US1661018A - Pile fabric - Google Patents

Pile fabric Download PDF

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Publication number
US1661018A
US1661018A US126375A US12637526A US1661018A US 1661018 A US1661018 A US 1661018A US 126375 A US126375 A US 126375A US 12637526 A US12637526 A US 12637526A US 1661018 A US1661018 A US 1661018A
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United States
Prior art keywords
tufts
twisting
warps
twisted
plied
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Expired - Lifetime
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US126375A
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James P Stroud
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James P Stroud
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Priority claimed from US25738728 external-priority patent/US1749551A/en
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D39/00Pile-fabric looms
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D2700/00Woven fabrics; Methods of weaving; Looms
    • D03D2700/50Pile-fabric looms; Pile fabrics
    • D03D2700/54Wire-tapestry looms for warp pile fabrics
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23929Edge feature or configured or discontinuous surface
    • Y10T428/23936Differential pile length or surface
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23957Particular shape or structure of pile
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23979Particular backing structure or composition

Description

Fd. 28, 192s. 1,661,018

l J. P. sTRoUD PILE FABRIC Filed Auk. 2, 1926 2 ,sheets-sheet 1 INVENTOR: fffzeSBSt/rmzd,

Feb. 218, 1928.

J, P. `sTRcDUD PILE FABRIC Filed "Auk 2. 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I N V EN TOR: Jdm ESrd kQ/HJ/fug TORNEYS.

W I TNESSES Patented Feb. 28, 192s.

UNITED STATES JAMES P. 4S'JTROUD, 0F NOBLE7 PENNSYLVANIA.

' PILE FABRIC.

y Application and August 2, 192e. 'serial N. 126,375.

. 5 effects apart from those obtainable by contrast due to difference in material composition of the vyarns from which the ile tufts are formed, through contrast res tant upon dyeing in different colors, or through vathe drawin 4i() gs,

riation in chemical treatment accorded the yarns in their preparationinitially. The foregoing desderatum I atta1n,as

hereinafter fully described, by a novel'mechanical treatment of the yarns forming the pile tufts in various portions of the fabric; to Witz--by twisting them to ldifferent degrecs and in differentdirections so as to predetermine, notwithstanding identical coloring, a marked physical contrast capable of maintaining its 4perinanency irrespective of severe wear. v

Another object of my invention' is to insure against upturning ofl the' rug'ed es through structural reinforcement where y the designated regions are stiifened and weighted so as to lay perfectly fiat.4

Another object of my invention is to enable manufacture of pile fabrics such as rugs and thelike in string form, i. e. in continuous'succession and with intervening blank spaces, on ordinary carpet looms without necessitating cessation in operation of the mechanism by which the pile wires are manipulated to form thel pile loops.

Further objects and attendant advantages will be readily apparent from the' detailed description which follows of the typical embodiment of my invention shown in whereof Fig. I is` a perspective y view illustrating in a diagrammatic way, how a series 'of individual rugs are woven in -continuoussuccession maccordance wlth the present improvements.

" margins weighted edges.

Fig. .IV is a fragmentarylon tu Fig. II is a cross-sectional view of one of therugs taken as indicated by the arrowsII-fII in- Fig. I.

. Fig. III is a view similar to the preceding showing Vhow the projecting perimetric of the rug are turned underand secured to th'ebody to provide reniforced Figs. III* and III are fragmentary views l:showing slightly modified constructions.

'tudinal sectional view-on an enlar ed sca e, taken as indicated by the arrows vV-IVJin Fig.

I, conventionally showing the texture of a typical `weave convenient to my invention.

Fig. V is a longitudinal sectional view of a carpetloom with the warp beams and harnesses arranged'to produce my novel v pile fabric.

Figs. VI and VII are diagrammatic views showing the manner in which the different face warpsare initiallyprepared in accordance with this invention; and

Fig. VIII is a view showing the weave the course of its formation.

In carrying out my invention, I preferably weave the rugs in continuous succession as depicted in Fig. I, wherein the individual rugs are designated by the numeral 10, and shown as separated by blank intervals 11. In the present instance, each rug is characterized by a border 12 that surrounds a center fieldlvdboth formed of ile facing tufts'upstandingfrom the ground) weave 14, which, as shown, is extended laterally along opposite side edgesas at 15, 15 and, also constitutes the blank intervals 11 aforesaid. Fora purpose later onI explained, a certain few of the face or pile warps are maintained in action during weaving ofthe blank intervals 1 .with consequent formation of connecting lines 16 of tufts that are Subsequently removed by hand or otherwise. -After weaving, the individual rugs 10 are cut apart along lines 17 medially of the blank intervals 11-a margin of the ground weave 14 beingV thus left at the ends of each rug. These end margins, ,as well as .the side margins 14 already mentioned, are after- .wards under-folded asivshown in Fig. III

will lay perfectly flat on the floor and thus l resist'being readily upturned. It is to be particularly noted'that the folds are so al-v ocated that the pilin isvcarried around the rug edges which a ds greatly to the at# 'tract-iveness of the finish. i

As an alternative I may. employ very stout yarns or cords along the edges ofzthe rug as exemplified at C in Fig. III, thesebeingV placed on the edge margins and n corporated incidentally to finishing said margins by overlockstitching; or they may .be inlaid after the manner of stuler-warps as shown at C in Fig. III incidental to weaving of the rugs-all as desired or found mostconvenient or economical in practice. In accordance with the present invention,

viii) distinction in appearance between the border areas 12 and the center areas 13 ot the rugs 10 is predetermined through a novel physical treatment incidental to initial preparation of the warps 18. 2() (Figs. IV and from which the facing pile tufts T, '1" in theatoresaid ai'eas are re-spectively formed. As shown in Fig. VI, the coinponent strands 19, 19 of the warps 18 are individually twisted looselyboth in one dirertion-and plied by twisting in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against recoiling subsequently when the loops L (Fig. VIII) are severed to forni the tufts T (Fig. IV) incidental to withdrawal of the loop forming wires IV (Fig. VIII). As a consequence, the fibers in the tufts T remain substantially straight and are therefore seen end on in the borders 12 of the rugs. On the other hand, the warps 20, constituting the center field facing o f' the rugs. are composed, as conventionally indicated in Fig. VII, of strands 21, 21 which are individually hard twisted`both in one direction-and plied by close twisting in the same direction. Owing to the hard twisting all in the one direction. the tufts T (Fig. IV) produced upon cutting the pile loops L (Fig. VIII) that are formed from the warps 0, contract in the direction of their length and open up somewhat at the/ends incidentally to recoiling as a result of which vthe center field the level of the borders 12,.`

These tufts T moreover, permanent curls with consequent impartation of a rough appearance to the center fields 13 which accordingly stand out in marked contrast to the smoother appearing border areas 12, all as conventionally illustrated in the drawings. When face warp-s of silk or other gloss material are employed, the distinction is heightenedthrough contrast ot the sheen of the tutt fibers visible sidewise in the center fields 13 with the more somber or subdued borders 12 wherein the tuft :fibers are seen end on.

hile I have described the face warps 18, 20 as being two ply, it is obvious that the number of plies, as well as the extent of relative twisting, may be varied indefinitely in actual practice.

The ground weave 14 suitable to my invention is susceptible of extensive diversification. and the one shown in Figs. IV and "VIII is therefore to be considered typical of many other possible forms. In the present instance, it involves, in addition to the face warps 18, 20, a layer of stutter warps 22 which are inlaid between upper and lower shuttle or weft threads 23, 24, the whole being tied together by binder warps designated 25. 25. The distinguishing t'eatui'e to be particularly remarked in the illustrated fabric is that the Warps 18 ai'e con- Call or two important deviations cealed in the ground fabric with the -stutier warps 22 throughout the entire center tield area 13, and conversely, that the 'face wai-ps 2O are suppressed in the border area 12 and therefore serve in the capacity of st-utters" in that region.

The typified weave duced on an ordinary shown in Fig. V ot jacquard mechanism tor the purpose, the only departure from customary practice being in the employmentI ot separate beams for the face warps 18. 2() and in the arrange` nient and control ot' the harnesses governing formation ofthe sheds. Thus in Fig. V, the end border warps 18 (for thefborder sides) are supplied 'from the beam ltfl and passed through heddles of a harness traine 18". The center tield wai-ps 2O for the side por tions ot the borders are-in turn-supplied by a beam 20, and controlled by a harness traine 21)". The stnfi'ei' warps 22 are lwound on a beam 22*l and may be guided through elongated eyes in harness frames 18" and 20; while the binder warps 25 are supplied troni a beam 25a, alternate'end's being passed through separate harness frames 25h and 25C. In addition,'an auxiliary beam 26 and an associated harness 26 are employed for the few isolated face warps by which the connecting tufts 16 (Fig. are formed across the intervals 11. 3y means of drop rods 27 the several harness frames are coordinated With roller arms 28 pivoted in the lower part of the loom, and adapted to be actuated individually by suitable cams on the cam shaft 29. The tutt loops L, L (Fig. VIII) are set up in the customary manner through cooperation between the lay reed shown at 30 in Fig. V, with the pile toi-ming wires IV previously mentioned. The loom isv ot' course equipped with the usual mechanism (not shown) for automatiy inserting and withdrawing the pile forming wires IV. T ie setting and operation ot the looin is clearly within the province of any skilled weaver and need not therefore be discussed in detail herein except as to one from customary practice: for example, attention is directed to the fact that the heddle frames 18b and 20" are rendered inactive when the warps 18, 2O are to be suppressed in the ground weave 14 of the fabric. ThisV may be accomplished by manual disconnection of the heddle frames 1 J suitable automatic means for the purpose. The use of a separate maintain the few isolated tace warps in constant action during weaving of the rugs is alsoA considered novel. This is advantageous in that the opeiation of. the loom is rendered continuous since it obviates the necessity for manual withdrawal of the pile wires IV incidentally to weaving of the withoutr necessitating usey same direction for blank intervals l1, as well as subsequent manual re-insertion of said wiies at the beginning of each new rug as would otherwise be the case.

It is of course possible, within the scope of lny invention, to produce designs other than the plain border variety herein lshown, and, while marked differences in surface appearance are obtainable with yarns all one color and material, more vivid contrasts may obviously be had byl employment of yarns of different colors and materials, or with yarns whose appearance is effected through variation in chemical treatment incidental to preparation initially.

After weaving and completion of the individual rugs, they may be subjected to a steaming operation to emphasize the curl of the tufts in the centei field areas 13 and to open up the tufts of the border areas to the maximum fullness.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

l. As a new article of manufacture, a pile fabric having its face embodying tufts formed of two different groups of multi-ply threads, the component strands of one group of threads being individually twisted in one direction, and plied by twisting in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against subsequent recoiling and thereby to provide straight tufts, and the strands of the other group of threads being twisted in one direction and plied by twistingin the same direc` tion for capacity to recoil and thereby to provide curled tufts.

2. As a new article of manufacture, a pile fabric formed of grouped tufts made of differentially twisted and plied stra-nds, one

group of which are individually twisted in' one direction and plied by twisting in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against recoiling, and the other group of strands being twisted in one direction'and plied by twisting in the saine direction for capacity to recoil.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a pile fabric having distinguishing face areas formed of tufts respectively occupying higher and lower planes, the component strands of the tufts in the higher plane being twisted in one direction and plied by twisting in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against recoil, and the component strands of the tufts in the lower plane being twisted in one direction and plied by twisting in the capacity to recoil.

4. As a new article of manufacture, `:a pile fabric having border face portions formed of tufts the component strands whereof are individually twisted in one direction and plied by twisting in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against recoil, and a center field portion composed of tufts the individual strands whereof are twisted in one direction fabric embodying a ground weave with an inner field formed of tufts the component strands whereof are twisted in one direction and plied by twisting in the same direction for capacity to recoil, a surrounding border of the ground weave with tufts the coinponent strands whereof are twisted in one direction and plied by twisting in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against recoil and to project above the plane of the inner field, and a perimetrically surrounding portion of the ground weave undei-folded and united to the back of the tuft ed border aforesaid so that the piling is rolled over around the fabric edges into coplanar relation with respect to the underside of said ground weave.

7. As a new article of manufacture, a pile fabric embodying a ground weave with an inner field formed of tufts the component strands whereof are twisted in one direction and plied by twisting in the same direction for capacity to recoil, a surrounding border 'of the ground weave with tufts the component strands whereof are twisted in one di` rection and plied by twisting in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against recoil and to project above the plane of the inner field, and a perimetricall y surrounding portion of the ground weave reinforced by a stout cord incorporated in its marginal edges by overlock stitching.

8. As a new article of manufacture, a pile fabric embodying a ground weave with an inner field formed of tufts the component strands whereof are twisted in one direction and plied by twisting in the same direction for capacity to recoil, a surrounding border of the. ground weave with tufts the compo- A"nent strands whereof are twisted in one di rection sind plied by twisting in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against recoil and to project above the plane of the inner' field, and a perimetrically surrounding portion of the ground weave unde-rfoldcd to marginally enclose a stout stiffening and reinforcing cord.

9. As a new article of manufacture, a pile fabric embodying a ground weave With an inner field formed of tufts the component strands whereof'are twisted in one direction and plied by twisting in the saune direction for capacity to recoil, a surrounding border of the ground Weave with tufts the component Strands Whereotl are twisted in one direction and plied by twisting' in the opposite direction so as to be neutralized against recoil and to project above the plane of the inner field, and a perimetrically surrounding)r portion of the ground weave projecting beyoud the border face urea, the projected l0 edges being folded under 'with inclusion of stout stil'fening und reinforcing cord, and

the folds united to the back of the ground weave.

In testimony whereof, I huye hereunto 15 gned my naine at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, this 15th day of July, 1926.

JAMES P. STROUD.

US126375A 1926-08-02 1926-08-02 Pile fabric Expired - Lifetime US1661018A (en)

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US25738728 US1749551A (en) 1926-08-02 1928-02-27 Pile fabric

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2597285A (en) * 1951-06-08 1952-05-20 Leslie S Brown Fleecelike stripping for boot tops or the like
US2662559A (en) * 1951-05-17 1953-12-15 Alexander Smith Inc Pile fabric
US2662560A (en) * 1950-06-22 1953-12-15 Alexander Smith Inc Pile fabric
US2662558A (en) * 1950-11-24 1953-12-15 Alexander Smith Inc Pile fabric
US2676384A (en) * 1954-03-02 1954-04-27 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Pile carpet and method of making the same
US2699593A (en) * 1951-12-07 1955-01-18 Firth Carpet Company Inc Pile fabric and method of making same
US2753614A (en) * 1949-09-17 1956-07-10 Collins & Aikman Corp Pile fabric and the manufacture thereof
US2754578A (en) * 1951-08-03 1956-07-17 Magee Carpet Co Pile fabric and method of making same
US2790225A (en) * 1954-05-21 1957-04-30 Mohasco Ind Inc Method of making pile fabrics
US2986777A (en) * 1956-08-31 1961-06-06 C H Masland And Sons Carpet molding
US4223427A (en) * 1978-10-16 1980-09-23 David Pernick Method of knitting and of processing high pile fabric

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2753614A (en) * 1949-09-17 1956-07-10 Collins & Aikman Corp Pile fabric and the manufacture thereof
US2662560A (en) * 1950-06-22 1953-12-15 Alexander Smith Inc Pile fabric
US2662558A (en) * 1950-11-24 1953-12-15 Alexander Smith Inc Pile fabric
US2662559A (en) * 1951-05-17 1953-12-15 Alexander Smith Inc Pile fabric
US2597285A (en) * 1951-06-08 1952-05-20 Leslie S Brown Fleecelike stripping for boot tops or the like
US2754578A (en) * 1951-08-03 1956-07-17 Magee Carpet Co Pile fabric and method of making same
US2699593A (en) * 1951-12-07 1955-01-18 Firth Carpet Company Inc Pile fabric and method of making same
US2676384A (en) * 1954-03-02 1954-04-27 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Pile carpet and method of making the same
US2790225A (en) * 1954-05-21 1957-04-30 Mohasco Ind Inc Method of making pile fabrics
US2986777A (en) * 1956-08-31 1961-06-06 C H Masland And Sons Carpet molding
US4223427A (en) * 1978-10-16 1980-09-23 David Pernick Method of knitting and of processing high pile fabric

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