US3031194A - Golf ball structure - Google Patents

Golf ball structure Download PDF

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Publication number
US3031194A
US3031194A US80582859A US3031194A US 3031194 A US3031194 A US 3031194A US 80582859 A US80582859 A US 80582859A US 3031194 A US3031194 A US 3031194A
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Prior art keywords
layer
resilient
golf ball
metal
adhered
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Strayer Donald Ross
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Perfection Finishing Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0022Coatings, markings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0023Covers
    • A63B37/0024Materials other than ionomers or polyurethane
    • A63B37/0026Balata
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0038Intermediate layers, e.g. inner cover, outer core, mantle
    • A63B37/0039Special materials
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0038Intermediate layers, e.g. inner cover, outer core, mantle
    • A63B37/004Physical properties
    • A63B37/0045Thickness
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/005Cores
    • A63B37/0051Special materials other than polybutadienes; Special construction
    • A63B37/0052Liquid cores
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/007Characteristics of the ball as a whole
    • A63B37/0072Characteristics of the ball as a whole with a specified number of layers
    • A63B37/0076Multi-piece balls, i.e. having two or more intermediate layers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S273/00Amusement devices: games
    • Y10S273/03Epoxy

Description

April 24, 1962 D. R. STRAYE 3,031,194

GOLF BALL STRUCTURE Filed April 13.. 1959 IN V EN TOR.

United States Patent Filed Apr. 13, 1959, Ser. No. 805,823

6 Claims. (El. 273 213) This invention relates to a golf ball-structure, and, more particularly, to such a structure which is more nearly elastic by virtue of the inclusion therein of a continuous, substantially spherical layer of a metal, which metal layer is bonded or adhered to a resilient portion of the golf ball structure.

It is an object of the instant invention to provide a new golf ball structure.

It is a further object to provide such a structure which is more nearly elastic, and is therefore superior to presently available structures of this type by virtue of the inclusion therein of a thin, continuous, substantially spherical layer of a metal bonded or adhered to a resilient portion of the structure.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the description which follows, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which a FIG. 1 is a plan view of a golf ball structure according to the invention; and

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

Referring now in more detail to the drawings, a golf ball structure according to the invention is indicated generally at ill. As can be seen in FIG. 1, the specific structure shown has the exterior contour of an ordinary golf ball structure, being substantially spherical in shape and having a plurality of dimples 12 arranged in a regular pattern.

As can be seen in FIG. 2 however, the structure 11 includes, adhered to the exterior of a conventional cover 13, usually made of balata gum, a thin metal layer 14. Interior of the cover 13 is a second thin metal layer 15, which second layer is adhered to the exterior surface of a sub-assembly 16, which sub-assembly comprises a resilient hollow core 17 filled with a liquid 18 and'an intermediate, resilient layer 19 composed of lengths 20 of a flat, resilient, ribbon-like material wrapped upon the exterior of the core 17. The resilient, liquid-filled core 17, the resilient, intermediate layer 19, and the balata gum cover 13 of thegolf ball structure according to the invention are conventionally used in producing golf ball structures, and need not herein be described in detail, as any available core, intermediate resilient layer and cover can be employed in producing a golf ball structure according to the invention. A thin, continuous, substantially spherical metal layer 21 is also provided on the exterior of the liquid-filled resilient core 1'7.

Each of the thin, continuous, generally spherical metal layers 14, and 21 in the golf ball structure of FIGS. 1 and 2 can conveniently be applied by a vacuum metalizing technique. When the part of the structure on which such a layer is to be applied is of an appropriate chemical composition, the metal layer can be applied directly thereto. When such part of the structure is chemically unsuitedto receive a metal layer, such part can be coated with a metallizable film, for example of a suitable synthetic'resinous material. Numerous commercially available synthetic resinous materials, particularly various epoxides, are known to be suitable for use in applying coatings, which when hardened, are readily metalizable, and are admirably suited for this purpose, when desired or required.

The following example is presented solely for the purpose of further illustrating and disclosing the inven- Patented Apr. 24', 1962 tion, and is in no way to be construed as a limitation thereon.

Example A conventional golf ball core which is a substantially spherical, resilient solid body of a styrene-butadiene copolymer rubber filled with a water-glycerin solution is introduced into a chamber evacuated to a pressure of approximately /2 micron of water absolute. Tungsten filaments within the evacuated chamber are then heated electrically to heat, melt, and evaporate or flash aluminum clips disposed within the chamber, and the golf ball core is rotated slowly and moved upwardly and downwardly to assure a uniform deposition of the aluminum vapor thereon. Heating of the tungsten filaments is continued until the desired coverage of aluminum is achieved, usually for from about /2 minute to about 2 minutes, and then stopped; evacuation of the chamber is then terminated and a vacuum seal broken. The golf ball core carrying a uniform, continuous, generally spherical coating of aluminum, which coating is approximately 0.000004 inch in thickness, is removed from the chamber.

A fiat, or ribbon-like, styrene-butadiene synthetic rubber strip approximately wide and ,4 4 thick is then wound upon the metalized golf ball core to produce a generally spherical sub-assembly comprising the metalized core (diameter approximately 1') and an adjacent, exterior resilient layer made up of the synthetic rubber strip. The diameter of this sub-assembly is approximately 1 /2". The sub-assembly is then placed in the evacuated chamber and metalizcd according to the procedure described above in the preceding paragraph to provide a generally spherical, continuous aluminum coating adhered to the exterior thereof. The aluminum coating, again, is approximately 0.000004 inch in thickventional manner well known to those skilled in the art. A thin coating of an epoxy resin 1 is then sprayed onto the surface of the cured balata gum cover, and allowed to air dry at an ambient temperature of approximately 25 C. for 24 hours. The assembly after air drying, is then metalized' according to the procedure described above to provide a third aluminum coating approximately 0.000004 inch in thickness. After completion of the metalizing, a second coating of the same epoxy resin is sprayed onto the metalized surface and allowed to air dry under ambient conditions of about 25 C. for 24 hours. The resulting product, after the final air drying, constitutes an improved golf ball structure according to the invention.

It will be appreciated from the foregoing example that a preferred structure according to the invention comprises a resilient, substantially spherical core, a layer of a metal having a thickness of the order of about 0.000005 inch (i.e., closer in thickness to 0.000005 inch than to either 0.0000005 inch or 0.00005 inch) adhered'to the core, an intermediate resilient layer exterior of the metal coating, the exterior of the intermediate layer'being generally spherical in shape, a second, generally spherical, continuous coating of a metal'of the order of about 0.000005 inch in thickness adhered to the intermediate resilient epoxy composition. is mixed with 15 parts of tridimethyl amino methyl phenol per parts of resin.

arr-31,194

layer, a cover surrounding, and in close proximity to the second metal layer, and a generally spherical, substantially continuous coating of a metal adhered to the cover and having a thickness of the order of about 0.000005 inch. Preferably, there is, intermediate the third metal coating and the cover, a synthetic resinous coating, and, most desirably, the structure includes a synthetic resinous coating intermediate the cover and the third metal layer, and, also, a second synthetic resinous coating exterior of the third metal coating. Epoxy coating compositions are ideal as each of the two synthetic resinous coatings.

It will be apparent that the bright, silvery appearance of the visible aluminum layer in a preferred golf ball structure according to the invention is not only decorative, but also facilitates finding a lost ball, and that the aluminum can be coated with a colored material, if desired, to give any other desired decorative effect. In such case, the aluminum brightens the appearance of the colored material.

Each of the metal layers or coatings in the golf ball structure produced as described in the foregoing example makes the golf ball approach more nearly an elastic condition when subjected to compression, as during use. It is Well known that natural and synthetic rubbers, while they are popularly considered to be elastic, and are such in the sense that they can be stretched by a tensile force and will, upon release of the tensile force, return to approximately their original condition, approach true elasticity far less closely than do most metals. It is believed, in retrospect, that the improved characteristics of a golf ball structure according to the invention are attributable to an unexpected cooperative effect between each of the generally spherical, thin metal layers therein and the resilient, but relatively poor elastic characteristics of the material to which such layer is adhered, the result of such cooperation being a greater reactive force when a golf ball structure according to the invention is subjected to a given impact. It will be appreciated, therefore, that, while a preferred structure according to the invention includes all three of the disclosed metal layers, it is essential for the cooperative action only that there be one such metal layer,

' and that the one layer can be exterior of the core, exterior of the winding, or exterior of the cover. While a thickness of the order of about 0.000005 inch has been disclosed as preferred, thicker metal layers, in most cases up to about 0.0005 inch, may also be used.

It will be apparent that various changes and modifications can be made from the specific details set forth herein, without departing from the spirit and scope of the attached claims.

What I claim is:

1. A golf ball structure comprising a generally spherical, resilient core having a generally spherical exterior surface, a continuous layer of aluminum having a thickness of about 0.000005 inch adhered to said exterior surface, an intermediate layer of a resilient material disposed around and in close proximity to said metal layer, said intermediate layer having a generally spherical exterior surface, a second layer of aluminum having a thickness of the order of about 0.000005 inch adhered to the exterior of said intermediate resilient layer, a resilient cover disposed around and in close proximity to said second aluminum layer, a hardened epoxy coating adhered to the exterior surface of said cover, a third aluminum layer having a thickness of about 0.000005 inch adhered to the exterior of said hardened epoxy coating, and a second epoxy coating layer adhered to the exterior of said third aluminum layer.

2. A golf ball structure comprising a generally spherica-l, resilient core having a generally spherical exterior surface, a continuous layer of a metal having a thickness of about 0.000005 inch adhered to said exterior surface, an intermediate layer of a resilient material disposed around and in close proximity to said metal layer, said intermediate layer having a generally spherical exterior surface, a second layer of a metal having a thickness of the order of about 0.000005 inch adhered to the exterior of said intermediate resilient layer, a resilient cover disposed around and in close proximity to said second metal layer, a hardened epoxy coating adhered to the exterior surface of said cover, a third layer of a metal having a thickness of about 0.000005 inch adhered to the exterior of said hardened epoxy coating, and a second epoxy coating layer adhered to the exterior of said third metal layer.

3. A golf ball structure comprising a generally spherical, resilient core having a generally spherical exterior surface, a continuous layer of a metal having a thickness of about 0.000005 inch adhered to said exterior surface, an intermediate layer of a resilient material disposed around and in close proximity to said metal layer, said intermediate layer having a generally spherical exterior surface, a second layer of a metal having a thickness of the order of about 0.000005 inch adhered to the exterior of said intermediate resilient layer, a resilient cover disposed around and in close proximity to said second metal layer, a hardened synthetic resinous coating adhered to the exterior surface of said cover, a third layer of a metal having a thickness of about 0.000005 inch adhered to the exterior of said hardened resinous coating, and a second synthetic resinous coating layer adhered to the exterior of said third metal layer.

4. A golf ball structure comprising a generally spherical,

resilient core having a generally spherical exterior surface, a continuous layer of a metal having a thickness of about 0.000005 inch adhered to said exterior surface, an intermediate layer of a resilient material disposed around and in close proximity to said metal layer, said intermediate layer having a generally spherical exterior surface, and a resilient cover disposed around and in close proximity to said intermediate layer.

5. A golf ball structure comprising a resilient core having a generally spherical exterior surface, an intermediate layer of a resilient material disposed around and in close proximity to said resilient core, said intermediate layer having a generally spherical exterior surface, a resilient cover disposed around and in close proximity to said intermediate layer, and having a generally spherical exterior surface, and layers of a metal having a thickness of about 0.000005 of an inch adhered to at least two of said generally spherical exterior surfaces, both of said metal layers being continuous throughout the entire gen-. erally spherical exterior surface to which they are adhered.

6. A golf ball structure comprising a resilient core having a generally spherical exterior surface, an intermediate layer of a resilient material disposed around and in close proximity to said resilient core, said intermediate layer having a generally spherical exterior surface, a resilient cover disposed around and in close proximity to said intermediate layer, and having a generally spherical exterior surface, and layers of a metal having a thickness from 0.000005 inch to 0.0005 inch adhered to at least two of said generally spherical exterior surfaces, each of said metal layers being continuous throughout the entire exterior surface to which it is adhered.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 716,348 Richards Dec. 16, 1902 1,182,604 Wadsworth May 9, 1916 1,568,514 Lewis Jan. 5, 1926 2,861,810 Veatch Nov. 25, 1958 OTHER REFERENCES Epoxy Resins, published 1957 by McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., pages 216, 222, 265, 286 cited.

Epoxy Resins, published by Reinhold Publishing Corp., pages 182, 199, 202, 203 cited.

US3031194A 1959-04-13 1959-04-13 Golf ball structure Expired - Lifetime US3031194A (en)

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Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3140094A (en) * 1960-03-14 1964-07-07 Donald P Hings Epoxy resin golf club head integrally cured with a shaft wrapping of glass fiber material
DE2938773A1 (en) * 1978-09-26 1980-04-03 Abbott Lab golf ball core of liquid
US5060953A (en) * 1991-01-18 1991-10-29 Spalding & Evenflo Companies, Inc. Golf ball
US5149100A (en) * 1991-06-17 1992-09-22 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5251903A (en) * 1992-10-19 1993-10-12 Bixler Dickie R Ball with grip pressure indicator
US5273287A (en) * 1991-11-27 1993-12-28 Molitor Robert P Golf ball
US5356150A (en) * 1993-07-14 1994-10-18 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5427378A (en) * 1994-01-10 1995-06-27 Murphy; James A. Golf ball and method of making same
US5470075A (en) * 1993-12-22 1995-11-28 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5507493A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-04-16 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5588924A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-12-31 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
WO1998043712A1 (en) * 1997-03-28 1998-10-08 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
US6048279A (en) * 1997-09-08 2000-04-11 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball
US6106414A (en) * 1999-02-05 2000-08-22 Yeh; Chien-Hwa Three-layered solid golf ball structure
US6120393A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-09-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle having a hollow interior
US6142887A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-11-07 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal, ceramic, or composite mantle or inner layer
US6162134A (en) * 1993-04-28 2000-12-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising silicone material
US6193618B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-02-27 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6244977B1 (en) * 1996-09-16 2001-06-12 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle with a cellular or liquid core
GB2357043A (en) * 1997-03-28 2001-06-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide Inc Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
US6261193B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-07-17 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball utilizing perimeter weighting
US6287216B1 (en) 1999-12-03 2001-09-11 Acushnet Company Wound golf ball and method of making same
WO2001068193A2 (en) 2000-03-13 2001-09-20 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US6565457B1 (en) 1997-07-14 2003-05-20 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball containing high density fillers in the core and cover
US6676876B2 (en) 1993-04-28 2004-01-13 The Top-Flite Golf Company Method of molding a low spin golf ball comprising silicone material
US6705957B2 (en) 1997-01-21 2004-03-16 Timothy M. Owens Golf ball
US20070161434A1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2007-07-12 Dufaux Douglas Golf ball
US20080057332A1 (en) * 2006-06-26 2008-03-06 Nanodynamics, Inc. Methods for making hollow metal spheres
US20100087277A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2010-04-08 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with very low compression and high cor
US20100087274A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2010-04-08 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with very low compression and high cor
US20110177884A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-21 Nike, Inc. Golf Ball With Cover Having Varying Hardness
US20110177885A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-21 Nike, Inc. Golf ball having increased moment of inertia
US8568250B2 (en) 2010-07-07 2013-10-29 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover having zones of hardness
US9320942B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2016-04-26 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover layer having zones of differing materials
US9433826B1 (en) * 2015-03-27 2016-09-06 Acushnet Company Golf ball incorporating metallic film and method of making

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US716348A (en) * 1902-10-06 1902-12-16 Kempshall Mfg Co Playing-ball.
US1182604A (en) * 1911-03-28 1916-05-09 Frank L O Wadsworth Golf-ball.
US1568514A (en) * 1923-12-22 1926-01-05 Thomas A Lewis Playing ball
US2861810A (en) * 1954-12-10 1958-11-25 Veatch Franklin Golf ball

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US716348A (en) * 1902-10-06 1902-12-16 Kempshall Mfg Co Playing-ball.
US1182604A (en) * 1911-03-28 1916-05-09 Frank L O Wadsworth Golf-ball.
US1568514A (en) * 1923-12-22 1926-01-05 Thomas A Lewis Playing ball
US2861810A (en) * 1954-12-10 1958-11-25 Veatch Franklin Golf ball

Cited By (62)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3140094A (en) * 1960-03-14 1964-07-07 Donald P Hings Epoxy resin golf club head integrally cured with a shaft wrapping of glass fiber material
FR2437222A1 (en) * 1978-09-26 1980-04-25 Abbott Lab Golf Ball has liquid core
US4244855A (en) * 1978-09-26 1981-01-13 Abbott Laboratories Liquid golf ball center
DE2938773A1 (en) * 1978-09-26 1980-04-03 Abbott Lab golf ball core of liquid
US5060953A (en) * 1991-01-18 1991-10-29 Spalding & Evenflo Companies, Inc. Golf ball
US5149100A (en) * 1991-06-17 1992-09-22 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5482286A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-01-09 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5766098A (en) * 1991-11-27 1998-06-16 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5588924A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-12-31 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5507493A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-04-16 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5503397A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-04-02 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5273287A (en) * 1991-11-27 1993-12-28 Molitor Robert P Golf ball
US5251903A (en) * 1992-10-19 1993-10-12 Bixler Dickie R Ball with grip pressure indicator
US6162134A (en) * 1993-04-28 2000-12-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising silicone material
US6634963B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2003-10-21 The Top-Flite Golf Company Golf ball comprising silicone materials
US6261193B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-07-17 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball utilizing perimeter weighting
US7041011B2 (en) 1993-04-28 2006-05-09 Callaway Golf Company Low spin golf ball utilizing perimeter weighting
US6676876B2 (en) 1993-04-28 2004-01-13 The Top-Flite Golf Company Method of molding a low spin golf ball comprising silicone material
US6193618B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-02-27 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6648778B2 (en) 1993-04-28 2003-11-18 Callaway Golf Company Low spin golf ball utilizing perimeter weighting
US6435985B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2002-08-20 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6561927B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2003-05-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Methods of making low spin golf ball utilizing a mantle and a cellular or liquid core
US6432000B1 (en) 1993-06-01 2002-08-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US6663509B2 (en) 1993-06-01 2003-12-16 Callaway Golf Company Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US5356150A (en) * 1993-07-14 1994-10-18 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5470075A (en) * 1993-12-22 1995-11-28 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5427378A (en) * 1994-01-10 1995-06-27 Murphy; James A. Golf ball and method of making same
US6142887A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-11-07 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal, ceramic, or composite mantle or inner layer
US6244977B1 (en) * 1996-09-16 2001-06-12 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6120393A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-09-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle having a hollow interior
US6309312B1 (en) 1996-09-16 2001-10-30 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
US6612939B1 (en) 1996-09-16 2003-09-02 The Top Flite Golf Company Golf ball comprising a metal, ceramic, or composite mantle or inner layer
US6705957B2 (en) 1997-01-21 2004-03-16 Timothy M. Owens Golf ball
US6976925B2 (en) 1997-01-21 2005-12-20 Nanodynamics, Inc. Golf ball
US20040204266A1 (en) * 1997-01-21 2004-10-14 Owens Timothy M. Golf ball
US20060178232A1 (en) * 1997-01-21 2006-08-10 Owens Timothy M Golf ball
GB2337937A (en) * 1997-03-28 1999-12-08 Spalding & Evenflo Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
WO1998043712A1 (en) * 1997-03-28 1998-10-08 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
GB2357043B (en) * 1997-03-28 2001-07-25 Spalding Sports Worldwide Inc Method of making a golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
GB2357043A (en) * 1997-03-28 2001-06-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide Inc Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
GB2357042B (en) * 1997-03-28 2001-07-25 Spalding Sports Worldwide Inc Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
GB2337937B (en) * 1997-03-28 2001-06-20 Spalding & Evenflo Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
GB2357042A (en) * 1997-03-28 2001-06-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide Inc Golf ball comprising of a metal mantle having a hollow interior
US6565457B1 (en) 1997-07-14 2003-05-20 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball containing high density fillers in the core and cover
US6048279A (en) * 1997-09-08 2000-04-11 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball
US6106414A (en) * 1999-02-05 2000-08-22 Yeh; Chien-Hwa Three-layered solid golf ball structure
US6287216B1 (en) 1999-12-03 2001-09-11 Acushnet Company Wound golf ball and method of making same
WO2001068193A2 (en) 2000-03-13 2001-09-20 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US20070161434A1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2007-07-12 Dufaux Douglas Golf ball
US20080057332A1 (en) * 2006-06-26 2008-03-06 Nanodynamics, Inc. Methods for making hollow metal spheres
US20100087277A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2010-04-08 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with very low compression and high cor
US20100087274A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2010-04-08 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with very low compression and high cor
US7918748B2 (en) 2008-10-06 2011-04-05 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with very low compression and high COR
US20110130217A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2011-06-02 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with very low compression and high cor
US20110177884A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-21 Nike, Inc. Golf Ball With Cover Having Varying Hardness
US20110177885A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-21 Nike, Inc. Golf ball having increased moment of inertia
US20110177887A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-21 Nike, Inc. Golf Ball With Cover Having Varying Hardness
US8529375B2 (en) * 2010-01-20 2013-09-10 Nike, Inc. Golf ball having increased moment of inertia
US8556750B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2013-10-15 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover having varying hardness
US9320942B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2016-04-26 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover layer having zones of differing materials
US8568250B2 (en) 2010-07-07 2013-10-29 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover having zones of hardness
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