US2861810A - Golf ball - Google Patents

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US2861810A
US2861810A US47443154A US2861810A US 2861810 A US2861810 A US 2861810A US 47443154 A US47443154 A US 47443154A US 2861810 A US2861810 A US 2861810A
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ball
surface
golf ball
depressions
film
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Veatch Franklin
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Veatch Franklin
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0021Tracking a path or terminating locations
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • A63B37/0007Non-circular dimples
    • A63B37/0009Polygonal
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • A63B37/0012Dimple profile, i.e. cross-sectional view
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0023Covers
    • A63B37/0029Physical properties
    • A63B37/0033Thickness
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0038Intermediate layers, e.g. inner cover, outer core, mantle
    • A63B37/004Physical properties
    • A63B37/0045Thickness
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/007Characteristics of the ball as a whole
    • A63B37/0072Characteristics of the ball as a whole with a specified number of layers
    • A63B37/0074Two piece balls, i.e. cover and core
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0021Tracking a path or terminating locations
    • A63B2024/0053Tracking a path or terminating locations for locating an object, e.g. a lost ball
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B43/00Balls with special arrangements
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B43/00Balls with special arrangements
    • A63B43/008Balls with special arrangements with means for improving visibility, e.g. special markings or colours

Description

Nov. 25, 1958 F. VEATCH 2,861,810

GOLF BALL Filed Dec. 10, 1954 F I G. 8

INVENTOR. RAN KLIN VEATCH ATTOR N EY United States Patent GOLF BALL Franklin Veatch, Lyndhurst, Ohio Application December 10, 1954, Serial No. 474,431

2 Claims. (Cl. 273-213) The present invention relates to an improved golf ball, and more particularly to a golf ball possessing high lightreflecting characteristics. It also relates to methods for producing this improved golf ball.

The problems of finding lost golf balls and of following the flight of golf balls in the air have plagued golf players for years. Many methods of overcoming these problems by changing the ball have been suggested. For example, depressions in the balls cover have been filled with luminescent material whereby the ball can be located at night or in dark places. Means associated with the ball for emitting a sound or visible vapor have been tried. All of these methods have proven to be more or less impractical.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a highly reflective golf ball whereby it may be spotted more readily on the ground or as it travels in the air. Another object is to provide such a ball whose reflectivity will not be aifected appreciably under repeated impacts.

These and other objects are attained by my invention which consists of a golf ball having in its outer surface a plurality of depressions which are coated with a mirrorlike metallic film not over about 0.0001 inch thick.

The invention will be better understood in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a front elevation of a conventional golf ball;

Figure 2 is an enlarged view of a depression in a golf ball taken on the plane indicated by the line 22;

Figures 3 and 4 are section and plane views, respectively, of a depression shaped as a polyhedron;

Figures 5 and 6 are section and plane views, respectively, of a conical shaped depression; and

Figures 7 and 8 are section and plane views, respectively, of a depression shaped as a frustum of a pyramid.

Golf balls generally consist of a core of some suitable elastic material and a continuous tough cover, usually made of balata. The covers are shaped by molds under heat and pressure. The outer surface of the cover is punctuated by a plurality of recesses, dimples, or depressions, hereinafter called depressions. For example, a golf ball 1 inches in diameter may have 150 depressions, each having a diameter of A; inch and the general shape of a spherical segment.

The invention is not limited by the actual metal used for the metallic film. Those metals which can be used include aluminum, platinum, tungsten, tantalum, mo-

"ice

herence and strength, and its tendency to tarnish should be considered.

The thickness of the metallic film is important. It has been discovered that metallic films not exceeding about 0.0001 inch possess sufficient flexibility to con: form, without fracturing, to the contour of golf ball covers as these covers are distorted upon contact with a golf club. For practical purposes, the films need not exceed about 0.00001 inch. Although a film of any thickness will improve the light reflectivity of a surface, metallic films on the order of about 0.000002 inch will adequately conceal the color of any coated surface. Therefore, film thicknesses in the range of about 2 to 10 millionths of an inch are preferred.

There are four methods of depositing metallic coatings, namely by(l) electroplating, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) electrostatic spraying, and (4) vacuum metallizing. Although all four methods can be used in the present invention, vacuum metallizing, chemical precipitation and electroplating are preferred because of theirlower cost, their capability of producing smoother films, and their ease of control. Electrostatic spraying tends to give a film which is not only too rough but also too thick.

In using the metallizing techniques, the surface of the golf ball is thoroughly cleaned and degreased with a suitable solvent to assure strong and uniform adherence of the metallic film. Although the metallic film may be deposited on this cleaned surface, an undercoat of lacquer, white paint, or the like, applied by dipping of spraying, provides a smooth, shiny, and flawless surface. Such a surface when metallized will be more reflective because the metal film precisely follows the pattern of the surface it covers. Thus, surface defects in the form of tiny cracks, scratches, and other visible blemishes are removed by the lacquer undercoat. Of course, butting or other means for obtaining smooth undercoat surfaces may be employed.

In utilizing the vacuum metallizing process, golf balls, whose surfaces have been prepared as mentioned above, are suspended in a chamber from which air is evacuated until the pressure is on the order of /2 micron of mercury or lower. The metal to be deposited (such as aluminum or silver) is then heated until it vaporizes; the vapors thereafter are deposited (i. e., condensed) on all surfaces exposed in the chamber, including the balls. Since the metallic films thereby produced are comparatively soft and easily abraded, the metal films on the elevated surfaces of the balls, that is, on all sur-. faces except those forming the depressions, may be removed by tumbling the balls in the presence of a fine scouring material or by a bufling operation. Thereafter, the balls, whose depressions are still coated with metal, are covered with a final coat of lacquer to prevent tarnishing of the metallic films.

The step which involves removing the metallic film by abrasion from elevated surfaces on the ball may be avoided by suitably masking these surfaces before or after the ball is subjected to vacuum metallizing. For example, the ball may be suspended in a tight fitting spherical container which has a plurality of perforations adapted to expose only the depressions of the ball. A technique which eliminates the necessity of removing part of the deposited metal film involves metallizing the entire surface of the ball, spraying the ball with a transparent lacquer (selected for its high abrasion resistance and adhesion to the metallic film), .drying the .lacquer, and then coating the elevated portions with a suitable white enamel.

In the chemical precipitating method, the golf ball, after suitable surface preparation as disclosed above, is totally covered with a mirror-like metallic film of silver by the Well known two-spray-nozzle technique. One of the nozzles supplies a dilutesolution of a salt of silver, and the other nozzle supplies a liquid agent which will reduce thesilver-and cause it to precipitate. Many compounds may be used as the essential silver reducing agent, "such as sucrose, Rochelle salts, hydrazine, formaldehyde, glyoxal, pyruvic aldehyde, sodium 'bislilfite, pyrogallol, phenylene diamine, and others. Different silver solutions may beused, 'but they are commonly dilute ammoniacal solutions of silver nitrate. Asa typical example, one might use dilute glyoxal as the reducing solution and a dilute silver-ammonia-nitrate complex as the silver solution. Preferably, the thickness of this film should be kept at or near the minimum required because, as the thickness of a chemically precipitated film increases, thefilm will become powdery and crystalline in appearance, thereby losing its mirror-like effect. After the -metallic film has been-chemically deposited, the ifilm is removed from the elevated portions of the ball leaving only the depressions 'mirrorized. Finally, the'ball is covered with a protective coating of lacquer.

The depos'itionof a thin metallic film on a ball by electroplating should be preceded not'only by a thorough cleaning of the balls surface but'also by a'pretreatrnent of the balls cleaned surface to render it electrically conductive. Usually this pretreatment consists of chemically precipitating a film of silver of a thickness less than that required fora mirror-like surface. Thereafter, a film ofsilvenchromium, rhodium, nickel, copper, or other suitable metals may be electrodeposited to the desired thickness. Finally, excess film may be removed and :the ball lacquered as described above.

Although the methods-of depositing thin mirror-like films of metal are well known, it is surprisingthat these methods can be used to mirrorize golf balls with a metallic'film flexible enough to conform to a golf balls balata cover asthat cover is violently and instantaneously distorted Without the film cracking or losing any appreciable amount of its brilliance.

The shape of the depressions in the golf ball can have an important effect on the ability of a player to follow its flight through the air or to locate it on the ground. Primarily, the player only sees the ball by means of light from the sun which is reflected to him by the surface of the ball. Obviously the ability of the player to detect the ball increases as the amount of light reflected from the ball to his eye increases. This amount of light is affected by the reflectivity, size, and shape of the balls surface. High reflectivity is obtained by means of the mirror-like metallic film. Further improvement lay in choosing the optimum size and shape for the reflecting surface.

Possible surface shapes may be characterized as plane, convex, and concave. A mirrored surface Which is plane will reflect parallel light rays from a distant object, such as the sun, as parallel rays whereby the distant object will appear the same size to an observer as if he viewed the object directly.

A mirrored surface which is convex Will reflect parallel light rays as divergent rays, and a mirror image of any given object will decrease in size as the observers distance from the mirror increases. Therefore, asa given mirrored surface becomes more convex, less light reflected from it Will reach a distant observer. However, this-reduced brilliance is offset by the increased chances that an observer will see the ball because the light, being divergent, will be projected on a larger area.

Concave mirrored surfaces reflect parallel light rays as converging rays. The focal point for converging rays from a true parabolic surface is at a distance (focal distance) from the surface equal to about one half the radius of curvature. An observer between the focal point and the concave surface sees an enlarged image which will become infinite in size at the focal point of a parabolic surface. At distances beyond the focal point the image is inverted and decreases in size because the light rays therebeyond begin to diverge. For maximum brilliance, therefore, the golf ball should have a plurality of spots whose surfaces are concave and whose radii of curvature are such that an observer (the golf player) is at a focal point. Under average conditions a golf player would want to see a golf ball Within five yards, if the ball is lost, and upto 250 yards on long tee shots. On this basis, mirrored spots on the ball should have concave surfaces with radii of curvature varying between 10 andSOO yards.

In view of the foregoing discussion, it willb'e seen that both convexandconcave surfaces possess advantages provided their respective radii of curvature are large, that is, exceed about 30 feet.

When considering mirrored depressions in the present invention with diameters on the order of 4; inch, .it is readily apparent that, whether the depression surfaces are either concave or convex with radii of curvature exceeding '10 yards, they may be considered as plane surfaces. Such curvatures could only be measured with sensitive "optical instruments. With a mirror support as flexible as the balata cover of a golf ball, it would be practically impossible eitherto manufacture or maintain precise and small differences of curvature from a plane surface. As best, one could design molds toproduce plane surfaces and accept the minor convexities or concavities which will inevitably occur.

In order that the quantum of light reflected will be appreciable, it is believed that the mirrored surfaces should have an area of at least 0.001 square inch, and preferably about 0.01 square inch. 'Except for the size of the depressions, there areno limitations on the maximum size.

The shape or design of the depressions can promote the utility of the present invention. Possible shapes include a segment of asphere, cone, a pyramid, frustums of a cone or pyramid, a cylinder, and a polyhedron. Figure 1 shows a conventional golf ball 10 with a plurality of depressions '11 and corresponding elevated portions '12. Figure 2 shows an enlarged cross-sectional View of a depression 11 Whose surface 13 may be viewed as enclosing a space having the shape of a segment of a sphere. The depression 11 consists of a recess or dimple in the golf balls balata cover 1.4. Figures 3 and 4, respectively, disclose a side and front view of a depression shaped as a polyhedron. As mentioned above, each of its individual faces should preferably have an area of at least 0.001'square inch.

Figures 5 and 6, respectively, show a side and front view of a cone-shaped depression. Figures 7 and 8 show similar views of a depression having the shape of a frustum of a pyramid. Where the base of this depression 15 (top of the frustum) has an area of about 0.01 square inch, the depression would have an optimum design or shape for the present invention.

While the methods and products of the present invention have been described with reference to specific embodiments, it will be apparent to those skilledin the art that various modifications may be made Without departing from the principles and true nature of the invention.

'I claim:

1. A golf ball having a plurality of depressions in the outer cover of said ball, each of said depressions being coated with an inner layer of a flexible, mirror-like metallic film 'not over about 0.0001 inch thick and an outer layer of a tough, itransparent lacquer, and each of said depressions having a base of 'at least 0;001 square inch.

2. A golf ball having a plurality of depressions in the outer cover of said ball, each of said depressions being coated with an inner layer of a flexible, mirrorlike metallic film not over about 0.0001 inch thick, and an outer layer of a tough, transparent lacquer, each of said depressions having a base of at least 0.001 square inch and said base having a radius of curvature in excess of 30 feet.

178,466 Read June 6, 1876 6 Daly Mar. 11, 1902 Rafn Nov. 24, 1914 Dunlap Feb. 3, 1920 White May 30, 1922 Miller Mar. 10, 1931 Freund Dec. 8, 1936 McKinney May 8, 1945 Olson June 28, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain 1914 France Dec. 21, 1923 Great Britain July 18, 1929

US2861810A 1954-12-10 1954-12-10 Golf ball Expired - Lifetime US2861810A (en)

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Cited By (45)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3031194A (en) * 1959-04-13 1962-04-24 Perfection Finishing Corp Golf ball structure
US4235441A (en) * 1979-09-14 1980-11-25 Richard Ciccarello Diffractionated golf ball
FR2613632A1 (en) * 1987-04-08 1988-10-14 Dunlop Ltd RETROREFLECTIVE ball for games
US4991851A (en) * 1990-05-09 1991-02-12 Ruben Melesio Reflective golf ball and method
US5060953A (en) * 1991-01-18 1991-10-29 Spalding & Evenflo Companies, Inc. Golf ball
US5149100A (en) * 1991-06-17 1992-09-22 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5273287A (en) * 1991-11-27 1993-12-28 Molitor Robert P Golf ball
US5356150A (en) * 1993-07-14 1994-10-18 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5427378A (en) * 1994-01-10 1995-06-27 Murphy; James A. Golf ball and method of making same
US5470075A (en) * 1993-12-22 1995-11-28 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5507493A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-04-16 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5588924A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-12-31 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5662534A (en) * 1995-06-26 1997-09-02 Kroll; Braden W. Golf ball finding system
US5836833A (en) * 1996-02-26 1998-11-17 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball
US5984806A (en) * 1997-01-13 1999-11-16 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Perimeter weighted golf ball with visible weighting
US6015356A (en) * 1997-01-13 2000-01-18 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball and method of producing same
US6120393A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-09-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle having a hollow interior
US6162134A (en) * 1993-04-28 2000-12-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising silicone material
US6193618B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-02-27 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6193617B1 (en) 1999-03-10 2001-02-27 Purespin Golf Company, Inc. Golf ball and method of making same
US6261193B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-07-17 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball utilizing perimeter weighting
US6315681B1 (en) 1997-01-13 2001-11-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Perimeter weighted golf ball with visible weighting
US6413170B1 (en) 1997-01-13 2002-07-02 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball
US6475106B1 (en) 2000-10-31 2002-11-05 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball with grooved dimples
US6565457B1 (en) 1997-07-14 2003-05-20 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball containing high density fillers in the core and cover
US6599203B1 (en) 1997-01-13 2003-07-29 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball
US20030211903A1 (en) * 2000-03-06 2003-11-13 Sunrise Enterprise Golf ball with improved directional stability in putting stroke
US6676876B2 (en) 1993-04-28 2004-01-13 The Top-Flite Golf Company Method of molding a low spin golf ball comprising silicone material
US20050117416A1 (en) * 2003-08-19 2005-06-02 Florian Schnabel Address decoding circuit and method for addressing a regular memory area and a redundant memory area in a memory circuit
US20060005731A1 (en) * 2004-07-06 2006-01-12 Karl Muth Dimpled projectile for use in firearms
US7128666B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2006-10-31 Callaway Golf Company Dimples comprised of two or more intersecting surfaces
JP2007021203A (en) * 2005-07-15 2007-02-01 Bridgestone Sports Co Ltd Golf ball
US20090264212A1 (en) * 2008-04-18 2009-10-22 Herbert William S Training balls for pool and the like
US20100087277A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2010-04-08 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with very low compression and high cor
US20100087274A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2010-04-08 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with very low compression and high cor
US20110177887A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-21 Nike, Inc. Golf Ball With Cover Having Varying Hardness
US20110177885A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-21 Nike, Inc. Golf ball having increased moment of inertia
US20110275462A1 (en) * 2009-12-14 2011-11-10 The Yokohama Rubber Co., Ltd. Ball for ball game and method of manufacturing the same
US20120165129A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2012-06-28 Nike, Inc. Golf Ball With Cover Layer Having Zones Of Differing Materials
US20130123032A1 (en) * 2009-04-20 2013-05-16 William S. Herbert Training balls for pool and the like
US8568250B2 (en) 2010-07-07 2013-10-29 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover having zones of hardness
US20130324310A1 (en) * 2012-05-31 2013-12-05 Nike, Inc. Golf Balls and Other Game Balls Having Improved Launch Monitor or Motion Tracking Visibility
US8877108B2 (en) 2011-12-29 2014-11-04 Nike, Inc. System and method for making a golf ball having a patterned surface
US20150283430A1 (en) * 2014-04-08 2015-10-08 James Dykas Multiple colored golf ball
US20160184642A1 (en) * 2014-12-30 2016-06-30 Acushnet Company Golf ball dimple surface

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US178466A (en) * 1876-06-06 Improvement in processes of producing imitation gold or silver lace
US237569A (en) * 1881-02-08 Hakbison b
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US1118878A (en) * 1914-10-17 1914-11-24 Robert Rafn Coating flexible objects of organic origin with metal.
US1329381A (en) * 1918-11-05 1920-02-03 Usa Process of coating wood
US1418220A (en) * 1920-10-22 1922-05-30 White John Golf ball
FR568415A (en) * 1923-07-06 1924-03-24 Improvement in golf balls
GB315575A (en) * 1928-07-21 1929-07-18 Dunlop Rubber Co Improvements in golf balls
US1795732A (en) * 1928-10-03 1931-03-10 Miller Carlton Earle Golf ball
US2063034A (en) * 1932-04-28 1936-12-08 Freund Erich Method of producing metallic coatings on a cellulose ester base
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Patent Citations (11)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US178466A (en) * 1876-06-06 Improvement in processes of producing imitation gold or silver lace
US237569A (en) * 1881-02-08 Hakbison b
US694946A (en) * 1900-08-30 1902-03-11 John A Daly Method of covering textile and porous materials with metal.
US1118878A (en) * 1914-10-17 1914-11-24 Robert Rafn Coating flexible objects of organic origin with metal.
US1329381A (en) * 1918-11-05 1920-02-03 Usa Process of coating wood
US1418220A (en) * 1920-10-22 1922-05-30 White John Golf ball
FR568415A (en) * 1923-07-06 1924-03-24 Improvement in golf balls
GB315575A (en) * 1928-07-21 1929-07-18 Dunlop Rubber Co Improvements in golf balls
US1795732A (en) * 1928-10-03 1931-03-10 Miller Carlton Earle Golf ball
US2063034A (en) * 1932-04-28 1936-12-08 Freund Erich Method of producing metallic coatings on a cellulose ester base
US2474273A (en) * 1946-03-07 1949-06-28 Raymond G Olson Fabric reinforcement

Cited By (70)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3031194A (en) * 1959-04-13 1962-04-24 Perfection Finishing Corp Golf ball structure
US4235441A (en) * 1979-09-14 1980-11-25 Richard Ciccarello Diffractionated golf ball
FR2613632A1 (en) * 1987-04-08 1988-10-14 Dunlop Ltd RETROREFLECTIVE ball for games
US4991851A (en) * 1990-05-09 1991-02-12 Ruben Melesio Reflective golf ball and method
US5060953A (en) * 1991-01-18 1991-10-29 Spalding & Evenflo Companies, Inc. Golf ball
US5149100A (en) * 1991-06-17 1992-09-22 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5507493A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-04-16 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5273287A (en) * 1991-11-27 1993-12-28 Molitor Robert P Golf ball
US5766098A (en) * 1991-11-27 1998-06-16 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5588924A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-12-31 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5482286A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-01-09 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US5503397A (en) * 1991-11-27 1996-04-02 Lisco, Inc. Golf ball
US6261193B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-07-17 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball utilizing perimeter weighting
US6162134A (en) * 1993-04-28 2000-12-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising silicone material
US6648778B2 (en) 1993-04-28 2003-11-18 Callaway Golf Company Low spin golf ball utilizing perimeter weighting
US6193618B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-02-27 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6634963B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2003-10-21 The Top-Flite Golf Company Golf ball comprising silicone materials
US6561927B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2003-05-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Methods of making low spin golf ball utilizing a mantle and a cellular or liquid core
US7041011B2 (en) 1993-04-28 2006-05-09 Callaway Golf Company Low spin golf ball utilizing perimeter weighting
US6676876B2 (en) 1993-04-28 2004-01-13 The Top-Flite Golf Company Method of molding a low spin golf ball comprising silicone material
US6435985B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2002-08-20 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
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