US1687080A - Method of and apparatus for stenciling - Google Patents

Method of and apparatus for stenciling Download PDF

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Publication number
US1687080A
US1687080A US184932A US18493227A US1687080A US 1687080 A US1687080 A US 1687080A US 184932 A US184932 A US 184932A US 18493227 A US18493227 A US 18493227A US 1687080 A US1687080 A US 1687080A
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Prior art keywords
stencil
work
fabric
paint
screen
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Expired - Lifetime
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US184932A
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Beck Roy Christian
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SELECTASINE SYSTEM
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SELECTASINE SYSTEM
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41FPRINTING MACHINES OR PRESSES
    • B41F15/00Screen printers
    • B41F15/08Machines
    • B41F15/0804Machines for printing sheets
    • B41F15/0813Machines for printing sheets with flat screens
    • B41F15/0827Machines for printing sheets with flat screens with a stationary squeegee and a moving screen

Description

I on. 9, 1928.-
R. c. BE CK uswnon OF AND APPARATUS FOR s'rnucnam Filed A ril 19, 1927' I a Shagts-Sheet 1 96 56 79 99 4 O v "7a f fi fivze; For ave/577,4 6501' I 9 9 5? A ing the work.
, Patented Oct. 9, 1928.
ROY CHRISTIAN BECK, OF LOS ANGEL-ES,
CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO SELECTASINE SYSTEM, OF SAN' FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, A CORPORATION OF CALIFORNIA.
METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR STENCILING. 7
Application filed April 19,
My invention relatesto the art of stenciling and more particularly to the art of stenciling through fabric.
A process of stenciling known to the trade as the selectasine process utilizes a stencilliquid state is placed upon the stencil at one end and is drawn over the stencil in a wave by a scraper which is preferably a rubber k ,squeegee. The paint thus drawn over the stencil fills the open pores :of the pervious design portions of'the stencil and adheres to the surface of the cardboard so that when the stencil is raised,.the paint is drawn by its adhesion to thecardboard substantially entirely out of the pores of the stencil which it filled. In raising the stencil, a momentary suction is created between the stencil and the cardboard, thus tending to tear the stencil and slow up the work.
It is an object'of my invention to eliminate suction forming as the stencil-leaves the cardboard. 1
Furthermore, in raising the stencil from 5 the work the edges of the stencil tend to leave the work first, being closest to the frame, and the middle portions later. This leaves a moire effect on the work, containing wave forms made by the stencil progressively leav- It is an object of my invention to provide a method of stenciling in which no such wave. marks are left on the work. i
' Though the selectasine process has come into extensive use in the production of advertising posters and the like, considerable difficulty has been met with in providing means whereby this art may be economically used in'large quantity production.
It is an object of myin'vention so .to provide a method of and apparatus. for stenciling and 17 and converge and connect with each through fabric by which the work may be turned. out economically in large quantities. No fabric hasbeen found for useas a *gether at their upper ends.
1927. Serial No. 184,932.
stencil whiclrwill not stretch under the pres sure of the squeegee especially toward the end of a stroke. This causes other portions UNITED STATES TENT-.oF-Frce of the stencil than that immediately c'ontacted by the squeegee to creep upon and, to some extent, smear the work.
It is a further object of my invention to provide a method -of and apparatus for stenciling through fabric which will prevent stretch in the stencil from smearing the work. Furthera objects and advantages will be made I manifest hereinafter.
In the drawings in which a preferred embodiment of the apparatus of my invention is. illustrated,
Fig. 1 is a paratus. I.
Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken. on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2.
plan view of my stenciling ap- Fig. 4 is a fragmentary oblique perspective view illustrating a detail of 'my stenciling apparatus.
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged view of'a portion of Fig. I
Figs. 6 to 10 inclusive are similar views, each of which is taken substantially on the line 6 6 of Fig. 2 and illustrating the paintfeed mechanism of my apparatus.
Referring specifically to the drawings, the apparatus of my invention is indicated by the numeral 10 which, as clearly shown in Figs. 1 and 2, includes a frame 11 having two front legs 12 and two backglegs 1 3 which are connectedtogethei': in pair \ne ar their lower ends by transverse tie bars 14. Transverse tie bars 15 are superimposed above the tie bars 14 and connect the legs 12.and 13 to- A longitudinal tie bar 16 is formed of angle iron and riveted to the legs 13 on the same level as the tie bars 14 so asto rigidly space the lower ends of the legs 13. A longitudinal tie bar 17 also formedpf angle iron, is superimposed above the tie bar 16-and spaces the legs 13 from each other at a point substantially midway between the tie bar 16 and the top of the legs 13. Two pairs of converging arms 18 and 19 .are connected to the ends of'the tie bars 16 other to form-'amigid bearing base plate 20 which is disposed slightly above the level of the longitudinal tie bar 17. Longitudinal rails 25 and 261116 preferably formed of angle iron and rest upon and are'secured to upper ends of the legs 12 and 13 so that corresponding webs are parallel to each other. The rails 25 and 26 have small up er and lower angle Sliding bearing blocks 35 and 36 are connected to the rail 26 and the tie bar 16' respectively near the center of the apparatus'lO so as to provide guideways for a.v vertical plunger rod 37. A treadle 38 has a fulcrum 39 resting upon the floor. One end 40 of the treadle 38,is adapted to be depressed by the operators foot, and the opposite end 41 of the treadle 38 is pivotally connected to a link 42 which is ivotally connected to the lower end of the p unger rod-37." A hearing block 45 is connected tothe rod 37.near the upper.
end thereof by bolts 46 and 47. The opening in the block 45, through which the bolt'47' passes, is enlarged to permit a limited horizontal movement of the lower end of the block relative to the lunger rod 37. k
A hearing 50 is ingedly mounted upon the plate 20. A shaft '51 extends through and ournals in thebearing block 45 and the bearnotch, as shown in Fig. 3. Likewise, in order that the shaft 51 be rotated in the bearings 45 and 50, thecircularcam 53 must be raised so that the lug 57 will be removed from the notch 54. \Vhen the cam 53 is thus raised and The frame 76 is adapted to nest in arectangular frame 85 formed of angle iron. The.
frame 85 has end members 86 and side members 87 and 88. Axle bars 89 and 90 are.
secured to the outer faces of the frame members 86, the axle bars extending to each side of the frame 85 and being provided with rollers91 which extend into the track grooves 29 formed on the inner faces of the rails 25 and 26. The rollers 91 thus su port the stencil screen so that this may die easily rolled liars 78 and 79. A
from end to end of the rail 25 and 26. Ac I tuatin-g posts 92 are provi 7 ed upon the axle bar 90 to extend upward therefrom, the osts 9 ing 50. ,Mounted on the shaft 51 just behind 92 each having a horizontal finger 93 or a i the block 45 is a circular cam 53 which" is .sepurpose to be described later.
cured to the shaft by a set screw 54. The cam The side member 88 of the-angle iron frame 53 has a radial. notch 54 extending in from 85 isprovided with a rectilinear rack 95, the
I theperipher thereof, Asupporting bracket teeth of which'extend downward, the pitch 35 56 is secure to the upper face of the longiplane of. the teeth coinciding with the plane tudinal tie bar 17 directly beneath the axis of the shaft 51 so that an upstanding lug 57 of the bracket 56 is adapted to enter the notch 54, .when thecam 53 is in the position shown in 40 Fi 3. a i large spur gear 65 and a work-holding drum 66 are rigidly mounted upon the inner end of the shaft 51, as clearly shown in Fig. 2.
A piece of work 67 is in this instance formed 4 of sheet material shaped to form a cylinder which will snugl 'fit .over the drum 6.6. In
Fig. 2 the material of the work 67 is broken away for the purpose of revealing the drum 66. The gear 65 has a pitch diameterwhich 50. is substantially the same as the diameter of the exterior surface of the work 67.
When the treadle lever 38 is in the dotted line position 69 in which it-is shown in Fig.
2, the shaft 51 and the parts rigidly associated 55 therewith are disposed in the dotted. line position 70. When the treadle 38 is depressed into its fullline position, the shaft 51 and its rigidly associated parts are raised to the full line position in which they are shown in Figf2.
60 In Fig. 3 the circular cam 53 is shown in full lines in its downward position which corresponds to the dotted line position 70 of Fig. 2. y In order for the cam 53 to thus assume its A H downward position, the notch 54 mustbe op- 5 posite the lug 57 so that-the lug may enter the of the screen fabric 80. Near the opposite ends of the rack 95, the metal of the side bar 88 is cut away, as clearly shownin Fig. 4,.at
96, for a purpose to be described later. Stops 98 and 99 are provided at opposite ends of the rails 25 so as to limit the longitudinal rolling movement of the screen '75 and prevent the rollers 91 from leaving the track grooves 29.
When the spur gear 65 is thus in mesh with the rack 95, the external surfaceof the work 67 just comes into contact with the lower surface of the screen fabric 80. If the screen 75 is now moved longitudinally on the rails 25 j and 26, the spur gear 65 is rotated, causing the work 67 to make'a rolling contact with the lower surface of the screen fabric 80 and also causing the circular cam 53 to rotate, thus movingthe notch 54 out. of registry with the lug 57 and? causing the shaft 51 to be mainrevolution thereof has been completed. Such arevolution is completed when the screen 75 tained in elevated position until a complete I 25 and 26 from that at which it is disposed in'Fig. 1. When this revolution of the shaft 51 is completed, the notch 54 again comes into registry with thelug 57 permitting the shaft to drop down so that it is locked against rotation. It may be clearly seen that a line 0011- tact. is made between the work 67 and the lower surface of the fabric 80 on a vertical plane passing through theaxis of the shaft 51. In carrying out the method of my invention it is necessary that paint be forced through the screen fabric 80 substantially on the line'of contact between this fabric and the work 67.
In order to accomplish this I have provided a paint-feed mechanism 100, the structure and operation of which is clearly illus trated in Figs. 5 to inclusive. Standards 101 and 102 are mounted on the rails 26 and respectively to extend upward therefrom, a shaft 103 being horizontally journalled in these standards. Adjustment screws 104 and 105 are threadedly mounted upon the standard 101 for a purpose to be described later. The paint-feed mechanism 100 includes a scraper body 108 which extends parallel with the shaft 103 and which has arms 109 and 110 which receive the shaft 103 so that the .mechanism 100 is rotatably mounted upon I the shaft 103. Thearm 109 has a lug 110 provided with a friction foot 111 which is disposed in engagementwith an upper surisposed face of the rack 95. The arm 109 is between the ends of the screws 104 and 105 so that these screws limit the rotation of the mechanism 100 about the shaft 103. A rubwith suitable collars 118 which slide upon.
the rods 114. Springs 119 are disposed about the rods 114 between the scraper body 108 and the slide rods 114 prevent removal-of the collars 118 from the ends of the rods 114.
A paint feeder 130 is rigidly secured upon. the scraper body 108 so as to project toward the pan 115 and so that a horizontal blade 131 of the paint feeder 130 lies just above the level of the upper surface of the floor 117 of the paint pan 115.
Asclearly shown in Fig. 6, the squeegee 105, as shown in Fig. 8.
the screen fabric 80 along the line of contact between the screen 80and the work 67.
The operation of the paint-feeding mechanism 100 is as follows:
. Figf 6 illustrates the screen 75 moving in the direction of the arrow 140 and nearing the end of its'stcnciling stroke. A wave of paint 141 is disposed in advance of the squeegee 113 so that paint is forced through the pervious portions of the screen fabric 80 to apply the design of the stencil screen 75 to the surface of the Work 67. i The parts of the paint-feeding mechanism 100 maintain -the same positions relative to each other during,the.entirc stenciling strokefiintil the end bar 79 contacts the vertical Wall 1116 of the paint pan 115, as shown in Fig. 6Q Then, as
the stencil screen 75 completes its movement in the direction of the arrow 140, the pan 115 is slid along the rods 114 to a paint-retaining position in which it is shown in Fig. 7 Here the screen 75 is at the "end of its stenciling stroke and the detent mechanism 120 drops into the annular groove 122 so as to retain the pan 115 in this position. As the pan moves to its paint-retaining position, the
. paint-feeder blade 131 extends upward into the pain 115 and the squeegee 113 rolls the paint 141 onto the floor 117 of the paint pan 115. Thus when the stencil 75 terminates its stenciling stroke, the paint has been entirely scraped from the fabric 80 onto the floor 117, and the detent mechanism 120 has locked the pan 115 in paint-retaining relation with the squeegee 113. At this time the shaft 51 has been rotated by the gear 65 so that the notch '54 of the circular cam 53 again registers with the lug 57 so that the shaft 51 and the parts assembled therewith, including the work 67, drop downward into the dotted line position 70 of Fig.- 2. The work 67 is thus rembved from contact with the screen fabric 80 and may be easily drawh from the drum 66 and replaced by a fresh piece of work. 7
The screen 75 is'nowmoved in the reverse direction as shown by the arrow 143 in Fig.
8. This movement causes the friction. foot. 111 of the scraper' body lug to rotate the feeding mechanism 100 about'the shaft 103 until the arm 109 contacts the screw This raises the mechanism 100 from contact with the screen fabric 80- while the stencil 75 is moved a complete return stroke in the direction of the arrow 143. The screen 7 5, as shown in the drawings,. is rcciprocated manually in the stencil machine 10, but any suitable power means may be provided to accomplish this- "Fig. 9 shows the screen 75 approaching the end of its return stroke in the direction of the arrow 143 and shows the finger 93 conturns the pan 115 to its outer position in which it is shown' in Fig. 10 As the pan 115 is thus projected outward, the feeder blade 131 scrapes a portion of the paint 141 off onto the screen fabric 80. A new. piece of work 67 has by this time been placed upon the drum 66 andby operation ofthe treadle 38 the new piece of 'work67 is raised into contact with the screen fabric 80 and the screen 7 5 is again drawn in the direction of the arrow 140. As the screen is thus drawn, the paint which was scraped from the pan 115 onto the screen fabric is drawn over the surface of the fabric by the squeegee 113 so as to stencil the outer face of the new piece of work 67 in the manner previously escribed. It will thus be seenthat no attention need be given to the paint-feeding mechanism 100 except to maintain a supply of paint upon the pan 115. The height of the feeding blade 131 is just suflicicnt to re- "move a slightly greater amount of paint from the pan 115 than that needed for a single stenci'ling stroke.
. While the work 67 isshown as permanently curved into a cylindrical form, it may be normall flat and be givena curved form merely or the purposeof causing it to contact the screen fabric 80 one single line. There. is a certain amount of creep -in the screen fabric 80 which would cause ashght smearing were the work 67 to'contact the screen fabr c over an area which has pre-- viously been passed over by the squeegee 113 in a stenciling stroke. The line contact utilized in the o eration of the stenciling machinelO there ore substantially prevents this smearing even though there is a certain amount of cree in the stencil fabric 80. While I haves iown but asingle apparatus for carrying out the novel method ofmy invention it is obvious that this method could be carried out advantageously by a great number of different forms of apparatus. I
therefore do not intend my process to be limited to its use with any special apparatus, but have indicated the scope of this process in the following claims. i I claim as myinvention:
1.. A method of stenciling through fabric,
which comprises: stretching said fabric in a plane; forming stencils" thereon; passing a curved surface of the work into contact with said fabric on a given line; forcing coloring matter through said stencils onto said work at said line; and moving said work relative to said fabric so that said line of contact, between said workand said fabric, moves. I
2. A method of stenciling with a substantially flat fabric stencil, which, comprises: bringing the work into contact'with'said stencil; moving said work and said fabric so that contact is maintained 'therebetween disposing pigment on said fabric; and causing said pigment to be-moved over the surface of said fabric by forcing a stationary scraper into contact with said fabric on a line on which said fabric 'coiitacts said work.
3. A method of stenciling with a fabric stencil, which comprises: disposing said stencil at a time; moving said work relative to said stencil so that various portions of the work successively contact the stencil; and
positioning a stationary scraper in contact I with said stencil opposite the position at which said stencil is touched by the work in order to direct pigment through said stencil upon said work.
5. method of stenciling with a fabric stencil, which comprises z-disposing said stencil in a flat plane; forming the work so it is adapted to make a' substantially rolling con- .tact with said" stencil; moving said work in rolling contact with said stencil; and 'directing pigment through said stencil in the area thereof contacted by said. work.
6. A method of vstenciling with a fabric a. stencil, which comprises: disposing, said sten- -.cil 1n a'fiat plane; forming the work so it is adapted to make a substantially rolling contact with said stencil; moving saidor-k in rolling contact with said stencil; and positioning a stationary scraper in contact with said stencil opposite the position at which said stencil'is touched by the work in order to directpigment through said stencil upon said work.
l 7. An apparatus for stenciling, which cQmrises a stencil; means for'disposing said stencil in a flat plane; means for movlng said stencil longitudinally; means for disposing the work in substantially rolling contact with said stencil as said stencilmoves longitudinally; and means for directing pigment through said stencil upon said work at the position of said rolling contact.
p 8. An-apparatus for stenciling, which comprises; a stencil; means for disposing said stencil in a flat plane; means for moving said stencil longitudinally; means for supporting the work out of contact with said stencil; means for moving the work into contact with said stencil in rolling relation therewith; means connecting said stencil and said work whereby said work makes a rolling contact with said stencil when said stencil is moved longitudinally; and means for directing pigment through said stencil upon said work at the position of said rolling contact.
the work out of contact with said stencil;
means for moving the work into contact with said stencil .in rolling relation therewith; means connecting said stencil an said work whereby saidwork makes a rolling contact 10 with said stencil when said stencil is moved longitudinally; means for directing pigment through said stencil upon said work at the position of said rolling contact; and means for disengaging said connecting-means when said rolling contact has continued a desired distance.
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at Los Angeles, California, this 14th day of April, 1927.
ROY CHRISTIAN BECK.
US184932A 1927-04-19 1927-04-19 Method of and apparatus for stenciling Expired - Lifetime US1687080A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2629321A (en) * 1950-01-30 1953-02-24 Gattuso Henry Andrew Stenciling apparatus
US2704510A (en) * 1952-07-05 1955-03-22 Eugene Landesman Screen printing machines
US2710577A (en) * 1950-07-25 1955-06-14 Firm Kerag Kesselschmiede App Screen printing machine
US2751842A (en) * 1952-12-13 1956-06-26 Marler E T Ltd Screen stencil-printing machines
US2850969A (en) * 1955-02-17 1958-09-09 Meyercord Co Screen type printing machine
US2881698A (en) * 1956-07-19 1959-04-14 Kenn Equipment Co Screen process printing machine
DE1081480B (en) * 1956-04-13 1960-05-12 Elmar Messerschmitt Dipl Kfm D Screen printing device
US3199449A (en) * 1961-12-18 1965-08-10 Matthew L Jaffa Method and apparatus for screen printing

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2629321A (en) * 1950-01-30 1953-02-24 Gattuso Henry Andrew Stenciling apparatus
US2710577A (en) * 1950-07-25 1955-06-14 Firm Kerag Kesselschmiede App Screen printing machine
US2704510A (en) * 1952-07-05 1955-03-22 Eugene Landesman Screen printing machines
US2751842A (en) * 1952-12-13 1956-06-26 Marler E T Ltd Screen stencil-printing machines
US2850969A (en) * 1955-02-17 1958-09-09 Meyercord Co Screen type printing machine
DE1081480B (en) * 1956-04-13 1960-05-12 Elmar Messerschmitt Dipl Kfm D Screen printing device
US2881698A (en) * 1956-07-19 1959-04-14 Kenn Equipment Co Screen process printing machine
US3199449A (en) * 1961-12-18 1965-08-10 Matthew L Jaffa Method and apparatus for screen printing

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