US3253396A - Method and apparatus for making textured yarn and product - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for making textured yarn and product Download PDF

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US3253396A
US3253396A US817180A US81718059A US3253396A US 3253396 A US3253396 A US 3253396A US 817180 A US817180 A US 817180A US 81718059 A US81718059 A US 81718059A US 3253396 A US3253396 A US 3253396A
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yarn
textured
jet
rate
bulking
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Sr Joseph Raymond Fish
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Beaunit Corp
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02GCRIMPING OR CURLING FIBRES, FILAMENTS, THREADS, OR YARNS; YARNS OR THREADS
    • D02G1/00Producing crimped or curled fibres, filaments, yarns, or threads, giving them latent characteristics
    • D02G1/16Producing crimped or curled fibres, filaments, yarns, or threads, giving them latent characteristics using jets or streams of turbulent gases, e.g. air, steam
    • D02G1/162Producing crimped or curled fibres, filaments, yarns, or threads, giving them latent characteristics using jets or streams of turbulent gases, e.g. air, steam with provision for imparting irregular effects to the yarn

Description

J. R. FISH, SR
May 31, 1966 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING TEXTURED YARN AND PRODUCT Filed June 1, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet l COMPRESSED VAR/ABLE SPEED M0701? CONSTANT SPEED MOTOR INVENTOR Jose 27k Raymond Eds/n52: BY R WW i ATTORNEY May 31, 1966 J. R. FISH, SR
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING TEXTURED YARN AND PRODUCT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 1, 1959 SPEED M070 VAR/ABLE INVENTOR dasgv/z Raymond PKG/@571 i al y/ 7 ATTORNEY United States Patent Ofiice 3,253,396 Patented May 31, 1966 3,253,396 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING TEXTURED YARN AND PRODUCT Joseph Raymond Fish, Sr., Woodbridge, Conn, assignor, by mesne assignments, to Beaunit Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed June 1, 1959, Ser. No. 817,180 13 Claims. (Cl. 57-34) This invention relates to blown or textured yarn. More particularly it relates to combination textured yarn in which lengths having only moderately blown or textured elfect alternate with lengths having a more pronounced blown or textured eifect.
An object of this invention is to provide a blown or textured yarn in which lengths of only moderately textured yarn alternate with lengths having a more pronounced textured eifect.
A further object of this invention is to provide a combination blown or textured yarn in which lengths having only a moderately textured eifect alternate with lengths having a more pronounced textured effect.
A still further object of this invention is to provide a blown or textured yarn in which random lengths having only a moderately textured effect alternate with random lengths having a more pronounced textured effect.
Still another object of this invention is to provide a combination blown or textured yarn containing core yarn and wrap or surface effect yarn in which random lengths having only a moderately textured effect alternate with random lengths having a more pronounced textured effect.
Another object of this invention is to provide a method of producing blown or textured yarn in which lengths of only moderately textured yarn alternate with lengths having a more pronounced textured effect.
Still another object of this invention is to provide 'a method of producing combination blown or textured yarn in which lengths having only a moderately textured effect alternate with lengths having a more pronounced textured effect.
A further object of this invention is to provide a method of producing blown or textured yarn in which random lengths having only a moderately textured eifect alternate with random lengths having a more pronounced textured effect.
A further object of this invention is to provide a method of producing combination blown or textured yarn containing core yarn and wrap or surface effect yarn in which random lengths having only a moderately textured effect alternate with random lengths having a more pronounced textured effect.
Another object of this invention is to provide a yarn texturing apparatus having separate means for advancing core yarn and wrap or effect yarn to a common yarn bulking gas jet.
Still another object of this invention is to provide a yarn texturing apparatus having means for advancing core yarn to a yarn bulking gas jet, separate means for advancing wrap or effect yarn to the same gas jet, and means for producing temporary increases in the rate at which. the wrap or effect yarn is advanced to the gas jet.
A further object of this invention is to provide a yarn texturing apparatus having means for advancing core yarn to a yarn bulking gas jet, separate means for advancing wrap or effect yarn to the same gas jet, and means for producing random temporary increases in the rate, at which the wrap or effect yarn is advanced to the gas jet.
Other and further objects of this invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which it relates from the following specification and claims and from the draw- A wide variety of textured yarns may be produced by feeding spun or multifilament yarn, or combinations thereof, to a bulking jet where gas turbulence, produced by introducing gas under pressure into the bulking zone of the jet, blows, bulks, lofts or fluffs the yarn. It is necessary that the rate at which the yarn is fed to the jet be greater than the rate at which the textured yarn is withdrawn from the jet to permit yarn contraction in the bulking zone. Such textured yarns and the apparatus and the methods used in their production are described in United States Patents No. 2,783,609, No. 2,807,862, No. 2,829,420, No. 2,852,906, No. 2,869,967, No. 2,874,443, No. 2,874,444, No. 2874,445, and No. 2,884,756. The nature of the textured effect produced depends on the type of yarn or yarns used, the type of gas bulking jet used, the gas pressure, and the amount,
of overfeed, i.e., the difference between the rate at which the yarn is fed to the jet and the rate at which it is withdrawn from the jet, as is explained in detail in the patents cited.
The methods described in these patents may be modified to give textured products which have a second novelty eifect. For example, a pulsating air jet may be used to produce thick and thin textured yarn. Nubby textured yarn may be produced by withdrawing the yarn from the jet at a constant rate while intermittently and at random interrupting the gas flow to the jet, by varying at random intervals the rate at which the textured yarn is withdrawn from the jet, or by withdrawing the textured yarn from the jet at a very low rate to permit an excessive amount of yarn construction in the jet. Textured yarn having alternating smooth and bulked lengths may be produced by intermittently impulsing the yarn.
I have found, unexpectedly, that the various gas bulking devices disclosed in the patents cited may be used to produce novelty combination yarns in which slightly textured lengths of effect yarn alternate with lengths having a more pronounced textured effect. The number of alternating lengths of differently textured etfect yarn forming a repeat may be so small that the novelty effect has a regular appearance, or it may be so great that the effect appears to be random. It is generally required that the effect in a novelty yarn shall appear to be random.
My apparatus consists of a gas bulking jet, operated as disclosed in the cited patents, means for feeding one or more core yarns to the jet, separate means for feeding one or more wrap or surface elfect yarns to the same jet, means for temporarily increasing the rate at which the efiect yarn is fed to the jet, and means for withdrawing the textured combination yarn from the jet and packaging it. The means for temporarily increasing the speed at which theeffect yarn is fed to the jet may act at regular intervals to give a visible pattern, or at random intervals to give an elfect having no apparent pattern.
*I feed the core yarn to the jet at a suitable fixed rate and I feed the wrap or elfect yarn to the same jet at a faster basic rate. At intervals I temporarily increase the rate at which the effect yarn is fed to the jet. During such periods of accelerated feed the bulking effect obtained in the effect yarn becomes more pronounced. I withdraw the textured combination yarn from the jet at a rate which is less than the rate at which the core yarn is fed to the jet so that the core yarn has a uniform moderately textured effect while the effect yarn has lengths textured at least slightly more than the core yarn, alternating with lengths having a more pronounced texture. The rates at which the core and effect yarns are fed to the jet and the rate at which the combination yarn is withdrawn from the jet may be varied widely as long as the relations just mentioned are maintained.
The core yarn should be one which may be textured at least slightly while the wrap or effect yarn should be one which may be textured readily, preferably to a greater degree than the core yarn. A wide variety of fiber types, yarn types, yarn sizes, yarn colors, etc., may be used, separately or in combination, to produce my novelty bulked yarns. Novelty yarns, such as crimped or self-crimping viscose rayon, may be used in the production of my combination yarn. The fiber types which may be used in the production of my novelty yarn include regenerated cellulose rayon, cellulose ester yarn, regenerated casein yarn, nylon, polyester yarn, silk, Fiberglas (a glass yarn), Fortisan (high tenacity saponified cellulose acetate yarn), Orlon (polyacry lonitrile yarn), Polythene (polyethylene yarn), and Vinyon N (vinyl chloride-acrylonitrile copolymer yarn).
Further details of this invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which it relates from the following specification, claims and drawing.
Referring to the drawing briefly:
FIG. 1 is a front schematic view of an apparatus incorporating this invention;
FIG. 2 is a schematic wiring diagram of this apparatus, showing the control system for the variable speed motor; and
FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the gas bulking jet.
Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawing it will be seen that the apparatus consists essentially of a pair of angle axis thread advancing rollers 10, 11 driven by constant speed motor 12, a second pair of angle axis thread advancing rollers 13, 14 driven by a variable speed motor 15 provided with a speed control system to be described subsequently, gas bulking jet 16, and drum driven take-up winder 17.
As shown in FIG. 1, core yarn 18 is withdrawn from supply cone 19, passed through a pig tail thread guide 20 and a spring-urged disc-type tensioning device 21, is wrapped about angle axis thread advancing rollers 10, 11 a suitable number of times, and then passed through pig tail thread guide 22 at a suitable constant rate to gas bulking jet 16. Wrap or effect yarn 23 is withdrawn from supply cone 24, passed through a pig tail thread guide 25 and a spring-urged disc-type tensioning device 26, is wrapped about angle axis thread advancing rollers 13, 14 a suitable number of times and then passed through pig tail thread guide 27 to gas bulking jet 16 at a basic rate which is faster than the rate of core yarn feed. From time to time the rate of effect yarn feed is increased sharply by means of the control system shown in FIG. 2. As is well-known in the art the angle axis thread advancing rolls positively feed or advance yarn wrapped about them a sufficient number of times to avoid slippage.
Compressed air, supplied to bulking jet 16, shown in detail in FIG. 3, through pipe 28, passes through jet passage 29 and constricted jet passage 30. Hollow needle 31, provided with head portion 32 so that it can be adjustably positioned in the jet to obtain the desired bulking effect, provides a yarn passage into constricted passage 30 of the jet, entering the same at an angle to its longitudinal axis. Towards its free end 33 half of hollow needle 31 is cut away so that the yarn can be withdrawn from the needle while free end 33 is positioned in cavity 34 in the wall of constricted passage 30. The gas stream 4 becomes turbulent in constricted passage 30 and blows the yarn about, texturing it to the extent that its nature and the amount of overfeed permit. Yarn texturing jets of this type are sold by Enterprise Machine Company of New Castle, Delaware, under their designation Type 42AR.
Returning now to the description of the travel of the yarn through the apparatus, it will be seen that core yarn 18 and the wrap or effect yarn 23 are combined in hol-' low needle 31 of jet 16 and pass through the hollow needle and constricted jet passage 30 together. Textured combination yarn 35 is withdrawn from passage 30 at approximately a right angle to its longitudinal axis at a rate less than therate of core yarn feed.
After it leaves jet 16 combination yarn 35 is passed about thread guide 36, through a pair of disc-type thread tension devices 37, 38, about thread guide 39, through traverse guide 40, and is wound on core 41 by means of a conventional drum-driven take-up winder 17.
The control system for motor 15, shown in FIG. 2, consists of a PTS3 Production Timer sold by Electro- -Mechanical Engineering Company of Charlotte, North Carolina, and a modified Type W2-400 Variac transformer, sold by General Radio Company of Cambridge, Massachusetts.
The Variac transformer consists of a single layer winding 42. on a toroidal iron core. Contact brush 43, mounted on rotatable arm 44, taps off the desired voltage from winding 42. A second contact brush 45, mounted on rotatable arm 46, which has an insulated portion 47, taps off a higher voltage from the same winding.
The design or pattern wheel of the Production Timer" has front side 48 and back side 49, each provided with a rim to which projecting segments (cams) 50, spaced as desired, may be secured. The diameter of the pattern wheel and projecting segments is 10 inches. A total of 62 of the segments supplied with this device may be attached to each rim of the wheel. It is convenient to divide each rim into 62 equal spaces, numbering them 1 to 62, so that the pattern may be represented by the numbers of the spaces to which segments are attached. Of course larger or smaller segments may be used with this pattern wheel. Motor 51, operating at 2.4 revolutions per minute, is connected with the pattern wheel shaft by a 1:1 drive. Switches 52 and 53, positioned adjacent the front and back sides of the pattern wheel, respectively, are closed by the segments as they pass over them. Cam 54, driven from the pattern wheel shaft by a 1:168 drive 55, actuates double pole, single throw switch 56 through member 57.
Electric power from a suitable source is connected to the input terminals of the Variac transformer. One contact 60 of cam-actuated switch 56 is connected in series with switch 53 and relay 61. The other contact 62 of cam-actuated switch 56 is connected in series with switch 52 and the same relay 61. Double pole, double throw switch 63 is actuated by relay 61. Contacts 64 and 65 of switch 63 are connected with contact brush 43 of the Variac transformer and rectifier 58 and the variable speed motor, respectively, and contacts 66 and 67 of i switch 63 are connected with contact brush 45 of the Variac transformer and rectifier 58 and the variable speed motor, respectively.
It will now be seen that the position of cam-actuated switch 56 determines whether relay 61 is actuated by the segments on the front side of the wheel, acting on switch 52, or by the segments on the back side of the wheel, acting on switch 53. When the relay is not energized the variable speed motor 15 is driven by current tapped off by contact brush 43 through contacts 64 and 65. As long as the relay is energized switch 63 is thrown so that the motor 15 is operated at an increased speed by current tapped off by contact brush 45 through contacts 66 and 67. The arms bearing the contact brushes may be fastened together so that the difference between the two rates of effect yarn feed will remain constant when the V'ariac setting is changed. Increasing the speed of motor increases the rate at which effect yarn is fed to the jet and consequently increases the textured effect obtained in this yarn.
The following examples illustrate the manner in which the invention is carried out.
EXAMPLE 1 Using the apparatus described above and shown in the drawing, core yarn consisting of one end of 300/75 2 turn bright cellulose acetate yarn was wrapped 3 /2 times about the angle axis thread advancing rollers and fed to the Type 42AR jet at about 37 yards per minute. Wrap or effect yarn consisting of 2 ends of 300/75 2 turn gold cellulose acetate yarn was wrapped 3 /2 times about the second set of angleaxis thread advancing rollers and was fed to the same jet at a basic rate of about 47 yards per minute. From time to time the control system temporarily increased the speed of the variable speed motor so that the wrap or effect yarn was fed to the jet at the accelerated rate of about 134 yards per minute. combination yarn was withdrawn from the jet at about 34 yards per minute. The air supplied to the jet was under a pressure of about 55 pounds per square inch.
Segments were secured to the front side of the design or pattern wheel in spaces 4, 11, 18, 25, 32, 37, 43, 50, 56 and 57, and to the back side in spaces 1, 7, 14, 21, 27, 33, 40, 46, 52, and'59.
EXAMPLE 2 One end of 150/40 3 turn bright cellulose acetate yarn and one end of 70/34 /2 turn semidull nylon was used as core yarn, and one end of 300/75 2 turn gold cellulose acetate yarn and one end of 150/40 3 turn bright cellulose acetate yarn was used as effect yarn. These yarns were processed as in Example 1.
EXAMPLE 3 One end of 150/40 3 turn bright viscose rayon and one end of 70/34 0 turn semidull Dacron polyester yarn was used as core yarn, and one end of 300/80 3 turn bright viscose rayon and one end of 150/40 3 turn bright viscose rayon was used as effect yarn. These yarns were processed as in Example 1, except that about 45-50 pounds per square inch compressed air was. used in the 'et.
1 The combination yarns thus obtained had alternating moderately and strongly textured lengths of effect yarn, apparently distributed at random.
The novel effect obtained may be varied widely for it depends on the yarns used, the amounts of overfeed, in particular the differences between the two rates of effect yarn overfeed as governed by the setting of the control system, the type of bulking device used, the air pressure used in the jet, etc., each of which may be varied widely as explained above.
A one-piece machine is shown and described but it will be recognized that this invention may be embodied in a multi-place machine. In such a machine an electrical or a pneumatic clutch may be used to vary the speed of the drive shaft for the effect yarn thread advancing rollers, or these may be driven by a direct current motor with a variable resistance, in each case using a suitable control device to obtain the desired speed changes. T-hread advancing means and take-up devices other than those described may also be used, in each case in connection with suitable thread guides and tension devices. The specific type of bulking device used to obtain the turbulent gas stream will depend on the effect desired.
While I have described this invention in detail with respect to certain embodiments thereof, it is not desired to limit it to the details described and illustrated except insofar as they are set forth in the following claims.
The
What is claimed is:'
1. A method of making textured yarn which comprises positively advancing a first yarn into a yarn bulking zone, positively advancing a second yarninto the same yarn bulking zone at a basic rate greater than the first rate of advance, producing a series of temporary increases over the basic rate of advance of the second yarn, bulking the yarns thus fed into the bulking zone, and withdrawing the combined textured yarns from the bulking zone at a rate lower than the first rate of advance, whereby the first yarn is at least slightly textured, and the second yarn is bulked to have a basic texture more pronounced than that of the first yarn and a series of lengths having a texture more pronounced than the basic texture.
2. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein the temporary increases in the rate at which the second yarn is advanced to the bulking zone are produced substantially at random, whereby the second yarn texture varia tions have a random appearance.
3. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein the first yarn is advanced to the bulking zone at a constant rate.
4. A method as defined in claim 2 wherein the first yarn is advanced to the bulking zone at a constant rate.
5. Yarn texturing apparatus comprising essentially a yarn bulking device, a first means for positively advancing yarn to said bulking device, means for driving said first yarn advancing means, a second means for positively advancing yarn to said bulking device, means for driving said second yarn advancing means at a basic rate greater than that of said first yarn advancing means, means for repeatedly temporarily increasing the rate of advance of the second yarn over the basic rate, and means for withdrawing combination textured yarn from said bulking device at a lower rate than said first yarn advancing device supplies yarn thereto, whereby the first yarn is at least slightly textured, and the second yarn has a basic texture more pronounced than that of the first yarn and a series of lengths having a texture more pronounced than the basic texture.
6. Yarn texturing apparatus as defined in claim 5 having means for temporarily increasing the rate of advance of the second yarn over the basic rate at substantially random intervals, whereby the second yarn texture variations have a random appearance.
7. Yarn texturing apparatus as defined in claim 5 having means for driving said first yarn advancing means at a constant rate.
8. Yarn texturing apparatus as defined in claim 6 having means for driving said first yarn advancing means at a constant rate.
9. Yarn texturing apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein said yarn bulking device comprises a jet adapted to create a zone wherein yarn is bulked and means for supplying gas under pressure to said jet.
10. Yarn texturing apparatus as defined in claim 6 wherein said yarn bulking device comprises a jet adapted to create a zone wherein yarn is bulked and means for suplying gas under pressure to said jet.
11. Yarn texturing apparatus comprising a jet adapted to create a zone wherein yarn is textured, means for supplying gas under pressure to said jet, a first pair of angle axis rollers for positively advancing a first yarn to said jet, means for driving said first pair of angle axis rollers at a constant rate, a second pair of angle axis rollers for positively advancing a second yarn to said jet, means for driving said second pair of angle axis rollers at a basic rate greater than that of said first pair of angle axis rollers, means for producing a random series of temporary increases in the rate of advance of the second yarn, and means for withdrawing combination textured yarn from said jet at a lower rate than said first pair of angle axis rollers supplies yarn thereto, whereby the first yarn is at least slightly textured; and the second yarn has a basic texture more pronounced than that of the first yarn and a series of random lengths having a texture more pronounced than the basic texture.
. 12. Yarn containing at least one textured core end and- References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 788,292 4/ 1905 Verlenden 57-91 2,852,906 9/1958 Breen 57-34 2,864,230 12/1958 Moore 57-157 2,869,967 1/1959 Breen 57-140 Grieset 57-34 Hilbert 57-140 Field 57-34 Breen 57-34 FOREIGN PATENTS Australia. Belgium. Great Britain. Great Britain. Great Britain.
MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner.
l5 RUSSELL C. MADER, Examiner.
H. G. GARNER, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (2)

  1. 5. YARN TEXTURING APPARATUS COMPRISING ESSENTIALLY A YARN BULKING DEVICE, A FIRST MEANS FOR POSITIVELY ADVANCING YARN TO SAID BULKING DEVICE, MEANS FOR DRIVING SAID FIRST YARN ADVANCING MEANS, A SECOND MEANS FOR POSITIVELY ADVANCING YARN TO SAID BULKING DEVICE, MEANS FOR DRIVING SAID SECOND YARN ADVANCING MEANS AT A BASIC RATE GREATER THAN THAT OF SAID FIRST YARN ADVANCING MEANS, MEANS FOR REPEATEDLY TEMPORARILY INCREASING THE RATE OF ADVANCE OF THE SECOND YARN OVER THE BASIC RATE, AND MEANS FOR WITHDRAWING COMBINATION TEXTURED YARN FROM SAID BULKING DEVICE AT A LOWER RATE THAN SAID FIRST YARN ADVANCING DEVICE SUPPLIES YARN THERETO, WHEREBY THE FIRST YARN IS AT LEAST SLIGHTLY TEXTURED, AND THE SECOND YARN HAS A BASIC TEXTURE MORE PRONOUNCED THAN THAT OF THE FIRST YARN AND A SERIES OF LENGTHS HAVING A TEXTURE MORE PRONOUNCED THAN THE BASIC TEXTURE.
  2. 12. YARN CONTAINING AT LEAST ONE TEXTURED CORE END AND AT LEAST ONE TEXTURED EFFECT END IN WHICH LENGTHS HAVING
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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US3380135A (en) * 1965-06-01 1968-04-30 Monsanto Co Tow tie-in method
US3411287A (en) * 1966-05-18 1968-11-19 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Fancy yarn
US3438194A (en) * 1966-11-24 1969-04-15 Bemberg Spa Process for the manufacture of a composite yarn which is provided with spaced slubs
US3457715A (en) * 1964-07-30 1969-07-29 Celanese Corp Method and apparatus for producing intermittent bulked and saponified yarn
US3517498A (en) * 1967-06-22 1970-06-30 Rodiaceta Apparatus and method for producing a doupion thread
US3653196A (en) * 1970-09-30 1972-04-04 Stevens & Co Inc J P Yarn texturizing apparatus and process
US3678549A (en) * 1969-03-17 1972-07-25 Rhodiaceta Process for the manufacture of high-bulk yarn
US3805344A (en) * 1972-09-14 1974-04-23 Enterprise Machine & Dev Variable feed means for jet texturing apparatus
JPS5123614B1 (en) * 1970-01-14 1976-07-17
US3971108A (en) * 1975-03-31 1976-07-27 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours & Company Set apparatus for treating yarn and process for stringup thereof
JPS5128743B1 (en) * 1968-02-21 1976-08-20
US4058968A (en) * 1976-09-03 1977-11-22 Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation Bulked yarn and method of forming a bulked yarn
US4068358A (en) * 1975-06-18 1978-01-17 Berliner Maschinenbau-Ag Vormals L. Schwartzkopff Machine for air-jet texturizing of continuous synthetic filaments
US4160307A (en) * 1976-11-16 1979-07-10 Chevron Research Company Improvements in thermoplastic yarn rebound texturizing methods
US4924566A (en) * 1987-01-08 1990-05-15 Akebono Brake Industry Co., Ltd. Method for manufacturing a reinforcing element for asbestos free friction material
WO2013043806A2 (en) 2011-09-23 2013-03-28 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Mixed fiber product for use in the manufacture of cigarette filter elements and related methods, systems, and apparatuses

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US788292A (en) * 1904-08-27 1905-04-25 Jacob S Verlenden Machine for twisting and doubling yarns.
GB755580A (en) * 1953-08-25 1956-08-22 Celanese Corp Improved process for the production of voluminous yarn
GB776410A (en) * 1954-05-28 1957-06-05 Celanese Corp Novelty yarn and method and apparatus for the production thereof
US2852906A (en) * 1951-12-14 1958-09-23 Du Pont Method and apparatus for producing bulky continuous filament yarn
US2864230A (en) * 1953-06-02 1958-12-16 Deering Milliken Res Corp Method of making novelty yarn
US2869967A (en) * 1957-08-23 1959-01-20 Du Pont Bulky yarn
US2874444A (en) * 1954-02-17 1959-02-24 Du Pont Production of curly yarn
US2895285A (en) * 1954-01-13 1959-07-21 Universal Winding Co Method of manufacturing yarn and the product thereof
US2931090A (en) * 1956-09-18 1960-04-05 Du Pont Textile apparatus
GB861327A (en) * 1951-12-14 1961-02-15 Du Pont Novelty yarns and process for producing same
US3017737A (en) * 1958-06-25 1962-01-23 Du Pont Method and apparatus for producing bulky continuous filament yarn

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US788292A (en) * 1904-08-27 1905-04-25 Jacob S Verlenden Machine for twisting and doubling yarns.
US2852906A (en) * 1951-12-14 1958-09-23 Du Pont Method and apparatus for producing bulky continuous filament yarn
GB861327A (en) * 1951-12-14 1961-02-15 Du Pont Novelty yarns and process for producing same
US2864230A (en) * 1953-06-02 1958-12-16 Deering Milliken Res Corp Method of making novelty yarn
GB755580A (en) * 1953-08-25 1956-08-22 Celanese Corp Improved process for the production of voluminous yarn
US2895285A (en) * 1954-01-13 1959-07-21 Universal Winding Co Method of manufacturing yarn and the product thereof
US2874444A (en) * 1954-02-17 1959-02-24 Du Pont Production of curly yarn
GB776410A (en) * 1954-05-28 1957-06-05 Celanese Corp Novelty yarn and method and apparatus for the production thereof
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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3457715A (en) * 1964-07-30 1969-07-29 Celanese Corp Method and apparatus for producing intermittent bulked and saponified yarn
US3380135A (en) * 1965-06-01 1968-04-30 Monsanto Co Tow tie-in method
US3411287A (en) * 1966-05-18 1968-11-19 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Fancy yarn
US3438194A (en) * 1966-11-24 1969-04-15 Bemberg Spa Process for the manufacture of a composite yarn which is provided with spaced slubs
US3517498A (en) * 1967-06-22 1970-06-30 Rodiaceta Apparatus and method for producing a doupion thread
JPS5128743B1 (en) * 1968-02-21 1976-08-20
US3678549A (en) * 1969-03-17 1972-07-25 Rhodiaceta Process for the manufacture of high-bulk yarn
JPS5123614B1 (en) * 1970-01-14 1976-07-17
US3653196A (en) * 1970-09-30 1972-04-04 Stevens & Co Inc J P Yarn texturizing apparatus and process
US3805344A (en) * 1972-09-14 1974-04-23 Enterprise Machine & Dev Variable feed means for jet texturing apparatus
US3971108A (en) * 1975-03-31 1976-07-27 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours & Company Set apparatus for treating yarn and process for stringup thereof
US4068358A (en) * 1975-06-18 1978-01-17 Berliner Maschinenbau-Ag Vormals L. Schwartzkopff Machine for air-jet texturizing of continuous synthetic filaments
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WO2013043806A2 (en) 2011-09-23 2013-03-28 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Mixed fiber product for use in the manufacture of cigarette filter elements and related methods, systems, and apparatuses
US10064429B2 (en) 2011-09-23 2018-09-04 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Mixed fiber product for use in the manufacture of cigarette filter elements and related methods, systems, and apparatuses
EP3456212A1 (en) 2011-09-23 2019-03-20 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Mixed fiber product for use in the manufacture of cigarette filter elements and related methods, systems, and apparatuses

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