AU645282B2 - Automated dispensing and diluting system - Google Patents

Automated dispensing and diluting system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
AU645282B2
AU645282B2 AU69410/91A AU6941091A AU645282B2 AU 645282 B2 AU645282 B2 AU 645282B2 AU 69410/91 A AU69410/91 A AU 69410/91A AU 6941091 A AU6941091 A AU 6941091A AU 645282 B2 AU645282 B2 AU 645282B2
Authority
AU
Australia
Prior art keywords
sample
nozzle
nozzle tip
way valve
pump
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Ceased
Application number
AU69410/91A
Other versions
AU6941091A (en
Inventor
Kohei Ishida
Ei Mochida
Hiroshi Obi
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Mochida Seiyaku KK
Original Assignee
Mochida Seiyaku KK
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to JP2009183A priority Critical patent/JPH087222B2/en
Priority to JP2-9183 priority
Application filed by Mochida Seiyaku KK filed Critical Mochida Seiyaku KK
Publication of AU6941091A publication Critical patent/AU6941091A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of AU645282B2 publication Critical patent/AU645282B2/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Ceased legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N35/00Automatic analysis not limited to methods or materials provided for in any single one of groups G01N1/00 - G01N33/00; Handling materials therefor
    • G01N35/10Devices for transferring samples or any liquids to, in, or from, the analysis apparatus, e.g. suction devices, injection devices
    • G01N35/1081Devices for transferring samples or any liquids to, in, or from, the analysis apparatus, e.g. suction devices, injection devices characterised by the means for relatively moving the transfer device and the containers in an horizontal plane
    • G01N35/109Devices for transferring samples or any liquids to, in, or from, the analysis apparatus, e.g. suction devices, injection devices characterised by the means for relatively moving the transfer device and the containers in an horizontal plane with two horizontal degrees of freedom
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N1/00Sampling; Preparing specimens for investigation
    • G01N1/28Preparing specimens for investigation including physical details of (bio-)chemical methods covered elsewhere, e.g. G01N33/50, C12Q
    • G01N1/38Diluting, dispersing or mixing samples
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N1/00Sampling; Preparing specimens for investigation
    • G01N1/28Preparing specimens for investigation including physical details of (bio-)chemical methods covered elsewhere, e.g. G01N33/50, C12Q
    • G01N1/38Diluting, dispersing or mixing samples
    • G01N2001/382Diluting, dispersing or mixing samples using pistons of different sections
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N35/00Automatic analysis not limited to methods or materials provided for in any single one of groups G01N1/00 - G01N33/00; Handling materials therefor
    • G01N35/10Devices for transferring samples or any liquids to, in, or from, the analysis apparatus, e.g. suction devices, injection devices
    • G01N35/1009Characterised by arrangements for controlling the aspiration or dispense of liquids
    • G01N2035/1025Fluid level sensing

Description

COMPLETE SPECIFICATION FOR OFFICE USE Application Number: Lodged: Class: Int. Class: Complete Specification Lodged: Accepted: Published: Priority: Related Art: *4o TO BE COMPLETED BY APPLICANT Name of Applicant MOCHIDA PHARMACEUTICAL CO., LTD.

Address of Applicant: 7, Yotsuya 1-chome, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan Actual Inventors: Hiroshi OBI, Kohei ISHIDA and Ei MOCHIDA Address for Service: SMITH SHELSTON BEADLE 207 Riversdale Road (P O Box 410) Hawthorn Victoria 3122 Australia *(Attorney Code SA) Complete Specification for the invention entitled: AUTOMATED DISPENSING AND DILUTING SYSTEM The following statement is a full description of this invention, including the best method of performing it known" to us: Page 1 Page 1 Our Ref: #6562 JC:MW:WB -Ia- This invention relates to an automated system for dispensing and diluting a sample, which is capable of dispensing an accurate volume of the sample. More 5 particularly, this invention relates to a system which is c capable of collecting an accurate volume of the sample by an accurate detection of the sample liquid surface, and which is capable of introducing all of the thus collectd accurate volume of ,the sample together with a diluting solution into I0 the reaction vessel to thereby consistently enable an accurate volume of the sample to be dispensed.

In the fields of clinical examination, biochemistry, biotechnology, chemical analysis and the like wherein tests Of*s involving chemical reactions are frequently carried out to determine the results, various attempts have been made to automate the process of tests and measurements. In'-juch tests and measurements, numerous types of samples each having little volume must be treated, and-therefore, a step of dispensing, which involves a collection of a predetermined volume of the sample by suction, is inevitable. For example, in an immunoassay utilizing an antigen-antibody reaction, a specimen such as serum, plasma, urine and other body fluids -2collected from a living body is repeatedly dispensed into a number of reaction vessels, and the thus dispensed specimens a.e mixed or diluted with a reagent before the test results may be obtained. As described above, in the above-mentioned fields, numerous types of specimens must be repeatedly dispensed and diluted with reagents, and therefore, a number of attempts have been made to' automate various steps of the Sdispensing.

In order to automate the dispensing step, an accurate O10 detection of the liquid sample surface in the sample container is critical, since, in the automatic dispensing, the nozzle tip has to be inserted into the sample liquid to a S predetermined depth to collect a predetermined volume of the sample into the nozzle tip. An inaccurate detection of the S* liquid surface in the container may result in a decreased dispensing precision. For example, when the liquid surface detected is higher than the actual surface, the depth of the nozzle tip inserted into the liquid would be decreased and ':*air may be sucked into the nozzle tip to result in a ;0 significant decrease of the dispensing precision. On the contrary, when the liquid surface detected is lower than the actual surface and the nozzle tip is inserted into the sample solution further than the predetermined depth, an increased volume of the sample attached to the outer surface of the

K,

1 -3nozzle tip would be introduced into the reaction container, and also, the pressure exerted to the gas within the nozzle /i tip by the sample solution would be increased to change the gas volume within the nozzle tip to affect the volume of the sample collected. Consequently, the dispensing precision would be decreased.

Accordingly,, various methods for detecting the liquid surface as well as the system used therefoj have been proposed together with sampling and dispensing methods and the systetsriused therefor.

The prior art 9.

t discloses an automatic-dispenser wherein a negative pressure is applied to a cylinder which is in communication with a nozzle tip, and the surface of the sample liquid is detected

S**

IS by using a pressure difference induced between atmosphere and the interior of the nozzle tip upon contact of the nozzle tip with the surface of the liquid sample, and thereafter, a S predetermined volume of the sample is collected by using the negative pressure of the cylinder.

o The prior art also discl s a dispenser wherein a collection of the liquid sample by suction is started in response to a change of the pressure within the nozzle before and after th contact of the lower end of the nozzle tip with. the liquid sample surface, and the volume of the sample dispensed is determined on the bases of Sthe pressure within the nozzle after collecting the sample Sfor a predetermined time.

The prior art further discloses a liquid surface-detector wherein air is discharged and sucked through a nozzle by a pump, and liquid surface is detected by a change of the pressure within the nozzle upon V1 contact of the nozzle with the liquid surface. The discharge and the suction of the liquid surface-detecting air is carried out with a suction pump used for collecting the sample.

The prior art further discloses a sampling system wherein air is discharged and sucked through a sampling nozzle by a compressor, and liquid 15 surface is detected on'the bases of a change of the pressure within the sampling nozzle upon access or contact of the r!pling nozzle with the liquid surface, and thereafter, the mp e solution is collected through the sampling nozzle with suction by using a plunger pump.

In the above-me;,tioned conventional liquid surfacedetectors a the liquid dispensers, the suction of the o 96 sample liqid is carried out after the liquid surface ietection by\xeducing the pressure of the air used for the iiquid surface detection in the nozzle, cylinder, gas 6 V

I

0 1 l conduit, pump and the like t exert a negative pressure to the sample liquid to thereby suck the sample liquid into the nozzle. Since the air is a compressible fluid, pressure control during the suction is quite difficult. More illustratively, the state of the air at the completion of the sample collection may vary in accordance with the volume and the pressure of the air, and the volume of the sample liquid collected rendering an accurate control of the volume of the sample collected difficult. In particular, a consistent, S.t. O repeated suction of a small volume of sample with little variation from sample to sample as well as from system to system is quite difficult to achieve with the conventional dispenser system.

Een if an accurate volume of the sample liquid were collected into the nozzle tip, the thus collected sample must be discharged into a reaction vessel such as a test tube for the'subsequent reaction or measurement of, for example, con6entration, and upon such a discharge, a considerable S* amount of the sample liquid will remain attached to the XO nozzle tip to make it difficult to discharg, all of the sample liquid in the nozzle tip. Consequently, the volume of the sample discharged would be inaccurate. For dispensing an 'atcurate volume of the sample, the volume of the sample collected by suction into the nozzle tip must be determined -6by taking nto account he volume of the sample which will remain 'attAChd to thr; zle tip upon discharge of the '.sample from the noz.le tip, and this would require a troublesome step oi preliminarily wetting the nozzle tip with the( mple t6 be dspens d.

Furthermore, the dispenser is primarily irtended for dispensing the sample. Therefore, when a dilution of the sample, in particular, an accurate dilution of the sample is required, the once dispensed sample has ti be diluted with a i0 diluting reagent by dispensing the reagent.

A system which is capable of carrying out both the Sdispensing and the diluting steps is commercially available.

9. This commercially available system, however, requires a manual liquid surface-detection, which may lead to a SUMMRY OF THE INVENTON 9e' vriatioinobject of the present inventionis to obviate the above-deseribed technical problems and provide a system for fusystem is not fully automatdispensing a sample in a liqampuid container to reaction vessels or measurement vessels h as a test.

d fully automatically dispensing a sample in a sample container to reaction vessels or measurement vessels ih as a test tube and dilute the thus dispensed sample with a reagent.

FR s *S -7- Another object of the present invention is to provide a system which is capable of accurately dispensing and diluting the sample even when the sample volume is small. According to a first aspect of the invention, there is provided an automated system for dispensing and diluting a sample comprising a removable nozzle tip for collecting a predetermined volume of the sample, the nozzle tip being inserted into the sample to collect the sample liquid by suction; a nozzle comprising an outer tube onto which said nozzle tip is removably :mounted and an inner tube disposed in said outer tube, said nozzle having a liquid passage defined within the inner tube for al wing a reagent to flow therethrough and a gas passage defined between the inner tube and the outer tube for allowing a liquid surface-detecting gas to flow therethrough, said liquid passage and said gas passage being in communication with an interior of said nozzle tip; a sample pump for sucking and discharging reagent into and out of the sample pump and for sucking and discharging the sample into and out of the nozzle tip, said suction and discharge of the sample being mediated by the reagent; i fa first three-way valve located in an array of tubings connecting said sample ump, said nozzle and a reagent bottle, said first three-way valve being switchable between one position for communicating said reagent bottle with said sample pump i 20 and another position for communicating said sample pump with said nozzle; a, plu ger pump adapted to be connected to a gas source for sucking and discharging the liquid surface-detecting gas supplied from the gas source; a second three-way valve located in an array of tubings connecting said o plunger pump, said nozzle and said gas source, said second three-way valve being 25 switchable between one position for communicating said gas source with said plunger pump and another position or communicating said plunger pump with the nozzle; a pressure senpr provided between said second three-way valve d said gas passage in said nozzle to produce a sigal upon detection of a change in gas pressure 96. within the gas passage caused by contact or access of said nozzle tip witt a surface Sl 4 AWM: 6562 8 8 NWnbCT 1993 -8of the sample liquid; and a two-way valve positioned adjacent the nozzle at a position between said pressure sensor and said gas passage in said nozzle, said two-way valve being positioned closer to said nozzle tha. to said pressure sensor.

According to a second aspect of the present invention, there is provided a system according to the first aspect of the invention further comprising a controller for controlling said first three-way valve, said second three-way valve and said wo-way yalve in response to signals from said pressure sensor; and acontroller for controlling said sample pump and said plunger pump ii response to signals from said pressure sensor.

so -as S C

WOOS*

S 7 I 0 I I- M W S S- ?o b 19 r Wl i.

Vi.V ^Mt'Qy MAW'SM:#6562 8 NOvcmbcr M C.1; -9- According to a third aspect of the invention, there is ,provided a system according to the first or second aspect of the invention further comprising an X-Y table comprising a sample section wherein one or more containers accommodating said sample are aligned in rows, a nozzle tip section wherein oie or more said nozzle tips are aligned in rows, and a test tube section wherein one or more test tubes into which said sample is dispensed are aligned in rows; io a means for traveling said nozzle in vertical direction; San X-Y traveling means for moving said vertically traveling means in transverse X-Y directions over said X-Y table, said X-Y traveling means supporting said vertically traveling means; and o 'l1s5 a means for supporting said X-Y traveling means.

In the above-described three aspects of the present invention, the nozzle tip may preferably be a disposable nozzle tip, and the liquid surface-detecting gas may preferably be air.

X0 DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic view of an automated dispensing and diluting system according to an embodiment of the present invention;

K

fl S~ *500 0 00000S 4;

S

0.55 SO 0 0 S 4 155 0

*SSOSS

S S 5550 5- 5 S5

S

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of an automated dispensing and--diluting system according to an embodiment of the present invention; and ,IG. 3 is top plana view of an X-Y table employed Ain the automated dispensing and di4u-ting system according to an, embodiment of the present invenition. p; Before explaining the embodiments of the invention detail, iti ob nesodthat the invention is not I.-rnited in' itsl application to the details of construction al~Xd 10 the arrangremeritf components as set forth in the following description or as-ilJiustrated in the ccompanying drawings.

The invention is capable of other embodiments and qf being pracj-Iqed'or 'barried,out in various ways.

a~DESCRIPTION OF THE PREPER1ED EMBODIMENT.

0 s as

S

505S

C

S

SSSSeS 6 5 b An automated system for dispppsing and q.iluting a sample 0 0; in accordance with 0 the present invention is hereinafter d~scribed in detail,.by referring to a preferred embodie n t illustrated in t he accomdpanying drawings.

Referri~g to -TI d. 1, there is sch'ematically illustrated an autom~ated disf ,nsing and diluting system 10 according to first ard seqpnd aspects of the present invention.

As shown in FIG. 1e the automated dispensing,6and diluting 4,isystem 10 in accordance witLh %the present invention

,I.

-Ii- 00i 0 0@ 000 0 0 000

OS

0SB 0 comprises a nozzle tip 12, a nozzle 14, a sample pump 16 comprising a plunger 16a and a cylinder 16b, a first threeway valve 18, a plunger pump 20 comprising a plunger 20a and a cylinder 20b, a second three-way valve 22, a pre sure sensor 24, a two-way valve 26, adf flexible tubings 28 and 30. The automated dispensing and diluting system 10 may further comprise a controller 32.

SThe nozzle tip 12 may have any desired configuration and I any desired inner volume insofar as the nozzle tip 12 is 10 tapered at its lower end portion to hold a predetermined volume of a sample 11 therein. Preferably, the nozzle tip 12 is removably mounted onto the nozzle 14, and therefore, the S nozzle tQp 12 aay preferably be a disposable nozzle tip. The v'lume of the sample 11 sucked in the nozzle tip 12 may be 5 determined by suitably selecting the inner volume of the sample pump 16, which is defined by the plunger 16a and the cylinder 16b.

The nozzle 14 comprises an inner tube and an outer tube.

I A liquid passage 14a is defined within the inner tube, and a o0 regen- 13 flows through the liquid passage 14a. A gas passage 2?b is defined beeen the inner tuhe and the outer tube, and a liquid surface-detecting gas 15, which is preferably air, flows through the gas passage 14b. The outer tube 14 is provided with a nozzle tip-mounting portion 14c at S 0 -12its lower end. The nozzle 14 is provided a. its -upperl end with:i an inlet 14d for the liquid passage 14a ~and an inlet 14e for the gas passage 14b. As described above, the nozzle tip 12 is removably mounted on the nozzle 14 at the nozzle tipmounting potion 14c. For the purpose of attaining a high precisioh, the nozzle tip 12 is air-tightly mounted to the nozzle 14.

The sample pump 16, which comprises the plunger 16a and eS..

the cylinder 16b, is provided for the suction and the i0 discharge of a predetermined volume of e sample 11 as well as a predetermined volume of reagent 13. The sample pump 16 first sucks a predetermined volume of the reagent 13 from a reagent bottle 34 by the downward movement of~-the plunger 16a in relation to the cylinder 16b, and fills the first'three- 15 way valve 18, the flexible tube 28, and the liquid passage 14a of the nozzle 14 with the reagent 13 by the upward movement of the plunger 16 in relation to the cylinder 16b.

The sample pump 16 then actuates to suck the sample 11 in the sample container 36 into the nozzle tip 12 and to discharge" o the sample 11 from the nozzle tip 12 into a test tube 54 by the downward and upward movements of the plunger 16a in -i relation to the cylinder 16b. The suction and the discharge of the sample 11 into~and out of the nozzl\ tip 12 is carried out via the reagent within the'tubing and the liquid t t 'iqi 0'I -13passage 14a of the nozzle 14 and the liquid surface-detecting gas 15 within the nozzle tip 12. After the discharge of the sample 11 from the nozzle tip 12, the sample pump 16 may actuate to 6rop a predetermined volume of the reagent 13 onto I) the interior of the tapered lower endportion of the nozzle tip 12 to wash off the sample 11 remaining in the nozzle tip 12. The sample 11 is thereby dispensed and diluted with the .i reagent 13. For the purpose of achieving a more complete discharge of tj^sample 11 and the reagent 13 from the nozzle i ip 12, the plunger pump 20 may be actuated to discharge the gas 15, preferably the air, from the gas passage 14b of the nozzle 14 to completely discharge both the liquidg remaining at the lower end of the nozzle liquidpassage 14and the liquids remaniing on the interior and at the lower end of the 15i nozzle tip 12.

The first three-way valve 18 is situated in an array of S tubings connecting the sao)le pump 16, the nozzle 14 and a reagent bottle 34.

1 The first three-way valve 18 may be switched to the side of the reagent bottle 34 to allow the ZO reagent 13 to flow from the reagent bottle 34 to the samplepump 16, or to the side of the nozzle 14 to allow the reagent tb flow through the passage from the sample pump 16 to the nozzle 14. When the reagent 13 is freshly sucked into the sample pump 16, the first th ee-way valve 18 terminates the as n 9 -14- 0

U..

*0Si *0 cBri flow of the reagent 13 from the sample pump 16 to the nozzle 14 and communicates the reagent bottle 34 kith the sample pump 16. During the suction and the disch ge of the sample 11 into and out of the nozzle tip 12 and the'\ischarge of the Sreagent 13 from the nozzle tip 12, the first three-way valve 18 terminates, the flow of the reagent 13 from the reagent bottle 34 to the sample pump 16and communicates the sample pump 16 and the iuid passage 14aof the nozzle 14.

The plunger pump 20 comprises the plunger 20a and the cylinder 20b. The plunger pump 20 i's provided for two major purposes. First, the plunger pump 20 actuates to discharge the liquij surface-detecting gas 1.5 from the nozzle tip 12 so that, upon contact of the lower end of the downward moving nozzle tip 12 with the liquid surface, the pressure of he 15 liquid surface-detecting gas 15 within the nozzle tip -12 is increased an the pressure sensor 24 detects this pressure increase. 5econdly, the plunger pump 20 actuates to discharge the gas 15 from the gas passage 14b for the purpose of a complete discharge of the sampFe 11 and the reagent 13 XO remaining at the lower ,end of the nozzle tip 12 after the discharge of the sample 11 and the reagent 13.

The second three-way valve 22 is located in an array of tubings c&hnecting the plunger pump 20, the nozzle 14 and a gas source (not shown) The second t hree-way valve <22 may be 0 switched to the side of the gas source such as atmosphere to allow for the gas 15, which is typically air,'to flow from the gas source o the plunger png ump 20, or to the side of th? nozzle 14 to ^alliow>the gas to flow from the plunger pump to the nozzle 14'. When the gas 15 is freshly sucked into the .plunger pump 20, the second threeway valve 22 terminates the flow of the gas 15 from the plunger pump 20 to the nozzle 14 pad communicates the gas source, typically atmosphere, with a the plunger pump 20. During the discharge of the gas 15 from the nozzle tip 12 for the detection of the liquid surface or the complete removal of the liquids remaining attached to the nozzle tip 12, the' second three-way valve 22 literminat s the flow of the from the gas our6e or atmophere to the plunger pum 0 and|\ communica es the plunger pump 20 wit the .9C 15 gas passage 14b of the nozzle 14. o SThe pressure sensor 24 is provided between the second three-way valve 22 and the two-way valve 26 for the purpose of meagring a pressureodeviatjpn of the,liquid surfacedetecting gas. The type of the pressure sensor 2,4 is not ;Lo particularly limited insofar as it can detect the pressure exerted by the plunger pump 20 upon contact of the lower end of the nozzle tip 12 with the surface of the sample 11 'resulting in a blockage of the gas passage from the nozzle tip 12, the gas passage 14b of the nozzle 14, the two-way eC -16valve 26, the flexible tue 30, the second three-way valve 22, and the plunger pump 20. Any pressure sensor of known type may be used including those measuring an absolute Spressure and a gauge pressure (differential pressure), and those capable of troducing a signal indicating the detection of the liquid surface by changing an electric output signal at a predetermined pressure. Exemplary pressure sensors include a strain gauge, a semiconductor gauge, and a piezo element.

The two-way valve 26 is ,an on-off valve, and is provided S between the pres sure sensor 24 and the nozzle 14, and in t~ vidinity of the inlet 14e of the gas passage 14b. The two-way talve 26 is closed except for during the detection of the *f liquid surface and during the complete discharge of the sample 3 15 Qand the reagent .emaining attached to the nozzle tip 12.

The flexible tube 28 connects the first th-ee-way valve 18 and the inlet 14d of the liquid passage 14a of the nozzle 14. The flexible tube 30 connects the two-way valve 26 and a ST coupler' 25 onto which the pressure sensor 24 connected.

X0 Since th6 nozzle 14 travels both the vertical direction, Sely the -direction and in transverse directions, namely X-Y directions as will b described later,i the tubes 28 and may preferably have a sufficiet length as well as a I sufficient flex ity to avoid excess elongation of the tube sufc dd -17as 900 4: :6 s t o 0 00 so 9 i a a a 0 c .9 9, and to prevent the tube from being fol1ed to result in the blockage of the tube.

As described above, the automated dispensing and diluting system of the present invention comprises a liquid surface-detecting sys)em and a dispensing/diluting system.

Among the components described above, the hlunger pump the second three-way valve 22, the pressure sensor 24, the tube 30, the two-way valve 26, the ga passage 14b of the nozzle 14, and the nozzle tip 12 constitute the liquid io surface-detecting system.

On the other hand[ the sampling pump 16, the first three-way valve 18, the tube 28, the liquid passage 14a of the nozzle 14, and the- nozzle tip 12 c&ostitute the dispensing/diluting system.

15 The most .characteristic feature of the automated Sdispensing and diluting system 10 in accordance with the present invention resides in that thesuction 'f the sample if by the sample pump 16 is carried out mainly through the reagent ~13 while the two-day valve 26 is closed. In the X0 present system, the gas or the air, which is a fluid susceptible to compression, is present only within the nozzle tip 12, the gasopassage 14b of the nozzle 14, and the tubing "between the inlet 14e of the gas passage 14b and the two-way valve 26, and the suction of the sample 11 is thus carried n

I

4:> ,0 1 .ii i

Q

i i O.

-18out mainly through the reagent 13, which is a noncompressible liquid. Accordingly, the pressure of the gas ithin 1nozle tip 12 at the time of the suctionshas well s the volume of the sample 11 sucked into the nozzle tip 12 S n be and acuatly controlled. Furthermore, since the saxmple 11 suckedi nto the nozzle tip 12 is first' dicharged by the ressure exerted by the sample pump 16, and thEn washed off by the reagent 13 dripping onto the interior Ssurf ace, of the tapered lower end' pdrtion of othe nozzlertip 0 12, 'and finally blown off by the gas supplied by the plunger Spump 20, the volume of the sample discharged is accurateto ,consiz tently ensure an accur te volume of the sample, to be dispensed. o The con roller 32 contols the motion of the first ,,in the Z direr n as we as their relative movements in a response to the sinal frressure sensor 24 produced'on the bases of the pressure of the liquid surface- Z0 detecting gas. The controller 32 may comprise a central 4 .processing unit, The controller 32' may also control the timing, the'-volume and the speed of the suction/d'ischarge of the sampl 16 and the ungepump 18, and further, the three di movements ofthe nozzle 4 in the XY and o- i e r 14'in the X Ym U tv nozzl a 4 ie X, Y and z U U -19directions. The control of the pumps 16 and 20 and the control of the nozzle 14 may be accomplished separately from the control of the valves 18, 22 and 26 by providing additional controllers. The construction of the automated dispensing and diluting system in accordance with the first and the second o aspects of the present invention has been described in the foregoing. An automated dispensing and diluting system in accordance with the third aspect of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 2.

The automated dispensing and diluting system 10 shown in FIG. 2 comprises a section 42 for accommodating the abo6edescribed components, and a base 44 extending in the horizontal see S* direction from the bottom of the accommodating section 42,

S.

1 5 said accommodating section 42 and said base constituting a main part 40 of the system, an Xi table 46 disposed on the a* me' f r A v' base 44, aozzle-traveling ans 48 for moving said nozzle 14 over the X-Y table 46 in the X, Y and Z directions.

A!

Referring to FIG. 3, the X-Y table 46 comprises a sample section 50 wherein one ormr-m6r sample specimen containers 36"' accommodating said sample specimen 11 are aligned, in rows, a nozzle tip section 52 wherein one or more of said nozzle tips 12 are aligned in rows, and a test tube section 56 wherein one J tp Q S\J 20- or more test tubes 54, °into which the sample 11 and the reagent 13 are dispensed, are aligned in rows.

The nozzle-traveling means 48 comprises two beams 58 and extending in he forward or Y direction from forward surface d" i tOD and on opposite of the accommodating section 42- at its top and on opposite ends; an arm 62 supported between the two beams 58 and extending perpendicularly to the beams 58 and 60 in the X direction, the arm 62 being capable of traveling in; the Y direction; a clamp 63 movably grasping the arm 62 and a plate 64 mounted on the clamp 63, the clamp 63 and the plate 64 being capable of traveling in the X direction; a nzzlesupporting member 66 movably mounted on the plate 64, the 0 r nozzle-supporting member 66 being capabli-ljf traveling in the Z direction along a guide 65 provided in e pate 64; and a drive o 15 (not shown) Onto the nozzle-supporting member 66 is mounted the S nozzle 14, and the nozzle tip 12 is rermovably mounted to the S*nnozzle 14. In FIG. 2, various components shown in FIG. 1 are not shown ex pt 'sor the nozzle 14 and the nozzle tip 12, and the components other than the nozzle 14 and the nozzle tip 12 0* are either accommodated in the accommodating section 42 or abbreviated for drawing convenience.

The plate 64 extends vertically, and the guide 65 is S piovided in the plate 64 along its longitudinal axis. The lu -21plate 64, the guide 65, the nozzle-supporting member 66, and the drive (not shown) constitute a means for traveling the nozzle 14 in the vertical direction.

The plate 64 is fixedly secured to the clamp 63. The clamp 63, the arm 62 and the drive (ot shown), which is typically a wire drive, constitute a means for traveling the nozzle 14 in the X direction. The arm 62, the beams 58 and and the drive (not shown), which is also typically a wire drive, constitute a means for traveling the nozzle 14 in the Y direction. These means for traveling the nozzle 14 in the X and Y directions constitute a means for traveling the nozzle, the "OO X-Y directions. The nozzle-traveling means 48 comprises the X-Y traveling means and the vertically trveling means.

a The drive (not shown) of the nozzle-traveling means 48 5 may comprise any conventional drive of known type, such as a wire with a pulley, a rack with a pinion, or the like.

The sample which may be used in the present invention is not limited to any particular type. The samples used are preferably those used in immunoreactions such as serum, aO plasma, urine, and other body fluids.

a* a.e The reagents which may be used in the present invention are, for example, purified water for dilution, and reagents which will be required in the subsequent reaction and which may be added beforehand. Typical reagents used are 7 lc? 'J -22physiological saline and a buffer solution having bovine serum albumin added thereto.

The liquid surface-detecting gas used in the present invention is not limited to any particular type insofar as the gas is inert with the sample specimen and the reagentt 9 and is capable of transmitting a minute change of pressure.

Exemplary gases include air, nitrogen gas, and other inert gases, among which the air being the most preferable for its low cost requiring no spe.al installation.

t The automated dspensing and diluting system in accordance with ,e present invention is an important unit which constitu s an immunological measurement system together with a immunoreaction apparatus and a measuring apparatus. The present system may automatically and 15 accurately dispense the sample into the test tubes and dilute see** the thus dispensed sample with the reagents, so that an immunoreaction may take place within the test tube in the mmunoreaction apparatus.

e Al The automated dispensing and diluting system of the zO present invention basically has a construction as set forth above. The operation of the automated dispensing and diluting systei of the present invention is hereinafter described described. U f c -23- *eO

S

OS.

S

*5

S

At first, the nozzle 14 of the automated dispensing and diluting system 10 is at its home position. The nozzle tip 12 is not yet mounted.

When a start switch is turned on, the arm 62 and the clamp 63 shown in FIG. 2 travel in transverse directions, that is, X and Y directions over the X-Y table 46 to the nozzle tip section 52 of the X-Y table 46 shown in FIG. 2.

The nozzle 14 stops at the nozzle tip-mounting position. The S nozzle 14 then moves downward along the guide 65 so that the 1 nozzle tip 12 is mounted to the nozzle 14. i* After completion of the mounting of the nozzle tip 12 onto the nozzle 14, the nozzle 14 together with the nozzle tip 12 moves upward along the guide 65 to the uppermost S position of the guide 15 Next, the nozzle 14 again travels over the X-Y table 46 by the X-Y traveling means to the sample section 50 of the X- Y table 46, and stops at the sample collecting position upon the sample container 36.

By this moment, the plunger pump 20 has already sucked a predetermined volume of the air 15 therein, and the second thrte-way valve 22 has been switched to the nozzle side to allow the air to flow from the plunger pump 20 to the nozzle 14. The two-way valve 26 has ben opened. The sample pump 161has already sucked a predetermined volume, for example, 5**4

B

.5.

U

SO

S 55' 0 550 S i~ S-24l 4- 200 1l of the reagent 13 therein, and the first three-way valve 18 has been switched to the nozzle side to allow the reagent 13 to flow through the passage between the sample pump 16 and the nozzle 14. The liquid passage has been filled with the reagent 13.

Next, the nozzle ,1 starts to move downward y the o to vertically traveling means. At the same time, the plunger pump 20 actuates to discharge the air 15 within the cylinder__' 20b by the upward movementof the plunge'r20a. The air 0 dischared from t'he plunger pump 20 flows through the second three-way valve 22, the pressure sensor 24, the two-way valve 26, the gas passage 14b, and the nozzle tip 12, and is discharged from the lower end of the nozzle tip 12.

When the lower end of the nozzle tip 12 contacts the o 15 surface of the sample 11, the pressure withn the nozzle tip 12 is increased. The pressure sensor 24 then detects -tis pressure increase.

When the pressure sensor 24 detects a pledetermined level of the pressure increase, it outputs a signal to indicate that the liquid surface has been detected. When this liquid surface-detection signal is output by the pressure~swtnsor 24, the plunger pump 20 stops its motion to' terminate the discharge of-the air 15, and consequently the pressure increase is ceased.

V V Immediately after the liquid surface detection, counting is started to allowthe nozzle to move downward a predetermined distance from the position at which the liquid Ssurface has been detected before the nozzle 14 is stopped.

The lower end ofthe nozzle tip 12 is then located the predetermined distance, for example, 2 to 3 mm, below the a liquid surface. The predetermined distance is deterined in accordance with the volume of the sample 11 to be dispensed and the size of the sample container 36.

Next, the two-way valve 26 is closed and the three-way valve 22 is switched t9 the atmosphere side so that the plunger pump is in communication with the atmosphere.

The sample pump 16 then actuates to suck a predetermined volume,. for example, 50 l1 of thesample 11 into the nozzle 1 1" f5 tip 12 by the downward motion of the plunger 16a in relation to the cylinder 16b. In the meanwhile, the plunger pump Ssucks in a predetermined volume of the air 15 from the atmosphere side.

V sid Upon the completion of the sucking of the sample 11 into tO thenozzle tip 12, the nozzle 14 moves upward along the guide and stops at the uppermost position of the guide 65. The nozzle 14 then travels over the X-Y table by the X-Y traveling means to the test tube section 56 of the X-Y table 7 <5

V,

26-

S.'

S

9Q 5 9 0r 0 09r 0 So 46. The nozzle 14 stops at the discharge position upon the predetermined test tube 54.

Next, the nozzle 14 ,icves downward to a predetermined position, for example, in the vicinity of the inlet of the test tube 54.

The sample pump 16 then actuates and the plunger 16a moves upward, for example, to the uppermost end of the cylinder 16b to first discharge the sample 11 in the nozzle tip 12 and then to wash off the sample 11 remaining in the nozzle tip 12 with the reagent 13, which is discharged from the liquid passage 14a pf the nozzle 14 to drop onto the interior of the tapered lower end portion of the nozzle tip 12.

fter th& di harge of the predetermined volume of the reagent 13 from the nozzle tip 12, the sample pump 16 stops its motion, the first three-way valve 18 is switched to the side of the reagent container 34, the second three-way valve 22 is switched to the side of the nozzle 14, and the two-way valve 6 is opened. The plunger pump 20 then actuates with the )ward movement, of the plunger 20a to discharge the air the nozzle tip 12 to completely discharge the sample 11 and the reagent 13 remaining at the lower end of the nozzle tip 12. Upon the completion of the discharge of the -27- remaining liqruids, the second three-way valve 22 is again switch~ed to 'the atmosphere side.

The~ samnple pumnp" 16 and~ the pl~unger pump 20 then actuate to suck the p2rdetermined volume, for example, 200 tl of the reagent 13 and the air 15, respectively, by the downward motion of the plunger~s 16a and 20a. After suicking, the pumps 16 and 20 stop their motion.

Both the first three-way valve 18 and the second threeway valve 22 are switched to the side of the nozzlhe 14.

the nozzle 14 moves upward along the guide 65 to *44& stop at the u ppermost position of the guide "Next, the nozzle 14 traveL2n over the ,X-Y table .46 to the' Snozzle tip, removing position by the X-Y traveling means to remove the nozz1l tip 12 from the nozzle 14. The nozzle 14 then returns to its~ home position. No~w, the system is prepared for the next dispensing~'operation.

An accurate, consistent dispensing/dilution may be reali,,__.,y repeating the process as descr~bed above.

"0 4.6 EFFECT OF THE :INVENTION C As deacribed above, in the present invention, the volume of tIhe liquid surface'-detecting gas used is minimized by'the use of ,tpe nozzle comprising the nner and the outer tubes 0 Kand by the suction of the.I-sample specimen into the nozzle'tip -28by means of the purified water or the reagent used forp i dilution in order to realize a convenient pressure control a during the suction to thereby establish a consistent, Saccurate suction volume. o *According to the present system, cross-contamination of the specimens are completely avoided by using the disposable tips.

SFurthermore, according to the present system, the accurate volume of the sample sucked into the nozzle tip is 0 washed out with the diluting reagent, and the liquids (the sample and the reagents) remaining attached on the lower erd Sof the nozzle tip are blown off by the liquid surfacedetecting gas, which is typically the air, and therefore, a consistent, accurate volume of the sample may be dispensed.

15 As a consequence, variation from system to system or user to user may be reduced to an extremely low level.

Still further, the system of the present invention enables a complete automation of the dispensing as well as the dilution with an accurate diluting volume to LO significantly simplify the measurement process.

c o t s ei ca on The claims form part of the disclosure of this specification.

C^

Claims (2)

  1. 2.i :.Th s e 2. The system according to claim 1 wherein said removable nozzle tip is a disposable tip. o O;-
  2. 3. The system according toclaim 1 wherein said liquid surface-detecting as is The system eaccording to claim 1 further comprising a controller for controlling said first three-way valve, said second three-way valve and said two- °way valve in response to °the signal produced by said pressure sensor; and a controller for controlling said sample pump and said plunger pump in The system accoring to any of the foregoing claims further comprising t" 4 Q!an X-Y table, as hereinbefore described, that includes a sample section wherein one or more containers accommodating said sample are aligned in rows, a e*1 15 nozzle tip section wherein one or more of said'nozzle tips are aligned in rows, and a test tube section wherein one or more test tubes into which said sample is dispensed are aligned in rows, said sample section, said nozzle tip section and said test tube section definingindependent sections on said X-Y table; vertically travelingmeans fo traveling said nozzle in vertical direction; 20 X-Y traveling means for ,traveling said vertically traveling means in transverse X-Y directions over said X-Y table, said X-Y traveling means supporting said vertically traveling means; and means for supporting said X-Y traveling means to suspend the nozzle with its vertically traveling means and X-Y traveling means over the X-Y table: T. An automated system according to any one of claims 1 to 5 substantially as WSWMAW5M16562 Novwrlt 1993 31 hereinbefore described with partcular reference to the examples DAE:8Nvebr19 ~~~~l;-.CARTER SMITH BEADLEll:i~: !-.ll :Patent Attorneys for the Applicant::: zl :MI: CHI DA PHARMAC E UTICAL CO., LTD:::: foes1 4:441-_1- i so-: .0 so:: I'-0 iJ P MAWSM-4662 9 Noymb r 199
AU69410/91A 1990-01-18 1991-01-16 Automated dispensing and diluting system Ceased AU645282B2 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2009183A JPH087222B2 (en) 1990-01-18 1990-01-18 Automatic dispensing dilution device
JP2-9183 1990-01-18

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
AU6941091A AU6941091A (en) 1991-07-25
AU645282B2 true AU645282B2 (en) 1994-01-13

Family

ID=11713437

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
AU69410/91A Ceased AU645282B2 (en) 1990-01-18 1991-01-16 Automated dispensing and diluting system

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US5158748A (en)
EP (1) EP0438136A3 (en)
JP (1) JPH087222B2 (en)
AU (1) AU645282B2 (en)
CA (1) CA2034257A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (81)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5183765A (en) * 1990-10-11 1993-02-02 Drd Diluter Corporation Means and method of measuring and dispensing
EP0556336A4 (en) * 1990-11-09 1994-02-23 Abbott Laboratories
US5507410A (en) 1992-03-27 1996-04-16 Abbott Laboratories Meia cartridge feeder
FR2688313B1 (en) * 1992-03-04 1995-05-12 Eric Marteau D Autry
US5610069A (en) 1992-03-27 1997-03-11 Abbott Laboratories Apparatus and method for washing clinical apparatus
US5376313A (en) 1992-03-27 1994-12-27 Abbott Laboratories Injection molding a plastic assay cuvette having low birefringence
US5960160A (en) 1992-03-27 1999-09-28 Abbott Laboratories Liquid heater assembly with a pair temperature controlled electric heating elements and a coiled tube therebetween
US5646049A (en) 1992-03-27 1997-07-08 Abbott Laboratories Scheduling operation of an automated analytical system
US5605665A (en) 1992-03-27 1997-02-25 Abbott Laboratories Reaction vessel
US5575978A (en) 1992-03-27 1996-11-19 Abbott Laboratories Sample container segment assembly
US5536471A (en) 1992-03-27 1996-07-16 Abbott Laboratories Syringe with bubble flushing
US5635364A (en) 1992-03-27 1997-06-03 Abbott Laboratories Assay verification control for an automated analytical system
US5627522A (en) 1992-03-27 1997-05-06 Abbott Laboratories Automated liquid level sensing system
US5540890A (en) 1992-03-27 1996-07-30 Abbott Laboratories Capped-closure for a container
US6190617B1 (en) 1992-03-27 2001-02-20 Abbott Laboratories Sample container segment assembly
US5578494A (en) 1992-03-27 1996-11-26 Abbott Laboratories Cap actuator for opening and closing a container
US5297431A (en) * 1992-06-01 1994-03-29 Thermo Separation Products (California) Inc. Automated sample dilution
US5342190A (en) * 1992-07-22 1994-08-30 Optex Biomedical, Inc. Apparatus for emplacing viscous material in a cavity
US5456880A (en) * 1992-11-20 1995-10-10 Shimadzu Corporation Micropipet apparatus and micromanipulator
EP0619476B1 (en) * 1992-12-19 1999-09-22 Boehringer Mannheim Gmbh Device for detection of a fluidic interface in a transparent measuring tube
US6537817B1 (en) 1993-05-31 2003-03-25 Packard Instrument Company Piezoelectric-drop-on-demand technology
US5468453A (en) * 1993-06-14 1995-11-21 Cirrus Diagnostics, Inc. Low carryover pipette probe
JP3318629B2 (en) * 1993-06-18 2002-08-26 ソニー株式会社 Liquid aspirating / discharging apparatus and method
US5397709A (en) * 1993-08-27 1995-03-14 Becton Dickinson And Company System for detecting bacterial growth in a plurality of culture vials
US5948360A (en) 1994-07-11 1999-09-07 Tekmar Company Autosampler with robot arm
WO1996001994A1 (en) * 1994-07-11 1996-01-25 Tekmar Company Modular vial autosampler
US6105598A (en) * 1996-06-14 2000-08-22 United States Filter Corporation Low capacity chlorine gas feed system
US5965828A (en) * 1995-12-14 1999-10-12 Abbott Laboratories Fluid handler and method of handling a fluid
US5723795A (en) * 1995-12-14 1998-03-03 Abbott Laboratories Fluid handler and method of handling a fluid
US5915282A (en) 1995-12-14 1999-06-22 Abbott Laboratories Fluid handler and method of handling a fluid
US5665601A (en) * 1996-01-22 1997-09-09 Johnson & Johnson Clinical Diagnostics, Inc. Avoiding bubble formation while sensing air-liquid interface using pressurized air flow
US6521187B1 (en) 1996-05-31 2003-02-18 Packard Instrument Company Dispensing liquid drops onto porous brittle substrates
US6203759B1 (en) 1996-05-31 2001-03-20 Packard Instrument Company Microvolume liquid handling system
US6083762A (en) * 1996-05-31 2000-07-04 Packard Instruments Company Microvolume liquid handling system
EP0810438B1 (en) * 1996-05-31 2004-02-04 Packard Instrument Company, Inc. Microvolume liquid handling system
US6308724B1 (en) 1998-04-03 2001-10-30 United States Filter Corporation Low capacity chlorine gas feed system
EP0909389A2 (en) 1996-07-05 1999-04-21 Beckman Coulter, Inc. Automated sample processing system
EP1512975A3 (en) * 1997-04-08 2006-05-24 Packard Instrument Company, Inc. Microvolume liquid handling system
DE69827952T2 (en) * 1997-04-08 2005-03-31 Packard Instrument Co., Inc., Downers Grove Mikrovolumenfluessigkeitshandhabungssystem
CA2236718A1 (en) * 1997-05-05 1998-11-05 Ove K. Dunder Ozone dispensing system
US5916524A (en) 1997-07-23 1999-06-29 Bio-Dot, Inc. Dispensing apparatus having improved dynamic range
US6537505B1 (en) 1998-02-20 2003-03-25 Bio Dot, Inc. Reagent dispensing valve
FR2776389B1 (en) * 1998-03-20 2000-06-16 Fondation Jean Dausset Ceph Device automatic realization of samples for implementing chemical or biological reactions in liquid medium
US6063634A (en) * 1998-04-01 2000-05-16 Abbott Laboratories Fluid assembly and method for diagnostic instrument
US6551557B1 (en) * 1998-07-07 2003-04-22 Cartesian Technologies, Inc. Tip design and random access array for microfluidic transfer
US6589791B1 (en) * 1999-05-20 2003-07-08 Cartesian Technologies, Inc. State-variable control system
AU2625801A (en) * 2000-01-04 2001-07-16 Biodevices, Inc. Pipet for liquid exchange
US6263900B1 (en) 2000-02-17 2001-07-24 United States Filter Corporation Low capacity chlorine gas feed system
US6861034B1 (en) * 2000-11-22 2005-03-01 Xerox Corporation Priming mechanisms for drop ejection devices
US6604405B2 (en) 2001-01-31 2003-08-12 Bacou Usa Safety, Inc. Monitoring system
US7198956B2 (en) * 2001-06-13 2007-04-03 Uffenheimer Kenneth F Automated fluid handling system and method
DE10136790A1 (en) * 2001-07-27 2003-02-13 Eppendorf Ag A method for metering liquids and device for carrying out the method
US6763846B2 (en) 2001-08-20 2004-07-20 United States Filter Corporation Fluid distribution device
US7288228B2 (en) * 2002-02-12 2007-10-30 Gilson, Inc. Sample injection system
US6746966B1 (en) * 2003-01-28 2004-06-08 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Method to solve alignment mark blinded issues and a technology for application of semiconductor etching at a tiny area
US7713752B2 (en) * 2003-02-25 2010-05-11 Northrop Grumman Corporation Magnetic bead agglomerator for automated ELISA process
US8187535B2 (en) * 2004-06-14 2012-05-29 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Robotic handling system and method with independently operable detachable tools
CN1311913C (en) * 2004-10-28 2007-04-25 博奥生物有限公司 Trace amount liquid jet system
US8057756B2 (en) 2005-01-28 2011-11-15 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Sampling probe, gripper and interface for laboratory sample management systems
US8192698B2 (en) * 2006-01-27 2012-06-05 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Sampling probe, gripper and interface for laboratory sample management systems
US8153061B2 (en) * 2005-11-23 2012-04-10 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. Storage and supply system for clinical solutions used in an automatic analyzer
US20080314412A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2008-12-25 Grippo Paul M Self-Cleaning Injection Port for Analytical Applications
US20090032065A1 (en) * 2005-12-08 2009-02-05 Bantz Daniel L Syringe wash station for analytical applications
US20090004063A1 (en) * 2007-06-29 2009-01-01 Symyx Technologies, Inc. Apparatus and method for actuating a syringe
JP2009025249A (en) * 2007-07-23 2009-02-05 Olympus Corp Dispensing device and automatic analyzer
JP2012510065A (en) * 2008-11-28 2012-04-26 ハミルトン・ボナドゥーツ・アーゲー Measuring device and the measuring method suitable for measurement of the measurement volume of the minimum
CN102301242B (en) * 2009-01-30 2014-07-23 株式会社日立高新技术 Automated analysis device and specimen processing device
JP5478101B2 (en) * 2009-03-31 2014-04-23 シスメックス株式会社 Reagent preparing apparatus and sample processing system
JP5275182B2 (en) * 2009-09-11 2013-08-28 株式会社日立ハイテクノロジーズ The dispensing apparatus and analysis apparatus
KR20110046935A (en) * 2009-10-29 2011-05-06 포항공과대학교 산학협력단 Droplet discharging device
JP5536727B2 (en) * 2011-08-01 2014-07-02 株式会社日立ハイテクノロジーズ Dispensing method and the dispensing apparatus
JP2013076674A (en) * 2011-09-30 2013-04-25 Fujifilm Corp Dispenser and suction nozzle position controlling method
CN103575924B (en) * 2012-08-08 2015-07-01 深圳中科强华科技有限公司 Blood sample delivery system
AU2013337608B2 (en) * 2012-11-01 2017-07-20 Leica Biosystems Melbourne Pty Ltd A fluid transport system
JP2014119387A (en) * 2012-12-18 2014-06-30 Sony Corp Dispensing apparatus, analyzer and method for controlling dispensing apparatus
CN104297497B (en) * 2013-07-16 2016-02-24 成都深迈瑞医疗电子技术研究院有限公司 A blood analysis method, control device and the blood cell analyzer
CN104501904B (en) * 2014-12-31 2018-06-19 烟台艾德康生物科技有限公司 Species negative pressure air-water exchange detecting means and how it works
CN104713614B (en) * 2015-03-20 2018-01-16 迪瑞医疗科技股份有限公司 One kind of liquid level detection apparatus and detection method
CN108027280A (en) 2015-06-26 2018-05-11 雅培实验室 Reaction vessel moving member for moving reaction vessels from a processing track to a rotating device in a diagnostic analyzer
WO2017049363A1 (en) * 2015-09-23 2017-03-30 Venipoc Pty Ltd Volumetric dispensing of blood
CN107271220A (en) * 2017-08-17 2017-10-20 宁夏软件工程院有限公司 Quantitative liquid extraction device for on-line detection machines

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4478094A (en) * 1983-01-21 1984-10-23 Cetus Corporation Liquid sample handling system
US4574850A (en) * 1985-01-17 1986-03-11 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Method of and apparatus for dispensing liquid
US4893515A (en) * 1986-09-18 1990-01-16 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Sample-sucking condition checking method and system

Family Cites Families (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
SE327840B (en) * 1968-01-25 1970-08-31 Atuokemi Ab
CH594235A5 (en) * 1976-02-06 1977-12-30 Mettler Instrumente Ag
JPS5513741U (en) * 1978-07-15 1980-01-29
JPH0121467B2 (en) * 1980-05-23 1989-04-21 Aloka
DE3039475C2 (en) * 1980-10-18 1988-09-01 Eppendorf Geraetebau Netheler + Hinz Gmbh, 2000 Hamburg, De
AU593288B2 (en) * 1985-10-15 1990-02-08 Tosoh Corporation Process and apparatus for injecting a minute volume of a solution and an apparatus therefor
JPS62299769A (en) * 1986-06-20 1987-12-26 Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd Dispenser
JPS63109373A (en) * 1986-10-27 1988-05-14 Kyoto Daiichi Kagaku:Kk Sampling method and apparatus therefor
JPS63109330A (en) * 1986-10-27 1988-05-14 Kyoto Daiichi Kagaku:Kk Method and apparatus for detecting liquid level
JPS63145963A (en) * 1986-12-09 1988-06-18 Oyo Bunkou Kiki Kk Auto-sampler
US4983515A (en) * 1989-02-16 1991-01-08 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Labeled cryopreserved cells for use as targets in cytotoxicity assays
JPH06264912A (en) * 1993-03-16 1994-09-20 Hitachi Ltd Screw fastening mechanism

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4478094A (en) * 1983-01-21 1984-10-23 Cetus Corporation Liquid sample handling system
US4478094B1 (en) * 1983-01-21 1988-04-19
US4574850A (en) * 1985-01-17 1986-03-11 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Method of and apparatus for dispensing liquid
US4893515A (en) * 1986-09-18 1990-01-16 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Sample-sucking condition checking method and system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP0438136A2 (en) 1991-07-24
CA2034257A1 (en) 1991-07-19
EP0438136A3 (en) 1992-01-22
JPH03214058A (en) 1991-09-19
AU6941091A (en) 1991-07-25
JPH087222B2 (en) 1996-01-29
US5158748A (en) 1992-10-27

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6083762A (en) Microvolume liquid handling system
EP0188265B1 (en) Method of dispensing liquid
US6060320A (en) Method of verifying aspirated volume in automatic diagnostic system
US5380486A (en) Apparatus for taking liquid content for use in analysis out of container
JP2725917B2 (en) The dispensing method of a blood sample
US6521187B1 (en) Dispensing liquid drops onto porous brittle substrates
JP4783776B2 (en) Microvolume liquid handling system
US7198956B2 (en) Automated fluid handling system and method
US6592825B2 (en) Microvolume liquid handling system
US5213761A (en) Automatic chemical analyzer having an improved delivery mechanism
US4528158A (en) Automatic sampling system
US4169125A (en) Modular chemical analysis system
US4729876A (en) Blood analysis system
US4340390A (en) Method and apparatus for metering biological fluids
JP4406643B2 (en) Liquid sampling probe and clean the fluidics system
AU648221B2 (en) New and improved, ultra-low carryover sample liquid analysis apparatus and method
EP0360487B1 (en) Method and apparatus for analysis of particles contained in a liquid sample
CA1204982A (en) Discharge system
US3900289A (en) Apparatus and method for filling a compartment
EP1316869B1 (en) Improvements in or relating to a fluid metering system
CN1920575B (en) Method for the classification of a liquid
USRE26055E (en) Automatic sample handling apparatus
JP4570120B2 (en) Improved method and apparatus for aspirating and dispensing a liquid
EP0107333B1 (en) Apparatus and method for supply of sample and sheath liquids to analytical flow cell
JP3229915B2 (en) Automatic biochemical analyzer