US4121750A - Processes for soldering aluminum-containing workpieces - Google Patents

Processes for soldering aluminum-containing workpieces Download PDF

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US4121750A
US4121750A US05729039 US72903976A US4121750A US 4121750 A US4121750 A US 4121750A US 05729039 US05729039 US 05729039 US 72903976 A US72903976 A US 72903976A US 4121750 A US4121750 A US 4121750A
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filler metal
weight
aluminum
workpieces
method
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US05729039
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Heinz Schoer
Werner Schultze
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Hydro Aluminium Deutschland GmbH
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Hydro Aluminium Deutschland GmbH
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K35/00Rods, electrodes, materials, or media, for use in soldering, welding, or cutting
    • B23K35/22Rods, electrodes, materials, or media, for use in soldering, welding, or cutting characterised by the composition or nature of the material
    • B23K35/24Selection of soldering or welding materials proper
    • B23K35/28Selection of soldering or welding materials proper with the principal constituent melting at less than 950 degrees C
    • B23K35/286Al as the principal constituent
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K35/00Rods, electrodes, materials, or media, for use in soldering, welding, or cutting
    • B23K35/22Rods, electrodes, materials, or media, for use in soldering, welding, or cutting characterised by the composition or nature of the material
    • B23K35/24Selection of soldering or welding materials proper
    • B23K35/28Selection of soldering or welding materials proper with the principal constituent melting at less than 950 degrees C
    • B23K35/286Al as the principal constituent
    • B23K35/288Al as the principal constituent with Sn or Zn

Abstract

Processes and compositions for soldering aluminum-containing workpieces wherein the solder contains components which lower the surface tension and the viscosity of the molten solder, and which lower the interfacial tension between the solder and the aluminum-containing workpieces. Useful components are bismuth, strontium, barium and antimony. The solder may be used with or without flux.

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 368,627, filed June 11, 1973 and now abandoned which is a continuation in part of our prior application Ser. No. 098,173 filed Dec. 14, 1970 now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In the soldering process, in contrast to what happens during welding, the added metal must melt, but the workpiece itself must not melt. For this reason, the melting region of the solder and the work temperature must lie beneath the melting point of the workpiece. The term "soldering" is commonly used to refer to processes for joining together metal surfaces with an alloy which may be a soft or a hard solder, and the term is used herein in this broad sense. When a hard solder is used, the process, which is generally carried out at a temperature above 450° C., is also referred to and known as brazing and the hard solder is referred to as a brazing alloy. Soft or common solder is used at temperatures below 450° C. and hard solder is relatively infusible as compared with soft solder.

In the soldering of aluminum and aluminum alloys, a serious problem exists by reason of the fact that a very resistant layer of oxide is present on the surface and prevents the molten solder from wetting the metal therebeneath. Although this oxide layer is very thin, it is nevertheless dense and stable, and after removal, a new film reforms spontaneously, even during the soldering process, so long as the operation is carried out in an oxidizing atmosphere such as air. It has hitherto been necessary for the soldering of aluminum-containing workpieces to remove the oxide layer from the region where the soldering is to take place, either by mechanical or by chemical means. One such method has been friction soldering, a special technique in which soft solder is applied and the oxide layer removed together with the molten solder. In a variation of this technique, ultrasonic soldering has been attempted but such technique has not come into common use.

Apart from such special processes, the removal of the oxide layer has been carried out by means of fluxes which, in addition, prevent the formation of a new oxide layer. The fluxes suitable for use in the soldering of aluminum, in general, are chlorides or fluorides and, for soft soldering, pure organic compounds are also used. All fluxes have the disadvantage that they lead to corrosion, most leading to very strong corrosion, and consequently residues must be completely removed. Moreover, there is always the danger of inclusion of flux in the solder joint. Residues and inclusions of flux damage the corrosion resistance of the solder portion, especially when dampness has access to the soldered joint. Removal of solder residues is costly and consequently is generally not complete. It is for such reasons that research has been directed to solders and especially hard solders which can operate without fluxes.

The difficulties described above become especially significant when the standards of strength and corrosion resistance for a soldered joint are considered. Solders previously used for soldering aluminum without flux have consequently not matured to actual practice or commercial production. As examples of processes that have been proposed in United States patents and publications, it has been recommended that the oxide layer be removed either through exothermic reaction or by reduction at the location where the joint is to be made, and this be carried out either in a high vacuum at an absolute pressure of about 10-6 torr, or with a combination of a reduction process in a vacuum at an absolute pressure of about 10-4 torr. In such processes, the solder, as well as any additional components, are generally added in the form of a mixture of powder.

In addition to the very dubious efficiency of the removal of oxide by the foregoing methods, these methods also have the disadvantages that the powders must be protected from oxidation during their preparation and stratification of the components must be prevented when the powder is applied to the workpiece, making such processes unsuitable for quantity production of aluminum workpieces. Also, large-scale use of high vacuum for soldering requires high costs for preparation and operation. Consequently, such processes can be used in only very special cases, such as for the manufacture of parts to be used with reactors or rockets.

As a general rule, the solders used for soldering aluminum-containing workpieces have the disadvantage of relatively high viscosity and surface tension, as well as poor wetting characteristics. This is particularly true for hard solders which, as stated above, have special significance. Such hard solders are usually of the aluminum-silicon (Al-Sl) type which may also contain copper (Cu), magnesium (Mg), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn) and cadmium (Cd). In addition to the commercial soft solders, there are zinc-aluminum (Zn-Al) solders which, according to the particular compositions and thereby the operating temperature, can be rated either as hard or as soft solders.

In order to avoid the difficulties of high viscosity and high surface tension, the flux contains in part additives in the form of zinc salts which produce a metal layer on the clean basic metal surface and increase the wetting by the solder at the point of joining.

A method for the preparation of solder to be used for soldering pure aluminum or nearly pure aluminum was disclosed in German Pat. No. 66,398, in which a substantial portion of the pure aluminum was melted and then the surface of the molten metal was covered with a layer of phosphoric acid, sodium bisulfate, fluorine compounds, or other acidic salts, and finally, to the molten metal was added a small quantity of copper and tin; or copper bismuth, zinc and tin; or copper, antimony, bismuth and zinc; or copper, bismuth, antimony and tin. Although this patent was issued in 1891, this process has never come into use. Such a solder would not be practical owing to the small difference in temperature between the melting point of the solder and of the workpiece, and the only reason why it was considered at all, was due to the fact that the melting point of aluminum was thought to be 800° C. at that time (page 1, left-hand column, paragraph 2 of that patent), when it is actually 659.7° C.

As was stated above, the fundamental problem in the soldering of aluminum lies in the fact that the workpiece is always covered with a skin of aluminum oxide which is only poorly wetted by the molten solder. It was therefore previously concluded that, for the achievement of satisfactory soldered joints on aluminum-containing workpieces, the oxide skin must be broken down and removed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In contrast to the view previously adopted with respect to the problem of soldering aluminum-containing workpieces, we have found that the wettability of the region to be soldered can be greatly improved by the addition of metallic elements other than those which have been previously used in solders for this purpose, which added elements reduce the viscosity and the surface tension of the molten solder and similarly reduce the interfacial tension between the molten solder and the workpiece.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Our researches have shown that a strong reduction of the viscosity and the surface tension of the molten solder, as well as of the interfacial tension between the molten solder and the workpiece, can be achieved by the addition of bismuth and/or strontium and/or barium and/or antimony in quantities of 0.01 to 10%, and preferably 0.05 to 2%, where these solders are free of silicon. However, it is also possible to prepare a suitable solder which contains at least 6% silicon as well as bismuth and/or strontium and/or barium and/or antimony in quantities of 0.01 to 10%, and preferably 0.05 to 2%.

Suitable solders for use in the soldering processes of the present invention may be of the following alloy types:

(a) Between 2 and 26% by weight of aluminum with the remainder being zinc;

(b) Between 6 and 20% by weight of silicon, with optionally various quantities of other alloying elements such as copper, magnesium, nickel, zinc, tin, and cadmium with the remainder being aluminum.

(c) Between 26 and 45% by weight of aluminum, and optionally up to 1% by weight of manganese, with the remainder being zinc.

Solders of all three of the foregoing types may, and preferably will, contain between 0.01 and 10% by weight of at least one of the metals of the group consisting of bismuth, strontium, barium, and antimony, as hereinbefore stated.

Solders of type a are soft solders whereas solders of types b and c are hard solders. Specific examples of solder compositions of each of these types are indicated in the Examples hereinafter.

We have discovered that solders such as are disclosed herein are suitable for use in fluxless soldering of aluminum when such soldering is carried out in a nonoxidizing atmosphere, or in an atmosphere containing only a small proportion of oxygen. A suitable method is to use an inert solder-blanketing gas such as argon of welding grade, nitrogen of commercial purity, or ammonia. Another method is to work in a low vacuum having for instance an absolute pressure of between 10-1 and 10 torr. Vacua in the range of absolute pressures between 10-1 and 10-6 torr as have been proposed for previously described methods of fluxless soldering, are definitely unnecessary for the processes of the present invention. More than the conventional precautions, such as the careful cleaning and drying of the area, which have hitherto been necessary, are not required in the soldering processes of the present invention. As with fluxless solders, the present process has the advantage that acid treatment to remove flux residues is not necessary.

The above-described reduction of the surface tension and viscosity, and the thereby improved wetting properties are also, naturally, an advantage when the soldering is carried out with an added flux. The addition of special materials to the flux to improve its wetting properties can be omitted when the solders described herein are used. Moreover, the composition of the flux can be altered in such a way that advantages are achieved in the removal of the flux residues. Solders having the compositions specified herein can be prepared and used in all of the conventionally used forms, such as wires, bars, shaped pieces, foils and solder plated sheets.

Examples of typical soldering compositions which can be used in the processes in accordance with the present invention are the following:

______________________________________EXAMPLE 1Si              11.7%Mn              0.09%Mg              0.03%Fe              0.35%Ti              0.02%Cu              0.02%Zn              0.05%Bi              0.15%Remainder aluminumEXAMPLE 2        EXAMPLE 3Si       12.3%       Si         7.2%Mn       0.07%       Mn         0.07%Mg       0.02%       Mg         0.03%Fe       0.25%       Fe         0.63%Ti       0.01%       Ti         0.04%Cu       0.01%       Cu         0.18%Zn       0.04%       Zn         0.11%Bi       0.50%       Bi         1.95%Sb       0.31%       Remainder aluminumRemainder aluminumEXAMPLE 4        EXAMPLE 5Si       8.1%        Si         15.8%Mn       0.05%       Mn         0.03%Mg       0.02%       Mg         0.04%Fe       0.49%       Fe         0.41%Ti       0.02%       Ti         0.03%Cu       0.13%       Cu         0.11%Zn       0.09%       Zn         0.18%Ba       2.13%       Sb         1.11%Sr       0.76%       Ba         1.37%Remainder aluminum            Remainder aluminumEXAMPLE 6        EXAMPLE 7Si       16.5%       Zn         95.70%Mn       0.03%       Al         3.95%Mg       0.03%       Bi         0.34%Fe       0.43%       Impurities 0.01%Ti       0.03%Cu       0.13%Zn       0.17%Ba       1.78%Remainder aluminumEXAMPLE 8        EXAMPLE 9Zn       94.23%      Zn         67.59%Al       5.10%       Al         30.40%Bi       0.18%       Sb         1.50%Ba       0.47%       Mn         0.35%Impurities    0.02%       Impurities 0.10%EXAMPLE 10Zn              68.10%Al              28.73%Sr              2.67%Mn              0.33%Impurities      0.09%______________________________________

It will be noted that the compositions of Examples 7 and 8 are soft solders of type a.

The solders whose compositions are specified in the foregoing examples were used for soldering pure aluminum and aluminum-manganese sheets. The samples were heated in an electrically heated oven. In all cases, soldering of aluminum workpieces was carried out without fluxes in a protective gas atmosphere with a gas such as argon or nitrogen. The soldering temperatures for the hard aluminum-silicon solders are between 590° and 605° C., for the zinc-aluminum hard solders (type c) between 530° and 545° C., and for the zinc-aluminum soft solders (type a) are between 400° and 415° C. The soldering time amounted to about 2 minutes. In all cases, satisfactory soldered joints were achieved.

In contrast thereto, attempts to prepare soldered joints with aluminum-containing workpieces using the commercial solders L-AlSi 12 and ZnAl 4 failed when no flux was used. The composition of the L-AlSi 12 solder in percentages by weight is as follows:

Si: 11-13.5

Mn: 0.1

Fe: 0.4

Ti: 0.03

Cu: 0.03

Zn: 0.07

Other individual components 0.03

Total of other components 0.05

Al remainder

The composition of the ZnAl 4 solder in percentages by weight is as follows:

Al: 3.9

Impurities: 0.04 (Cu, Mg, Si, Fe, B, Cd, Pb)

Zn remainder:

Both solders were produced by Vereinigte Aluminum-Worke Aktiengesellschaft, Bonn.

Vibration of the sample during the soldering process did not improve the results.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalence of the following claims.

What is claimed as new and desired to be protected by Letters Patent is set forth in the appended claims.

Claims (16)

We claim:
1. A method of joining aluminum workpieces bearing an aluminum oxide surface layer which comprises:
interposing between said workpieces an aluminum-silicon filler material consisting essentially of aluminum containing from 6 to 20% by weight of silicon and from 0.01 to 10.0% by weight of an aluminum wetting agent selected from the group consisting of bismuth, antimony, strontium and barium,
heating said workpieces in contact with said filler material with a heating device to a temperature in the range from about 590° C. to about 605° C. wherein the resulting viscosity and surface tension of said filler material at said temperature is less than the viscosity and surface tension of said filler material in the absence of said wetting agent and the interfacial tension between said filler material and said workpieces is lower than the interfacial tension in the absence of said wetting agent and,
performing said heating step in a substantially non-oxidizing atmosphere and in the absence of a flux.
2. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein said filler metal contains about 0.05 to 2.0% by weight of said substance.
3. In the method of joining aluminum containing workpieces which comprises heating in contact with said aluminum containing workpieces a filler metal having a normal viscosity and a normal surface tension in its molten state and a normal interfacial tension between said molten filler metal and said workpieces, the improvement which comprises:
interposing between said workpieces a filler metal consisting essentially of zinc, about 2 to 25% by weight of aluminum, up to about 1% by weight of manganese and about 0.01% to about 10.0% by weight of at least one substance selected from the group consisting of bismuth, strontium, barium and antimony to substantially decrease the normal interfacial tension between said molten filler metal and said workpieces and to lower the normal viscosity and the normal surface tension of said molten filler metal,
maintaining said workpieces and said filler metal in a substantially non-oxidizing atmosphere,
non-exothermically raising the temperature of said filler metal in said substantially non-oxidizing atmosphere until said filler metal has reached a molten condition, said temperature raising step being performed in the absence of a flux and said filler metal being raised to a temperature substantially below the melting point of aluminum.
4. A method as defined in claim 3 wherein said filler metal is free of Si.
5. A method as defined in claim 3 wherein said filler metal contains up to 26% by weight of aluminum.
6. A method as defined in claim 3 wherein said filler metal contains at least 26% by weight of aluminum.
7. In the method of joining aluminum workpieces which comprises heating in contact with said aluminum workpieces an aluminum-silicon filler metal having a normal viscosity and a normal surface tension in its molten condition and a normal interfacial tension between said molten filler metal and said workpieces, the improvement which comprises:
interposing between said workpieces an aluminum-silicon base filler metal containing at least about 0.01% by weight of at least one substance selected from the group consisting of bismuth, strontium, barium and antimony to substantially decrease the normal interfacial tension between said molten filler metal and said workpieces and to lower the normal viscosity and the normal surface tension of said molten filler metal,
maintaining said workpiece and said filler metal in a substantially non-oxidizing atmosphere,
raising the temperature of said filler metal with a heating device in said substantially non-oxidizing atmosphere until said filler metal has reached a molten state, and
performing said temperature raise in the absence of a flux and said raised temperature being substantially below the melting point of aluminum.
8. A method as defined in claim 7 wherein said filler metal comprises at least 6% by weight of Si.
9. A method as defined in claim 7 wherein said filler metal comprises substantially 6-20% by weight of Si and substantially 0.01 to 10% by weight of said substance.
10. A method as defined in claim 7 wherein said filler metal comprises at least one substance selected from the group consisting of Cu, Mg, Ni, Sn, Zn, and Cd.
11. A method as defined in claim 10 wherein said filler metal comprises substantially 0.05 to 4.7% by weight of Cu where present, substantially 0.05 to 10% by weight of Mg where present, substantially 0.03 to 4% by weight of Ni where present, substantially 0.03 to 12% by weight of Sn where present, substantially 9.3 to 10.7% by weight of Zn where present, and substantially 0.03 to 12% by weight of Cd where present.
12. A method as defined in claim 11 wherein the remainder of said filler metal is substantially Al.
13. A method as defined in claim 7 which comprises raising the temperature of said filler metal to between about 590° C. and about 605° C.
14. A method as defined in claim 7 which comprises maintaining said workpieces and said filler metal at a pressure greater than about 10-1 torr. during said joining operationg.
15. A method as defined in claim 7 wherein said filler metal contains about 0.05 to 2.0% by weight of said substance.
16. A method as defined in claim 7 wherein said filler metal contains up to about 10% by weight of said substance.
US05729039 1969-12-15 1976-10-04 Processes for soldering aluminum-containing workpieces Expired - Lifetime US4121750A (en)

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DE19691962760 DE1962760C3 (en) 1969-12-15 1969-12-15
DE1962760 1969-12-15
DE2028683 1970-06-11
DE19702028683 DE2028683A1 (en) 1970-06-11 1970-06-11 Brazing aluminium and its alloys
US36862773 true 1973-06-11 1973-06-11

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4240574A (en) * 1978-03-13 1980-12-23 Ford Motor Company Fluxless brazing of aluminum in inert gas
EP0039153A1 (en) * 1980-04-29 1981-11-04 Marston Palmer Ltd. A sheet of foil, clad sheet of aluminium and method of brazing using a strontium containing brazing alloy
US4929511A (en) * 1983-12-06 1990-05-29 Allied-Signal Inc. Low temperature aluminum based brazing alloys
US4948031A (en) * 1986-11-10 1990-08-14 Hazeltine Corporation Process for bonding aluminum with cadmium and product thereof
US5071058A (en) * 1988-09-30 1991-12-10 Union Carbide Industrial Gases Technology Corporation Process for joining/coating using an atmosphere having a controlled oxidation capability
US5151332A (en) * 1986-11-10 1992-09-29 Hazeltine Corporation Aluminum sheets bonded with cadmium
US5351750A (en) * 1993-03-24 1994-10-04 Valeo Engine Cooling, Inc. Tubular element for a heat exchanger
US6659329B1 (en) * 1999-04-16 2003-12-09 Edison Welding Institute, Inc Soldering alloy
US20040129764A1 (en) * 2003-01-07 2004-07-08 Dong Chun Christine Reducing surface tension and oxidation potential of tin-based solders
US20090014093A1 (en) * 2006-05-25 2009-01-15 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of making and using same
US20100065549A1 (en) * 2006-12-11 2010-03-18 Alan Belohlav System and Method of Brazing Using Non-silver Metals
US20110073216A1 (en) * 2005-11-10 2011-03-31 Daniel James Jossick Brazing Material Containing A Flux
US20110089222A1 (en) * 2006-05-25 2011-04-21 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of making and using same
US20110123824A1 (en) * 2007-05-25 2011-05-26 Alan Belohlav Brazing material
USRE44343E1 (en) 2002-07-24 2013-07-09 Lucas-Milhaupt, Inc. Flux cored preforms for brazing
US9157134B2 (en) 2009-10-26 2015-10-13 Lucas-Milhaupt, Inc. Low silver, low nickel brazing material
US9731383B2 (en) 2014-07-09 2017-08-15 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of using same

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB421439A (en) * 1933-04-28 1934-12-20 Henry Petot New alloy and its applications
US2943181A (en) * 1957-09-30 1960-06-28 Vac Hyd Proc Corp Brazing process and apparatus
US3081534A (en) * 1960-11-18 1963-03-19 Armour Res Found Aluminum base brazing alloy
US3355281A (en) * 1964-04-22 1967-11-28 Nat Distillers Chem Corp Method for modifying the physical properties of aluminum casting alloys

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB421439A (en) * 1933-04-28 1934-12-20 Henry Petot New alloy and its applications
US2943181A (en) * 1957-09-30 1960-06-28 Vac Hyd Proc Corp Brazing process and apparatus
US3081534A (en) * 1960-11-18 1963-03-19 Armour Res Found Aluminum base brazing alloy
US3355281A (en) * 1964-04-22 1967-11-28 Nat Distillers Chem Corp Method for modifying the physical properties of aluminum casting alloys

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4240574A (en) * 1978-03-13 1980-12-23 Ford Motor Company Fluxless brazing of aluminum in inert gas
EP0039153A1 (en) * 1980-04-29 1981-11-04 Marston Palmer Ltd. A sheet of foil, clad sheet of aluminium and method of brazing using a strontium containing brazing alloy
US4464442A (en) * 1980-04-29 1984-08-07 Imi Marston Limited Brazing alloy
US4929511A (en) * 1983-12-06 1990-05-29 Allied-Signal Inc. Low temperature aluminum based brazing alloys
US4948031A (en) * 1986-11-10 1990-08-14 Hazeltine Corporation Process for bonding aluminum with cadmium and product thereof
US5151332A (en) * 1986-11-10 1992-09-29 Hazeltine Corporation Aluminum sheets bonded with cadmium
US5071058A (en) * 1988-09-30 1991-12-10 Union Carbide Industrial Gases Technology Corporation Process for joining/coating using an atmosphere having a controlled oxidation capability
US5351750A (en) * 1993-03-24 1994-10-04 Valeo Engine Cooling, Inc. Tubular element for a heat exchanger
US6659329B1 (en) * 1999-04-16 2003-12-09 Edison Welding Institute, Inc Soldering alloy
USRE44343E1 (en) 2002-07-24 2013-07-09 Lucas-Milhaupt, Inc. Flux cored preforms for brazing
US20040129764A1 (en) * 2003-01-07 2004-07-08 Dong Chun Christine Reducing surface tension and oxidation potential of tin-based solders
US8753455B2 (en) 2005-11-10 2014-06-17 Handy + Harman Brazing material containing a flux
US20110073216A1 (en) * 2005-11-10 2011-03-31 Daniel James Jossick Brazing Material Containing A Flux
US20110089222A1 (en) * 2006-05-25 2011-04-21 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of making and using same
US9095937B2 (en) 2006-05-25 2015-08-04 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of making and using same
US8274014B2 (en) * 2006-05-25 2012-09-25 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of making and using same
US20090014093A1 (en) * 2006-05-25 2009-01-15 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of making and using same
US10071445B2 (en) 2006-05-25 2018-09-11 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of making and using same
US8507833B2 (en) 2006-12-11 2013-08-13 Lucas-Milhaupt, Inc. System and method of brazing using non-silver metals
US20100065549A1 (en) * 2006-12-11 2010-03-18 Alan Belohlav System and Method of Brazing Using Non-silver Metals
US20110123824A1 (en) * 2007-05-25 2011-05-26 Alan Belohlav Brazing material
US9157134B2 (en) 2009-10-26 2015-10-13 Lucas-Milhaupt, Inc. Low silver, low nickel brazing material
US9731383B2 (en) 2014-07-09 2017-08-15 Bellman-Melcor Development, Llc Filler metal with flux for brazing and soldering and method of using same

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