES (5) ES8105676A1 (en)

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EP0097843B1 (en) * 1982-06-29 1987-07-22 Cadbury Schweppes Plc In-home drink dispenser
US4306667A (en) * 1979-10-12 1981-12-22 The Coca-Cola Company Post-mix beverage dispensing system syrup package, valving system, and carbonator therefor
US4357284A (en) * 1981-06-26 1982-11-02 Coca Cola Company CO2 Supply system for a carbonator device
EP0080253B1 (en) * 1981-11-12 1990-01-31 The Coca-Cola Company Post-mix beverage dispenser
US4493441A (en) * 1981-11-12 1985-01-15 The Coca-Cola Company Portable post-mix beverage dispenser unit
US4570830A (en) * 1983-06-28 1986-02-18 Cadbury Schweppes, Plc Gravity dispenser
EP0223209A3 (en) * 1985-11-20 1988-10-05 Cadbury Schweppes Plc In-home drink dispenser
EP0246052A1 (en) * 1986-05-10 1987-11-19 Cadbury Schweppes Limited Improvements relating to beverage dispensers
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ES499735A0 (en) 1982-05-01
EP0175815A3 (en) 1987-04-15
DE3071958D1 (en) 1987-06-04
ES509096D0 (en)
EP0159399B1 (en) 1988-01-07
ES493281D0 (en)
EP0022589A3 (en) 1982-04-07
EP0100414A2 (en) 1984-02-15
EP0175815A2 (en) 1986-04-02
EP0100414B1 (en) 1988-06-01
ES509216A0 (en) 1983-06-01
ES509216D0 (en)
ES8401419A1 (en) 1983-12-01
ES499736A0 (en) 1982-09-01
ES509096A0 (en) 1983-12-01
ES499735D0 (en)
EP0250003A1 (en) 1987-12-23
ES8204694A1 (en) 1982-05-01
ES8207093A1 (en) 1982-09-01
EP0159399A1 (en) 1985-10-30
ES8105676A1 (en) 1981-06-16
ES499736D0 (en)
ES8306575A1 (en) 1983-06-01
EP0100414A3 (en) 1985-10-30
EP0175815B1 (en) 1989-11-23
ES493281A0 (en) 1981-06-16
EP0022589A2 (en) 1981-01-21

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