US3626883A - Sailing vessel with the luff of the mainsail clear of the mast - Google Patents

Sailing vessel with the luff of the mainsail clear of the mast Download PDF

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US3626883A
US3626883A US3626883DA US3626883A US 3626883 A US3626883 A US 3626883A US 3626883D A US3626883D A US 3626883DA US 3626883 A US3626883 A US 3626883A
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vessel
mainsail
mast
head
tack
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Daivd W Ellis
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Daivd W Ellis
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63HMARINE PROPULSION OR STEERING
    • B63H9/00Marine propulsion provided directly by wind power
    • B63H9/04Marine propulsion provided directly by wind power using sails or like wind-catching surfaces
    • B63H9/08Connections of sails to masts, spars, or the like
    • B63H9/10Running rigging, e.g. reefing equipment

Abstract

A sailing vessel in which the mainsail luff is set on a different plane than the mast to avoid wind turbulence aft of a supporting mast. A track is secured athwartship just aft of the mast and the tack of the mainsail moves along the track. The luff of the mainsail is sparless so as not to interfere with the airfoil.

Description

United States Patent Daivd W. Ellis 271 Lincoln Ave., Barrington, RJ. 02806 875,443

Nov. 10, 1969 Dec. 14, 1971 inventor Appl. No. Filed Patented SAILING VESSEL WITH THE LUFF OF THE MAINSAIL CLEAR OF THE MAST 5 Claims, 5 Drawing Figs.

U.S. C1 1 14/39, 1 14/ l 02 Int. Cl B63h 35/00, B63h 9/00 1 14/39,

Field of Search [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,670,936 5/1928 McIntyre et a]. 1 14/39 X 1,856,803 5/1932 Blackman 1 14/102 3,259,093 7/1966 Taylor 114/39 X Primary Examiner-Trygve M. Blix Attorney-Barlow & Barlow ABSTRACT: A sailing vessel in which the mainsail lufi is set on a different plane than the mast to avoid wind turbulence aft of a supporting mast. A track is secured athwartship just aft of the mast and the tack of the mainsail moves along the track. The luff of the mainsail is sparless so as not to interfere with the airfoil.

Patented Dec. 14, 1971 3,626,883

3 Sheets-Sheet l FIG.|

INVENTOR DAVID W. ELLIS Patented Dec. 14, 1971 3,626,,fi83

3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR DAVID w, ELL|S flaw WM ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 14, 1971 I5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR DAVID w. ELLIS ATTORNEYS SAILING VESSEL WITH THE lLUFF OF THE MAINSAIL CLEAR OF THE MAST BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In a sailing vessel the mainsail usually has the luff which extends from the head to the tack of the sail behind the supporting mast; the mast causes turbulence of the air particularly on the leeward side of the luff of the sail and is, therefore, inefficient It is often noticed that the mainsail is much less efficient than the jib because the jib does not have its luff back of a mast. This is true on most points of sailing except directly before the wind. Of course, the thicker the mast, the more the turbulence, and the less efficient is the sail behind it.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A sailing vessel in which the mainsail is supported at its head by a mast while the tack of the sail is positioned to one side of the mast, causing the luff of the sail to be on a different plane than the mast.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a sloop rig having a mainsail and jib with my improved rig for locating the mainsail out from behind the mast;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a multihulled vessel with two mainsails and a jib, the mainsails being also rigged to have their Iuffs at an incline to the vertical and out from behind the mast;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a vessel with an outrigger pointed at both ends and showing an arrangement of sails wherein one may become the mainsail and the other a jib when the vessel is going with one end forward; while the jib becomes a mainsail and the mainsail becomes a jib when the vessel is going with the other end forward and in the opposite direction;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing the rig when the opposite end of the vessel is'leading and going in the opposite direction from that shown in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 3 with the mainsail in a different position.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIG. I I have illustrated the hull of a sailing vessel as with the mast 11 extending upwardly therefrom and held in position by a port stay 12 and a starboard stay 14. The head stay is designated 15 upon which the jib 16 is mounted with its tack 17 secured to the bow of the vessel 10 and its clew 18 sheeted as at 19 through a block 20 which may move along a T-shaped rail 21 with the sheet 19 held in position by a jam cleat 22.

The mainsail is designated generally 25 and has a head 26, tack 27, luff 28 extending between the head and the tack, while there is a clew 29. The head 26 is held at the upper part of the mast by any suitable halyard arrangement, while the tack is secured to a slider 30 which may be moved laterally of the vessel along a traveler bar 31 which may in some cases extend beyond the opposite side rails of the vessel. The slider 30 has suitable outhauls extending from the slider about a block 32 on the port end of the traveler bar 31 and then led in as at 33 to come cleat, while at the opposite end of the traveler bar 31 a starboard outhaul 34 may be attached to the slider 30, then through the block 35 and inwardly as at 36 to be made fast to a cleat or the like. By this arrangement the tack 27 may be hauled toward the windward side of the vessel, in the case of FIG. 1 to the port side, which will incline the luff 28 to the vertical represented by the vertical mast 11 which when at rest conditions is vertical. In this case the clew may be held stationary by a main sheet 38, or the sheet may be adjustable where desired for slackening the clew of the sail for a more advantageous setting thereof such as at a greater angle than a close hauled position. A boom 39 will extend along the foot of the sail 25, and the sail will be attached to the boom at the tack and at the clew and also possibly by sliders for the entire length of the boom.

By this arrangement-the luff 28 of the sail is inclined to the vertical and is clear of the mast so that it will receive an undisturbed wind; the jib in this case will function in the usual manner.

In the showing in FIG. 2, a trimaran type of multihulled vessel is shown in which the center hull is designated as 40, while there are hulls on either side 41 which are secured to the hull 40 by suitable braced connections The mast is designated 42 and is held in the center hull 40 in a vertical position by head stay 43 and port and starboard side stays 44. The in this case is designated 45 and its tack 46 is secured to the bow 47 in a usual manner while its head 48 is supported by the mast. Its clew 49 is sheeted in a known manner as at 50 secured to a jam cleat 51. Two mainsails 55 and 56 have their heads 57 and 58 supported at the upper end of the mast, they being each hauled up by some halyard while their tacks 59 and 60 are secured to moveable slides on tracks 61 and 62 so as to hold the luffs 63 and 64 which extend from the head to the sail tack in position inclined to the vertical on either side of the mast 42, also to allow positioning of one mainsail ahead of the other mainsail to prevent blanketing of one sail by another in certain wind directions. The clew of the port mainsail 56 is sheeted as at 65 to a jam cleat 69 for adjustment of the foot 66 of the sail which may have a boom to properly trim the sail. while the clew 67 of the starboard sail 55 is sheeted as at 68 for properly trimming this sail, the sheet being held by a jam cleat 69 on the deck of the center hull 40. The sail 55 may also have a boom for proper trim.

By this arrangement the luffs of the mainsail 63 and 64 are clear of the mast 42, thus affording unobstructed wind to the luff of these sails. Further the incline of the windward sail 56 provides a righting moment by a downward pressure to overcome the heeling of the vessel while with a leeward sail 55 inclined as shown there would be created an upward pressure also assisting in overcoming the heeling of the vessel. This is particularly effective in a multihull vessel where the may be laterally displaced a substantial distance from the mast but is also effective in a single hull vessel as shown in FIG. I as well.

In FIGS. 3 and 4 I have shown the wind as at 69 and a double-ended vessel 70 proceeding in the direction of arrow 700 with an outrigger 71. In FIG. 3 one of the sails 72 acts as a jib while the other sail 73 acts as a mainsail. The heads of each of the sails 74 and 75 are supported by the mast 76, and when sailing with the wind coming on the outrigger side of the vessel, the sail 72 will act as ajib and its tack 77 will be secured to the leading end 78 of the vessel which will act as a bow, while the clew 79 of sail 72 will be sheeted by means of blocks 80 riding on slider 80S and sheet 80' to obtain the desired set of the sail.

In the case of FIG. 3, the sail 73 will act as a mainsail, and its tack 81 will be hauled to the windward side of the vessel on a slider 81S riding on track 81 by lines 90. Once in position the slider may be secured by a fastening screw, which is common to the art and the luff made taught by tackle 91 so as to incline the luff 82 to the windward or outrigger side of the vessel and out from behind the mast. Sheeting may be as at 83, 84 through suitable blocks 85, 86.

In case it is desired to change the course and proceed at a different angle to the wind shown by arrow 69 (FIG. 4), instead of swinging the vessel through a arc in a usual tack, the sails are shifted so as to cause the vessel to proceed in the opposite direction, the bow 78 becoming the stern and the stem 88 the bow with the sail 73 acting as the jib and the sail 72 acting as the mainsail as seen in FIG. 4. This is accomplished by hauling the heretofore leech 87 of the sail 73 down tight to the end 88 of the vessel by blocks 86, which edge 87 now becomes the Iufi or leading edge of the jib, while the heretofore tackle 91 attached to the now clew of sail 73 will act as the sheets for this sail 73 once the slider 815 is released. In a like manner the corner 93 of the heretofore jib 72 now becomes the tack of the now mainsail 72 and is hauled to the outrigger on windward side of the vessel by tackle 80 fastened to slider 808 where it becomes the tack and the sheet 94 is slacked off so as to trim the sail for movement of the vessel in the direction of arrow 70a.

In FIG. 5 l have illustrated a rig which is the same as shown in FIG. 3 with the vessel proceeding in the direction of arrow 70a except that in this case the lufi 82 of the mainsail 73 is hauled to the port side of the vessel, or the side opposite the outrigger, by means of the tackle 91 which moves the tack of the sail on the slider 81S, and in this case the sheet of the mainsail shown at 84, 85 is slacked off so that the mainsail will have a proper set comparable to the set of the jib 72 with the wind in the direction shown by arrow 69.

In the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 3-5 it should be understood that directional control must be provided by a pair of rudders, which if coupled together to act in unison, may be left immersed. If the rudders are separate, then the bow rudder must be lifted out of the water.

I claim:

1. A sailing vessel comprising a hull, a mainsail having a head, a tack, and a sparless flexible luff extending from the head to the tack, means to tension the luff and support the head above the hull, a track extending laterally of the vessel,

means to hold the tack to the track and move the tack to a position laterally of the support for the head to expose the luff to the windward side of the vessel and in a different plane than that of the means to support the head.

2. A sailing vessel as in claim 1 wherein there are a plurality of sails.

3. A sailing vessel as in claim 1 wherein there are a plurality of sails, a track for at least one of the sails, means to secure the tack of one sail to said track to incline it oppositely to the plane of the other sail with reference to the support for the head. i

4. A sailing vessel as in claim 1 wherein there are a plurality of sails means to oppositely incline the sails to the plane of the support for the head, said means being adjustable lengthwise of the vessel.

5. A sailing vessel as in claim I wherein there are a plurality of sails inclined oppositely to the plane of the support for the head, each with both inclined oppositely to the plane of the support for the head, each with both clews and tacks equipped with track and hauling tackle to adjust them laterally of the vessel.

i i i i i

Claims (5)

1. A sailing vessel comprising a hull, a mainsail having a head, a tack, and a sparless flexible luff extending from the head to the tack, means to tension the luff and support the head above the hull, a track extending laterally of the vessel, means to hold the tack to the track and move the tack to a position laterally of the support for the head to expose the luff to the windward side of the vessel and in a different plane than that of the means to support the head.
2. A sailing vessel as in claim 1 wherein there are a plurality of sails.
3. A sailing vessel as in claim 1 wherein there are a plurality of sails, a track for at least one of the sails, means to secure the tack of one sail to said track to incline it oppositely to the plane of the other sail with reference to the support for the head.
4. A sailing vessel as in claim 1 wherein there are a plurality of sails means to oppositely incline the sails to the plane of the support for the head, said means being adjustable lengthwise of the vessel.
5. A sailing vessel as in claim 1 wherein there are a plurality of sails inclined oppositely to the plane of the support for the head, each with both clews and tacks equipped with track and hauling tackle to adjust them laterally of the vessel.
US3626883D 1969-11-10 1969-11-10 Sailing vessel with the luff of the mainsail clear of the mast Expired - Lifetime US3626883A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4044702A (en) * 1974-10-21 1977-08-30 Jamieson Robert S High efficiency aerodynamic sail system for boats, and method for sailing
FR2481222A1 (en) * 1980-04-29 1981-10-30 Perrier Marcel Multi-hull for marine vessel - has hulls joined by cross tubes fitted with upright members joined at apex of triangular mast
US4392444A (en) * 1980-01-10 1983-07-12 Andersson Lars G High stability trimaran
GB2128153A (en) * 1982-09-25 1984-04-26 Frank Robert Goodman Sailboats
WO1994008844A1 (en) * 1992-10-09 1994-04-28 Ivar Brandin A sailboat rig
DE4312649A1 (en) * 1993-04-19 1994-10-20 Gernot Kloss Combined sail control for jib and main sail of sailing vessels
CN102372080A (en) * 2010-08-04 2012-03-14 陈文渊 Sailing boat
US20180022430A1 (en) * 2016-07-19 2018-01-25 Mx Production Command and control device for sails of sailboats or kite sails
US10040529B1 (en) * 2017-07-25 2018-08-07 Steven J. Salani Simplified sailing rig

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1670936A (en) * 1923-11-24 1928-05-22 Mcintyre Malcolm Sailing craft
US1856803A (en) * 1930-09-10 1932-05-03 Edward L Blackman Fore and aft rigged vessel
US3259093A (en) * 1965-10-07 1966-07-05 Stephen M Taylor Sailboat hull

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1670936A (en) * 1923-11-24 1928-05-22 Mcintyre Malcolm Sailing craft
US1856803A (en) * 1930-09-10 1932-05-03 Edward L Blackman Fore and aft rigged vessel
US3259093A (en) * 1965-10-07 1966-07-05 Stephen M Taylor Sailboat hull

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4044702A (en) * 1974-10-21 1977-08-30 Jamieson Robert S High efficiency aerodynamic sail system for boats, and method for sailing
US4392444A (en) * 1980-01-10 1983-07-12 Andersson Lars G High stability trimaran
FR2481222A1 (en) * 1980-04-29 1981-10-30 Perrier Marcel Multi-hull for marine vessel - has hulls joined by cross tubes fitted with upright members joined at apex of triangular mast
GB2128153A (en) * 1982-09-25 1984-04-26 Frank Robert Goodman Sailboats
WO1994008844A1 (en) * 1992-10-09 1994-04-28 Ivar Brandin A sailboat rig
DE4312649A1 (en) * 1993-04-19 1994-10-20 Gernot Kloss Combined sail control for jib and main sail of sailing vessels
CN102372080A (en) * 2010-08-04 2012-03-14 陈文渊 Sailing boat
US20180022430A1 (en) * 2016-07-19 2018-01-25 Mx Production Command and control device for sails of sailboats or kite sails
US10689075B2 (en) * 2016-07-19 2020-06-23 Mx Production Command and control device for kites
US10040529B1 (en) * 2017-07-25 2018-08-07 Steven J. Salani Simplified sailing rig

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