US2301249A - Apparatus for drying fabric - Google Patents

Apparatus for drying fabric Download PDF

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US2301249A
US2301249A US274388A US27438839A US2301249A US 2301249 A US2301249 A US 2301249A US 274388 A US274388 A US 274388A US 27438839 A US27438839 A US 27438839A US 2301249 A US2301249 A US 2301249A
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fabric
air
surfaces
means
drying
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US274388A
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Jr Harry W Butterworth
Cohn Samuel
Jules G Walter
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Samcoe Holding Corp
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Samcoe Holding Corp
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F26DRYING
    • F26BDRYING SOLID MATERIALS OR OBJECTS BY REMOVING LIQUID THEREFROM
    • F26B13/00Machines and apparatus for drying fabrics, fibres, yarns, or other materials in long lengths, with progressive movement
    • F26B13/10Arrangements for feeding, heating or supporting materials; Controlling movement, tension or position of materials
    • F26B13/12Controlling movement, tension or position of material
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06CFINISHING, DRESSING, TENTERING OR STRETCHING TEXTILE FABRICS
    • D06C3/00Stretching, tentering, or spreading textile fabrics; Producing elasticity in textile fabrics
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F26DRYING
    • F26BDRYING SOLID MATERIALS OR OBJECTS BY REMOVING LIQUID THEREFROM
    • F26B13/00Machines and apparatus for drying fabrics, fibres, yarns, or other materials in long lengths, with progressive movement
    • F26B13/06Machines and apparatus for drying fabrics, fibres, yarns, or other materials in long lengths, with progressive movement with movement in a sinuous or zig-zag path
    • F26B13/08Machines and apparatus for drying fabrics, fibres, yarns, or other materials in long lengths, with progressive movement with movement in a sinuous or zig-zag path using rollers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F26DRYING
    • F26BDRYING SOLID MATERIALS OR OBJECTS BY REMOVING LIQUID THEREFROM
    • F26B13/00Machines and apparatus for drying fabrics, fibres, yarns, or other materials in long lengths, with progressive movement
    • F26B13/10Arrangements for feeding, heating or supporting materials; Controlling movement, tension or position of materials
    • F26B13/101Supporting materials without tension, e.g. on or between foraminous belts
    • F26B13/103Supporting materials without tension, e.g. on or between foraminous belts with mechanical supporting means, e.g. belts, rollers, and fluid impingement arrangement having a displacing effect on the materials
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06CFINISHING, DRESSING, TENTERING OR STRETCHING TEXTILE FABRICS
    • D06C2700/00Finishing or decoration of textile materials, except for bleaching, dyeing, printing, mercerising, washing or fulling
    • D06C2700/04Tenters or driers for fabrics without diagonal displacement

Description

NOV. 10, 1942- H. w. BUTTERwoRTH. JR., Erm. 2,301,249

APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRIC 4 Sheets-Sheet l Filed May 18, 1939 HOT All? FROM BLU/VfR lNVENTORS Hw Kd. B477@ lun ffl Jr.

51W; lvm.; l MM ATTORNEYS Cam NOV- 10, 1942- H. w. BUTTERWORTH, JR., Erm. 2,301,249

APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRIC Filed May 18, 1939 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 NOV- 10, 1942- H. w. BUTTERWORTH, JR., Erm. 2,301,249

APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRIC Filed May 18, 1939 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 CLOTH N0v- 10, 1942 H. w. BUTTERWORTH, JR., ErAL APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRIC 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 18, 1939 76 INVENTORS fxH/lw M" 10.3., mM/4k l MMMQMM ATTORNEYS Patented Nov. 10, 1942 APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRIC Harry W. Butterworth, Jr., Chestnut Hill, Pa., and Samuel Cohn, Mortimer Colm, and Jules G. Walter, New York, N. Y., asslgnors to Samcoe Holding Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application May 18', 1939, Serial No. 274,388

(Cl. :i4- 52) 12 Claims.

This invention relates to apparatus for drying and conditioning textile fabrics. While the invention will be described more particularly in connection with the treatment of tubular knit rayon fabric, it may be uitilized in handling knit, tubularized woven and fiat knit and woven fabrics of rayon and fibres other than rayon to afford similar advantages.

Almost all textile fabrics, more particularly knit goods, while in the process of being dried, will either elongate or shrink of their own accord in their various dimensions. Knit fabric, and especially rayon fabric, is by nature very elastic and subject to distortion in handling unless special precautions are taken. This condition is particularly pronounced when the fabric is wet and it is both difficult to keep the fabric in flat condition free from wrinkles as well as to dry same without subjecting it to stretch. The wet fabric may, for examplel if subjected to stresses during drying, be stretched beyond its elastic limit, with the result that a permanent set occurs in the individual fibers of the yarn and in the stitches. This results in difficulty because the finished fabric is non-uniform with respect to the natural stitch formation and the distortion of the wales `or cross-lines, and it is impossible by further treatment to eliminate the distortion. Consequently, tension should be avoided in drying, to afford the full elasticity of the fabric in length and width when it is completed and to ensure the proper appearance of the finished fabric.

Furthermore, it is desirable to avoid over-drying of the fabric which in its finished condition normally contains a given percentage of moisture, depending to some extent upon the nature of the fiber used. The apparance and hand of the fabric depend upon the retention of the normal moisture content. If it is over-dried, the moisturecontent may be nonnalized by steaming, but it is preferable to conduct the drying operation so that a proportion of moisture remains in the fabric as it leaves the dryer.

In some types of dryers the forming of wrinkles results in non-uniform drying and over-drying. Again, the method of propulsion of the fabrics ten'ds in many cases to create tension. In the loop or festoon type of dryer wherein the fabric hangs in loops from movable slats of a conveyor which carries the fabric through the drying chamber, beside the factor of'uneven drying due to wrinkles and folds, the moisture presthe weight of the fabric itself, to create tension and the fabric is stretched unevenly.

It is the object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for drying fabric wherein the fabric is supported and is advanced through the dryer, wherein it will either shrink or elongate of its own accord, in its various dimensions, naturally without creating any tension while the moisture is removed progressively and uniformly from the fabric, maintained in flat condition without wrinkles.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an apparatus for drying in which the amount of moisture removed can be controlled easily to ensure delivery of the fabric, properly conditioned, that is to say with a residuum of moisture which is adapted to closely approximate the natural moisture content of the fabric.

It is the further object of the invention to support the fabric as much as possible while it is being advanced and to allow the fabric itself to control the speed of the various reels over which it is progressed, to permit the natural shrinking or elongating of the fabric to take place.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a dryer affording means for advancing the fabric uniformly without tension and of delivering thereto large volumes of air in such a manner as to progressively remove the moisture content of the fabric tothe desired extent.

A further object of the invention is the provision of apparatus in which the fabric is advanced at an automatically controlled linear speed with automatic control of the various elements which carry the fabric so as to prevent the application of tension at any portion of the fabric.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a drying apparatus in which the air feed can be adjusted with respect to the Width of .the fabric so that the apparatus may accommodate fabric of varying Widths without loss or Waste of air supplied.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be'apparent as it is better understood by reference to the following specification and the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of an apparatus embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a vertical section diagrammatically illustrating the passage of .the fabric through the dryer and the application of air thereto, details of the mechanism being omitted for the purpose ent in the loops of fabric is suiilciently heavy plus of clarity;

Fig. 3 is a vertical section on the line 3--3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a side view of the apparatus;

Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is an enlargedvertical section Villustrating the driving mechanism of the dryer;

Fig. 7 is a plan section illustrating details of the driving mechanism;

Fig. 8 is an elevation partially in section of the mechanism shown in Fig. 'I

Fig. 9 is an enlarged sectional view illustrating the variable speed mechanism; and

Fig. 10 is a diagrammatic view illustrating another arrangement of the inlet and outlet ducts for distributing air to the dryer.

As hereinbefore indicated, the invention depends upon the conveyance of the fabric at an automatically controlled linear speed at all sections thereof through the drying compartment wherein it is subjected to a large volume of air at high velocities applied and distributed so as to eii'ect the maximum desired drying effect at an accelerated rate. In accomplishing this purpose. we have provided a drying chamber in which a plurality of reels are mounted for rotation and adapted to support the fabric as it advances through the dryer. Preferably each of the reels subsequent to the first is driven through :an automatic speed controlling mechanism, and the fabric is advanced over the series of reels without subjecting it to any tension. As the fabric advances, a large volume of air which may be heated to the desired temperature, is introduced and distributed at high velocities so that it is directed against and passes through the fabric and is withdrawn through a duct at the end of the reel. This air bearing a proportion of moisture removed from the fabric may be re-circulated in various ways, with or without the addition of fresh air, depending upon the amount of drying desired, the nature of the fabric, and the amount of moisture to be withdrawn therefrom.

Instead of withdrawing the air carrying moisture from all of the reels and returning the air to the air inlet, the method may be operated so that the air wtihdrawn from the first reel is delivered through a supplemental blower to a second reel and so on through the apparatus until the air is finally withdrawn from the last reel, after which it will have done all of the drying of which it is capable. In this procedure, the air undergoes a gradual temperature drop from reel to reel, and its relative humidity is greatly stepped up from reel to reel, so that by the time the air leaves the last reel its temperature, due to evaporation, is very low as compared to its original temperature, and its relative humidity is quite high, due to the moisture which has been absorbed in traveling through the fabric.

'Ihe same general result may be accomplished by employing two or more consecutive units for drying and delivering the air withdrawn from the several individual reels of the first unit to the reels of .the second unit without intermediate heating or separation of moisture. Thus, in the second unit, through which the fabric passes, it is subjected to conditioning due to the higher moisture content of the air introduced thereto.

Other variations of the method may be employed, the fundamental condition being that the fabric is supported and advanced in a flat smooth condition without being subjected to tension and as it is advanced a large volume of air at high velocity is directed against the fabric, the temperature and moisture content of the air being adjusted in various ways, such as the introduction of fresh air, to ensure delivery of the fabric free fromsurplus moisture. Since the weight of the fabric itself while being advanced and the moisture it contains are factors inducing tension, they are olf-set by the considerable support given to the fabric in its position on each reel.

While details of the apparatus may be varied in carrying out the invention, we prefer the apparatus hereinafter described. Referring to the drawings, 5 indicates a chamber of suitable form and construction, affording a compact housing for a series of reels 6, each mounted on a shaft l for rotation. The reels may be of any suitable construction, such as slats, fish netting or other porous surfaces or closed surfaces. Preferably, the reels consist of end frames 8 carrying slats l9. The number of reels in any given dryer may be varied. We prefer to employ an even number, -but an odd number may be used. 'I'he mechanism for driving the reels will be described in detail hereafter.

The fabric I0 before entering the dryer may pass over one or more rectifiers as more fully described in application Serial Number 190,830 to remove all wrinkles while being spread to smooth, fiat condition, or over a spreader unit as more fully described in Patent Number 2,130,118 and then enters the top of the dryer over a cylinder II which is driven in a manner hereinafter described, so that its peripheral speed is synchronized with that of the first reel B. The fabric passes around the first reel E and thence around the succeeding reels and is delivered from the bottom of the dryer. As hereinbefore stated, each of the reels 6 is driven, and its speed of rotation is varied continuously so as to avoid any tension in the fabric as it passes from reel to reel.

Air is introduced, preferably at high velocities, by blowers I2, preferably disposed at both ends of the dryer through ducts I3 to distributors having semi-cylindrical faces I5 disposed about the surfaces of the respective reels. The surfaces I5 are provided with a multiplicity of nozzles I6 (Fig. 8) which direct the air onto the fabric as it rests upon the slats 9. The air is directed against and passes through the fabric and is withdrawn through ducts Il located in suitable positions. These ducts are connected to downtakes I8, and the air withdrawn is conveyed through ducts I9 to heating chambers 20 which may include suitable heating elements 2l. Dampers 22 are provided and may be adjusted to permit the introduction of the desired amount of fresh air with the air which is returned by the blowers I2 to the dryer.

Since the width of fabrics to be treated varies, it may be necesary to provide means to distribute the air without waste thereof. We provide, therefore, in each of the distributors I4 vanes 23, which are threadedly mounted on shafts 24, the threads being right and left hand respectively, so that rotation of the shafts causes the vanes to move inwardly and outwardly, thus narrowing or widening the air passage through which air is delivered to.the nozzles I6. The shafts 24 are provided with sprockets 25 and are connected by chains 26 and 21. An operating handle 28 on one of the shafts 24 permits simultaneous operation of all of them to adjust the vanes 23 on both sides of the dryer to the desired spacing to accommodate fabric of any given width. Consequently, air is distributed only through the nozzles I6 which are registered with the fabric lhaving a pulley 35 thereon connected by a belt l Il to a pulley 32. A fiat belt 53 extends about thepulley 32 and upward to a pulley 34 at the top of the dryer. 'Ihe latter pulley is mounted on an arm 35 pivoted at 35 and adjustable by means of a tension device or spring 51 and a screw Il, so that the tension on the belt 33 is uniformly maintained.l The high speed belt 33.

drives combination V and flat belt pulley 59 by short arc contact. The V groove and combination pulley 39 drives pulley 40 throughV belt 4i. Pulley 40 is'fastened to the input shaft of the reducer 4I'. The output shaft of the reducer is direct coupled to reel 5. This same output shaft carries pulley 42 which drives to combination pulley and gear 43 through V belt 44. The gears 43, 45 reverse rotation and the drive continues through combination gear and V .belt pulley 45 through v belt 46 to pulley 41 on the shaft of the cylinder Il. The connections are such that the peripheral speed of the first reel 4 is identical with that of the cylinder Il, and no tension can be exerted on the fabric as it enters the dryer.

Each of the subsequent reels is driven by a variable speed mechanism which is illustrated in detail in Figs. '1 to 9 inclusive of the drawings. A description of one of these mechanisms will serve for Aall of the subsequent reels, the peripheral speeds of which are adjusted automatically by the mechanism to control thetension of the fabric.

Pulleys 4l and 55 are fastenedV together having a suitable common bearing 50' and revolving on a stationary shaft 49. Pulley 55 engages a pulley `52 fastened to revolving shaft 5i which also carries a variable speed pulley 54 of the type illus- -trated and described, for example, in U. S. Patent No. 2,050,358. This pulley, as illustrated inV Fig.v

The v-belt 5l is connected to a pulley 5| on ashaft 52 of a speed-reducing mechanism 5l, the details of which form no part of the present invention and are not illustrated. The -output of the speed-reducing mechanism 5,3 is the' shaft 1 of the reel 6. y

Io accomplish the speed variation, `a ldancer roll 64 is mounted on an arm which is-secured to a shaft 56 mounted in a bearing 51 in the side wall of the dryer. to rest lightly against the fabric il as it passes from one reel to the next. Any variation in the tension of the fabric causes the dancer rolll 64 to move, thus transmitting motion to the shaft 55. Secured to this shaft is an eccentric arm. carrying bearings 55 for the stub shaft 53 andalso v an arm 1li with a counterweight 1I which is adapted to beadjusted so as to balance the dancer As the dancer roll shifts the position 4of the I The dancer roll 54 is adapted 13 which is held under tension by a spring 14. Variations in the relative positions of the shafts 62 and 53 will cause, through the variable speed pulley including the element 55, a change of pitch of the latter pulley and a modification of the speed ofthe shaft 62 in accordance with the temporary condition of the fabric i0. Thus, the second reel 6 and each of the succeeding reels is subject to an increase or reduction of peripheral speed continuously as the condition of the fabric I0 varies. In operation, the dancer roll 64 changes its position to vary the speed of the reel it controls according to the elongation or shrinking of the fabric being handled to accomplish the purpose of' advancing the fabric without subjecting it to any substantial tension. Thus, on certain fabrics, the speed of the reels may be progressively increased, on other fabrics, the speed of the reels may be alike or where shrinkage takes place during drying, one or more of the reels subsequent to the first may be run at a speed slower than that of the first reel. Where elongation of the fabric takes place during drying. which may be predetermined, the speed of the reels subsequent to the first may be fixed at' a progressive increase. In such case, the dancer rolls and the devices controlled by them may be eliminated or maybe used to effect such changes in the individual drive of the several reels as may be necessary to meet the varying conditions which cannot be predetermined. It is understood that where tension on the fabric isdesired, the dancer roll 64 may be so adjusted as to obtain the tension desired.

In Fig. 10, we have illustrated a modification of the apparatus in which the drying chamber 5 is provided with reels 6' and distributors i4' as in the preceding embodiment of the invention.

The fabric is conveyed through the dryer in the manner hereinbefore described. In this case, however, air is introduced by a blower 15 to the first distributor I 4 and is withdrawn through a duct 16 and delivered by a blower 11 to the second reel 5'. Thence the air is withdrawn and returned to successive reels by blowers 15' and 11' until it is withdrawn through the exhaust 18. This arrangement, as we have hereinbefore stated, permits the application of air, partially moistened by passage through the fabric, again to the fabric in the several stages. The several reels 5' will be driven so as to avoid stretching the s fabric by utilizing the mechanism hereinbefore applied but to the opposite side of the fabric,l

thus insuring uniformity of air through-the'fabric and drying.

v Itis to be understood that numerous variations of thev procedure and apparatus are possible. For example, `the fabric may enter the bottom and permeation leave'the top of the dryer, the flow of air being as shown or reversed. Also, instead of conveyy ing the fabricv transversely from reel to reel, it

stub shaft 53, the relative positions of the various pulleys will be changed. Any slack inv the belt 5 I is immediately taken up by'an idler 12 on an arm may be causedto travel down one side of the dryer and up the other side, and the delivery of air and the moisture content thereof in the two v sides of the-dryer vmay be adjusted to effect the vdrying of the fabric in the desired manner and lparticularly to leave therein the amount of residualmoisture which is required to afford the optimum condition thereof. Another alternative use of the dryer involves, as we have stated., the use of two or more units arranged so that the fabric passes through each unit successively and the air employed in one unit is delivered without further heating or drying to the following unit to eifect conditioning of the fabric. 1

These and other modifications may be introduced without departing from the invention or sacrificing the advantages thereof.

We claim:

1. A dryer for handling a continuous strip of air-pervious textile fabric comprising a chamber, a plurality of spaced, air-pervious rotary fabric conveying members adapted to receive the fabric and convey it successively around said rotary members and through the chamber, the size of said members relative to their spacing being such that the fabric is supported by said members during a substantial portion of its travel through said chamber, means for directing a blast of drying air against and through the fabric as it passes around said rotary members, said air directing means being positioned to direct the air in a direction to hold the fabric against said rotary members, means normally urged toward the fabric and bearing against the fabric passing between a pair of successive rotary members. the movement of said last-mentioned means being responsive to the looseness or tautness of the fabric passing between said pair of rotary members and actuating means controlled by said last- I mentioned means for driving the rotary member of said pair onto which the fabric is received at variable speeds to control the tension to which the fabric passing about said member is subjected and to avoid subjecting the fabric passing about said member to substantial tension.

2. A dryer for handling a continuous strip of air-pervious textile fabric comprising a chamber, a plurality of spaced, air-pervious rotary fabric conveying members adapted to receive the fabric and convey it successively around said rotary members and through the chamber, the size of said members relative to their spacing being such that the fabric is supported by said members during a substantial portion of its` travel through said chamber, means for directing a blast of drying air against and through the fabric as it passes around said rotary members, said air directing means being positioned to direct the air in a direction to hold the fabric against said rotary members, and to confine the blast of air striking the fabric to that portion of the fabric passing over the rotary conveying members, so that the position of the fabric between the rotary conveying members is not ailected by the air blast, means normally urged toward the fabric and bearing against the fabric passing between a pair of successive rotary members, the movement of said last-mentioned means being responsive to the looseness or tautness of the fabric passing between said pair of rotary members and actuating means controlled by said last-mentioned means for driving the rotary member of said pair onto which the fabric is received at variable speeds to control the tension to whichthe fabric passing about said member is subjected and to avoid subjecting the fabric passing about said member to substantial tension.

3. A dryer for handling a continuous strip of air-pervious fabric comprising a chamber, a plurality of spaced, air-pervious reels adapted to receive the fabric and convey it successively around said reels and through the chamber, the size of said reels relative'to their spacing being such that the fabric is supported by said reels during a substantial portion of its travel through said chamber, means for directing drying air against and through the fabric as it passes around said reels, said air-directing means being positioned to direct the air in a direction to hold the fabric against the reels, feeler devices normally urged toward the fabric and bearing against the fabric passing between each pair of successive reels, the movement of each feeler device being responsive to the looseness or tautness of the fabric passing between the pair of reels between which it is located, and actuating means controlled by each feeler device for driving the reel next beyond the feeler device onto which the fabric is received at variable speeds to control the tension to which the fabric passing about said member is subjected and to avoid subjecting the fabric passing about said member to substantial tension.

4. A dryer for handling a continuous strip of air-pervious textile fabric comprising a chamber, a plurality of spaced, air-pervious reels adapted to receive the fabric and convey if successively around said reels and through the chamber, the size of said reels relative to their spacing being such that the fabric is supported by said reels during the major portion of its travel through said chamber, a series of air jets disposed opposite said reels and concentric thereto for directing a. blast of drying air against and through the fabric as it passes around said reels, means normally urged towards the fabric and bearing against the fabric passing between a pair of successive reels, the movement of said lastmentioned means being responsive to the looseness or tautness of the fabric passing between said pair of reels, and actuating means controlled by said last-mentioned means for driving' the reel of said pair onto which the fabric is received at variable speeds to control the tension to which the fabric passing about said member is subjected and to avoid subjecting the fabric passing about said member to substantial tension.

5. A dryer for handling a continuous strip of air-pervious textile fabric comprising a chamber, a plurality of spaced, air-pervious rotary fabric conveying members adapted to receive the fabric and to convey it successively around said rotary members and through the chamber, the size of said rotary members relative to their spacing being such that the fabric is supported by said members during a substantial portion of its travel through said chamber, means for directing a blast of drying air against and through the fabric as it passes around said rotary members, said air directing means being positioned to direct the air in a direction to hold the fabric against said rotary members, means for supplying power to said rotary members to rotate them including a main drive means and individual variable speed drives for said rotary members driven from said main drive means, and means normally urged towards the fabric and bearing against the fabric passing between a pair of successive rotary members, the movement of said last mentioned means being responsive to the looseness or tautness of the length of fabric passing between said pair of rotary members and actuating means operated by said last-mentioned means to control the speed of the individual variable speed drive for the rotary member of said pair onto which the fabric is received.` y

6. A dryer for handling a continuous strip of air-pervious textile fabric comprising a chamber,

a plurality of spaced, air-pervious rotary fabric conveying members adapted to receive the fabric and to convey it successively around said rotary members and through the chamber, the size of said rotary members relative to their spacing being such that the fabric is supported by said members during a substantial portion of its travel through said chamber, means for directing a blast of drying air against and through the fabric as it passes around said rotary members, said air directing means being positioned to direct the air in a. direction to hold the fabric against said rotary members, means for supplying power to said rotary members to rotate them including a main drive means and individual variable speed drives for said rotary members driven from said main drive means, and a dancer roll located between each pair of rotary members, each of said dancer rolls normally being urged towards the fabric and bearing against the fabric, the movement of each dancer roll being responsive to the looseness or tautness of the length of the fabric passing between the rotary members between which they, respectively, are located and actuating means operated by each dancer roll to control the speed of the individual variable speed drive for the next successive rotary member onto which the fabric is received.

'7. Apparatus for drying air-pervious textile fabrics comprising a chamber having a drying zone therein, means for passing the fabric in flat spread` position through the drying zone, means for maintaining the portions of the fabric to be subjected to drying in the drying zone under conditions of substantially uniform longitudinal slackness, said means'including spaced, airpervious, rotatable supporting and advancing surfaces, means for rotating said surfaces, the size of said surfaces and the distance between them being so correlated that the fabric is in contact with said surfaces for the major portion of its travel through the drying zone, the shape of said surfaces and their relation to one another in the chamber being such that the fabric, in passing over said surfaces forms into a series of loops, means for directing air against and through'the fabric as it passes over said surfaces in a direction to maintain the fabric pressed against said surfaces, and means engaging the fabric and operated thereby for adjusting the means for rotating said surfaces to control the peripheral speed of said surfaces independently of one another and in accordance with the looseness orA tautness of the fabric between said surfaces.

8. Apparatus for drying air-pervious textile fabrics comprising a chamber having a drying zone therein, means for passing the fabric in fiat spread position thfough the drying zone, means for maintaining the portions of the fabric to be subjected to drying in the drying zone under conditions of substantially uniform longitudinal slackness, said means including spaced, air-pervious, rotatable supporting and advancing surfaces, means for rotating said surfaces, the size of said surfaces and the distance between them being so correlated that the fabric is in contact with said surfaces for the major portion of its travel through the drying zone, the shape of said surfaces and their relation to one another in the drying chamber being such that the fabric in passing over said surfaces and from one of said surfaces to another is oppositely flexed and the opposite sides thereof are alternately and successively caused to contact said surfaces,

fabric as it passes over said surfaces in a direction to maintain the fabric pressed against said surfaces, and means engaging the fabric and operated thereby for adjusting the means for rotating said surfaces to control the peripheral speed of said surfaces independently of one another and in accordance with the looseness or tautness of the fabric between said surfaces.

9. Apparatus for drying air-pervious textile fabrics comprising a chamber having a drying zone therein, means for passing the fabric in flat spread position through the drying zone, said means including spaced, air-pervious, rotatable supporting and advancing surfaces, means for rotating said surfaces, the size of said surfaces and the distance between them being so correlated that the fabric is in contact with said surfaces during a substantial portion of its travel through the drying zone, the shape of said surfaces and their relation to one another in the chamber being such that the opposite sides of the flattened fabric alternately and successively contact said surfaces as they pass over them, means for maintaining the fabric as it passes over andbetween said surfaces so that it is maintained under conditions of substantially uniform longitudinal slackness, means for directing air against and through the fabric as it passes over said surfaces in a direction to maintain the fabric pressed against said surfaces, and means engaging the fabric and operated thereby for adjusting the means for rotating said surfaces to control the peripheral speed of saidl surfaces independently of one another and in accordance with the looseness or tautness of the fabric between said surfaces.

10. Apparatus for drying air-pervious textile fabrics comprising a chamber having a drying zone therein, means for passing the fabric in flat spread position through the drying zone, means for maintaining the portions of the fab- Aric to be subjected to drying in the drying zone under conditions of substantially uniform longitudinal slackness, said means including spaced,

means for directing air against and through the air-pervious, rotatable supporting and advancing surfaces, meansV for rotating said surfaces, the size of said surfaces and the distance between them being so correlated that the fabric is in contact with said surfaces for the major portion of its travel through the drying zone,` the shape of said surfaces and their relation to one another in the chamber being such that the fabric, in passing over said surfaces, forms into a series of loops, means for directing drying air in a relatively large volume and at high velocity against and through the fabric as it passes over said surfaces in a direction to maintain the fabric pressed against said surfaces, and means engaging the fabric and operated thereby for adjusting the means for rotating said surfaces to control the peripheral speed of said surfaces independently of one another and in accordance with the looseness or tautness of the fabric between `said surfaces.

1l. Apparatus for drying air-pervious textile fabrics comprising a chamber having a drying zone therein, means for passing the fabric in fiat spread position through the drying zone, means for maintaining the portions of the fabric to be subjected to drying in the drying zone under conditions of substantially uniform longitudinal slackness, said means including spaced, air-pervious, rotatable supporting and advancing sur-` faces, means for rotating said surfaces, the size of said surfaces and the distance between them being so correlated that the fabric is in contact with said surfaces for the major portion of its travel through the drying zone, the shape of said surfaces and their relation to one another in the chamber being such that the fabric, in passing over said surfaces forms into a series of loops, means for directing Jets of drying air against and through the fabric as it passes over said surfaces in a direction to maintain the fabric pressed against said surfaces, and means engaging the fabric and operated thereby for adjusting the means for rotating said surfaces to control the peripheralspeed of said surfaces independently of one another and in accordance with the looseness or tautness of the fabric between said surfaces.

12. Apparatus for drying air-pervious textile fabrics comprising a chamber having a. drying zone therein, means for passing the fabric in flat spread position through the drying zone, means for maintaining the portions of the fabric to be subjected to drying in the drying zone under conditions of substantially uniform longitudinal slackness, said means including spaced, airpervious, rotatable supporting and advancing surfaces, means for rotating said surfaces, the size of said surfaces and the distance between them being so correlated that the fabric is in contact with said surfaces for the major portion of its travel through the drying zone, the shape 'of said surfaces and their relation to one another in the chamber being such that the fabric in passing over said surfaces forms into a series of loops, means for directing air against and through the fabric as it passes over said surfaces in a direction to maintain the fabric pressed against said surfaces, said means for directing air against and through the fabric being s0 positioned that the drying air is directed against the fabric only at those places where the fabric is supported by said surfaces so that the position of the fabric between said surfaces is not affected by the blast of drying air, and means engaging the fabric and operated thereby for adjusting the means for rotating said surfaces to control the peripheral speed of said surfaces independently of one another and in accordance with the looseness or tautness of the fabric between said surfaces.

HARRY W. BUTTERWORTH, JR. SAMUEL COHN.

MORTIMER COHN.

JULES G. WALTER.

US274388A 1939-05-18 1939-05-18 Apparatus for drying fabric Expired - Lifetime US2301249A (en)

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GB634340A GB540054A (en) 1939-05-18 1940-04-08 Improvements in method of and apparatus for drying fabric
US465034A US2427943A (en) 1939-05-18 1942-11-09 Apparatus for feeding and drying fabrics

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Cited By (31)

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US2416027A (en) * 1943-02-03 1947-02-18 Wendell H Shields Cloth drying machine
US2427943A (en) * 1939-05-18 1947-09-23 Samcoe Holding Corp Apparatus for feeding and drying fabrics
US2440159A (en) * 1944-02-26 1948-04-20 American Viscose Corp Apparatus for drying thread by conduction
US2440648A (en) * 1944-01-19 1948-04-27 Uxbridge Worsted Co Inc Apparatus for drying cloth with air
US2512128A (en) * 1946-03-15 1950-06-20 Orr Felt & Blanket Company Method and apparatus for uniformly drying and curing a resin impregnated endless textile strip
US2518740A (en) * 1947-02-03 1950-08-15 Orr Felt & Blanket Company Method and apparatus for drying and curing felts
US2559412A (en) * 1946-05-23 1951-07-03 Dungler Julien Drum drying machine
US2570318A (en) * 1942-11-09 1951-10-09 Samcoe Holding Corp Apparatus for drying fabric
US2596358A (en) * 1949-03-22 1952-05-13 Batson Cook Company Drier for slashers
US2637991A (en) * 1946-10-01 1953-05-12 Samcoe Holding Corp Fabric treating system
US2741443A (en) * 1952-02-29 1956-04-10 Deering Milliken Res Corp Yarn tension regulator
US2750679A (en) * 1952-10-23 1956-06-19 Samcoe Holding Corp Handling apparatus for textile fabric
US2777213A (en) * 1952-07-02 1957-01-15 Dungler Julien Supporting and transporting means for web or sheet material in nozzle driers
DE958106C (en) * 1952-06-01 1957-02-14 Haas Friedrich Maschf Friction drive for the conveying and turning rolls in machines for treating shrinking or laengender textile, paper or other material webs
US2835047A (en) * 1955-01-29 1958-05-20 Fleissner & Sohn Method and apparatus for willow drying
US2837830A (en) * 1956-06-19 1958-06-10 American Viscose Corp Method and apparatus for drying flexible sheet material
US2929153A (en) * 1955-11-29 1960-03-22 American Viscose Corp Drying apparatus for sheet material
US2981007A (en) * 1956-11-23 1961-04-25 Fleissner & Sohn Maschf Willow drier
US2985210A (en) * 1958-01-20 1961-05-23 Genevieve I Magnuson Treating apparatus for fruit and vegetable articles
US3065551A (en) * 1957-07-22 1962-11-27 Samcoe Holding Corp Reel dryer
US3151955A (en) * 1958-07-11 1964-10-06 Fleissner & Co G M B H Fa Drying of layers of granular and other comminuted material
US3254593A (en) * 1963-10-03 1966-06-07 Beloit Corp Gloss calender drive system and method
DE1228116B (en) * 1959-06-26 1966-11-03 Artos Meier Windhorst Kg Device for driving of incoming and dilating webs
US3394470A (en) * 1965-07-23 1968-07-30 Vepa Ag Sieve drums with eccentric positioning of fan means
US3412474A (en) * 1965-12-11 1968-11-26 Vepa Ag Apparatus for the treatment of textile material
US3427725A (en) * 1964-04-29 1969-02-18 Fur Patentdienst Anstalt Sieve drum dryer
US3494048A (en) * 1968-01-22 1970-02-10 Fmc Corp Web edge baffle in jet drying hood
US3581411A (en) * 1969-03-06 1971-06-01 Frank Catallo Cycle-air pervious drum-type drier
US4341335A (en) * 1980-10-07 1982-07-27 Sistig Corporation Method and apparatus for controlling tension in a moving material
US4562627A (en) * 1984-02-01 1986-01-07 Samcoe Holding Corporation Method for finish drying of tubular knitted fabrics
US20060019561A1 (en) * 2004-07-23 2006-01-26 Highland Industries, Inc. Fabric having balanced elongation

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US2579741A (en) * 1946-11-18 1951-12-25 Houston Fearless Corp Motion-picture film developer feeding device
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US2650776A (en) * 1948-01-28 1953-09-01 Jr Ross Eugene Risser Hose retraction assembly
US2797086A (en) * 1952-10-04 1957-06-25 Samcoe Holding Corp Control apparatus
US2753183A (en) * 1953-01-29 1956-07-03 Littell Machine Co F J Mechanical speed variator for continuous strip feeding
US2787463A (en) * 1953-11-16 1957-04-02 Huck Co Web tension control mechanism
US2816758A (en) * 1955-12-12 1957-12-17 Danly Mach Specialties Inc Continuous stock feed for power presses
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US3888400A (en) * 1974-03-28 1975-06-10 Littell Machine Co F J Loop control apparatus for continuous strip material
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US1470953A (en) * 1920-03-22 1923-10-16 Edwin M Bassler Paper-making machine
US1545638A (en) * 1923-01-06 1925-07-14 Reeves Pulley Co Automatic speed regulation
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US1956062A (en) * 1931-07-14 1934-04-24 Duvall James Coating and drying machine for alpha continuous sheet of paper and the like
US2074455A (en) * 1932-02-05 1937-03-23 Nat Electric Heating Company I Electric heating and drying roll
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US2050358A (en) * 1933-11-13 1936-08-11 Isaac E Mcelroy Variable speed pulley
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US2200328A (en) * 1937-08-26 1940-05-14 Samcoe Holding Corp Propelling means for long strips of material
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US2301249A (en) * 1939-05-18 1942-11-10 Samcoe Holding Corp Apparatus for drying fabric

Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2427943A (en) * 1939-05-18 1947-09-23 Samcoe Holding Corp Apparatus for feeding and drying fabrics
US2570318A (en) * 1942-11-09 1951-10-09 Samcoe Holding Corp Apparatus for drying fabric
US2416027A (en) * 1943-02-03 1947-02-18 Wendell H Shields Cloth drying machine
US2440648A (en) * 1944-01-19 1948-04-27 Uxbridge Worsted Co Inc Apparatus for drying cloth with air
US2440159A (en) * 1944-02-26 1948-04-20 American Viscose Corp Apparatus for drying thread by conduction
US2512128A (en) * 1946-03-15 1950-06-20 Orr Felt & Blanket Company Method and apparatus for uniformly drying and curing a resin impregnated endless textile strip
US2559412A (en) * 1946-05-23 1951-07-03 Dungler Julien Drum drying machine
US2637991A (en) * 1946-10-01 1953-05-12 Samcoe Holding Corp Fabric treating system
US2518740A (en) * 1947-02-03 1950-08-15 Orr Felt & Blanket Company Method and apparatus for drying and curing felts
US2596358A (en) * 1949-03-22 1952-05-13 Batson Cook Company Drier for slashers
US2741443A (en) * 1952-02-29 1956-04-10 Deering Milliken Res Corp Yarn tension regulator
DE958106C (en) * 1952-06-01 1957-02-14 Haas Friedrich Maschf Friction drive for the conveying and turning rolls in machines for treating shrinking or laengender textile, paper or other material webs
US2777213A (en) * 1952-07-02 1957-01-15 Dungler Julien Supporting and transporting means for web or sheet material in nozzle driers
US2750679A (en) * 1952-10-23 1956-06-19 Samcoe Holding Corp Handling apparatus for textile fabric
US2835047A (en) * 1955-01-29 1958-05-20 Fleissner & Sohn Method and apparatus for willow drying
US2929153A (en) * 1955-11-29 1960-03-22 American Viscose Corp Drying apparatus for sheet material
US2837830A (en) * 1956-06-19 1958-06-10 American Viscose Corp Method and apparatus for drying flexible sheet material
US2981007A (en) * 1956-11-23 1961-04-25 Fleissner & Sohn Maschf Willow drier
US3065551A (en) * 1957-07-22 1962-11-27 Samcoe Holding Corp Reel dryer
US2985210A (en) * 1958-01-20 1961-05-23 Genevieve I Magnuson Treating apparatus for fruit and vegetable articles
US3151955A (en) * 1958-07-11 1964-10-06 Fleissner & Co G M B H Fa Drying of layers of granular and other comminuted material
DE1228116B (en) * 1959-06-26 1966-11-03 Artos Meier Windhorst Kg Device for driving of incoming and dilating webs
US3254593A (en) * 1963-10-03 1966-06-07 Beloit Corp Gloss calender drive system and method
US3427725A (en) * 1964-04-29 1969-02-18 Fur Patentdienst Anstalt Sieve drum dryer
US3394470A (en) * 1965-07-23 1968-07-30 Vepa Ag Sieve drums with eccentric positioning of fan means
US3412474A (en) * 1965-12-11 1968-11-26 Vepa Ag Apparatus for the treatment of textile material
US3494048A (en) * 1968-01-22 1970-02-10 Fmc Corp Web edge baffle in jet drying hood
US3581411A (en) * 1969-03-06 1971-06-01 Frank Catallo Cycle-air pervious drum-type drier
US4341335A (en) * 1980-10-07 1982-07-27 Sistig Corporation Method and apparatus for controlling tension in a moving material
US4562627A (en) * 1984-02-01 1986-01-07 Samcoe Holding Corporation Method for finish drying of tubular knitted fabrics
US20060019561A1 (en) * 2004-07-23 2006-01-26 Highland Industries, Inc. Fabric having balanced elongation
US7732356B2 (en) 2004-07-23 2010-06-08 Highland Industries, Inc. Fabric having balanced elongation

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US2427943A (en) 1947-09-23
GB540054A (en) 1941-10-03

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