US580935A - ehbets - Google Patents

ehbets Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US580935A
US580935A US580935DA US580935A US 580935 A US580935 A US 580935A US 580935D A US580935D A US 580935DA US 580935 A US580935 A US 580935A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
barrel
frame
cartridge
movement
breech
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Publication date
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US580935A publication Critical patent/US580935A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A19/00Firing or trigger mechanisms; Cocking mechanisms
    • F41A19/06Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms
    • F41A19/25Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having only slidably-mounted striker elements, i.e. percussion or firing pins
    • F41A19/27Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having only slidably-mounted striker elements, i.e. percussion or firing pins the percussion or firing pin being movable relative to the breech-block
    • F41A19/29Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having only slidably-mounted striker elements, i.e. percussion or firing pins the percussion or firing pin being movable relative to the breech-block propelled by a spring under tension
    • F41A19/30Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having only slidably-mounted striker elements, i.e. percussion or firing pins the percussion or firing pin being movable relative to the breech-block propelled by a spring under tension in bolt-action guns

Description

(No Model.) 5 SheetsSheet 1.

O. J. EHBETS. FIREARM Patented Apr. 20, 1897.

I mentar:

dfiys.

(No Model.) 5 Sheeta8heet 2.

C. J. EHBETS.

FIREARM Patented Apr; 20, 1897.

m: mums m2 cc. PHUTD-LITKO. wsum 5 Sheets-Sheet "3" (No Model.)

G. J. EHBETS.

FIREARM.

Patented Apr. 20, 1897.

nuwa. wmummou u c 5 Sheets-*Sheet 4.

(No Model.)

0. J. EHBETS. FIREARM.

Patented Apr. 20, 1897.

wwN

ma mmms PETERS co PHOTO-7N0, WASl-HNGTON, 0. c4

(No Model.) v 5 Sheets-Sheet 5.

0.. J. EHBETS. FIREARM.

No. 580,935. Patented Apr. 20, 1897.

. while I have in the accompanying drawings ranged to slide in the frame instead of being UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CARL J. Elll3E"S, OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO THE COLTS PATEN" FIRE ARMS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF SAME PLACE.

FIREARM.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 580,935, dated April 20, 1897. Application filed February 14,1896 Serial No. 579.229. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern struction of the frame that is to say, that Be it known that I, CARL J. EHBETS, a citiportion of the firearm which supports the barzen of the United States, residing in the city rel, firing mechanism, &c.the object being and county of Hartford, State of Connecticut, in part to adapt the frame for cooperation 5 have invented certain new and useful Imwith other features of the invention and in provements in Firearms, of which the followpart to improve the construction thereof withing is a specification, reference being had to out regard to the special character of other. the accompanying drawings, forming a part portions of the firearm. Ihave also improved hereof. the construction of the holder which in a 10 The particular result which I have had in magazine-firearm such as a pistol receives the view in my present invention has been the cartridges and is itself inserted within the production of an improved automatic magaframe, whereby the cartridges are more sezine-pistol, and the invention may therefore cure] y held when the holder isoutside of the be said to relate in a general way to autoframe and whereby the delivery of the car- 15 matic breech-loading firearms. It will be tridges from the holder tothe cartridge-chamreadily understood, however, especially as ber of the barrel may be perfectly regulated this description proceeds, that various feaand controlled. tures of the invention which are incidental to The barrel of the firearm, as heretofore, is the attainment of the particular result aimed provided with a vent in rear of the muzzle, 7o 20 at and referred to above are not restricted in through which the gases escape to act upon their applicability to firearms of the particumechanism by which the empty shell is exlar class referred to, but are capable of being tracted and ejected, a fresh cartridge inserted applied with good results to firearms of other in the barrel, and the firing mechanism set; classes. It is therefore to be observed that but in the improved firearm the barrel is arillustrated the invention as embodied in an fiXed,-whereby, as will more clearly appear automatic magazine-pistol and have hereinhereinafter, the construction and arrangeafter described the various features of the ment of other operating parts of the firearm invention in their most approved form with are simplified and improved and the liability o especial reference to their use in such a pisto accident is reduced to a minimum. De-

tol nevertheless I do not intend thereby to revices are provided whereby the delivery of strict my invention to the particular coneach cartridge in succession into the carstruction shown and described, nor even to tridge-chamber of the frame is so controlled the combination of the several features toas to render it practicallyimpossible for any 3 5 gether. in a single firearm of any description, cartridge to get out of position in such a manand that I do intend to cover each feature as ner or to such an extent as to interfere in any broadly as the state of the art will permit way with the proper insertion of the cartridge without regard to the particular kind of firein the barrel. The shell extracting and ejectarm and withoutregard tothe particular coming devices have also been improved, so as 4o bination of other parts or features in which to insure the removal of each empty shell in it may be employed. succession with absolute certainty and with- In order that the detailed description of the out any possible interference with the feedparticular construction which I have chosen ing of the next fresh cartridge. The firing to illustrate as an embodiment of the invenpin is so constructed as that it shall be .very 5 5 tion may be more easily understood and the small and therefore very light, which, as is relations of the various parts more quickly well known, is a highly desirable quality; comprehended, I will proceed to enumerate Provision is also made for retracting the firsome of the main features of the invention, ing-pin positively aftereach operation, so that indicating briefiy and in a general way the it cannot by any possibility come in contact I00 50 character of each. In the first place my inwith the primer of the fresh cartridge until vention resides in part in the form and conthe firing mechanism is purposely operated.

The lock mechanism is so constructed as to dispense altogether with any loose intermediate part between the trigger and the sear, notwithstanding the location, in a pistol, of the triggerin frontof the grip or handle,which constitutes the magazine, and of the hammer in rear of the same, and whereby the sear is left free to engage and hold the hammer at full-cock until the trigger has been released by the finger of the operator and again pressed, and the safety device, which prevents the effective movement of the trigger until all parts are in position for the discharge of another cartridge, is made extremely simple and cerrain in its act-ion.

The several working parts of the pistol or other firearm are also so combined and arranged that. the work to be done by the part set in motion by the escaping gases is distributed throughout the movement of such part, thereby preventing any excessive strain upon the working part at any one point and insuring the certain and proper action of all of such parts.

Other features and details of improvement will appear more clearly hereinafter.

In the accompanying drawings, in which I have illustrated an embodiment of inyinvention, Figure 1 is a righ t-hand side elevation of a gas-operated magazine-pistol closed-that is to say,with the parts in position for firing, but with the hammer down. Fig. 2 is a lefthand side elevation of the same, but open-- that is to say, with the parts in a position which they assume during action and with the hammer cockeda portion of the frame being broken out to showparts within. Fig. 3 is a vertical central section of the same seen from the right and with the parts in the positions represented in Fig. 2, the cartridgehold-er being shown in side elevation and the position of the cartridge in the receivingchamber above the magazine being indicated by dotted lines. Fig. 4 is a plan view of the pistol closed, as seen from above. Fig. 5 is a partial section on the plane indicated by the line 5 5 of Fig. 1, illustrating the construction and arrangement of the cartridge-holder in relation to the frame. Figs. 6 and 7 are partial horizontal sections through the rear of the frame, illustrating the construction, arrangement, and operation of the escapement device which controls the delivery of cartridges from the holder, the escapement device being represented in different positions in the two views. Fig. 8 is a transverse section on the plane indicated by the line 8 8 of Fig. 3. Fig. 9 is a detail viewin cross-section of a slightly-different form of the gas-cup from that shown'in Figs. 3 and 8. Fig. 10 is a view in elevation of the firing mechanism as seen from the left, a portion of the frame being also represented in vertical central section. Figs. 11 and 12 are detail views showing the dilferent positions assumed by parts of the firing mechanism during operation. Fig. 13 is a detail plan view, on a somewhat its connection.

larger scale than Figs. 10, 1.1, and 12 and partlybroken out, illustrating the relation of the trigger-arm and sear. Fig. 14 is a horizontal section of the pistol in a plane of the axis of the barrel, the parts being represented in position for firing,with the hammer cocked. Figs. 15, 16, and '17 are partial views similar to Fig. 14, illustrating particularly the operation of the extractor and ejector and the movement of these parts during the operation of the pistol. Figs. 18 and 19 are rear views of the breech-block, illustrating particularly the construction and operation of the retractor for the firing-pin. Fig. 20 is a detail view illustrating a slightly-different form and arrangement of the firin g-pin. Fig.

21 is a detail plan view of the forward portion of the fixed frame with the gas-cup in position and with the filling-ring, hereinafter referred to, in place. Fig. 22 is a perspective view of the filling-ring shown in Fig. 21. Fig. 23 is a detail plan view of the cartridge stop. Fig. 2a is a section on the plane indicated by the line 24 24: of Fig. 23. Fig. 25 is a vertical central section of the forward part of the frame and of the barrel, illustrating a modification of construction hereinafter referred to.

The frame which receives and supports the various working parts preferably combines in one piece a g'rip'or handle a, which is hollowed out to form a magazine-chamber a for the reception of the cartridge-holder, hereinafter referred to, and a receiver G which supports the barrel. The grip or handle a is recessed as may be necessary to receive and support the firing mechanism and near its top is provided with an abutment a Figs. 3, 14, 15, 16, and 17, which unites the side walls of the frame and forms a solid breech-block, which is integral with the frame, and therefore removes altogether the danger which exists in the use of pistols with movable breechblooks of injury from the flying backward of the breech-block in case of the breakage of The upper part of the grip and the receiver a are milledor otherwise hollowed out from the upper surface downward to form two side walls or cheek-pieces a between which the levers hereinafter referred to are received and supported, and to form a seat a, Figs. 3, 8, and 14, in which the barrel is supported with freedom to slide longitudinally. The frame is also recessed below the seat a to form a communicating chamber a for the reception of a reactionspring, hereinafter referred to, being thus divided vertically from the top downward to but not through the under side of the receiver. For convenience in manufacture the receiver a? is preferably made quite short, and

an independent extension a is provided to properly support the barrel and front sight a as well as to form an abutment a for the reaction-spring and to stiifen and bind together the two parts of the divided. frame. To support this extension or jacket 0. the

forward end of the frame or receiver a is provided about the aperture of the barrel-seat a with a screw-threaded boss at, Figs. 3, 4, 14, and 21, upon which the extension or jacket a is screwed, being locked in position by a screw a whose head is seated partly in the top of the receiver and partly in the top of the jacket or extension. In the con struction rep resented in Figs. 3 and 21 this boss a is slotted at top and bottom to correspond with the recessing of the receiver a and to permit the introduction of the barrel, as hereinafter described. In order that the receiver may be practically rigid when all of the parts of the arm are assembled, I have provided fillingpieces to fit in and fill the slots in the bossor in the extremity of the frame, and which yet are readily removable to permit the removal of the barrel when required. These filliug-pieces are formed as lugs 0. on a ring 0 (shown clearly in Figs. 21 and 22,) which has a seat formed therefor in the rear of the extension or. jacket Q The barrel 5 in the embodiment of the invention represented in the drawings isarranged to slide longitudinally in the frame in the seat 00 formed for that purpose, and in the extension or jacket G7, and in order that the friction 011 the barrel may be reduced to a minimum the rear end of the barrel is made slightly larger than the body thereof, as at b,'so as to have a close sliding fit in the seat a while the forward extremity of the extension-or jacket (1 is formed with a narrow annular bearing a to have a close sliding fit on the reduced forward portion 5* of the barrel 1), while between these two bearings the barrel and the frame are practically out of contact. On its under side the barrel is, provided with a lug or projection 11 which enters and moves in the springchamber a and re ceives the pressure of the reaction-spring b. On its upper side the barrel is provided with a lug or projection 5 which furnishes a point of attachment for the gas-lever, hereinafter referred to. These lugs 17 and b in the construction represented in Fig. 3 are integral with the barrel, which necessitates the slot ting of the boss at and of the forward extremity of the frame, as already described, so that the barrel may be introduced into the seat a of the frame from the front. If for any reason, however, it is undesirable to slot the boss a and the extremity of the frame, as stated, the lugs b and b may be formed upon a band or ring I), as represented in Fig. 25, which may fit closely about the barrel, but yet permit thebarrel to be inserted into it while it is held in the frame, the band or ring being further secured by a screw 19 or by any other suitable means. This modification permits the front extension or jacket a to be made integral with the frame, as shown in Fig. 25, the front opening of the barrel-seat being closed by the bushing 01. and the sprin g-chamber by a screw-plug.

At'a suitable point in rear of the muzzle 1), the lug 11 being provided for this purpose,-

and in the construction herein described pro- .vision is made for permitting the required longitudinal movement of the barrel by supporting the gas-lever by means of a brace-1e ver 0, which is pivoted between the side walls a of the frame, as at 0 and is forked at its forward end to embrace the gas-lever 0, so that when the arm is closed, as represented in Figs. 1 and 4, both the brace and the gas lever shall lie down snugly between the walls a of the frame, in which position the end of the gas-lever overlies the vent b of the barrel b. In order that the escaping gases may act upon the gas-lever properly, I prefer to provide a gas cup 0 which is supported wholly by the frame, is entirely independent of the barrel 5, which must-of necessity move with respect to the gas-cu p, and is entered by a plug a onthe gas-lever c.

If the forward end of the frame is slotted from the top downward, as h'ereinbefore described, the gas-cup c is not integral with the frame, but is held to its seat therein bya pin 0 or by other suitable means. The gas cup, as well as the forward extension or jacket (1.7, may, however, be made integral with the frame, as shown at c in Fig. 25, in which case the extremity of the frame is not slotted. The lugs b and b are secured to the barrel 1), after its insertion in the forward end of the frame, by means of the band or ring I)", as already described, and the front bearing a is in form of abushing attached to the frame after the insertion of the barrel. Whether the gas-cup be integral with the frame or independent thereof, it is formed with a hole 0 which registers with the vent U of the barrel b when the latteris at rest in its rearward position, so that at the instant of explosion the gases may impinge upon the gas-lever and effect the desired movement of the parts. The bottom of the gas-cup is formed to fit against the barrel when the latter is in its normal position, as already described, and preferably the bottom is reduced in thickness about the hole 0 to form a thin knife-edge, which shall operate in the well-known manner of a gas-check to prevent leakage of gases, at the instant of explosion, between the gascup and the barrel, the pressure of the gases between the bottom of the gas-cup and the plug 0 forcing the thin knife-edge down against the barrel. Although this close fit of the bottom of the gas-cup against the barrel is desirable at the instant of explosion, nevertheless it is equally desirable that immediately thereafter, and as the barrel commences to move, the gas-cup shall be free from the barrel, so as to reduce the friction on the latter. For this purpose the barrelis reduced in its external diameter a trifle a short distance in rear of the vent b so as to form a seat for the gas-cup at the instant of explosion, but to provide for clearance between the barrel and the gas-cup after the barrel has moved forward slightly, such arrangement being represented in Fig. 3 at b.

The frame having a suitable opening at, Figs. 1 and 14 to 17, inclusive, primarily intended for the ejection of the empty shells, but which will also permit the introduction of a loaded cartridge into the cartridge-receivin g chamber in rear oft-he barrel when the latter is in its forward position for insertion in to the barrel as the latter is moved back, it is obvious that, if desired, the arm maybe operated manually to efiect the loading and that cartridges may be introduced and fired one at a time. The arm is,however,intended for use as a magazine-firearm, and for this purpose the grip or handle a is made hollow to form a magazinechamber. The cartridges are preferably placed first in a holder at, which is then introduced into the magazine-chamber through the aperture in the bottom of the grip. The construction and arrangement of the holder which I prefer to employ for this purpose are clearly represented in Figs. 3 and 5. It comprises a suitable case of sheet metal, which is adapted to receive the cartridges one upon another and is provided with a spring d and follower d which press the cartridges upward toward the delivery end of the holder. In a suitable bracket d upon one side of the holder is pivoted a lever d which has at its upper end a finger d to project inward over the cartridges,and thereby prevent their escape from the holder when the latter is outside of the grip or handle, while its lower end is in pr0ximity to the lower end of the holder in convenient position to be operated by a finger of the same hand which grasps the holder in charging it. A spring (1 acts upon the lever d to maintain the finger normally in the path of the cartridges, while permitting the lever to be operated to withdraw the finger, and thereby permit the feed of the cartridges to be regulated and controlled by other means. In order to prevent the accidental release of the cartridges when the holder is out of the arm, a block al is mounted to slide in a slot (1 formed in the holder under the lower end of the lever d so that when said block is pushed upward under the end of the lever the latter will be held positively from movement to release the cartridges, while at the same time the block may be readily pushed from under the end of the lever to leave it free. The lower end of the lever 01 is bent outward or otherwise formed with an incline or camsurface d for cooperation with the lower edge of the grip a, so that as the holder is inserted in the grip the lever d is shifted to withdraw the finger d from the path of the cartridges. The inclined portion of the lever is preferably also provided with a rounded projection 61 for engagement with a corresponding recess in the lower edge of the grip to retain the holder in place. The lever has sufficient movement when the holder is inplaee in the grip to permit of the engagement of said projection with the recess and its disengagement therefrom by the application of pressure upon the projecting end of the lever. The block al stands in line with the wall of the chamber in the grip, so that as the holder is introduced the block is by the same action thrust outward to release the lever d The upper left-hand rear corner of the holderis notched or cut away, as at d, for a purpose presently to be described.

The follower is provided with a dropped shoulder 61 for engagement with the finger d of the lever 01*, which at all times projects at least slightly within the wall of the case (1 and into the path of said shoulder,-so that the follower is permitted to rise to the height necessary to place the last cartridge in position in the chamber above the magazine and yet is prevented from being itself thrown out of the case.

As the cartridges are no longer held by the finger d of the lever d when-the holder is in place in the arm, it becomes necessary to provide an escapement device of some sort, which shall be operated at the proper'times to permit or prevent the escape of the cartridges from the holder into the cartridgereceiving chamber of the frame. The device which embodies this part of my invention is represented in Figs. 2, 6, and 7. As there shown it comprises a rod 6, which is arranged to. have a limited longitudinal movement in a suitable hole formed therefor alongside of the barrel-seat a This rod normally stands in the position represented in Fig. 6 and is provided with a projection or shoulder e, which projectsinto the notch (Z in the holder cl and therefore stands in the path of the head of the uppermost cartridge in the holder,

and the distance between such projection or shoulder e and the opposite side of the holder 01 is less than the diameter of the cartridge-head, so that the cartridge'cannot escape. In rear of the projection or shoulder e the rod e is reduced or formed with a notch 6 which in the forward movement of said rod 6 is brought into line with the head of the cartridge and permits it to escape into the cartridge-receiving chamber of the frame. It will of course be understood that the forward end of the uppermost cartridge is overlaid by the barrel except when the latter is in its extreme forward position and that the function of the escapement device is therefore mainly to hold down the head end of the cartridge, so that when the cartridge is finally released it shall move into the cartridge-receiving chamber of the frame with its axis substantially in parallelism with the axis of IOC IIC

the barrel. The movement of the escapement device to release the head of the cartridge will therefore take place when the barrel approaches the limit of its forward movement and after the empty shell has been ejected from the chamber. I prefer, therefore, to cause the barrel itself to actuate the escape- 1nent-rod at the proper time, and for this purpose the rod is provided with two shoulders or projections for engagement with the barrel or with an intermediate part, the one at the end of the forward movement of the barrel to release the cartridge and the other at the end of the rearward movement of the barrel to move the projection 9 into the path of the head of the next cartridge. The lost motion between the barrel and the escapement permits the latter to be stationary except when movement is required and reduces the length of movement requisite to effect the desired purpose. Between the barrel and the frame is disposed a slide-plate a which serves an additional purpose, hereinafter referred to, but as it may be employed also to actuate the escapement it is used for this purpose instead of actuating the escapement directly by contact with the projection on the barrel. This plate or slide c has a tongue 6 which is arranged to make contact with either the shoulder a or the shoulder e on the rod 6, as clearly shown in Fig. 2, and itis itself adapted to be moved in one direction or the other near the end of the forward or the end of the rearward movement of the barrel by lugs or projections b I), which are formed on the side of the barrel (9, as clearly shown in Figs. 14, 15, 16,and 17. It will be observed that there is lost mot-ion both between the barrel 1) and the plate e and between the plate 6 and the rod 6, the parts being so adjusted and arranged, however, as to give the required movement to the rod e.

The extractor or extractor-hook f is mo unted in a groove in the right-hand side of the frame, alongside of the stationary breechblock 6?, as shown clearly in Figs. 1, 14, 15, 16, and 17, and is adapted to engage the head of the cartridge when the barrel is in its rearward position, as shown clearly in Fig. 14, the end of the barrel being recessed. and beveled off, as at Z7 to permit of such engagement. The extractor has a limited longitudinal movement with respect to the breech-block, so that as the barrel starts forward the extractor moves a short distance with it before it holds the shell, so that it shall be withdrawn from the barrel, as clearly represented in Fig. 15. At the same time it is caused to move inward positively to engage the head of the cartridge, having been hitherto only in position for engagement. For this purpose the extractor is formed with an incline or cam-surface f,.which engages a cross-bar or abutment f carried by the frame, the incline being so formed that the extractor is forced inward as it moves for ward. A spring f is arranged to impel the extractor forward when such movement is permitted by theforward movement of the barrel, and the rear end of the extractor is held in place by a screw-pin f which is threaded through the frame and ehters loosely the hole f in the extractor, in which the spring f is seated, the screw-pin thus serving as a fulcrum for the lateral movelnentof the extractor.

The ejector, by which the empty shell is thrown out of the arm after it has been withdrawn from the barrel, is shown clearly in Figs. 2, 3, 14,15,16, and 17. It is constructed with especial reference to the fact that there is but a limited relative movement in a longitudinal direction of the shell and the extractor, and it is also arranged to cooperate with the extractor and prevent the escape of a shell therefrom until it has been entirely withdrawn from the barrel. It will be ob served that, as between the ejector and the breech-block, provision is made for a limited relative longitudinal movement, and that, as between the barrel and the ejector, there is also a relative longitudinal movement. In the construction shown the ejector derives its movement from the movement of the barrel, and in the figures of the drawings referred to it is shown as a hook g, which is normally impelled inward by spring action, being itself preferably of spring metal. It is arranged to slide in a slot at in the left-hand side of the frame and is secured, by means of a boss 9, to the plate e hereinbefore referred to, through a slot a", forward of the slot at. The means for actuating the plate 2 having been fully described already, it will be obvious that the ejector is drawn forward as the barrel approaches the end of its forward movement and is moved backward to its original position as the barrel approaches the end of its rearward movement. The movement of the ejector is not wholly due, however, to the movement of the barrel. It will be observed that the ejector has a heel 9 which when the barrel is in its rearward position rests upon the barrel. It will also be observed that as soon as the barrel moves forward the inclined end 9 rests against an incline (L of the frame, which has such a pitch that as soon as the ejector is left free to be impelled inward by the action of its own springshank it will cause the ejector to move forward from the position shown in Fig. 14 to the position shown in Fig. 15, in which the heel g rests against the body of the empty shell and the hook g engages the head ofthe shell. In this position the ejector holds the shell against the extractor, and in order that the shell may be held rigidly at this time, so as to prevent with certainty its escape from the extractor, the

.parts of the ejector and of the extractor between which the shell is held are concaved to fit the latter, and the ejector is provided with lugs or ears 9 which in this position underride lugs or cars a on the sides of the slot a, these lugs a forming an abutment which IIO holds the ejector positively from outward movement at this time. The forward movement of the ejector with the barrel pulls the shell from the position shown in Fig. to-

ward the relative position shown in Fig.- 1G, and as the distance between the ejector and the extractor is thus diminished the ejector is impelled inward with sufficient rapidity to throw the shell outward through the aperture (1 in the frame. As the forward movement of the ejector continues it is moved outwardly by contact with the incline formed in the wall of the frame between the two slots a and a" of the correspondingly-inclined inner side of the ejector. This outward movement of the ejector is so timed and adjusted that the ejector is withdrawn from the cartridgereceiving chamber in the frame before the final forward movement of the barrel and of the rod 6, permitting a cartridge to escape from the holder cl to the receiving-chamber. As the barrel thereafter moves rearward it underrides the heel of the ejector, so that as the ejector is moved backward toward the end of the rearward movement of the barrel the lugs g thereon ride outside of the lugs a on the frame.

It will be understood that during the rearward movement of the barrel, when a fresh cartridge has been admitted to the cartridgereceiving chamber, the end of the barrel rides over the front end of the uppermost cartridge left in the holder, or over the follower,when the magazine is emptied, and keeps it down, the lower edge of the barrel being suitably chainfered for this purpose, the rear or head end of the cartridge being held by the escapement device already described. It will also be evident that some means should be provided to limit the upward movement of the front end of the cartridge as it passes from the holder into the empty cartridge-receiving chamber, so that it may be properly directed into the returning barrel. I have provided an effeetive device for this purpose, which is shown in Figs. 3, 23, and 24. As there shown this device comprises a longitudinally slotted plat-e h, which is secured to the breech-block a covers the cartridge-receiving chamber on the side opposite that through which the cartridges enter, and forms a guide for a sliding block h. The latter has a downward projection 71. to limit the upward movement of a cartridge, and is also provided with a hook h to engage a projection 19 on the top of the barrel 1), by which means the block and proj-ection are drawn forward with the barrel.

In order that the block and projection or finger may be left at the proper point, a device is provided to disengage the hook h from the barrel, such device comprising an incline Men the plate h, which is engaged by a shoulder h on the hook h to raise the latter and efiect its disengagement from the barrel. In the rearward movement of the barrel the block and finger are carried back by contact with the barrel, a recess being formed between the breech-block and the barrel, preferably in the barrel, for the reception of the projection or finger b The cartridge is exploded, as usual, by a firing-pin, which is mounted in the breechblock and transmits the blow of the hammer to the primer of the cartridge. It is highly desirable that the tiring-pin be as small and as light as possible, and it is also necessary to provide means for the retraction of the firing-pin after the explosion of the cartridge, so that its point may not project forwardly from the breech-surface and thereby occasion a prematureexplosion by the violent contact therewith of the primer of the cartridge as the parts of the arm assume position for firing. The construction and arrangement of the firing-pin and of the means for retracting-the same are shown in Figs. 3, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20. As there represented the firingpin it is mounted in a suitable seat in the breech-block a having a shoulder to limit the forward movement thereof; The pin may be round and held from turning in its seat by a spline 70 as shown in Figs. 18 and 19, or it may be flattened vertically, as shown in Fig. 20, and held from turningby the retractor, presently to be described. In the rear face of the breech-block is formed a guideway k for the reception of the retractor 70 which is formed as a plate with a slot 10 to embrace the rear end of the firing-pin. The firing-pin or the retr-actoris provided with a cam-surface whereby the movement of the retractor in the guideway causes a rearward movment of the firing-pin. As represented in Fig. 3, the pin is is notched on its under side to form a cam or incline k for cooperation with the cross-bar k of the retractor 10 the said crossbar being preferably beveled, as indicated. As the retractor is free to move transversely with respect to the firing-pin to alimited extent, it is evident that when the retractor is in one extreme position, as indicated in Fig. 19, the firing-pin is free to be moved forward by the impact of the hammer. As the retractor is moved to the other extreme position (represented in Fig. 18) the cross-bar 10 thereof will act upon the incline or cam 70 of the firing-pin to withdraw the latter positively into the position represented in Fig. 3. The retractor is actuated to withdraw the firingpin at the proper time by some moving part of the arm. As represented in Figs. 3, 18, and

19, the retractor is arranged to move vertically and is provided with a lip 70*, to be engaged bya lip c on the hub of the brace 0', so that as the latter is turned upon its pivot by the action of the gas-lever c in its rearward movement the retractor is lifted and withdraws the firing-pin, while as the brace reassumes its closed position the retractor descends and leaves the firing-pin free. In assembling these parts the retractor is first dropped into the guideway and allowed to fall to the full extent permitted by said guideway, in which position the slot 10 fully uncovers the seat for the firing-pin, which is then inserted. Thereafter the brace c is put in place, care being taken that its lip 0 engages the lip k of the retractor. When the pivot-pin of the brace is put in place, the retractor will be held slightly above its lowest position, and the crossbar thereof will then engage the forward side of the notch in the firing-pin and will prevent the same from falling out of its seat in the breech-block.

The limbwork or firing mechanism of the arm remains now to be described. This comprises a hammer l, which is pivoted in a suitable recess in the frame in rear of the magazine-chamber, a mainspring Z, which is secured in the frame and cooperates with the hammer in substantially the usual manner, a tension-screw Z being arranged to act upon the mainspring, a sear m, which is also pi voted in the frame in rear of the magazineehamber, and a trigger n, which is pivoted in the frame in front of the magazine-chamber. This mechanism is represented in an approved form in Figs. 3, 10, 11, 12, and 13. The mainspring Z bears upon a roller Z carried by a pin Z in the heel of the hammer, the roller being located in a slot in the heel, as indicated in Figs. 11 and 12. The hammer is cocked in opposition to the pressure of the mainspring Z by an arm or arms 0 which extend downwardly from the hub of the brace c and engage the lugs or bosses 1", which project externally from the sides of the hammer and support the ends of the pin 1*, the said arms 0 straddling the hammer and allowing it to move between them to strike the firing-pin. It will be observed by an inspection of Fig. 3 that the brace c during the complete movement of the gas-lever from front to rear position moves to its eX- treme position, carrying with it the hammer, and then retires somewhat from that extreme position, the hammer being held in its extreme rearward position by the sear, as usual. The gas-lever is thus made to do the work of cocking the hammer during the early part of its rearward movement, while the Work of moving the shell-ejector is performed during the latter part of such rearward movement, whereby the work performed by the gas-lever is distributed over its entire movement and excessive resistance at any one pointavoided. The hammer is provided as usual with a fullcock notch Z and an undercut half-cock notch Z ,and is further provided with the well-known fiy P, which acts in the usual manner to prevent the engagement of the sear with the half-cock notch during the fall of the hammer. The scar m is pivoted in proper position with relation to the hammer and is normally pressed into engagement therewith by the usual sear-spring 'm. As represented in the drawings, the sear has an arm on) extended below its pivot, which arm is preferably provided with a lateral projection m for cooperation with the trigger-arm, hereinafter referred to. The trigger a is pivoted in the frame in front of the magazine-cham her and preferably at a point below the line of pressure of the finger of the operator when firing, a trigger-sprin g n beingarranged to press the trigger normally forward. The trigger has formed in one piece therewith or secured rigidly thereto an arm 02 which eX- tends rearwardly toward the sear at one side of the cartridge-chamber and has at its rear end a lug or projection n to correspond and cooperate with the lug or projection m of the sear.

In order that the discharge of the arm may be controlled so that but one shot may be fired at a time, the trigger and sear must be so related and must so cooperate that the pressure of the finger upon the trigger shall first disengage the sear from the hammer to permit the hammer to fall and shall then release the sear, so that it shall be free to engage and hold the hammer as soon as it is cooked, it being further required that the triggershall be released and again pressed by the finger before the arm can be fired again.

, Otherwise the rapidity of action of the arm is such that two or more of the cartridges would be fired before the operator could release the trigger. Accordingly the arm n of the trigger in its rearward movement must first disengage the sear from the hammer and then move clear of the sear, and in its forward movement it in ust pass by the sear without disturbing it. In the normal position of the parts the projection n of the trigger-arm stands slightly above the projection m of the sear-arm, as represented in Fig. 10, and the movement of the rear end of the arm will be downward, as indicated in Fig. 11. Accordingly the lug or projection m of the sear-ar1n is formed with a cam-surface which inclines downward and forward, while the lug or projection n of the trigger-arm has a cam-surface which inclines in the opposite direction, or upward and rearward. Hence the downward movement of the rear end of the trigger-arm will cause a rearward movement of the. lower end of the sear-arm and will thereby disengage the sear from the hammer. As the movement of the trigger is completed the rear end of the trigger-arm will pass below and clear of the lower end of the sear-arm, thereby immediately leaving the sear free to be acted upon by its spring m and restored to position to engage and hold the hammer as it is brought to full-cock. With the hammer at fnllcock and the trigger in its rearmost position the lateral projection on the trigger-arm stands below the lateral projection on the sear-arm, and in the upward movement of the triggerarm as the trigger is released, as indicated in Fig. 12, the one projection will strike the other. Accordingly provision is made whereby the trigger-arm may slip by the sear-arm. To this end the triggenarm n is made wide enough to be rigid and unyielding in the plane of its effective movement, that is, in a vertical plane in the construction shown, and is made thin enough to be yielding and flexible in the transverse plane. Furthermore, the projections m and n are beveled or rounded off laterally in opposite directions, whereby as the trigger is released the projection on the trigger-arm slips by the projection on the sear-arm without disturbing the sear. To guard against the possibility of the slipping of the projection 12 from the projection m during the effective movement of the trigger, I have undercut the cam-surfaces m and n somewhat, so that they may interlock during the effective movement of the trigger and prevent lateral displacement, notwithstanding the lateral flexibility of the arm 91 The safety device, which prevents the possibiliiy of operating the trigger until all of the parts of the arm are in position for firing, is operated by the movement of the barrel, as indicated clearly in Figs. 3 and 10. It comprises a spring-pressed pawl a which is pivoted-in the upper end of the trigger n, and projects into the spring-chamber a of the frame sufficiently to engage a shoulder e of the frame, and thereby prevent movement of the trigger. The pawl, however, is arranged to be struck by the lug b of the barrel or by a pin 5 therein when the barrel reaches its rearmost position and to be disengaged thereby from said shoulder to permit the rearward movement of the trigger, The pivoting of the trigger at the bottom permits this device to be exceedingly simple in construction, as well as absolutely certain in operation. The relative position of the centers of the trigger and pawl and the locking-shoulder is suchthat any pressure upon the trigger when the parts are not in position for firing only makes the engagement of the pawl with the shoulder wherefore the action of the spring 17 will not.

tend to hold the gas-lever down firmly in its seat, nor prevent its rebounding slightly when the barrel is thrown to the rear. When the hammer is down, however, it and the main spring will act, through the arms 0 of the brace, to hold the gas-lever firmly to its seat and prevent rebounding; but if the arm is not used as an automatic arm, but is manually operated, the hammer may be at full-cock or at half-cock when the arm is closed, and in order to prevent rebounding under such circumstances I prefer to provide a device of the general character of that represented in Fig. 3, in which a small piston c is seated upon a spring o in a hole in the gas-lever c and slips into a recess 0 in the forward side of the lug b on the barrel 0 when the gas-le ver reaches its lowest position, and thereby prevents the rebounding.

The operation of the arm in firing will be readily understood in view of the foregoing description of the construction and operation of the several parts.

Let it be assumed that the arm is closed, as represented in Fig. 1, with the hammer at full-cock and a cartridge in the barrel, as indicated in Fig. 14:. In this position of the parts the safety-pawl n is held out of engagement with the cooperating shoulder, and the trigger is therefore free to be moved. The hammer being released by the movement of the trigger explodes the cartridge, and

some of the gases of explosion escape through the vent b and throw the gas-lever c violentl y backward. The brace c rises, permitting the end of the gas-lever, which is connected to the barrel, to throw the latter forward against the force of the spring b During this movement of the barrel the empty shell is extracted and ejected and a fresh cartridge is released from theholder and is held in position to be inserted into the barrel. The movement of the brace 0 brings the hammerto full-cock, in which position it is held by the scar and at the same time raises the retractor 76 and positively withdraws the fir ing-pin. As soon as the barrel has completed its forward movement it is immediately returned by the reaction-spring b and the fresh cartridge, being supported at the rear by the abutment a is caused to enter the barrel. As the barrel reaches its seatthe safety-pawl n is disengaged from the shoulder a and the arm is in readiness for a second discharge.

I have described with much particularity the construction of the various devices shown in the accompanying drawings as embodying or as cooperating with the various features of my invention, but it will be understood, as I have hereinbefore pointed out, that I do not intend thereby to limit my invention to the precise construction and arrangement of parts shown and described, as many variations therefrom might be made without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim and desire to secure by Letters Pat- I ent 1. In a cartridge-holder for magazine-firearms, the combination of a removable case to receive the cartridges, a spring and follower to feed the cartridges forward in said case, a lever of a length substantially equal to that of the case, having a finger at one end.

of said case to engage the cartridges and pivoted to the case at about its middle while its other end stands free at the other end of the case, and a spring to hold said lever With its,

ICC

IIC

the path of the cartridges, said lever having an incline to cooperate with a fixed part of the firearm to move said lever against the spring and release the cartridges as the holder is inserted in the firearm.

3. In a cartridge-holder for magazine-firearms, the combination of a case to receive the cartridges, a spring and follower to feed the cartridges forward in said case, a lever having a finger at one end to engage the cartridges and pivoted to the case, a spring to hold said lever with its finger normally in the path of the cartridges, and a block sliding on said case under the free end of said lever to hold said lever positively against movement.

at. In a magazine-firearm, the combination with a frame and a cartridge-holder to enter the same, of a lever pivoted to the holder and having at one end a finger to engage the cartridges and being formed at the other end to engage said frame to retain the holder therein, and a spring to maintain said lever in normal position.

5. In a magazine-firearm, the combination with a frame and a cartridge-holder to enter the same, of a lever pivoted to the holder and having at one end a finger to engage the cartridges and being formed at the other end to engage said frame to retain the holder therein, a spring-to maintain said lever in its normal position, and a block sliding on said holder under the free end of said lever to preventmovement thereof and to be moved from under the end of the lever by contact with the frame as the holder is placed therein.

6. In a cartridge-holder for magazine-firearms, the combination of a case to receive the cartridges, a spring and follower to feed the cartridges forward in said case, a lever pivoted to the case having a finger at one end to engage the cartridges, a spring to hold said lever With its finger normally in the path of the cartridges, said lever having an incline to cooperate with a fixed part of the firearm to move said lever and release the cartridges from the finger as the holder is inserted in the firearm, and a shoulder on the follower in the path of said finger, whereby the follower is prevented from being entirely thrown out of the holder, while permitted to movethe cartridge resting on said follower beyond the end of the holder,

7. Inabreech-loadingfirearm,th.e combination of a frame, a barrel sliding in said frame, firing mechanism including a trigger, and a trigger-detent standing normallyin the path of the barrel and operated thereby to permit movement of thetrigger.

8. In a breech-loadingfirearm,the combination of a frame, a barrel sliding in said frame, firing mechanism including a trigger, and a detent-pawl pivoted in the trigger and normally engaging a shoulder of the frame and operated .by the movement of the barrel to permit movement of the trigger.

9. In a breech-loadin g firearm,the combination of a frame,'a barrel sliding in said frame,

firing mechanism, a trigger pivoted in said frame at a point below the line of pressure on said trigger, and a trigger-detent carried by said trigger above said line of pressure and standing normally in the path of movement of the barrel.

10. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame,abarrel sliding in said frame and having'a vent in rear of the muzzle, a gaslever actuated by the escape of gas through said vent, and a connection between said lever and said barrel whereby said barrel is moved by said lever.

11. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame,a barrel slidingin said frame and having a vent in rear of the muzzle, a gaslever actuated by the escape of gas through said vent, a connection between said lever and said barrel, and a spring acting upon said barrel to return the same.

12. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame,a barrel sliding in said frame and having a vent in rear of the muzzle, a gas lever actuated by the escape of gas through said vent, and a brace pivoted to said frame and having the gas-lever pivoted to itself.

13. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame recessed vertically to form a seat for a barrel and a spring-chamber, one above the other, a-barrel sliding freely in said seat and having a lug or projection to enter the spring chamber, a reaction spring disposed in said chamber and acting against said lug or projection, and a gas-lever mounted on said frame above said seat and intermediate mechanism to move said barrel against the spring.

14. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame having a seat to receive the barrel, a barrel mounted to slide in said seat, a spring-chamber below said seat, a gas-lever mounted on said frame above said seat and intermediate mechanism to move said barrel in one direction and a spring in said chamber to engage a projection from said barrel to move the-same in the opposite direction, said barrel having at its rear end a narrow annular bearing with a close-Working fit in said seat and said frame having at its forward end a narrow annular bearing with a close-working fit on said barrel, said barrel and frame being out of contact at intermediate points, whereby said barrel is accurately guided and supported with a minimum of friction.

15. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame recessed from its upper surface downward to form a seat'for a barrel and a spring-chamber, one above the other, a barrel sliding freely in said seat and having a lug or projection on its lower side to enter the spring-chamber and a lug or projection on its upper side, a spring to cooperate with the firstnamedlu g or projectioma gas-lever connected to the last-named lug or projection and operated by gas escaping from the barrel, and a brace for said gas-lever.

16. in a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame recessed from its upper surface downward to form a seat for a barrel and a spring-chamber, one above the other, and having at its forward end a screw-threaded boss divided to correspond with the frame, a jacket screw-threaded to engage said boss and forming an extension of said frame to guide and support the barrel, and a barrel sliding in said seat in said frame and having a lug or projection to enter the spring chamber thereof.

17. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame recessed from its upper surface downward to form a seat for a barrel and a spring-chamber, one above the other, and having at its forward end a screw-threaded boss divided to correspond with the frame, a ring having lugs to enter and fill the openings in the wallof said boss, a jacket screw-th readed to engage said boss and forming an extension of said frame to guide and support the barrel, and a barrel sliding in said seat in said frame and having a lug or projection to enter the spring-chamber thereof.

18. In a gas-operated firearm, the combination of a frame, a barrel sliding in said frame and havinga vent in rear of the muzzle, a gas- ,cup'supported by said frame and having a hole to register with the vent of the barrel when the barrel is in its normal position, and a gas-lever connected to said barrel and having a plug to enter said gas-cup.

19. In a gas-operated firearm, the combination of a frame, a barrel sliding in said frame and having a vent in rear of the muzzle, a gas cup supported by said fra-meand having a hole to regsiter with the vent of the barrel when the barrel is in its normal position, the bottom of said gas-cup being formed to fit upon the barrel and reduced to form a knifeedge about said hole, and a gas-lever connected to said barrel and having a plug to enter said gas-cup.

20. In a gas-operated firearm, the combination of a frame, a barrel sliding in said frame and having a vent in rear of the muzzle, a gas-cup supported by said frame and having a hole to register with the vent of the barrel when the barrel is in its normal position, the bottom of said gas-cup being formed to fit upon the barrel about said vent and said barrel being reduced in the rear of said vent whereby as said barrel is moved it is cleared from the gas-cup, and a gas-lever connected to said barrel and having a plug to enter said gas-cup.

21. In a gas-operated firearm, the combination of a frame, a barrel having a vent in rear of the muzzle, a gas-lever, a brace pivoted to the frame and supporting the gas-lever and a hammer, said brace having an arm or extension to engage and to cook the hammer as it swings upon its pivot.

22. In a gas-perated firearm, the combination of a frame, a barrel having a vent in rear of the muzzle and sliding in said frame, a gaslever connected to said barrel, a brace pivoted to the frame and supporting the gas-lever and a hammer, said brace having an arm or ex tension to engage and to cook the hammer as it swings upon its pivot.

23. In'a gas-operated breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame, a barrel having a vent in rear of the muzzle, a gas-lever actuated by the escape of the gases through said vent, a second lever connected to said gas-lever, a breech-block, a firing-pin and a retractor formed to engage said firing-pin to withdraw the same and itself engaged and actuated by the second-named lever.

24:. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a fixed breech-block having an apand a barrel, one of said parts being movable toward and from the other, a guide-plate closin g one side of said cartridge-receiving chamber, and a cartridge-stop mounted on said gnide-plate and engaged by said movable part to be brought thereby into the line of the cartridge-feed to limit the movement of each cartridge in succession.

26. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-receiv-' ing chamber and means to feed the cartridges into said chamber in position for insert-ion into the barrel, of a breechblock and a barrel, one of said parts being movable toward and from the other, a guide-plate closing one side of said cartridge-receivin g chamber, a cartridge-stop mounted to slide on said guideplate, and a hook connected to said stop to engage said movable part, said guide-plate having an incline to disengage said hook from said movable part.

27. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-receivin g chamber and means to feed the cartridges into said chamber in position for insertion into the barrel, of a breech-block fixed in said frame, a barrel sliding in said frame, a guideplate supported by said frame to close one side of said cartridge-receiving chamber, and a cartridge-stop mounted on said guide-plate and engaged by said barrel to be brought thereby into the line of the cartridge-feed to limit the movement of each cartridge in succession.

28. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-receiving chamber, and a cartridge-holder having a spring-follower to feed the cartridges into said chamber in position for insertion into the barrel, of a breech-block and a barrel, one of said parts being movable toward and from the other, a guide-plate closing one side of said cartridge-receiving chamber, and a cartridgestop mounted on said guide-plate in opposition to said spring-follower and engaged by said movable part to be brought thereby into the line of the cartridge-feed d uring the movement of each cartridge in succession.

29. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartrid ge-receiving chamber, and means to feed the cartridges into said chamber in position for insertion into the barrel, of a breech-block and a barrel, one of said parts being movable toward and from the other, and a recess being formed in the end or face of one of said parts, a guide-plate closing one side of said cartridge-receiving chamber, a block mounted on said guide-plate and engaged by said movable part to be moved into and out of line of the cartridge-feed, and a downwardly-projecting plate carried by said block and adapted to enter said recess when said movable part is in proximity to the stationary part, and to be moved by said block into position to limit the movement of each cartridge in succession when said movable part is moved to open the cartridge-chamber.

30. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-chamber and a breech-block and a barrel, one of which parts is movable toward and from the other,of a cartridge-holderbelow said chamber and cartridge-feeding devices and an escapement device located below said chamber and in proximity to the end of said holder and op erated by said movable part and cooperating with the cartridge-holder to prevent or permit the escape of cartridges therefrom.

31. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with the frame having a cartridgechamber and a breech-block and a barrel, one of which parts is movable toward and from the other, of a cartridge-holder below said chamber a'nd cartridge-feeding devices, and a rod sliding in said frame below said chamber and in proximity to the end of said holder and operated by said movable part, said rod having a shoulder to stand in the path of each cartridge-head and, in cooperation with said.

holder, to prevent the delivery of the cartridge from the holder or to be moved therefrom to permit the delivery of the cartridge.

32. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-chamber and a breech-block and a barrel, one of which parts is movable toward and from the other, of a cartridge-holder below said chamber supported in said frame and having its rear upper corner cut away, cartridge-feeding devices, and a rod sliding in said frame below said chamber and in proximity to the end of said holder and operated by said movable part to bring a shoulder thereon into the cut-away portion of said holder to stand in the path'of the cartridge-head or to be moved .therefrom and, in cooperation with said,

holder, to prevent the delivery of the cartridge from the holder or to be moved therefrom to permit the delivery of the cartridge.

33. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-chamber, a stationary breech-block and a barrel sliding in said frame, of a cartridge-holder below said chamber and cartridge-feeding de vices, and a rod sliding in said frame below said chamber and in proximity to the end of said holder and operated by said sliding barrel, said rod having a shoulder to be moved therewith into or out of the path of the car tridge-head and, in cooperation with said holder, to prevent the delivery of the cartridge from the holder or to be moved therefrom to permit the delivery of the cartridge.

34. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-chamber, a stationary breech-block and a barrel sliding in said frame, of a cartridge-holder below said chamber and cartridge-feeding devices,an escapement device located below said chamber andin proximity to the end of said holder to cooperate with the cartridge-holder and prevent or permit the escape of cartridges therefrom and a slide mounted on said frame to be operated by said barrel and actuating said escapement device.

35. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-chamber, a stationary breech-block and a barrel sliding in said frame, of a cartridge-holder below said chamber and cartridge-feeding devices, a rod sliding in said frame below said chamber and in proximity to the end of said holder and having a shoulder to cooperate with the cartridge-holder to prevent or permit the escape of cartridges therefrom and having also operating-shoulders and a slide mounted on said frame and moved to and fro by said barrel to engage one or the other of ,said operating-shoulders.

36. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame, a sliding barrel, a fixed breech-block, and an extractor formed to engage each cartridge or shell as the barrel moves forward and sliding longitudinally and moving laterally to a limited extent in said frame, said extractor having a lateral'camsurface or incline to cooperate with an abutment, whereby as the extractor is moved forward with the barrel it is forced positively inward to engage said cartridge or shell.

37. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame, a sliding barrel, a fixed breech-block, an extractor formed to engage each cartridge or shell as the barrel moves forward and sliding longitudinally and moving laterally to a limited extent in said frame, said extractor having a lateral cam-surface or incline to cooperate with an abutment, whereby as the extractor is moved forward with the barrel and shell it is forced positively inward to engage said shell, and a spring to impel said extractor forward.

38. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination of a frame, a sliding barrel, a fixed breech-block, an extractor formed to engage each cartridge or shell as the barrel moves forward and sliding longitudinally and movin g'laterally to a limited extent in said frame, said extractor having a lateral cam-surface or incline to cooperate with an abutment, whereby as the extractor is moved forward with the barrel it is forced positively inward to engage said cartridge or shell, and a pin carried by said frame and entering loosely a recess in the'end of said extractor to retain the same in the frame and form a fulcrum therefor.

39. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-receiving chamber, and a breech-block and a barrel, the one of said parts being movable toward and from the othert-o open the cartridge-receiving chamber, of an ejector forced inward with a spring-pressure and having its free end normally overlying the breech-block and held from the cartridge thereby, the said breech-block and the said ejector having relative longitudinal movement, v.whereby as the cartridge-chamberis opened the ejector is permitted to move inward into engagement with the shell.

40. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-receiving chamber, and a breech-block and a barrel, the one of said parts being movable toward and from the other to open said cartridge-receiving chamber, of an ejector, the said breech-block and the said ejector having relative longitudinal movements, whereby as the cartridge-chamber is opened the ejector is permitted to move inward into engagement with the shell, an extractor carried by the breech-block on the opposite side of the cartridge-receiving chamber and an abutment carried by the frame to engage the ejector and hold the same positively from outward movement, whereby the shell is held for the proper action of the extractor.

41. In a breech-loading firearm, the combi nation with a frame having a cartridge-receiving chamber, and a breech-block and a barrel, the one of said parts being movable toward and from the other to open the cartridge-receiving chamber, of an ejector having a relative longitudinal movement with respect to the breech-block and moving inward into engagement with the shell during such longitudinal movement, an extractor carried by the breech-block on the opposite side of the cartridge-receiving chamber and having a limited longitudinal movement with respect to the breech-block, and an abutment carried by the "frame to engage the ejector and hold the same positively from outward movement, whereby the shell is held for the proper action of the extractor.

42. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-recei vin g chamber, a fixed breech-block and abarrel sliding in said frame, of a spring-ejector carried with the barrel and held normally tridge-receiving chamber, and an abutment carried on said frame to engage said ejector as it is moved forward and inward to hold the same positively from outward movement.

44:. In a breech-loading firearm, the combi nation with a frame having a cartridge-receiving chamber, a fixed breech-block and a barrel sliding in said frame, of an ejector sliding in a slot in the side of said frame, and moved longitudinally by the barrel at the end of its forward and of its rearward movement, said barrel being formed to underride said ejector 'andto hold the same during its rearward movement.

45. In a breech-loading firearm, the comb1- nation with a frame having a cartridge-receivrel sliding in said frame, a spring-ejector sliding in a slot in said frame and moved longitudinally therein by the barrel at the end of its forward and rearward movement, the

forward end of said slotin the frame inclining forward and outward, whereby as the ejector is moved forward by the barrel it is permitted to move inward to engage the cartridge-shell, but as barrel and ejector approach the end of their forward movement,

the ejector is positively moved outward from.

the cartridge-receiving chamber by contact with the inclined end of said slot;

' 46. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a cartridge-receiv- -ing chamber, and having its side wall longitudinally slotted, a fixed breech-block and a barrel sliding in said frame, a plate disposed within said frame and engaged by projections on said barrel and an ejector moving in said slot and secured to said plate to be moved therewith.

47. In a gas-operated firearm, the combination of a frame, a barrel having a vent in rear of the muzzle, a gas-lever, a brace pivoted to the frame and supporting the gas-lever, a hammer and a spring for yieldingly holding said hammer in its normal position, said brace having an arm to engage and cock the hammer as it swings on its pivot, whereby the pressure of said spring against the hammer, in its normal position, yieldingly holds the brace and the gas-lever in their closed position.

48. In a breech-loading firearm, the combination with a frame having a magazine-chamber, a hammer and asear to engage said haming chamber, a fixed breech-block and a bar- IOC mer, said hammer and sear being pivotally mounted in rear of said chamber below the barrel, of a trigger pivoted at a point below the line of pressure thereon in front of said magazine-chamber and having a rigid arm extending rearwardly and formed with a cam to engage and move the sear.

49. In a firearm having a magazine-chamber, the combination with a hammer and a sear to engage the hammer, the said hammer and sear being mounted in rear of said chamber, of a triggerpivoted in front of said chamber having a rigid arm extended rearwardly toward said sear, said arm having a cam-like projection to engage a projection on the scar and release the scar and to pass beyond said projection in the continued movement of the trigger, leaving the sear free to engage the hammer again as the latter is cooked.

50. In a firearm, the combination with a hammer and a sear to engage the hammer, of a trigger having an arm extended toward said sear, said arm being rigid in one plane and flexible in another plane and having a camlike projection to engage a projection on the sear, whereby as the trigger is moved in one direction the cam-like projection on said arm will engage and shift the scar and as the triggeris moved in the opposite direction said arm will yield to permit the projection thereon to pass by the sear, substantially as shown and described.

51. In a firearm, the combination with a hammer and a sear having a cam-like projection undercut in one direction, of a trigger having an arm extended toward said sear, said arm being flexible in one plane and having a cam-like projection to engage the projection on the scar and undercut in the opposite di rection, whereby the movement of the trigger is caused to effect the movement of the sear and the disengagement of said cam-like projection during such movement is prevented, substantially as shown and described.

52. In a firearm, the combination with a hammer and a scar to engage the hammer, of a trigger having an arm extended toward said sear, said arm being rigid in one plane and flexible in another plane and having a proj ection with a canrsurface inclining to the rear and asecond cam-surface inclined to one side, said sear having also a projection with camsurfaces to cooperate respectively with the cam-surfaces of the projection on said arm, whereby during the movement of the trigger in one direction the projection on said arm effects movement of the sear to release the hammer and during movement of the trigger in the opposite direction the arm yields laterally and permits the projection thereon to slip over the projection on the sear, snbstantially as shown and described.

This specification signed and witnessed this 12th day of February, A. D. 1896.

CARL J. EHBETS. In presence of JAS. S. BRYANT,

A. L. ULRICH.

US580935D ehbets Expired - Lifetime US580935A (en)

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US580935A true US580935A (en) 1897-04-20

Family

ID=2649613

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US580935D Expired - Lifetime US580935A (en) ehbets

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US580935A (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2436937A (en) * 1945-05-23 1948-03-02 Gen Motors Corp Shell ejecting mechanism for machine guns
US2484444A (en) * 1945-04-14 1949-10-11 Mossberg & Sons O F Cartridge ejector for firearms
US2780881A (en) * 1950-01-31 1957-02-12 Remington Arms Co Inc Firearm ejector
US2807902A (en) * 1954-04-16 1957-10-01 Olin Mathieson Cartridge extractors
US2869268A (en) * 1955-09-07 1959-01-20 Sears Roebuck & Co Spring ejector means
US3094803A (en) * 1961-02-23 1963-06-25 Noble Mfg Co Inc Bolt action magazine firearm with a cantilever spring for holding cartridges in the magazine
US3783739A (en) * 1971-12-07 1974-01-08 W Perrine Gun toggle mechanism with biasing means positioned in predetermined area on toggle to absorb shell explosive reactive forces
US20050132628A1 (en) * 2003-12-22 2005-06-23 Olson Douglas D. Trigger assemblies for grenade launcher attachments to gas-operated rifles
US8061255B1 (en) 2008-02-01 2011-11-22 Arne Bengt Boberg Firearm with cartridge pick-and-place mechanism
EP2609892A1 (en) 2011-12-28 2013-07-03 Cook Medical Technologies LLC Ureteral stent
US9777980B2 (en) 2013-09-13 2017-10-03 Heizer Defense, LLC Compact semi-automatic firearm

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2484444A (en) * 1945-04-14 1949-10-11 Mossberg & Sons O F Cartridge ejector for firearms
US2436937A (en) * 1945-05-23 1948-03-02 Gen Motors Corp Shell ejecting mechanism for machine guns
US2780881A (en) * 1950-01-31 1957-02-12 Remington Arms Co Inc Firearm ejector
US2807902A (en) * 1954-04-16 1957-10-01 Olin Mathieson Cartridge extractors
US2869268A (en) * 1955-09-07 1959-01-20 Sears Roebuck & Co Spring ejector means
US3094803A (en) * 1961-02-23 1963-06-25 Noble Mfg Co Inc Bolt action magazine firearm with a cantilever spring for holding cartridges in the magazine
US3783739A (en) * 1971-12-07 1974-01-08 W Perrine Gun toggle mechanism with biasing means positioned in predetermined area on toggle to absorb shell explosive reactive forces
US20050132628A1 (en) * 2003-12-22 2005-06-23 Olson Douglas D. Trigger assemblies for grenade launcher attachments to gas-operated rifles
US7010879B2 (en) * 2003-12-22 2006-03-14 Knight's Armament Company Trigger assemblies for grenade launcher attachments to gas-operated rifles
US8061255B1 (en) 2008-02-01 2011-11-22 Arne Bengt Boberg Firearm with cartridge pick-and-place mechanism
EP2609892A1 (en) 2011-12-28 2013-07-03 Cook Medical Technologies LLC Ureteral stent
US9777980B2 (en) 2013-09-13 2017-10-03 Heizer Defense, LLC Compact semi-automatic firearm

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3566744A (en) Automatic gun receiver combination
US3846928A (en) Bolt latch for auto loading firearm
US1972763A (en) Firearm construction
US2336146A (en) Firearm
US853715A (en) Firearm.
GB376316A (en) Improvements in automatic firearms
US2125350A (en) Firearm
US681439A (en) Magazine-gun.
US960825A (en) Automatic gun.
US1226478A (en) Automatic firearm.
US1028032A (en) Automatic repeating firearm.
US580924A (en) Firearm
US1451443A (en) Machine gun
US1293021A (en) Automatic machine-gun.
US858745A (en) One-pounder machine-gun.
US3680433A (en) Semi-automatic shotgun having rotary and sliding breech block
US2719375A (en) Firearm with a pair of action bars
US2645873A (en) Slide-actuated firearm with tilting locking block
US684055A (en) Automatic firearm.
US747585A (en) Automatic firearm.
US2865255A (en) Firearm with transversely movable barrel chamber
US1851696A (en) Firearm
US1907163A (en) Automatic gun
US642018A (en) Automatic machine-gun.
US797420A (en) Firearm.