US3345969A - Sailing rig - Google Patents

Sailing rig Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3345969A
US3345969A US541320A US54132066A US3345969A US 3345969 A US3345969 A US 3345969A US 541320 A US541320 A US 541320A US 54132066 A US54132066 A US 54132066A US 3345969 A US3345969 A US 3345969A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
jib
boom
mainsail
mast
sailing
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US541320A
Inventor
Purvis Minton Grier
Original Assignee
Purvis Minton Grier
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Purvis Minton Grier filed Critical Purvis Minton Grier
Priority to US541320A priority Critical patent/US3345969A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3345969A publication Critical patent/US3345969A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63HMARINE PROPULSION OR STEERING
    • B63H9/00Marine propulsion provided directly by wind power
    • B63H9/04Marine propulsion provided directly by wind power using sails or like wind-catching surfaces
    • B63H9/08Connections of sails to masts, spars, or the like
    • B63H9/10Running rigging, e.g. reefing equipment

Description

Oct, 10, 1967 M. c;` PuRvls v 3,345,969
SAILING RIG Filed April 8, 1966 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Oct. 10, 1967 M. G. PuRvls SAILING RIG 5 S'heecs--Sheetl 2 Filed April 8, 1966 Oct. l0, 1967 M. G. PuRvls 3,345,969
SAILING RIG Filed April e, 196e s sheets-sheet :s
EZ .i 4@ MM/2 mzw y @Mm United States. Patent C 3,345,969 SAILING RIG Minton Grier Purvis, 1947 Greenwood Ave., Wilmette, Ill. 60091 Filed Apr. 8, 1966, Ser. No. 541,320 11 Claims. (Cl. 114-102) ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates generally to improvements in sailing rigs and one embodiment as disclosed herein consists of a frame carried as a unit 4by the forward portion of a boom, said frame including a forward extension which provides abutments engageable with opposite sides of a jib boom structure. The jib boom structure at its forward extremity is secured against unauthorized upward displacement by a device which functions independently of the boom and frame structures to secure the jib boom in its proper position against vertical shifting. The after extremity of the jib boom structure is pivotally supported at a point adjacent to and preferably forward of the mast axis, and jib sheet guiding means supported by the frame is designated to direct jib sheets to a point adjacent the mast axis and thereby preclude any substantial longitudinal shifting of the jib sheets when the boom is shifted laterally.
Conventional or standar-d type sailboats of the type employing fore and aft sails, which include a jib and mainsail, are designed so as to require independent trimming of each sail. Thus it is common practice to employ a main sheet which leads from the main boom to a deck fitting and a jib sheet which also leads from the jib clew to a deck fitting. It is also conventional practice to secure the tack of the jib to a forward fitting on the deck or bowsprit and to secure the peak or-head portion of the jib by a halyard which leads downwardly from an upper sheave on the mast to a `deck fitting or cleat. Such sailing rigs require the trimming of the mainsail independently of the jib and vice. versa. One of the important objects of the present invention is to provide a sailing rig whereby once the relative setting of the jib with respect to the mainsail has been accomplished, as for example, after coming about, no further independent trimming or adjustment of the jib is required. To this end it is proposed to so design the rigging that when the mainsail is trimmed by the adjustment of the main sheet, the jib will automatically maintain its proper setting with respect to the mainsail.
A further object of the present invention is to provide new and improved sailing rig features which will maintain a substantially constant aerodynamic slot effect between the mainsail and jib, under varying sailing conditions. The aerodynamic slot effect increases the efficiency and thrust derived from the wind over that of a standard fore and aft sailing rig, using the same amount of sail area, by as much as 23 percent.
It is also an object of the present invention to provide a saili-ng rig which will expedite the ease with which sail adjustment and manipulation may -be accomplished, thus making it easy for even inexperienced sailors to operate a sailing vessel efiiciently and safely.
To this end the. invention proposes the simplification of sail trimming and manipulation by the use of a single sheet connected with a mainsail boom.
It is a further object of the invention to reduce to a minimum the extent of overlap of the jib and mainsail when the wind direction ranges anywhere from the 'beam to the stern of the boat; thereby increasing ythe amount of sail area exposed under these conditions.
It is also an object of the present invention to provide l 3,345,969 Patented Oct. 10, 1967 a novel and improved sailing rig of the type referred to above which will have practical application to a wide variety of hull designs and which may be used on sailboats, iceboats, and land sailing craft with equal facility and which is applicable to marconi, gaff and gunter rigged vessels.
The foregoing and other objects and advantages will be more apparent from the following detailed description when conidered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:
FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a sailboat on a starboard tack equipped with a sailing rig which is representative of one embodiment of the present invention;
FIG. la is a fragmentary elevational view of the portlon of the mast and rigging included within the larger of the two dot-and-dash circles of FIG. 1, an upper portion of the mast being broken away to show the sheave arrangement for the main halyard;
FIG. lb is a fragmentary perspective of the portion included within the smaller of the two circles of FIG. l;
FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional plan view taken substantially along the line 2 2 of FIG. l;
FIG. 2a is a detailed perspective view showing the manner in which the luff of the mainsail is slidable in a track secured to the mast by a series of rings;
FIG. 3 is a plan view of the sailboat shown in FIG. 1;
FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of the sailboat shown in FIGS. 1 and 3;
FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the forward portion of the sailboat as viewed in FIG. l, with the mainsail and forwardly extending portion of the mainsail Iboom removed to expose parts otherwise hidden;
FIG. 5a is a fragmentary perspective view of the strucfliplr icluded within the dot-and dash circle of FIG. 5 and FIG. 5b is an enlarged fragmentary view of the mainsail boom and sheave arrangement for guiding the jib sheets;
FIG. 6 is a fragmentary perspective View of a mainsail boom structure in the 'vicinity of the mast, with the mainsail removed more clearly to illustrate the manner 1n which the jib sheets are guided between the clew of the jib and the deck fittings;
FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view of the lower portion of the mast in the vicinity of the deck;
FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along the line 8-8 of FIG. 7;
FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective View 0f the portion included within the dot-and-dash circle of FIG. 6; and
FIG. 10 is a horizontal 4sectional view taken substantially along the line 10-10 0f FIG. 7.
Referring now to the drawings more in detail, wherein like numerals have 'been employed to designate similar parts throughout the various figures, it will be seen that the present invention has been disclosed in association with a sailboat having a hull 10, a mast 12, .a rudder 14, a relatively short bowsprit 16 and a centerboard 17 shown at approximately two-thirds normal depth. The mast or spat `12 is braced at its forward side by a fore stay 18 extending from the forward end of the bowsprit 176 to a fitting 19 near the upper extremity of the mast, FIG. 1. The afterside of the mast 12 is supported or braced by a pair of conventional adjustable backstays, namely a star-board stay 20 and a port stay 22. These back-stays extend from a suitable fitting at the upper extremity -of the mast 12 to suitable deck blocks 24, and from these blocks the stays are adapted to be secured to one of a pair of jam cleats 26, depending upon the tack the vessel is sailing. If the vessel `is sailing on a starboard tack, as shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and be cleated, with stay 20 slack. If desired, a permanent backstay, attached to a boomkin on the stern of the boa-t, may be used instead of, or along with, the adjustable backstays. In addition, permanent side stays, short spreaders and shroud lines may be used, with the jib rotating or traveling just outside the side stays. The side stays must be spaced inside the jib sufficiently so as not to interfere with the operation of the jib.
The sails consist of a jib 28 and a mainsail 30. The foot of the mainsail 30 is secu-red in the usual manner to a main boom 32. The boom 32 is generally horizontally disposed and consists of an after portion to which the mainsail is secured and a forward portion extending forward of the mast 12 to which the tack of the jib 28 is secured. The boom 32 is pivotally mounted upon the mast 12 as clearly shown in FIG. 6. An aperture in the boom structure 32 serves to accommodate the mast 12, and a triangular frame structure designated generally by the numeral 36, later to be described, serves to accommodate the jib sheets 318 and 40. Thus the bottom 32 pivots or swings about the axis of the spar or mast 12. A standard sail track 34 (FIG. 6) is mounted on the top of the boom 32 to accommodate the slides on the foot of the mainsail.
The luff of the mainsail 30 is guided by conventional slides on a track A. The track has a T-shaped metal backing and is secured to the Ymast 12 by metal rings B. The track is attached by rings to the mast 12 so that the mainsail may swivel about the mast. In addition, this arrangement allows the mainsail to be raised or lowered without interfering with permanent side stays or spreader bars which may be attached at any location along the sides of the mast. The head or peak of the mainsail is secured to a halyard 42 which passes over a pair of pulleys 44 mounted at the upper extremity of the mast 12, FIG. la. From the forward sheave 44 the halyard 42 leads downward to a cleat 46 mounted on the mast 12, FIG. 7.
The raising and lowering of the jib 28 is controlled through the agency of a jib halyard 48. As shown in FIGS. la and 1b, the Ajib halyard 48 is secured at one extremity to the peak of the jib 28 and passes over a sheave 50 supported by a bracket or fitting 52. The bracket 52 is pivotally supported by a fitting or rod 54 fixed to the forward side of the mast 12. This pivotal support permits lateral shifting of the sheave 50 for reasons later to be explained. From the sheave 50 the halyard 48 extends downward and may be `secured to a cleat 56 mounted on the forward side of the mast 12 as clearly shown in FIG. 7. The luff of the jib 28 carries conventional fittings 58 designed to be snapped upon a jib `stay 60. The upper extremity of the jib stay 60 is secured in a fixed position through the agency of a fitting 62 and a complementary fitting 64 secured to the forward side of the mast 12, FIG. 1b. The tack of the jib 28 as well as the lower extremity of the jib stay 60 are secured to the forward extremity of the jib boom 66.
The after extremity of the jib boom 66, FIGS. 1 and 5, is pivotally coupled with .a second or complementary jib boom 68 through the agency of a fitting 70, shown more clearly in FIG. 9. It will be noted that the jib boom v68 is strengthened against lateral displacement or bending through the agency of a conventional rjumper-stay arrangement designated by the numeral 74. The after or upper extremity of the jib boom 68 is secured to the forward side of the mast by a fitting 76 which is pivotally coupled to the mast 12 through the agency of a complementary fitting 78, FIG. a. The lower or forward extremity of the jib boom 68 has a fixed coupling with a cable 80 extending between the forward extremity of the jib boom 66 and a fitting 82 secured to the lower portion of the mast 12 as clearly shown in FIGS. 5 a-nd 6. The angle which the jib boom `68 makes with the portion of the cable 80 extending from the mast is approximately 45 The jib booms 66 and 68 are maintained under compression through the agency of the taut cable 80 and the jib stay 60, previously referred to. A conventional turnbuckle 81 may be employed to control the tension in the cable 80. In other words, the jib booms 66 Iand 68 are tied together as a unit by this arrange-` ment, thus resisting forces tending to shift the forward extremity of the jib boom 66y upward or downward, and at the same time permitting a required degree of lateral shifting of this jib boom about the mast, in a manner to be described.
Employing two jib booms instead of one allows easier passage of the jib over the top of the jib booms and shortens the required length of the main boom extension 84. The previously described bracket 52, FIG. 1b, and its pivotal sup-port 54 serve to facilitate lateral displacement of the jib 28. The lateral shifting of the forward extremity of the jib booms 66 and 68 with respect to the axis of the boom 32, as explained above, assures the maintenanoe of the desired air slot between the jib and the mainsail. As a result, the mainsail and the jib may be shifted about the axis of the mast or spar 12 on both port and starboard tacks without disturbing or changing the air slot referred to above. In addition t-o providing the proper air slot between the sails, the above described structures cooperate to provide a substantially perfect air foil under all conditions. In FIG. 2 the frame structure 36 is provided with an arcuate metal band 104 t-o facilitate the coupling of the frame structure with the lower portion of the mast 12. This metal band is hinged or otherwise secured to the frame structure 36. It prevents the main boom 32 from shifting away from the mast 12. Both the mainsail halyard and the jib halyard are positioned externally of the member 104.
In conventional sailing rigs, the tack of the jib is usually secured in a fixed position to the bow of the boat or the forward end of the bowsprit, as for example the bowsprit 16 shown in FIGS. 1 and 5. With such conventional sailing rigs, in order to maintain the proper setting of the jib with respect to the mainsail, an adjustment of the angle of the mainsail with relation to the wind will require an adjustment of the angle of the jib setting also, in order to obtain maximum sailing efficiency. By employing the arrangement of the jib boom unit 66 and 68, as described above, the lateral shifting of the mainsail boom causes a corresponding shift of the jib boom unit 66 and 68 with consequent lateral shifting of the tack of the jib. It will be seen from FIG. 3 that when the vessel is sailing on a starboard tack, the tack of the jib will be positioned on the starboard side of the center line of the vessel. The jib boom unit 66 and 68 is operatively associated with the mainsail boom 32 through the agency of a pair of parallel frame members 84 secured at one extremity to the frame structure 36 as clearly shown in FIG. 6. The free extremities of the longitudinal parallel frame members 84 may be tied together by a transverse frame member 86. It will be understood from the foregoing that the main boom 32, the triangular frame structure 36, and the parallel frame members 84 are all firmly attached together and move together as a unit as the boom 32 is n shifted from one sailing position to another.
A limited degree of lateral shifting of the jib boom unit 66 and 68 wth respect to the Iboom 32 is desired. Thus, as shown in FIG. 3, with the vessel sailing on a starboard tack, the jib boom unit 66 and 68 is slightly out of axial alignment with the boom 32. The extent of this lateral displacement of the jib boom unit 66 and 68 with respect to the boom 32 is determined by the inner opposed surfaces of the parallel frame members 84, as illustrated in FIG. 2. The jib boom unit 66 and 68 may be positioned either to port or starboard of the boom axis, depending upon the tack which is being sailed. If the vessel is sailing upon a starboard tack as shown in FIG. 3, the jib boom unit 6'6 and 68 will be inclined slightly to port of the boom axis, whereas if the vessel is sailing on a port tack, they will be inclined slightly to Astarboard of the boom axis. With this arrangement, the
aerodynamic slot between the jib and the mainsail is maintained in such a manner as to enhance the sailing ei- 'ciency of the vessel. In the area where the maximum aerodynamic slot effect is required, when the wind direction ranges anywhere from a close rea-ch to a beam reach, the angle between the longitudinal axis of the main boom 32 and the longitudinal axis yof the jib boom unit 66 and 68 is approximately 7. When the wind direction ranges anywhere from the beam reach to the stern of the boat, the angle between the two booms is not of any importance to sailing eiciency, and the angle changes from 7 on a beam reach to 5.5 when the wind is from the stern of the boat. If a very long jib boom unit is to be used on a ship, then no angle need be maintained between the axis -of the main boom and the axis of the jib boom unit as there will then be a suflicient distance between the jib and mainsail, and the distance between frame members 84 can be decreased. However, with the standard proportions of jib and mainsail used, an offset angle of about 7 lwill be required to maintain the proper spacing between the jib and mainsail due to the aerodynamic curvature -of each sail.
From the foregoing description, it will be understood that the present invention contemplates a sailing rig in which the setting of the jib with respect to the mainsail is maintained in a novel manner. By having the boom 32, the triangular frame structure 36, the parallel frame members 84, and the jib boom unit 66 and 68 movable as a unit about the axis of the mast 12, with provision for slight axial misa'lignment or angular displacement of the jib boom unit with respect to the main boom, increased sailing eiciency may be obtained without independently adjusting the setting of the jib with respect to the mainsail at frequent intervals; once the initial setting of the jib with respect to the mainsail has been accomplished. The setting or trim of the mainsail 30 is controlled in the usual manner by a main sheet 88.
Attention is now directed to the manner in which the jib sheets 38 and 40 lead from the clew of the jib 28. This may `best be observed in FIG. 6, wherein it will be seen that the jib sheet 38 leads from the clew of the jib to a pulley or sheave 90 carried by the triangular frame structure 36, and thence to another p-ulley 92. From the sheave or pulley 92, the jib sheet 38 passes through a conventionalV fair lead 94, then crosses over to the starboard sheave 96 of a double pulley carried on the underside of the frame structure 36. From the sheave 96, the jib sheet 38 passes downward to a pulley 98 mounted on the deck of the vessel, and from this point the sheet passes through another deck sheave or block 100 to a conventional jam cleat 102. When the vessel is sailing on a starboard tack as shown in FIG. 6, the jib sheet 58 is trimmed and secured in position by the jam cleat 102. The other jib sheet 40, which at this time is running free, extends from the clew of the jib 28 to a sheave 90a and thence to a second sheave 92a and through a fair lead 94a carried by the triangular frame structure 35. From this point, the jib sheet 40 crosses over jib sheet 38 and thence to the port sheave 96a on the double pulley mounted underneath the frame structure. The jib sheet 4t) extends downward to a sheave 98a mounted on the deck of the vessel and then to a deck block or sheave 100a. A jam cleat 102a functions similarly to the previously mentioned jam cleat 102, when the vessel is sailing on a port tack. With this arrangement, the jib sheet which is used to trim the jib will always be located on the windward or high side of the vessel where it is much easier and safer to cleat and uncleat. In conventional sailing rigs, it is common to lead the operative jib sheet to the leeward or lower side of the vessel. Thus the present invention contemplates so positioning the operative jib sheet that it may be cleated or lnncleated on the high side of the vessel. This arrangement contributes materially to the convenience with which the working or operative jib sheet may be handled.
By having the yupper pulleys 9696a (FIGS. 6 and 7) and the lower pulleys 98-98a positioned in proximity to the axis of the mast 12, the lateral shifting of the mainsail boom 32 results in no appreciable movement of the working or operating jib sheet, such as in the case with the operative main sheet 88, shown in FIG. 3. In other words, the mainsail boom may be subjected to lateral displacement or adjustment without altering, to any substantial degree, the preset relationship of the jib with respect to the mainsail. Once the jib is set with lrelationship to the mainsail when the Wind is from any direction on one side of the boat between the bow and the stern, it need not be changed until the boat comes about and the wind is from any direction on the other side of the boat. This is to be contrasted with present day conventional rigging wherein any change in the lateral adjustment of the mainsail boom with respect to the wind direction requires an additional corresponding adjustment of the jib.
The specic structural features disclosed and described herein are representative of one embodiment of the invention. However, it should be understood that other modifications and changes are contemplated Without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.
The invention is claimed as follows:
1. A sailing rig including a mast, a mainsail, a jib, a mainsail halyard, means associated with the upper portion of said mast for receiving and guiding the mainsail halyard, a jib halyard, means for guiding the jib halyard, a substantially horizontal mainsail boom, said boom being -swivelly coupled with the lower portion of said mast, a section comprising a forward extension of the boom which is iixedly secured to the boom, jib tack accommodating means laterally shiftable as an incident to the movement of said forward extension, means operable independently of said boom and forward extension for securing said jib tack accommodating means against unauthorized upward displacement, jib sheet means connected at one extremity with the clew of said jib, means for securing the free extremity of a jib sheet in a fixed position to maintain the setting of the jib, and a mainsail sheet connected with the main boom.
2. A sailing rig as set forth in claim 1, wherein the jib tack accommodating means comprises a jib boom structure, the forward extremity of which is connectable with the jib tack and is laterally shiftable, and the after extremity of which is secured against lateral displacement.
3. A sailing rig as set forth in claim Z, wherein the after extremity of the jib boom structure is pivotally supported.
4. A sailing rig as set forth in claim 2, wherein abutment means is provided in association with the forward extension of the mainsail boom to limit the extent to which the forward extremity of the jib boom structure may be shifted laterally beyond a vertical plane coincident with 'the mainsail boom axis.
S. A sailing rig Ias set forth in claim 1, wherein jib sheet guiding means -is provided for directing the jib sheets from the jib clew to an area which proximates the vertical mast axis thereby nullifying any substantial longitudinal shifting of said jib sheets when the mainsail boom is shifted laterally.
6. A sailing rig :as set forth in claim 5, wherein the jib sheet directing means proximating the mast axis includes vertically spaced rotary guides mounted adjacent said mast.
7. A sailing rig as set forth in claim 5, wherein frame means is associated and movable as a unit with said boom, and jib sheet guiding members are supported by said frame means to receive said jib sheets directly from the jib clew at points intermediate said jib clew, and points proximating the mast axis.
8. A sailing rig as set forth in claim 2 wherein means is provided for pivotally supporting the jib boom structure forwardly of the m-ast axis.
9. A sailing rig as set forth in claim 5, wherein the jib sheets traverse each other athwart ship whereby to enable 8 the trimming and the setting of the jb from the Windward References Cited side of a vessel equipped with said sailing rig.
10. A sailing rig as set forth in claim 7, wherein the UNITED STATES PATENTS frame means includes `a section in the nature of a cross arm structure which traverses the boom and is secured 5 '2106209 1/1938 Edge 114-39 in a xed position thereta 2,147,501 2/ 1939 Ryder 114-102 11. A sailing -rig as set forth in claim 1 including sail 3,205,849 9/1965' Thorndlke 114 1O2 track means for accommodating slides carried by the lui of the mainsail, and means for coupling said track means MILTON BUCHLER, Primary Examiner. to the mast so as to permit lateral shifting of said track means With respect to the mast periphery. T- M- BLIX, Assistant Examiner-

Claims (1)

1. A SAILING RIG INCLUDING A MAST, A MAINSAIL, A JIB, A MAINSAIL HALYARD, MEANS ASSOCIATED WITH THE UPPER PORTION OF SAID MAST FOR RECEIVING AND GUIDING THE MAINSAIL HALYARD, A JIB HALYARD, MEANS FOR GUIDING THE JIB HALYARD, A SUBSTANTIALLY HORIZONTAL MAINSAIL BOOM, SAID BOOM BEING SWIVELLY COUPLED WITH THE LOWER PORTION OF SAID MAST, A SECTION COMPRISING A FORWARD EXTENSION OF THE BOOM WHICH IS FIXEDLY SECURED TO THE BOOM, JIB TACK ACCOMMODATING MEANS LATERALLY SHIFTABLE AS AN INCIDENT TO THE MOVEMENT OF SAID FORWARD EXTENSION, MEANS OPERABLE INDEPENDENTLY OF SAID BOOM AND FORWARD EXTENSION FOR SECURING SAID JIB TACK ACCOMMODATING MEANS AGAINST UNAUTHORIZED UPWARD DISPLACEMENT, JIB SHEET MEANS CONNECTED AT ONE EXTREMITY WITH THE CLEW OF SAID JIB, MEANS FOR SECURING THE FREE EXTREMITY OF A JIB SHEET IN A FIXED POSITION TO MAINTAIN THE SETTING OF THE JIB, AND A MAINSAIL SHEET CONNECTED WITH THE MAIN BOOM.
US541320A 1966-04-08 1966-04-08 Sailing rig Expired - Lifetime US3345969A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US541320A US3345969A (en) 1966-04-08 1966-04-08 Sailing rig

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US541320A US3345969A (en) 1966-04-08 1966-04-08 Sailing rig

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3345969A true US3345969A (en) 1967-10-10

Family

ID=24159079

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US541320A Expired - Lifetime US3345969A (en) 1966-04-08 1966-04-08 Sailing rig

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3345969A (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3968765A (en) * 1972-10-30 1976-07-13 Menegus Robert L Rotatable-mounting apparatus for sails
US4044702A (en) * 1974-10-21 1977-08-30 Jamieson Robert S High efficiency aerodynamic sail system for boats, and method for sailing
FR2517276A1 (en) * 1981-11-30 1983-06-03 Valle Jean Claude Sail board rigging hoist - is fitted to ring nut on bolted mast connection on top of mast
US5272996A (en) * 1990-01-26 1993-12-28 Franz Drexler Surfboard sail
US5419269A (en) * 1992-01-15 1995-05-30 Clerk; Ernest J. Sailing boat
WO1995018744A1 (en) * 1994-01-04 1995-07-13 Thoresen Per Gunnar A device for the mast of a sailboat
EP2487101A1 (en) * 2011-02-11 2012-08-15 Axel Irmer Sail device
USD822578S1 (en) * 2016-05-13 2018-07-10 Velum Limited Sailboat

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2106209A (en) * 1935-09-07 1938-01-25 Edge Charles Noel Sailboat
US2147501A (en) * 1936-06-24 1939-02-14 William E Ryder Sailing rig
US3205849A (en) * 1963-06-13 1965-09-14 Henry G Thorndike Sailing vessel

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2106209A (en) * 1935-09-07 1938-01-25 Edge Charles Noel Sailboat
US2147501A (en) * 1936-06-24 1939-02-14 William E Ryder Sailing rig
US3205849A (en) * 1963-06-13 1965-09-14 Henry G Thorndike Sailing vessel

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3968765A (en) * 1972-10-30 1976-07-13 Menegus Robert L Rotatable-mounting apparatus for sails
US4044702A (en) * 1974-10-21 1977-08-30 Jamieson Robert S High efficiency aerodynamic sail system for boats, and method for sailing
FR2517276A1 (en) * 1981-11-30 1983-06-03 Valle Jean Claude Sail board rigging hoist - is fitted to ring nut on bolted mast connection on top of mast
US5272996A (en) * 1990-01-26 1993-12-28 Franz Drexler Surfboard sail
US5419269A (en) * 1992-01-15 1995-05-30 Clerk; Ernest J. Sailing boat
WO1995018744A1 (en) * 1994-01-04 1995-07-13 Thoresen Per Gunnar A device for the mast of a sailboat
US5687666A (en) * 1994-01-04 1997-11-18 Thoresen; Per-Gunnar Device for the mast of a sailboat
EP2487101A1 (en) * 2011-02-11 2012-08-15 Axel Irmer Sail device
USD822578S1 (en) * 2016-05-13 2018-07-10 Velum Limited Sailboat
USD850354S1 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-06-04 Velum Limited Sailboat

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2106432A (en) Sailing craft
US4273060A (en) Sailing vessel
US3345969A (en) Sailing rig
US3142282A (en) Sailing vessel
US1856803A (en) Fore and aft rigged vessel
US6189471B1 (en) Sailboats and methods
US4704979A (en) Sail system
US3693571A (en) Sail rig
US2353007A (en) Sailing vessel
US2893339A (en) Rigging system for sailing craft
US3626883A (en) Sailing vessel with the luff of the mainsail clear of the mast
US4122793A (en) Mainsail and/or mizzensail furling device
US3720180A (en) Raffe sail for boats
US4292910A (en) Spinnaker post for sailing vessel
US2126665A (en) Rig for sailboats and vessels
US6932010B1 (en) Sailboat with offset boom
US5894807A (en) Sailboat
US3205849A (en) Sailing vessel
US3795216A (en) Square-rigged sailboat
US5988086A (en) Sailboat and methods
US6189472B1 (en) Craft with tilting sail
US4799443A (en) Swing sail boat
US4706590A (en) Deck mounted lateral mast rake adjuster
US20020139285A1 (en) Sail rig for a wind driven craft
CA2702407C (en) Sail propulsion system