US2289335A - Shoe and method of making the same - Google Patents

Shoe and method of making the same Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2289335A
US2289335A US36092540A US2289335A US 2289335 A US2289335 A US 2289335A US 36092540 A US36092540 A US 36092540A US 2289335 A US2289335 A US 2289335A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
shoe
locking strip
stitching
upper
face
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Fred L Ayers
Original Assignee
Newton Elkin
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B9/00Footwear characterised by the assembling of the individual parts
    • A43B9/04Welted footwear
    • A43B9/06Welted footwear stitched or nailed through

Description

Patented July ,14,` `1942 SHOE AND METHOD 0F MAKING SAISIE l Fred L. Ayers, Watertown, Mass., assixnor of onehalf to Newton Elkin, Philadelphia, Pa.

Application October 12, 1940, Serial No. 360,925

4 claims.

This invention relates to shoes of the general type illustrated in my Patent No. 2,065,786 granted December 29, 1936, wherein the shoe sole is secured to the lasted shoe by permanent cement and with the shoe lasted to present an outwardly directed marginal iin to `which is permanently y'cemented a locking strip also secured to the outersole. More' particularly, though not exclusively, this invention relates to such shoes of the close edge type in which there isy no welt y showing the locking strip of Figure 6.

simulating stitching securing the locking strip to Figure 14 is a View similar to Figure 13, but

Figures 1, 2 and 3 illustrate certain innersole structures especially suitable for use in connection with the present invention. `In Figure 1 the innersole structure comprises an innersole I shapedto the bottom of the last and on one face of which, which will be the lower face inthe completed shoe, is a layer 2, preferablyV of canvas or other similar material, of considerable strength, which in the forepart, and in the shank also, if desired, is extended outwardly beyond the edge of the portionI as shown at 3. The portions I and 2 asshown in this gure arecemented together face to face. Figure 2 shows a construction somewhat similar to Figure 1, but the layers I and 2 are secured together about their margins as by the line of stitching 4. This stitching may be in lieu of or in adidtion to the cement bond is lightly attached to the shoe by such stitching.

This stitching may pass through the top face of the locking strip, in which it is preferably seated in a slit therein so that it lis concealed in the finished shoe. The stitching may .pass through the lower face of the locking strip but whether through the top or bottom` faces it Vextends to the upper materials through its inner edge face. This stitching is quite insuilicient as a permanent method of securing the locking strip, but it serves to correctly locate it on the shoe and to act as a guide in the application ofthe cement and as a 4Figures 4 to 7, inclusive, are perspective views of locking strip constructions,-any vone ofwhieh may be employed. f

Figure 8 is a lateral cross section throughthe forepart of a' last showing lthe innersole of Figure 2 in position and the upper pulled over.

Figure 9- to 13, inclusive, are detail sections to a larger scale than Figure vand through one side only showing successive operations in the making of the shoe. a

between the parts I and 2. This layer 2 may Well be the cement coated canvas commonly employed in the so called Gem innersoles. In Figure 3 the upper member of the innersqle structure shown at 5 is slit inwardly around its edges as at 6 to form upper and lower lips 1 and 8. Tothe lower face of the portion 5 there is secured,as by the stitching 9 passing throughthe lip 8, a layer of canvas or similar material such as I0. This layer I0 maybe secured by cementing itto the outer face of the member 5 in addition to or in lieu of the stitching 9. The innersoleis temporarily secured to the last with the fabric layer outermost and with the edges of the body portion I of the structure substantially flush with the side edges of the last as shown in Figure 8. The upper materials I4 and I5 are then assembled and pulled over the last I6 and temporarily secured as by the lasting tacks I1'v with the margins I8 and I9 of the upper materials extending outwardly and overlying the margin 20 of the canvas layer such as 2 or I0.

It is preferable to thread sidelast with Aa light thread between the lasting tacks in order to in'- sure tight securement ofthe upper after which these tacks are pulled.

There is also provided in continuous length in the top face 23a is shown as inclined toward' the beveled or rounded edge 22. In Figure 6 the slot 23h is made in the under or flesh side of the locking strip inclined toward its inner edge, while in Figure 7 the lower face is grooved out as shown'at 23e. This grooving out allows more room 'to receive the out-turned upper margins as will later appear. The locking strip and the upper margins I8 and I9 and the margin 20 are then secured together as by the inseam stitching 25. When the top slit strip of Figures 4 or 5 is used, the outer face of this stitching is embedded in the slit 23, 23a, respectively, the material of the locking strip closing over this stitching and concealing it from view. Whatever locking strip construction is employed, the stitching passes through substantially the inner-edge face of the locking strip intothe upper materials so4 respect differing materially from the usual' welt strip as applied to a welt `shoe, but it does serve to secure the locking strip temporarily until the strip can be more eiiecetively secured by other means. The locking strip may be fed in to the point of stitching to the inseam stitches by a guide similar to the usual welt guide but,"particu larly when aclose edge shoe is being made, the guide may be considerably smaller. Next,with or without a preliminary rough trimming, the margin is turned inwardly and cemented by permanent cement to the outer face of the innersole structure as shown in Figure 10, thus enclosing the inner loops of the inseam stitching.

Then the upper material margins are trimmed oil! as' shown in Figure 1l close to the outer face of the folded-in margin 20 and vbeing somewhat extended outwardly beneath the locking strip 2|. Ordinarily the trimmed edges extend in the neighborhood of V8 to of an inch beyond the inner edge of the locking strip 2|, the parts then being in substantially the positions shown in Figure 11 with the locking strip extending outwardly and forming with the trimmed upperY margins a V shaped space 21. 'Ihe outer face of the shoe outer may then be roughened within the space 21, if this is found necessary or desirable, and a permanent cement such as pyroxylin cement is then applied to the lower face of the locking strip, within the space 21, to the exposed edges of the upper materials, and the fabriclayer 2 extending somewhat inwardly of the margin 20. The presence of thelocking strip 2l at this time acts to define one edge of thespace for receiving the cement and it projects out suiiiciently far to make it easy to avoid the application of cement to portions of the upper above the strip 2| in the finished shoe. The cement penetrates well into the inseam stitching and' between the upper parts and the fabric layer 2 and subsequent pressure so forces it in that' the cement bond with the stitching is substantially as eii'ective as though the locking strip were later applied and cemented to the top face of the stitching as is shown in my previous patent hereinbefore mentioned.

An outersole 30 is then applied and cemented thereto under pressure as lshown in Figures 13 or 14, depending on whether the locking strip is slit from the upper or lower face, respectively. The

trimmed and the shoe finished in the usual man-4 ner. This construction makes possible the formation of a close edge shoe vof the type shown in my patent with a considerable simplification in handling of the parts and the attaching of them together.

If it is desired to make a shoe simulating in appearance a welt shoe, a locking strip of suflicient width to receive outersole stitching may be employed and the outersole be stitched to the locking strip as well as cemented thereto and to the upper and innersole margins. This method is applied about the forepart of the shoe and if desired may be extended into the shank or even entirely around the heel, but where it is employed about the forepart only, the shank and heel portions may be lasted as desired, or if this method has been brought into the shank of the shoe, they lasting of the' heel portion only will proceed in accordance with any of the known methods. The slit or groove in the face` of the locking strip permits the -innersole stitches to become embedded in the strip. When the slit is in the top face of the strip they thus do not show in the finished shoe. The securement of the locking strip by the inseam stitching is not relied upon as a permanent securement since the strip could easily be torn away were it not for the cementing of it in position.

From the foregoing description of certain embodiments of this invention, it should be evident to those skilled in the art ,that various changes and modifications might be made without departing from the spirit or scope of this invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim: l

1. The method of making a shoe, which comprises pulling over and temporarily securing an upper to a last with the upper margins in face-toface contact with a marginal portion on an innersole structure, simultaneouslystitching a locking strip through its inner edge face to said marginal portions and upper margins, turning the marginal portion inwardly and securing it to the exposed surface of the innersole structure inwardly of the'stitching, trimming the upper margins, applying cement to the lower face of said locking strip between said margins and locking strip, and to said marginal portion, and applying an outersole to the shoe.

2. The method of making a shoe, which com- "prises pulling over and temporarily securing an surface of the innersole structure inwardly of the outersole and the locking strip may then be edge 76 stitching, trimming the upper margins. roughing the top face of said trimmed margins, applying cement to the lower face of said strip, between said margins and locking strip. and applying an outersole to the shoe.

3. A shoe having an. innersole having an extended lower layer folded inwardly about its margin adjacent to the outer edge of said innersole, upper materials secured to said innersole by stitches passing through said layer at the line offold and enclosed by said folded margin, and

with the margins of said upper materials outan outersole underlying and cemented to said innersole, upper margins, and locking strip.

4. A shoe having an innersole having an extended lowerl fabric layer having its margin folded inwardly and secured to its lower facelupper materials secured to said innersole by stitches passing through said layer at the line of fold and lying between said folded margin and said lower -face, a locking strip having the inseam stitches extending through its inner edge face, and be- 10 tween which strip and said innersole the upper materials extend, said upper materials, locking FRED L. AYERS.

US2289335A 1940-10-12 1940-10-12 Shoe and method of making the same Expired - Lifetime US2289335A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2289335A US2289335A (en) 1940-10-12 1940-10-12 Shoe and method of making the same

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2289335A US2289335A (en) 1940-10-12 1940-10-12 Shoe and method of making the same

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2289335A true US2289335A (en) 1942-07-14

Family

ID=23419955

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2289335A Expired - Lifetime US2289335A (en) 1940-10-12 1940-10-12 Shoe and method of making the same

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2289335A (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2428153A (en) * 1943-12-31 1947-09-30 Gottlieb Henry Manufacture of welt shoes
US2900649A (en) * 1955-04-26 1959-08-25 United Shoe Machinery Corp Methods of making platform shoes, the parts of which are united by a reinforced seam
US3348325A (en) * 1966-02-18 1967-10-24 Lawrence S Snclgrove Overlapping tab index
US6226895B1 (en) * 1998-06-25 2001-05-08 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Footwear construction
US20040143995A1 (en) * 2003-01-23 2004-07-29 Mcclelland Larry W. Direct attach footwear construction
US20100313450A1 (en) * 2009-06-10 2010-12-16 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Footwear construction

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2428153A (en) * 1943-12-31 1947-09-30 Gottlieb Henry Manufacture of welt shoes
US2900649A (en) * 1955-04-26 1959-08-25 United Shoe Machinery Corp Methods of making platform shoes, the parts of which are united by a reinforced seam
US3348325A (en) * 1966-02-18 1967-10-24 Lawrence S Snclgrove Overlapping tab index
US6226895B1 (en) * 1998-06-25 2001-05-08 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Footwear construction
US20040143995A1 (en) * 2003-01-23 2004-07-29 Mcclelland Larry W. Direct attach footwear construction
US20100313450A1 (en) * 2009-06-10 2010-12-16 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Footwear construction
US8127468B2 (en) 2009-06-10 2012-03-06 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Footwear construction

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3344537A (en) Footwear
US2384927A (en) Shoe construction
US2538170A (en) Shoe with upper having locating and lasting tabs
US2458500A (en) Ribbed strip for insoles
US2325639A (en) Shoemaking
US2283273A (en) Sandal
US3942206A (en) Method of making shoes
US2005048A (en) Shoe and the manufacture thereof
US3075212A (en) Method of applying a decorative strip to a shoe
US2240626A (en) Shoe with interlaced upper elements
US2201382A (en) Welt
US2275574A (en) Beaded welting
US2548961A (en) Edge binding and counter construction for moccasins
US2436050A (en) Platform type shoe and method of making same
US2297594A (en) Footwear
US2379681A (en) Footwear
US2554159A (en) Slip lasted shoe and process of making the same
US1607896A (en) Flexible-sole shoe
US2386809A (en) Footwear and method of making same
US2984918A (en) Shoe
US2384431A (en) Shoe construction
US2388744A (en) Shoe construction
US3431570A (en) Methods of making welted and outsoled true moccasins
US2230504A (en) Shoe
US1656564A (en) Welting and method of making the same