US3457715A - Method and apparatus for producing intermittent bulked and saponified yarn - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for producing intermittent bulked and saponified yarn Download PDF

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US3457715A
US3457715A US386139A US3457715DA US3457715A US 3457715 A US3457715 A US 3457715A US 386139 A US386139 A US 386139A US 3457715D A US3457715D A US 3457715DA US 3457715 A US3457715 A US 3457715A
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yarn
bulking
intermittent
pattern
jet
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Clare W Eldridge
Charles W Long
Robert O Gamble
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Celanese Corp
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Celanese Corp
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02GCRIMPING OR CURLING FIBRES, FILAMENTS, THREADS, OR YARNS; YARNS OR THREADS
    • D02G1/00Producing crimped or curled fibres, filaments, yarns, or threads, giving them latent characteristics
    • D02G1/16Producing crimped or curled fibres, filaments, yarns, or threads, giving them latent characteristics using jets or streams of turbulent gases, e.g. air, steam
    • D02G1/162Producing crimped or curled fibres, filaments, yarns, or threads, giving them latent characteristics using jets or streams of turbulent gases, e.g. air, steam with provision for imparting irregular effects to the yarn

Description

y 29, 1969 c. w. ELDRIDGE Er AL 3,457,715
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTERMITTENT BULKED AND SAPONIFIED YARN Filed July so, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 y 1969 c. w. ELDRIDGE ET Al. 3,457,715
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTERMITTENT BULKED AND SAPONIFIED YARN 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 50, 1964 y 29, 1959 c. w. ELDRIDGE ET AL 3,457,715
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTERMITTENT BULKED AND SAPONIFIED YARN Filed July 30, 1964 I 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 E50 4 Ham. //Y/ZPV/77Z7Yr BAX/AG fZfD t SUPPLY United States Patent 3,457,715 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTERMITTENT BULKED AND SAPONIFIED YARN Clare W. Eldridge, Charles W. Long, and Robert O.
Gamble, Rock Hill, S.C., assignors to Celanese Corporation of America, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed July 30, 1964, Ser. No. 386,139 Int. Cl. D02g 3/36 US. Cl. 57-6 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Method and apparatus for the preparation of novel sheath-core yarn from at least two yarn ends, said method comprising intermittently saponifying at least one end of yarn, simultaneously subjecting said intermittently saponified end of yarn and at least one other yarn end to the action of a bulking means and subsequently twisting said yarn ends.
The present invention relates to methods of bulking (texturizing) and saponifying yarn and the resultant products.
It is an object of the present invention to provide methods of intermittently or continously bulking (texturizing) yarn and concurrently, intermittently or continuously, saponifying the yarn where the yarn comprises such saponifiable material as secondary cellulose acetate, and the resultant yarns.
It is another object of this invention to provide a method for the preparation of sheath-core yarns by intermittently or continuously saponifying at least two yarn ends and intermittenly or continuously bulking at least two yarn ends.
Other objects of the present invention will appear from the following description and claims.
In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, two ends of yarn to be twisted and plied and intermittently bulked are withdrawn from supply packages. One end, designated the core end, is withdrawn by conventional means such as a standard feed roll, and the other end, designated the effect end, is withdrawn by such means as an auxiliary feed roll. The two ends are plied and subjected to a drawdown type operation such as downtwisting onto a single take-up means such as a bobbin, as in a normal downdrawing/ plying operation. Two intermediate steps are incorporated in the process. After leaving the feed rolls, the two ends are laced through a bulking jet and then through an intermittent tensioning device from which device the plied yarn is wound onto the take-up bobbin. The auxiliary feed means (e.g., rolls) is driven at such rate to deliver yarn at a slightly greater rate than the standard feed means (e.g., rolls). With no tension applied to the yarn by the tensioning device, the normal downtwisting/ plying operation takes place. But, when the tension is applied to the yarn by the tensioning device, which is programmed intermittently so to do, both ends are momentarily stopped or slowed to nearly a stop, creating no tension, or a very low tension which is less than the tension in the core end, in the eifect end because the efiect end is slightly overfed. At the same time that the tension device is energized a burst of pressurized fluid such as air is admitted into the bulking jet. This burst of fluid into the, jet bulks the effect end around and entangles it with the core end, creating a tight, a111, strong slub.
The programming technique employed in timing the intermittent bulking and controlling the length of yarn bulked is basically the same as the technique described in copending application Ser. No. 6,129, filed Feb. 2, 1960, now US. Patent No. 3,194,000. The fullness of 3,457,715 Patented July 29, 1969 the bulk is governed by the ratio of effect end delivery rate to core end delivery rate, or overfeed, and by the average frequency of bulking. The programmed pattern is applied to a tape and the pattern is detected by a photoelectric cell. An electric feeler pick-up or magnetic tape pick-up or the like are utilizable as alternatives-to the photoelectric cell. A plurality of pattern pick-up units inaty be connected in series to attain special pattern efec s.
The intermittent tension device may be of an electromagnetic type employing two tension discs. No tension is appl ed by the tension device on the yarn when the device is not energized. When the tension device is energized by the pattern pick-up unit, the discs are abruptly brought together with suificient pressure to stop or nearly stop the yarn. Intermittent tensioning of the yarn may also be accomplished by the use of conventional pneumatic or mechanical devices.
Intermittent air supply may be accomplished by means of an electric solenoid air valve, which is actuated by the same pattern signal that controls the intermittent tenslon device. When energized, the solenoid opens the valve thereby deliverying air at a predetermined pressure to the bulking jet. A quick acting mechanical air valve or the llke may be used as an alternative to the solenoid type air valve. Furthermore, a time delay feature may be used in the process to allow air to enter the jet either before or after the tension device is signalled, thereby to obtain longitudinally asymmetrical slubs.
If the tension device is adjusted to give slightly less tenslon and if both it and the air valve are energized contmuously, the yarn will be bulked continuously'in a tight, uniform texture. The fullness of this continuously texturized yarn again depends on the overfeed ratio of eflect end delivery rate to core end delivery rate; the greater the ratio, the more full the yarn.
Several variations of the above described basic processes are possible, utilizing substantially the same equipment. Each of these variations will create a difierent textured eflect in the yarn. These variations will now be described.
Using the basic two-ply process with one end constantly overfed, the programmed pattern which signals the solenoid air valve and intermittent tensioning device may also be used (or an entirely separate pattern would serve equally well) to signal an electromagnetic clutch attached to the auxiliary (overfeed) feed roll, thereby intermittently to slow the auxiliary feed roll to the same speed as the standard feed roll. In this manner there is produced a continuous tightly bulked yarn with intermittent thicker sections or a more prominently slubbed yarn.
Using the basic two-ply process, but with both ends fed at the same rate, the same pattern which in the last described embodiment signalled an electromagnetic clutch attached to the auxiliary feed roll to slow said roll may instead intermittently signal an electromagnetic clutch to increase the auxiliary teed roll speed to a predetermined overfeed rate. When the signal is intermittently oif, thereby intermittently releasing the clutch, the auxiliary feed roll intermittently returns to the same speed as the standard feed roll. In this manner there is produced a tighter plied yarn with slubs of any length and fullness desired.
Using the basic two-ply process with both ends fed at the same rate, a programmed pattern signal may be sent to a clutch-brake assembly controlling the auxiliary feed roll, so that when the clutch-brake assembly is signalled the auxiliary feed roll momentarily stops thereby effecting an overfeed by the standard feed roll. In this manner there is produced a plied yarn with slubs of any fullness desired.
Furthermore, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention, a single end bulking process is provided. By running the single end over the auxiliary feed roll operating at a slight overfeed rate, then through the bulking jet, then over the standard feed roll and finally onto the take-up bob-bin, the slack in the yarn due to the overfeed is taken up by the jet when the jet is supplied with burst of bulking fluid and said slack is thereby formed into a full, compact slub. Intermittent bursts of fluid are provided to the jet in the same manner as in the basic two-ply process. In this manner there is produced yarn wherein the frequency of slubs and the overfeed are each directly related to the other.
In accordance with other aspects of the present invention: there are provided methods for intermittent saponification of secondary cellulose acetate yarn; there are also provided methods for intermittent saponification of secondary cellulose acetate yarn concurrent with intermittent bulking thereof. It should be noted that in any of the methods to be described, continuous, rather than intermittent, saponification may be attained by running the yarn directly in contact with the saponifying means or fluid without provision of a programmed pattern to interrupt or deflect the yarn from this path.
Standard, single feed roll downtwisting machines equipped with an auxiliary feed roll and emulsion rolls may be used in any of the intermittent saponification processes or continuous saponification processes. As described in copending application Ser. No. 6,129, filed Feb. 2, 1960, now US. Patent No. 3,194,000, lifter arms programmed for intermittent operation may be used to pattern the intermittent saponification. However, alternatively, depressor arms programmed for intermittent operation may be used to pattern the intermittent saponification. This alternative is particularly useful when intermittent saponification is eflected between the feed roll or rolls and take-up bobbin.
In another aspect of the present invention, stationary wick-type applicators, supplied by a tray or tank, may be used instead of the standard rotating emulsion rolls and supply trough. With this type of applicator, either the lifter arm or depressor arm type of device may be used to eflect the intermittent saponification pattern. In the absence of a programmed pattern, continuous saponification is accomplished.
Another method of intermittently or continuously saponifying is to utilize a fine, controlled nozzle to spray the saponifying fluid onto the yarn. The fluid nozzle may be governed by a solenoid valve, receiving its signal in the same manner as the lifter arms described in patent application Ser. No. 6,129, thereby to effect any predetermined intermittent pattern. The controlling valve need not necessarily be a solenoid type valve but may be mechanically or pneumatically actuated. A variation of this method of intermittent saponification consists in providing a controlled stream of saponifying fluid, instead of a fine spray, through or into which the yarn is intermittently deflected or continuously directed by means of a horizontally acting device similar to the aforesaid lifter arm. Thusly, there is attained very sharp control of the desired pattern.
It is thus seen that by any of the preceding methods cellulose acetate yarn may be intermittently put in contact with and then removed from sodium hydroxide solution or other appropriate saponifying solution. In this manner, segments of the yarn are saponified. The saponified segments of the yarn are dyeable by direct dyes but substantially undyeable by conventional disperse acetate dyes; whereas, the unsaponified segments of yarn are dyeable by conventional disperse acetate dyes but substantially undyeable by direct dyes. Thus, a fabric constructed from these yarns and cross-dyed with both direct dye and disperse acetate dye exhibits a dual-color effect.
To combine the primary intermittent or continuous saponification process with the primary intermittent or continuous bulking (texturizing) process requires no mechanical alterations in either of the individual processes. Where one of the variations of one of the processesus combined with the other process or with one of its variation's, minor mechanical alteration is necessary.
One of the combined process embodiments comprises continuous saponification combined with intermittent bulking. Either the continuous saponification or the intermittent bulking may be performed before the other.
Similarly, continuous saponification may be combined with continuous bulking in either order.
Also, intermittent saponification may be combined with continuous bulking in either order.
Further, intermittent saponification may be combined with intermittent bulking. A number of pattern variations may be accomplished as follows:
For example, the saponified and bulked segments of yarn need not coincide. To attain this efiFect one or two signal patterns may be used. If one signal pattern is used, the bulking signal and the saponifying signal occur simultaneously in which case the slub or bulked (textured) portion of yarn is always a fixed distance from the saponified portion; such distance is equal to the length of the yarn path from the saponifying point to the bulking point. If two signal patterns are used, one controlling each of the saponifying and bulking, the two are not necessarily related in any way to each other. In this latter manner, a random pattern of saponified portions and an unrelated random pattern of bulked portions are included in the same yarn to give a very novel effect in fabric constructed from such yarn.
In another embodiment of the intermittent saponification/ intermittent bulking combination, it is provided that the saponified segments of yarn always coincide with the bulked segments of yarn. To produce ths efifect, a definite time control is established between the pattern signal to saponify and the pattern signal to bulk; to accomplish uniform saponification, it is preferred that saponification take place before bulking, even though consequently the bulking jet must be periodically cleaned. The effect is acconiplished by providing two pattern signal pick-up units operating in tandem on a single pattern tape. The distance between the two pattern pick-up units is predetermined so that the yarn is saponified or bulked by a given pattern signal from the first pick-up unit and at the exact time a given thusly saponified or bulked segment of yarn reaches the other operationtbulking or saponification) the same signal is picked up by the second whereby said other operation is performed. The distance between the two pick-up units may be determined from the following equation:
where I is the distance between pick-up units, l is the yarn distance from the saponification point to the bulking point, V is the pattern tape speed and V is the yarn speed.
This time delay effect can alternatively be accomplished by a similar approach which involves two pick-up units and two-pattern tapes or a single pattern tape with two channels. One pick-up unit controls the saponification operation from one pattern. From an equivalent pattern on the second pattern tape or channel, the second pick-up controls the bulking operation. Identical pattern signals will be staggered in the manner described above in order thatl segments of yarn be bulked and saponified coextensive y.
In still another embodiment of the intermittent saponification/intermittent bulking combination, it is provided that yarn be unsaponified and bulked coextensively. This is accomplished by juxtaposing the saponification apparatus relative to the yarn so that the apparatus saponifies the yarn except when signalled. When the saponification apparatus is signalled, the yarn thereby is removed from the saponifying means and since this signal is synchronized to provide previous or subsequent bulking in the thereby unsaponified segment the desired result is attained. This combination preferably is effected by bulking and then saponifying, so that both plied ends are saponified uniformly and so that the jet is not clogged by an excess of saponifying fluid and/ or the solid or liquid by-products of saponification.
In the drawings:
FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of a downtwister in combination with an intermittent bulking device constructed in accordance with the present invention;
FIG. 2 is a fragmentary schematic illustration, in per spective of an intermittent saponifying device adapted to be operationally combined with the downtwister shown in FIG. 1.
FIG. 3 is a fragmentary schematic illustration, in perspective, of another intermittent saponifying device adapted to be operationally combined with the downtwister shown in FIG. 1.
FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 are block diagrams representing some possible variations in the programming arrangement and thus in the treatments that can be carried out by the apparatus according to the present invention.
The drawings will now be described in detail.
FIGURE 1 Downtwister D (which is basically a conventional structure and constitutes no part of the present invention) comprises a standard pair of feed rolls 10 and 11 and a downtwisting ring 12.
One end of yarn, core end 13, is withdrawn from supply package 14, passed through pigtail guides 15 and 16, under feed roll 10, through the nip between feed rolls 10 and 11, through pigtail guide 17 and to bulking device B.
Simultaneously, a second end of yarn, effect end 18, is withdrawn from second supply package 19, passed through pigtail guides 20 and 21, under roll 22 of an auxiliary paid of feed rolls 22 and 23, through the nip of said auxiliary paid of feed rolls, through pigtail guide 24 and to bulking device B.
Bulking device B comprises jet 25 and yarn tensioning or clamping device 26. Jet 25 essentially comprises a housing 27 in which is defined a chamber (not shown) through which yarn ends 13 and 18 are adapted to pass. Communicating with the chamber is an inlet tube or conduit 28 through which a gaseous or vaporous bulking fluid under high pressure may be admitted into the chamher.
The actual construction of jet 25 comprises no part of the present invention, and thus it is not deemed necessary to illustrate the jet specifically herein. Merely by way of example, jet 25 may be an air jet as disclosed in British Patent No. 776,410, or an air or stream jet such as that disclosed in US. patent application Ser. No. 812,718, filed May 12, 1959, in the names of I. O. Smith and C. R. Delagrange, now abandoned. Whatever type of jet is employed, however, the arrangement is such that when yarn is overfed into the jet, the fluid supplied to the bulking chamber, due to its turbulent flow out of the chamber, causes the yarn to be deformed and rendered considerably more bulky and voluminous than it was prior to entering the jet.
The yarn tensioning or clamping device 26 essentially comprises a pair of flat-faced discs 29 and 30, of which the disc 30 is stationarily mounted. A detailed description of the means by which and manner in which tensioning device 26 is operated is found in patent application Ser. N0. 6,129, filed Feb. 2, 1960, and said detailed description is hereby incorporated herein by reference and, accordingly, will not be duplicated.
Core end 13 and effect end 18 are passed together through bulking jet 25 wherein slubs are formed by means of entanglement of effect end 18 about core end 13 within the chamber of bulking jet 25 during its intermittent operations. Slubs 31 and 32 are formed during the intermittent operation of bulking jet 25. The slubbed, plied yarn 33 formed by the operation of bulking device B passes through pigtail guide 34 to downtwisting ring 12 by means of which yarn 33 is wound onto take-up spool or package 35.
Auxiliary feed rolls 22 and 23 are set to deliver effect end 18 at a slightly greater rate than standard feed rolls 10 and 11. With no tension applied to the yarn ends by tensioning device 26, the normal downtwisting/plying operation takes place. But when tension is applied by tensioning device 26 (intermittently programmed to do so by the method and means described in detail in patent application Ser. No. 6,129, filed Feb. 2, 1960, which detailed description hereby is incorporated herein by reference), both ends are momentarily stopped or slowed nearly to a stop, thereby creating no tension or a very low tension in the core end and no tension in the effect end (because the effect end is slightly overfed). At the same time that the tension device is energized, a burst of pressurized fluid such as air is admitted into jet 25 through inlet tube or conduit 28. This burst of fluid draws the excess yarn in effect end 18 (created by the slight overfeed of auxiliary feed rolls 22 and 23 before and during tensioning) into the jet, bulking it around and entangling it in core end 13, thereby creating a tight, full, strong slub. The programming technique employed in timing the intermittent bulking and controlling the length of yarn bulked is the same as the technique described in detail in the aforesaid patent application, which detailed description hereby is incorporated herein by reference.
FIGURE 2 This is a modification of the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 2 of patent application Ser. No. 6,129, filed Feb. 2, 1960. The only difference is that arm 40 is a depressor arm rather than a lifter arm. Yarn 41 passes under depressor arm 40. As illustrated: when arm 40- is not depressed, yarn 41 follows path X, does not contact emulsion roll 42 and accordingly is not saponified; on the other hand, when arm 40 is depressed, yarn 41 follows path Y, contacts emulsion roll 42 and accordingly is saponified.
FIGURE 3 This is another modification of the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 2 of patent application Ser. No. 6,129, filed Feb. 2, 1960. The differences here are that: arm 50 deflects the yarn and thus may be termed a deflector arm; and saponifying fluid is supplied in a spray or a constant stream through conduit 51 to nozzle 52 and then falls in carryoff tray 53. When arm 50 is not activated, yarn 54 is not deflected and follows path R through saponifying fluid 55; when arm 50 is activated, yarn 54 is deflected and follows path S which avoids sponi'fying fluid 55.
Referring again to FIG. 1, it should of course be noted that intermittent saponifying apparatus, such as that illustrated in FIG. 3, may be inserted between pigtail 16 (shown in FIG. 3 also) and standard feed rolls 10 and 11 (shown in FIG. 3 also) whereby core end 13 will be intermittently saponified.
FIGURE 4 This is an illustration in the form of a block diagram of a single pattern, unsynchronized, simultaneous bulking and saponifying process. Core end 13 is withdrawn from supply package 14 by standard feed rolls 10, .11 and passed to intermittently actuated bulking jet 25. Effect end 18 is withdrawn from supply package 19, passed through intermittent saponification device S (such as the device illustrated in FIG. 3) and to auxiliary feed rolls 22, 23 and thence to intermittently actuated bulking jet 25. Both ends are joined in the bulking jet. saponification device S and both units of bulking device B, namely bulking jet 25 and tensioning device 26, are simultaneously intermittently actuated by signals programmed on pattern tape T and picked up by pick-up unit P from which said signals are transmitted simultaneously to units S, 25 and 26.
FIGURE 5 This is an illustration in the form of a block diagram of a two pattern, unrelated and unsynchronized saponifying and bulking process. As can readily be seen, this system is the same as the FIGURE 4 system except that: saponification device S is intermittently actuated by signals programmed on pattern tape T, picked up by pick-up unit P and therefrom transmitted to saponification device S; and "both units of bulking device B, namely bulking jet 25 and tensioning device 26, are simultaneously intermittently actuated by signals programmed on another pattern tape T, picked up by another pick-up unit P and therefrom transmitted simultaneously to units 25 and 26.
FIGURE 6 This is an illustration in the form of a block diagram of a single pattern, synchronized bulking and saponifying process. Core end 13 is withdrawn from supply package 14 by standard feed rolls 10, 11 and passed to intermittently actuated bulking jet 25. Effect end 18 is withdrawn from supply package 19 by auxiliary feed rolls 22, 23 and passed to intermittently actuated bulking jet 25. Both ends are joined in the bulking jet. Both units of bulking device B, namely bulking jet 25 and tensioning device 26, are simultaneously intermittently actuated by signals programmed on pattern tape T, picked up by pick-up unit P and therefrom transmitted to units 25 and 26. saponification device S is intermittently actuated by signals programmed on pattern tape T, picked up by pick-up unit P and therefrom transmitted to saponification device S. Synchronization, whereby the bulked and saponified segments of yarn always coincide, is efiected by relating l l V, and V (all defined above) according to the above equation.
The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:
1. A method of making novel sheath-core yarn having at least two plies comprising intermittently saponifying at least one end of yarn, simultaneously subjecting the intermittently saponified yarn and at least one other yarn end to the action of a bulking means wherein said saponified yarn is disposed centrally of said other end and said other end is entangled about and with said saponified yarn and subsequently twisting all of said yarn ends.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein at least one of said ends comprises secondary cellulose acetate.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein said other end is bulked intermittently about said saponified yarn.
4. The method of claim 3 wherein said intermittent saponifying and said intermittent bulking are synchronized whereby saponified segments of said saponified yarn are substantially coextensive with the segments of said other end which are bulked about said saponified yarn.
5. Apparatus for making novel sheath-core yarns comprising in combination first feeding means, for feeding a core end, second feeding means for feeding a sheath end, means for saponifying at least one end, means for plying and bulking said core end and said sheath end, said means for plying and bulking comprising a bulking jet in combination with a tensioning means, said bulking jet and said tensioning means being in such juxtaposition to each other and to said first and second feeding means that the yarn fed from both feeding means will pass through said bulking jet before said tensioning means.
6. The apparatus of claim 5 for making novel sheathcore yarns wherein said bulking jet, said tensioning means and said saponifying means are operatively connected to means for programming intermittent actuation of said bulking jet, of said tensioning means and of said saponifying means.
7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said means for programming comprises patterned tape means in combination with pick-up means for sensing the pattern of said tape means and translating said pattern into signals and means for transmitting said signals to said bulking jet and to said tensioning means and to said saponifying means, which three latter means are actuated in response to said signals.
References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,017,737 1/1962 Breen 5734 3,105,349 10/1963 Palm et al. 57 34 3,113,413 12/1963 Jacobs et al. 57-34 3,144,747 8/1964 Palm et a1 5734 1,966,440 7/1934 Dickie et al 57157 X 2,089,194 8/1937 Dreyfus 57-157 X 3,083,522 4/1963 Rakowski et al. 5734 3,091,909 6/1963 Taylor et al. 5734 3,194,000 7/1965 Eldridge et al. 5734 3,253,396 5/1966 Fish 5734 3,262,177 7/1966 Cobb et al. 281
FOREIGN PATENTS 861,327 2/ 1961 Great Britain.
JOHN PETRAKES, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.
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US3854313A (en) * 1972-01-11 1974-12-17 Hoechst Ag Process for the manufacture of slub yarns
US4058968A (en) * 1976-09-03 1977-11-22 Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation Bulked yarn and method of forming a bulked yarn
US4145869A (en) * 1977-07-22 1979-03-27 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Slub yarn and method of forming same
US4155216A (en) * 1976-09-13 1979-05-22 Akzona, Incorporated Production of novelty yarns
US4311000A (en) * 1979-08-29 1982-01-19 Burlington Industries, Inc. Novelty yarn production
US4335588A (en) * 1978-01-03 1982-06-22 Akzona Incorporated Yarn process and apparatus
US4368612A (en) * 1979-11-13 1983-01-18 Milliken Research Corporation Apparatus for forming false twisted slubyarn
US4446691A (en) * 1982-11-10 1984-05-08 Milliken Research Corporation High A.C.-D.C. yarn tension control
US4446690A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-05-08 Milliken Research Corporation Bar balloon control
US4449355A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-05-22 Milliken Research Corporation A.C.-D.C. Slotted type yarn tension control
US4449354A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-05-22 Milliken Research Corporation Disc type yarn tension control
US4454710A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-06-19 Milliken Research Corporation Balloon control for yarn texturing machine
US4457129A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-07-03 Milliken Research Corporation Slotted disc type yarn tension control
US4462557A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-07-31 Milliken Research Corporation Spring biased electromagnetically controlled tension control
US4467594A (en) * 1981-03-05 1984-08-28 Milliken Research Corporation Spun-like textured yarn
US4478036A (en) * 1983-02-22 1984-10-23 Milliken Research Corporation Method, apparatus and intermittently textured yarn
USRE31808E (en) * 1979-08-29 1985-01-22 Burlington Industries, Inc. Novelty yarn production
US4532760A (en) * 1984-02-21 1985-08-06 Milliken Research Corporation D. C. Yarn tension control
US5379501A (en) * 1993-05-24 1995-01-10 Milliken Research Corporation Method of produce loop pile yarn

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US2089194A (en) * 1934-12-07 1937-08-10 Dreyfus Henry Textile yarn and fabric and the production thereof
GB861327A (en) * 1951-12-14 1961-02-15 Du Pont Novelty yarns and process for producing same
US3105349A (en) * 1954-05-28 1963-10-01 Celanese Corp Method and apparatus for producing novelty yarn
US3017737A (en) * 1958-06-25 1962-01-23 Du Pont Method and apparatus for producing bulky continuous filament yarn
US3144747A (en) * 1959-05-05 1964-08-18 Celanese Corp Apparatus for producing a composite novelty slub yarn
US3253396A (en) * 1959-06-01 1966-05-31 Beaunit Corp Method and apparatus for making textured yarn and product
US3113413A (en) * 1959-06-08 1963-12-10 Eastman Kodak Co Apparatus and method for producing volumized slub yarn
US3083522A (en) * 1959-12-21 1963-04-02 Courtaulds Ltd Production of textile yarns
US3194000A (en) * 1960-02-02 1965-07-13 Celanese Corp Apparatus and method for bulking yarn
US3262177A (en) * 1961-11-01 1966-07-26 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Apparatus for producing novelty bulked yarn
US3091909A (en) * 1962-05-31 1963-06-04 Stevens & Co Inc J P Intermittent control apparatus

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3678549A (en) * 1969-03-17 1972-07-25 Rhodiaceta Process for the manufacture of high-bulk yarn
US3854313A (en) * 1972-01-11 1974-12-17 Hoechst Ag Process for the manufacture of slub yarns
US4058968A (en) * 1976-09-03 1977-11-22 Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation Bulked yarn and method of forming a bulked yarn
US4159619A (en) * 1976-09-13 1979-07-03 Akzona Incorporated Method for producing novelty yarns
US4155216A (en) * 1976-09-13 1979-05-22 Akzona, Incorporated Production of novelty yarns
US4145869A (en) * 1977-07-22 1979-03-27 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Slub yarn and method of forming same
US4335588A (en) * 1978-01-03 1982-06-22 Akzona Incorporated Yarn process and apparatus
US4311000A (en) * 1979-08-29 1982-01-19 Burlington Industries, Inc. Novelty yarn production
USRE31808E (en) * 1979-08-29 1985-01-22 Burlington Industries, Inc. Novelty yarn production
US4368612A (en) * 1979-11-13 1983-01-18 Milliken Research Corporation Apparatus for forming false twisted slubyarn
US4467594A (en) * 1981-03-05 1984-08-28 Milliken Research Corporation Spun-like textured yarn
US4446690A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-05-08 Milliken Research Corporation Bar balloon control
US4449354A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-05-22 Milliken Research Corporation Disc type yarn tension control
US4454710A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-06-19 Milliken Research Corporation Balloon control for yarn texturing machine
US4457129A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-07-03 Milliken Research Corporation Slotted disc type yarn tension control
US4462557A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-07-31 Milliken Research Corporation Spring biased electromagnetically controlled tension control
US4449355A (en) * 1982-10-18 1984-05-22 Milliken Research Corporation A.C.-D.C. Slotted type yarn tension control
US4446691A (en) * 1982-11-10 1984-05-08 Milliken Research Corporation High A.C.-D.C. yarn tension control
US4478036A (en) * 1983-02-22 1984-10-23 Milliken Research Corporation Method, apparatus and intermittently textured yarn
US4532760A (en) * 1984-02-21 1985-08-06 Milliken Research Corporation D. C. Yarn tension control
US5379501A (en) * 1993-05-24 1995-01-10 Milliken Research Corporation Method of produce loop pile yarn

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