US3463136A - Projectile loading mechanism for air rifle - Google Patents

Projectile loading mechanism for air rifle Download PDF

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US3463136A
US3463136A US3463136DA US3463136A US 3463136 A US3463136 A US 3463136A US 3463136D A US3463136D A US 3463136DA US 3463136 A US3463136 A US 3463136A
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magazine
barrel
port
reservoir
projectile
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John F Vadas
Edward P Joslyn
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Crosman Arms Co Inc
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Crosman Arms Co Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B11/00Compressed-gas guns, e.g. air guns; Steam guns
    • F41B11/50Magazines for compressed-gas guns; Arrangements for feeding or loading projectiles from magazines
    • F41B11/51Magazines for compressed-gas guns; Arrangements for feeding or loading projectiles from magazines the magazine being an integral, internal part of the gun housing

Description

Aug. 26, 1969 J. F. VADAS ET AL 3,463,136
- PROJEC'IILE LOADING MECHANISM FOR AIR RIFLE '7 Filed Oct. 26, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS. JOHN F. VADAS EDWARD P. JOSLYN ATTORNEY i Aug. 26, 1969 J VADAS ET AL 3,463,136
7 PROJECTILB LOADING MECHANISM FOR AIR RIFLE Filed Oct. 26, 1966 I04, |O3 /|Q |6 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 [ll W III/l A Has 72; 6'9 :8
66 INVENTORS. 4 68 JOHN F. VADAS 67 BY EDWARD P. JOSLYN F 3 AT T oRNEY United States Patent US. Cl. 124-11 9 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A magazine, which holds projectiles in single file in the gun frame, communicates at its forward end with the rear end of the gun barrel and at its rear end with the upper end of a large projectile reservoir formed in the frame beneath the magazine. A spring-loaded detent normally closes off the magazine from the reservoir, but can be opened manually to allow projectiles to roll from the reservoir into the magazine to replenish the latter, when the barrel is tilted downwardly. The bolt of the gun, which normally blocks the front end of the magazine, when retracted allows a projectile to drop from the magazine into the barrel. When the bolt is advanced, the projectile is advanced to firing position and held there until fired by a magnet on the bolt.
This invention relates to air rifles, and more particularly to a BB-type rifle.
Most BB rifles are provided with magazines, which can hold a plurality of BB-type projectiles at one time. The BB shots are usually sold in containers which hold upwards of one hundred or more projectiles; and a BB gun magazine is loaded by pouring or otherwise transferring projectiles from the container to the magazine.
A major disadvantage of prior BB rifles, however, is the magazines usually can hold only a small number of projectiles, less than the number carried in a container, and must be replenished frequently. Since the opening in the magazine through which the projectiles are fed from the container to the magazine is usually quite small, considerable care must be taken each time the magazine is loaded to avoid spilling the projectiles.
It is an object of this invention to provide an improved air rifle of the type described, which has a magazine that is easier to load than prior like rifles.
Another object of this invention is to provide an improved air rifie of the type described, whichhas a magazine of larger capacity, and which, in fact, will hold as many balls as are supplied in an ordinary packet.
Another object of this invention is to provide an air rifle of the type described which has improved means for feeding BB-type projectiles one-by-one into firing position in the rifle.
A more specific object of this invention is to provide an improved air rifle having means including a reservoir for holding and feeding upwardly of one hundred or more BB-type projectiles one-by-one into a firing position in the rifle.
Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinafter from the specification and from the recital of the appended claims, particularly when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
In the drawings:
FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view of an air rifle made in accordance with one embodiment of this invention, parts thereof being cut away and shown in section;
FIG. 2 is a fragmentary plan view of this rifle, parts again being broken away and shown in section;
3,463,136 Patented Aug. 26, 1969 "ice FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view on a somewhat enlarged scale on line 3-3 in FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows; and
FIG. 4 is a fragmentary bottom view of this rifle, parts thereof being cut away and shown in section.
The novel rifle illustrated herein has an elongate projectile magazine, which communicates at its forward end with a magazine port in the rear end of the rifle barrel, and at its rear end with a large chamber or reservoir adjacent the butt of the rifle. A manually operable, spring-loaded detent is mounted at the upper end of the reservoir normally to close the rear end of the magazine from communication with the reservoir. BB-type projectiles may be inserted into the reservoir through a large opening, which is normally closed by a spring-loaded door or cover. The magazine has a diameter which is only slightly greater than that of the average size BB; and it is filled by tipping the gun barrel downwardly, and retracting the spring-loaded detent to allow projectiles to roll from the reservoir into the rear end of the magazine. A second spring-loaded detent projects through a second port in the barrel just forward of the abovedescribed magazine port, so that as the leading projectile in the magazine enters the barrel through the magazine port, it is prevented from rolling out of the forward end of the barrel. A manually-operable bolt is reciprocable in the rear end of the barrel between a retracted position in which it uncovers the magazine port to allow a projectile to enter the barrel from the magazine, and an advanced position in which it engages and urges the last-named projectile forwardly beyond the second detent, and into registry with a third port, which connects the barrel bore with a supply of air or other gas under pressure. A magnetic tip on the bolt holds the BB in registry with this third port until the holding power of the magnet is overcome by the gas pressure which propels the BB from the barrel.
Referring now to the drawings by numerals of reference, the riflle comprises a frame or housing 10 to the rear end of which the usual stock or butt 12 (FIG. 1) is secured in conventional manner. Also secured in conventional manner at their rear end in frame or housing 10 are the barrel 16 and a pump cylinder or sleeve 18 (FIG. 1). Sleeve 18, which is secured to the barrel 16 by a screw 19, is positioned immediately beneath and parallel to the barrel, and at its rear end is closed by a plug 20 (FIG. 1).
Mounted in sleeve 18 adjacent the forward end thereof for reciprocation by a conventional pumping mechanism (not illustrated) is a piston 22 (FIG. 1). Secured in sleeve 18 rearwardly of the piston 22 is a plug 24. In its forward end the plug 24 has an axially extending duct 26, which communicates at its rear end with a chamber 27 formed in the plug 24. Mounted to reciprocate in this chamber 27 is a check valve 28, the forward end of which has a conical surface 29, which is adapted to seat against a complementary conical surface formed internally in the plug 24.
Valve 28 is urged forwardly in plug 24, to close off flow of air from duct 26, by a compression spring 31, which is housed in a chamber 32 formed in a coupling 33 that is threaded onto the rear end of plug 24. At its rear end coupling 33 has a reduced diameter axial bore 34 that communicates with chamber 32. The coupling projects at its rear slidingly and sealingly into an O- ring 36, which is secured in an annular internal groove in a valve 38. Valve 38 is mounted to reciprocate in a hollow block 40, the forward end of which surrounds the coupling 33. Block 40 is secured against the axial movement in the sleeve 18 by the plug 33, and by a tang 41, which is struck up from the sleeve 18 to engage an external shoulder 42 on block 40. Intermediate its ends block 40 has a radial port 44, which communicates with the lower end of a ring 45 that extends radially through sleeve 18 into barrel 16 to register with a radial port 46 formed in the barrel.
Mounted to reciprocate in sleeve 18 between the valve 38 and the plug 20 is a block or hammer 48. A spring 50, which is interposed between the hammer 48 and the plug 20, urges the hammer constantly forwardly into engagement with the rear end of valve 38.
Pivoted intermediate its ends on a pin 53 (FIGS. 1 and 4), which is secured in the frame beneath the rear end of the sleeve 18, is a trigger 54, the lower end of which projects downwardly into a conventional trigger guard 55. At its upper edge, the trigger 54 has a projection 57, which extends upwardly through a slot 58 in the under side of the sleeve 18 for engagement with the rear end of the hammer 48. At its forward end the trigger 54 has a downwardly-extending projection 59, which engages a safety pin 64 (FIGS. 1 and 3) that is mounted in the forward end of the trigger guard 55 for axial reciprocation between safety and release positions, respectively. Intermediate its ends pin 64 has a reduced diameter portion 65 (FIG. 3).
Mounted intermediate its ends on pin 53 adjacent the trigger 54 is a torsion spring 60, one end of which is secured in a hole 62 (FIG. 1) in the forward end of trigger 54, and the opposite end of which engages safety pin 64 to urge the trigger counterclockwise (FIG. 1) about pin 53. As illustrated in FIG. 3, pin 64 is in its safety position, and an enlarged portion 66 thereof is in engagement with projection 59 on the forward end of the trigger 54, so that the trigger cannot be pivoted to release the hammer 48. The spring 60 seats resiliently at this time in a recess 68 (FIG. 3) in the pin 64 releasably to hold the latter in this safety position. Pin 64 may be pushed manually to its opposite or release position in which the spring 60 seats in groove 67 of the pin, and the projection 59 on the trigger registers with the reduced diameter portion 65 of the pin, so that the trigger may be pivoted to release the hammer 48.
Above the rear end of the barrel 16 the frame 10 is provided with a longitudinally extending magazine 70 (FIGS. 1 and 3), which is circular in cross section, and which has a diameter only slightly larger than the diameter of a conventional BB-type projectile. This magazine communicates at its forward end with a radial port 71, which is formed in the barrel 16 rearwardly of the port 46, and communicates at its rear end with a pellet chamber or reservoir 72, which is formed in frame 10 to the rear of the trigger guard 55.
Slidable in barrel 16 and in an aligned bore 73 (FIG. 1) former in frame 10 beneath the magazine 70, is a bolt 74 (FIGS. 1 and 3). The bolt 74 has a right angular handle portion 75 that projects laterally through a slot 76 (FIG. 1) in the frame. At its forward end slot 76 communicates with a notch 77 in which the handle portion 75 of the bolt is adapted to seat, when the bolt is locked in its forward position. A magnetic pin 69 is secured in the forward end of bolt 74.
Mounted to reciprocate in a bore 78 (FIG. 1), which is formed in the frame rearwardly of the magazine 70, is a pin 79. Intermediate its ends pin 79 has a lateral projection 80, which extends upwardly through a slot 81 in the top of the frame 10. A spring 82, which is seated in the bore 78 behind the pin, urges the pin into its advance position, in which the projection 80 engages the forward end of the slot 81, and in which the forward end of the pin 79 projects into the rear end of the magazine 70 to close off the latter relative to reservoir 72.
Pivotally mounted over an opening 84 (FIGS 1 and 4) formed in one side of the frame 10 to register with the chamber 72 is a rectangular plate or cover 85. Cover 85 is slightly larger than the opening 84; and its marginal edges are held resiliently against the inside face of frame 10 around the opening 84 by a spring 86, which is seated at one end against the inside face of the cover approximately centrally thereof, and at its opposite end against a registering boss 87. which projects from the opposite side of the frame 10 into a chamber 88 formed in the frame forwardly of the chamber 72. Opposite ends of the spring 86 surround registering studs or lugs 89 and 90, which project from the confronting faces of the cover 85 and boss 87, respectively, to prevent lateral displacement of the spring 86, when the cover 85 is pivoted. Forwardly of the stud 89, two spaced lugs 91 and 92 project from the inner face of the cover 85 t0 flank opposite sides of a parition 93 that extends between opposite sides of the frame 10 at the forward end of chamber 88. Another lug 94 projects from the inside face of cover 85 into the chamber 88 to register with, and to cover, an opening 95, which is formed in the partition 96 separating chamber 72 from the chamber 88.
Mounted to reciprocate in a port 101 (FIG. 2), which is formed in the barrel 16 slightly forwardly of and at right angles to, the port 71, is a pin or detent 100. At its outer end pin 100 has an enlarged head 102, which reciprocates in a recess in an annular boss 103, which projects from the inside of the frame in registry with the port 101. A spring 104, which is seated at one end against the frame 10, and at its opposite end in a recess in the head 102, resiliently urges the pin 100 into the barrel bore.
In use, the rifle is loaded with BB-type projectiles by pushing manually against the knurled surface 97 formed on the outer face of the plate 85. This causes the plate to be pivoted about its forward end (its right end in FIG. 4) against the resistance of spring 86. During this movement the rear end (left end in FIG. 4) of the cover 85 swings in the opening in partition 96, thereby uncovering the portion of the opening 84 which registers with projectile chamber 72. A full container of BB-type projectiles may then be dumped through the opening 84 into the chamber 72. When the cover 85 is released, the spring 86 returns it to the position illustrated, wherein the projection 94 closes off the opening 95 to prevent any of the balls from spilling over from chamber 72 into chamber 88.
To load the magazine, the pin 79 is moved manually rearwardly by its projection 80, after which the barrel 16 is tilted downwardly, so balls will roll out of the chamber 72 and into the magazine 70 until the magazine is filled. The pin 79 is then released to prevent the balls in the magazine from rolling back into the reservoir 72.
The gun is loaded by manually drawing the bolt 74 to its rearmost position. The pin 69 in the forward end of the bolt is then just rearward of port 71. This permits the foremost ball P in the magazine 70 to drop down through port 71 into the barrel between pin 69 and detent 100. The bolt 74 is then advanced manually to its forward position, and is pivoted to seat its handle portion 75 in the locking notch 77. As the bolt advances, its pin 69 pushes the ball P ahead of it (FIGS. 1 and 2) past the inner end of spring loaded pin 100 into firing position just forward of port 46. Magnetic pin 69 releasably holds the projectile in this firing position so that it will not accidentally roll out of bore of the barrel should the latter be tipped downwardly before firing.
The gun is then cocked by manually manipulating the conventional pumping mechanism (not illustrated) to reciprocate the piston 22 in the sleeve 18. Each time the piston 22 advances toward the plug 24, it compresses and forces air through the duct 26, around the outside of check valve 28 into the compressed air chamber 32. Each time the piston 22 is moved away from the plug 24 the surface 29 on valve 28 seats against the forward end of the chamber 27 to prevent previously compressed air in the chamber 32 from leaking back past the valve through duct 26. During this pumping operation the projection 57 on the trigger 54 is engaged with the rear end of the hammer 48 so that the latter is releasably held in its forward position,
where it engages and holds the block 38 sealingly over the reduced diameter rear end of the plug or coupling 33.
After the pumping mechanism has been operated a sufficient number of times to develop the desired pressure in chamber 32, the gun may be fired in the usual manner by pulling the trigger 54 to pivot its projection 57 out of engagement with the rear end of the hammer 48. The compressed air in chamber 32 therefore forces the valve 38 and hammer 48 rearwardly against the resistance of spring 50 far enough to disengage the forward end of the valve 38 from the rear end of member 33, thereby permitting the compressed air to flow out of chamber 32 through bore 34, port 44, ring 45 and port 46 against the projectile then in firing position in the barrel. The forward end of the bolt 74 has a diameter slightly less than that of the projectile, so that the projectile is thus propelled by the air from the gun barrel 16.
As the pressure in chamber 32 thereafter decreases, the spring 50 returns the hammer 48 and the valve 38 forwardly to the position illustrated. Also at this time the spring *60 pivots the trigger 54 counterclockwise (FIG. 1) on the pin 53 so that the projection 57 once again is placed in engagement with the rear end of the hammer 48. The rear end of the chamber 32 is thus once again closed by the valve body 38; and the bolt 74 may once again be manipulated rearwardly and then forwardly to insert another projectile into firing position in the gun.
After the projectiles in the magazine 70 have been used up, the magazine may be replenished by once again drawing pin 79 manually rearwardly, and tipping the gun barrel downwardly so that balls from the reservoir 72 roll into the magazine.
From the foregoing it will be apparent that with the novel BB gun disclosed herein a relatively simple and reliable means has been provided for storing a very large supply of projectiles. Moreover, with this novel gun, a supply of balls may be poured easily and readily through the relatively large opening 84 into the reservoir 72; and need not be carefully inserted one-by-one through a relatively small aperture into the magazine, as was the case in most prior, like guns. In addition, by using the spring loaded detent 100, and the magnetic tip on the forward end of the bolt 74, projectiles are fed positively and accurately into firing position in the gun from the forward or discharge end of the magazine 70.
While the invention has been described in connection with a specific embodiment thereof, it will be understood that it is capable of further modification, and this application is intended to cover any variations, uses, or adaptations of the invention following, in general, the principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come within known or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains and as may be applied to the essential features hereinbefore set forth, and as fall within the scope of the invention or the limits of the appended claims.
We claim:
1. A gas-operated gun, comprising:
a frame having therein an elongate conduit defining a projectile magazine adapted to hold a plurality of projectiles,
a barrel secured at its rear end in said frame parallel to said conduit, and having its bore connected to one end of said conduit,
said frame having therein a reservoir for holding a greater number of projectiles than said conduit, and communicating with the opposite end of said conduit,
a movable member on said frame normally closing said conduit off from said reservoir, and movable manually to an open position to allow projectiles to drop from said reservoir into said conduit,
said conduit having a cross sectional area only slightly larger than the cross sectional area of a projectile, thereby to guide a plurality of projectiles in single file from said reservoir to said bore,
the volume and projectile capacity of said reservoir being substantially larger than that of said conduit, whereby said conduit may be replenished with projectiles from said reservoir, when said member is moved to its open position,
a movable cover mounted on said frame over an opening which communicates with said reservoir,
a portion of said cover overlying the inside face of said frame around said opening, when said cover is closed, and
a spring interposed between said frame and said cover resiliently to hold said cover closed over said open- 111g,
said cover being movable manually into said reservoir against the resistance of said spring to permit the insertion of projectiles into said reservoir through said opening.
2. A gas-operated gun, comprising:
a frame having therein an elongate conduit defining a projectile magazine adapted to hold a plurality of projectiles,
a barrel secured at its rear end in said frame parallel to said conduit, and having its bore connected to one end of said conduit,
said frame having therein a reservoir for holding a great number of projectiles than said conduit, and communicating with the opposite end of said cond-uit,
a movable member on said frame normally closing said conduit off from said reservoir, and movable manually to an open position to allow projectiles to drop from said reservoir into said conduit,
said conduit having a cross sectional area only slightly larger than the cross sectional area of a projectile, thereby to guide a plurality of projectiles in single file from said reservoir to said bore,
the volume and projectilecapacity of said reservoir being substantially larger than that of said conduit, whereby said conduit may be replenished with projectiles from said reservoir, when said member is moved to its open position,
said movable member comprising a pin mounted to move in opposite directions in a recess in said frame into and out of an advanced position in which said pin projects into said conduit to prevent projectiles in said reservoir from entering said conduit, and vice versa, and
a spring interposed between said frame and said pin resiliently to urge said pin into its advanced position,
said pin having thereon a projection which extends through an opening in said frame to the exterior thereof to permit manual movement of said pin in a direction to withdraw it from said conduit.
3. A gas-operated gun, comprising:
a frame having therein an elongate conduit defining a projectile magazine adapted to hold a plurality of projectiles,
a barrel secured at its rear end in said frame parallel to said conduit, and having its bore connected to one end of said conduit,
said frame having therein a reservoir for holding a greater number of projectiles than said conduit, and communicating with the opposite end of said conduit,
a movable member on said frame normally closing said conduit off from said reservoir, and movable manually to an open position to allow projectiles to drop from said reservoir into said conduit,
said conduit having a cross sectional area only slightly larger than the cross sectional area of a projectile, thereby to guide a plurality of projectiles in single file from said reservoir to said bore,
the volume and projectile capacity of said reservoir being substantially larger than that of said conduit, whereby said conduit may be replenished with pro- 7 jectiles from said reservoir, when said member is moved to its open position,
said reservoir being formed in said frame rearwardly of said barrel,
said conduit opening at its rear end on said reservoir, and at its forward end on a first radial port formed in said barrel adjacent the rear end thereof,
a resilient detent projecting radially into the bore of said barrel through a second radial port formed in said barrel forwardly of said first port releasably to hold a projectile against axial movement forwardly in said bore after the projectile has been delivered through said first port,
a bolt reciprocable in said bore for manual movement between a retracted position in which it uncovers said first port to allow a projectile to advance therethrough from said conduit into said bore forwardly of said bolt, and an advanced position in which it blocks said first port,
said barrel having therein a third radial port axially forwardly of said second port,
said bolt being operative upon the movement thereof from its retracted to its advanced position to force a projectile, which has passed through said first port to said bore, axially forwardly in said bore beyond said detent and said third port to a firing position in said barrel, and
trigger-operated means for admitting a supply of gas under pressure into said bore through said third port.
4. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 3 having means for releasably holding a projectile against axial movement in said bore, after the projectile is in firing position.
5. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 4, wherein the last-named means comprises a magnetic member secured on the forward end of said bolt.
6. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 5 wherein:
said magnetic member is disposed just slightly rearwardly of said first port, when said bolt is in its retracted position, and
said second port is disposed just slightly forwardly of said first port, whereby when said bolt is retracted, the axial space in said bore between said magnetic member and said detent is large enough to accommodate only one of the projectiles in said magazine.
7. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 3, wherein said trigger-operated means comprises:
a stationary, hollow valve block secured in said frame beneath said barrel,
a ring secured in said barrel coaxially of said third port and opening at one end on said third port, and at its opposite end on the interior of said block,
a compressed air chamber communicating with the interior of said block,
a valve reciprocable in said block between a closed position in which it seals off said opposite end of said ring from said chamber, and an open position in which said chamber is in communcation with said barrel bore through said ring, and
a trigger for releasably holding said valve in its closed position, and operable to release said valve for movement to its open position by the compressed air in said chamber.
8. A gas'operated gun, comprising:
a frame having therein a projectile magazine,
a barrel secured at its rear end in said frame and having in its annular wall a first port which communicates with one end of said magazine to deliver projectiles one by one from said magazine to the bore in said barrel,
a bolt reciprocable in said bore for manual movement between a retracted position in which it uncovers said first port to allow a projectile to advance therethrough from said magazine into said bore forwardly of said bolt, and an advanced position in which it blocks said first port,
a resilient detent mounted in a second port formed in said barrel forwardly of said first port, and engageable with a projectile which has passed through said first port to said bore releasably to hold the lastnamed projectile against axial movement forwardly in said bore, when said bolt is in its retracted position,
said bolt being operative upon the movement thereof from its retracted to its advanced position to force a projectile, which has entered said bore through said first port, axially forwardly in said bore beyond said detent to a firing position in said barrel, and
means for releasably holding a projectile against axial movement in said bore, after the projectile is in firing position.
9. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 8, wherein the last-named means comprises a magnetic member secured on the forward end of said bolt.
References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,862,697 6/ 1932 Mihalyi.
3,142,294 7/1964 Baldwin l2452 XR 3,297,325 1/1967 Lerner et al 124-50 XR 3,348,531 10/1967 Yano 12427 2,293,957 8/1942 Wells.
RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner W. R. BROWNE, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.
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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3913554A (en) * 1973-07-30 1975-10-21 Healthways Air operated gun
US3999534A (en) * 1974-10-30 1976-12-28 Bangor Punta Operations, Inc. Gas operated rifle
US4037344A (en) * 1976-03-22 1977-07-26 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Magnetic cartridge chambering and bolt holding system
FR2740997A1 (en) * 1995-11-10 1997-05-16 Gland Yves Device for loading of paint balls into compressed air gun
WO2005028991A2 (en) * 2003-09-16 2005-03-31 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Electronic paintball marker
US20060005825A1 (en) * 2004-02-17 2006-01-12 Monks Steven J Electro-magnetically operated bolt
US20060005822A1 (en) * 2004-02-23 2006-01-12 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Novel firing assembly for compressed gas operated launching device
US20090007895A1 (en) * 2007-01-23 2009-01-08 Bill Whistler Kenworthy Apparatus for launching subcaliber projectiles at propellant operating pressures including the range of operating pressures that may be supplied by human breath
US20090301456A1 (en) * 2008-04-24 2009-12-10 Barwick Jr Billie John Loading Pellets in Pellet Guns
US20100206283A1 (en) * 2009-02-19 2010-08-19 Yongmart Manufacturing Co., Ltd. Single-chamber type firing mechanism of paintball gun
US20110041826A1 (en) * 2009-08-24 2011-02-24 Yin-Hsi Liao Assembly structure of an action and a gas cylinder
US8893696B2 (en) 2007-01-23 2014-11-25 Bill Whistler Kenworthy Apparatus for launching subcaliber projectiles at propellant operating pressures including the range of pressures that may be supplied by human breath

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US1862697A (en) * 1930-04-19 1932-06-14 Benjamin Air Rifle Company Air rifle
US2293957A (en) * 1939-03-13 1942-08-25 Dalsy Mfg Co Air pistol
US3142294A (en) * 1958-06-10 1964-07-28 Jr Ross O Baldwin Mechanical gun
US3297325A (en) * 1964-02-17 1967-01-10 Lerner George Spring type pistol-bagatelle
US3348531A (en) * 1964-03-06 1967-10-24 Sekiden Kagaku Kogyo Co Ltd Toy gun having a divided magazine

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1862697A (en) * 1930-04-19 1932-06-14 Benjamin Air Rifle Company Air rifle
US2293957A (en) * 1939-03-13 1942-08-25 Dalsy Mfg Co Air pistol
US3142294A (en) * 1958-06-10 1964-07-28 Jr Ross O Baldwin Mechanical gun
US3297325A (en) * 1964-02-17 1967-01-10 Lerner George Spring type pistol-bagatelle
US3348531A (en) * 1964-03-06 1967-10-24 Sekiden Kagaku Kogyo Co Ltd Toy gun having a divided magazine

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3913554A (en) * 1973-07-30 1975-10-21 Healthways Air operated gun
US3999534A (en) * 1974-10-30 1976-12-28 Bangor Punta Operations, Inc. Gas operated rifle
US4037344A (en) * 1976-03-22 1977-07-26 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Magnetic cartridge chambering and bolt holding system
FR2740997A1 (en) * 1995-11-10 1997-05-16 Gland Yves Device for loading of paint balls into compressed air gun
US20070215135A1 (en) * 2003-09-16 2007-09-20 Aj Acquisition I Llc Electronic paintball marker
WO2005028991A2 (en) * 2003-09-16 2005-03-31 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Electronic paintball marker
WO2005028991A3 (en) * 2003-09-16 2005-09-01 John E Campo Electronic paintball marker
US7624727B2 (en) 2003-09-16 2009-12-01 Kee Action Sports I Llc Electronic paintball marker
US20060005825A1 (en) * 2004-02-17 2006-01-12 Monks Steven J Electro-magnetically operated bolt
US7607424B2 (en) * 2004-02-17 2009-10-27 Planet Eclipse Limited Electro-magnetically operated rotating projectile loader
US20060005822A1 (en) * 2004-02-23 2006-01-12 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Novel firing assembly for compressed gas operated launching device
US20070028910A1 (en) * 2004-02-23 2007-02-08 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Novel firing assembly for compressed gas operated launching device
US7159585B2 (en) 2004-02-23 2007-01-09 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Firing assembly for compressed gas operated launching device
US8297268B2 (en) 2007-01-23 2012-10-30 Bill Whistler Kenworthy Apparatus for launching subcaliber projectiles at propellant operating pressures including the range of operating pressures that may be supplied by human breath
US20090007895A1 (en) * 2007-01-23 2009-01-08 Bill Whistler Kenworthy Apparatus for launching subcaliber projectiles at propellant operating pressures including the range of operating pressures that may be supplied by human breath
US8893696B2 (en) 2007-01-23 2014-11-25 Bill Whistler Kenworthy Apparatus for launching subcaliber projectiles at propellant operating pressures including the range of pressures that may be supplied by human breath
US8291894B2 (en) 2008-04-24 2012-10-23 Barwick Jr Billie John Loading pellets in pellet guns
US20090301456A1 (en) * 2008-04-24 2009-12-10 Barwick Jr Billie John Loading Pellets in Pellet Guns
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US20100206283A1 (en) * 2009-02-19 2010-08-19 Yongmart Manufacturing Co., Ltd. Single-chamber type firing mechanism of paintball gun
US20110041826A1 (en) * 2009-08-24 2011-02-24 Yin-Hsi Liao Assembly structure of an action and a gas cylinder
US7931017B2 (en) * 2009-08-24 2011-04-26 Guay Guay Trading Co., Ltd. Assembly structure of an action and a gas cylinder

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