US1212240A - Automatic player-piano. - Google Patents

Automatic player-piano. Download PDF

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US1212240A
US1212240A US2354615A US2354615A US1212240A US 1212240 A US1212240 A US 1212240A US 2354615 A US2354615 A US 2354615A US 2354615 A US2354615 A US 2354615A US 1212240 A US1212240 A US 1212240A
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ports
series
hammer
hammers
pawl
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Thomas E Monroe
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Thomas E Monroe
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10FAUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10F1/00Automatic musical instruments
    • G10F1/02Pianofortes with keyboard

Description

T. E. MONROE.
AUTOMATIC PLAYER PIANO.
APPLICATION FILED APR. 23. 1915.
1,212,240. Patented Jan. 16,1917.
n45 mmms FEYERS co I-NOYO uino WASHINGTON, r: c
THOMAS E. MONROE. OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.
AUTOMATIC PLAYER-PIANO.
Application filed April 23, 1915.
[ all whom it may concern 130 it known that I, THOMAS E. MONROE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the borough of Brooklyn, in the city and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Automatic Player-Pianos, of which the following is a specification.
The invention relates to automatic player pianos, and has for its principal object to provide means whereby certain notes of a tune may be automatically played louder than the other notes in the tune, and whereby the excess of loudness of such notes over the remainder of the tune may be regulated at the will of the operator.
The invention consists in the novel construction, arrangement and combination of devices, elements and parts, as shown in the ccompanying drawings, and fully described in this specification. I
In the said drawings, Figure 1 is a fragmentary front view of a tracker-bar such as I employ, also showing a fragmentary portion of my perforated music-sheet; Fig. 2 is a transverse vertical section of auxiliary pneumatic devices used in carrying my invention into effect; Fig. 3 is a longitudinal vertical section of the same, taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2, and looking in the direction of the arrows; Fig. 4 is a fragmentary bottom view taken on the line H of Fig. 2 and F 5 is a view of a fragment of a modified form of music sheet, as hereinafter particularly described.
In the rendering of music, it is often desirable that the air, or main portion of the composition, be given greater prominence than the secondary portion, or accompaniment, and that the relative intensity of these two portions of the piece may be varied by the operator at will. To secure the best results, he should also be able to vary the force of the whole series of notes in the air, as such, and of the whole series of ac-' companiment notes as such, independently at will while he is playing the music, playing the accompaniment softly while he is playing the air more loudly. In carrying my invention into effect, in the embodiment ther of which I have selected for illustration in the accompanying drawings, and description in this specification, I achieve these ends as follows: I provide a playerpiano, having strings, hammers, and other mechanism, and having the usual pneu- Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Jan. 16, 1917. Serial No. 23,546.
matic operating devices. The tracker-bar which I employ (see Fig. l) is designated 8. This tracker-bar is similar to those used on ordinary player-pianos, provided with air ports 7 which control the striking mechanism. This tracker-bar, however, is provided with an additional series of ports 9, preferably located above or in advance of said first named ports, these ports controlling the pneumatic mechanism to be hereinafter described. I provide also a perforated musicsheet 5, provided with slits 11. Certain of these slits, (those controlling notes which it is desired to emphasize) are provided at their lower ends with offsets 10. Itwill be observed that the ordinary slits, which are not provided with offsets, will as the sheet travels downward over the tracker-bar, open tain of the main ports 7. WVhen, however, aslit provided with an offset 10 moves over the tracker-bar, it first opens a port 9 to its full extent, and after having passed thereover, opens the corresponding port 7 to its full extent for a short time, subsequently cutting down the width of this opening to the width of the ordinary slit, at which width it is maintained as long as the slit leaves the port 7 uncovered.
Instead of providing perforations having offsets, as above described, I may provide a music sheet as shown in Fig. 5 in which, for the offsets are substituted independent auxiliary perforations 50 located substan tially as an ofiset would be, but separated from the adjacent main perforations 51 by an unperforated portion of the material of the music sheet. I also provide the usual hammers, designated 29, which are mounted on shafts 3%, pivoted at 32, and provided with surfaces 33 adapted to receive the impact of rods These hammers strike against strings 31, and their extreme backward movement is limited by the stop 36. These hammers are also provided with portions 27 provided with surfaces 28 adapted to be engaged by the pawls 23 hereinafter to be described.
The ports 7 of the tracker-bar 8 are provided with ducts 3 leading to the usual pneumatic hammerstriking mechanism. The ports 9 are provided with flexible ducts 12 leading through passages 13, to diaphragm chambers ll. 7 There is one diaphragm chamber for every port 9, and each chamber is connected by means of a comonly portions of cerparatively small vent 21 with suction chest 22, which is in turn connected by means of a flexible tube to the main suction chest of the pianofnot shown on the drawing.) The chambers are preferably arranged in a double row, as shown in the drawings, for the sake of ecconomizing space.
Each chamber 14. is provided with a dia phragm 15, having a downwardlyprojecting screw 17 secured in a washer 16. T also provide for every chamber let a lever 19, pivoted at 20. This lever is provided with an upwardly extending screw 38,which is connected with the screw 17 by means of a turnbuckle 18. Each lever 19 is provided at one end with a weight 25, and at the other with a movable pawl 23, pivoted thereto at 2 and normally held in the position shown by a spring 26. The entire diaphragm mechanism, levers and exhaust box 22 are sup ported by uprights 39. These uprights have their lower ends pivoted at 32, and are capable of moving about said pivot to a limited extent, as indicated by the dotted lines in Fig. 2, carrying the diaphragm mechanism with them. These uprights may be operated by any suitable means (not shown in the drawings) which may, for example, terminate in a handle outside the piano case and within reach of the operators hand.
The operation of my invention is as follows: When the piano is not in use, the uprights 39 are inclined to their full extent toward the left of Fig. 2, the diaphragms 15 being exposed to atmospheric pressure on both sides, are under no tension, and assume approximately the position shown in the right-hand chamber of Fig. 2, being held in this position by the weights 25 on the levers 19. The end of the lever 19 bearing the weight 25 being depressed, the other end bearing the pawl 23 is raised, and the said awl is out of engagement with the surface 28. The hammers occupy the position shown at the left of Fig. 2, resting on the stop 86. TV hen it is desired to operate the piano, the perforated music-sheet 5 is inserted in the usual manner, and the pneumatic bellows of the piano put in operation. A. suction is thereby created in the chamber 22, and as the chambers 1% communicate therewith, and as their communication with the outer air through the ports 9 is cut off by the music sheet, a suction is created in the chambers 1a, and the diaphragms 15 are raised against the force of the weight 25, depressing the pawls 23 into engagement with the surfaces 28 connected with the hammers 29. The uprights 39 are then moved into a position ap- 2, by means of descrlbed. mechanism proximately as shown in Fig. the external handle previously This moves the diaphragms and connected therewith into a position approximately as shown in bemg in a depressed Fig. 2, and the pawls 23 position, the hammers neiaeao are moved into the right-hand position as shown. As the music-sheet 5 travels downward over the tracker-bar 8, certain of the ports 7 will be from time to time uncovered for varying intervals of time, thus operating the hammers 29 by means of the rods 35 in the usual manner. As long, however, as none of these slits are provided with ofisets 10 or auxiliary perforations 50, the suction in the chambers it will be maintained, and the pawls 23 will remain depressed. Thus the hammers 29 will be played from the position shown at the right of Fig. 2, and, owing to the shortness of the stroke, and the short duration of the blow from the rod 35,the blow of the hammer will be a light one, such as is suitable for an accompaniment. The intensity of this blow" may be varied by moving the uprights 39 either toward the right or toward the left of Fig. 2, by means of the external handle mentioned above, in a manner which will be well understood. When, however, a slit with an offset or an auxiliary perforation 50 passes over the tracker-bar, one or" the ports 9 is uncovered, and air is admitted to the chamber 1% with which said port communicates. As the inlet of said chamber is considerably larger than the outlet, it follows that when the inlet is uncovered the chamber will almost immediately fill with air, and remain full as long as the inlet remains uncovered, but that when the inlet is again covered it will be emptied through the opening 21. As air is admitted to one of these chambers 14 by the uncovering of the port 9 connected therewith, the pressure on the outside of the diaphragm 15 is equalized, and under the action of the weight 25, the diaphragm drops into the position shown at the right of Fig. 2, operating to raise its pawl 23, and allowing the hammer previously held by said pawl to drop back against the stop 36. The slit 11, with its offset 10, continues to move over the tracker-bar, until a port 7 is uncovered. The hammer 27, being then played from the stop 36, owing to the greater length of its stroke and the greater duration of the blow of the rod 35, the impact will be considerably greater than if the hammer were played from the pawl 23, and the sound correspondingly louder. The intensity of these notes may be varied in the usual well-known manner. Tt will be understood that the series of ports 9 must be sufficiently in advance oi the series 7 to permit the former to operate and release the hammers and still allow the pawled levers to drop again into holding position before a hammer rebounds after striking a string, so that on such rebound the hammer may be again caught and held by its pawl.
Tt will be observed pivoted to the levers 19 at 24k,
and normally held in the position that the pawls 23 are shown in the drawings 13o by a spring 26. Although when the hammer is played from the stop 36, the pawl 23 is normally out of the way, et it sometimes happens that a hammer may be resting upon stop 36 when its pawl 23 is in its lowered position, as for instance, if the operator forgetfully moves the uprights 39 forward be fore starting the suction, or if after the raising of a pawl 23 it should resume its position before the note is played. If this should happen, the hammer may still be played from the stop 36, as the hammer in its passage will pass the pawl 23, its impact being suflicient to bend the spring 26 and raise the pawl the latter resuming its normal position after the hammer is past. The pawl 23 should drop back into place before the hammer 27 drops away from the string 31. The backward stroke of the hammer is thus arrested by the said pawl, and it will not again be played from the stop 36 unless the pawl is again raised. By means of the turnbuckle 1.8, the normal position of the lever 19 may be properly adjusted, so that the pawl 23 will normally be in engagement with the surface 28, but will clear same when the pawl-bearing end of the lever 19 is raised.
The advantages of my invention are obvious. It will be seen that by the structure shown and described, it is possible to play the notes of the melody or main portion of lhe composition with a certain intensity, and
the accompaniment or supplementary portion with a ditlerent intensity, and to var i at will the absolute and relative intensities of these two sets of notes, thus enabling proper expression to be put into the rendering of the piece.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is as follows:
1. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said haminer-actuating mechanism; of a .suct n-chamber, a series of auxiliary suction chambers each provided with a diaphragm, a channel between said first named suction chamber and each of said auxiliary snctioinchamb devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms and adapted to hold one of said hammers from moving backwai.' il when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, a second series of ports in said tracker bar, and a channel connecting each port of said second series with one of said auxiliary suction chambers.
2. In a player piano, the combination with igs, hammers, means for operating said hammers and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports OPGLtItlVQly connected with said hammer-actuating mechanism; of a suction-chamber, a series of auxiliary suction-chambers each provided with a dia phragm, a channel between said first named suction chamber and each of said auxiliary suction chambers, a channel between each of said auxiliary suction chambers and the open air, devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms and adapted to hold one of said hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, and a second series of ports in said tracker bar, said second series of ports opening into said second named ch annels.
In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer actuating mechanism; of a suction chamber, a series of auxiliary suction chambers each provided with a diaphragm, a channel between said first named suction chamber and each of said auxiliary suction chambers, a channel between each of said auxiliary suction chambers and the open air, said second named channels being larger than said first named channels, devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms and adapted to hold one of said hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, and a second series of ports in said tracker bar, said second series of ports opening into said second named channels.
l. In a player piano the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer-actuating mechanism; of a suction-chamber, a series of auxiliary suctionchambers each provided with a diaphragm, a second series of ports in said tracker bar, a channel connecting each of said second series of ports with one of said auxiliary suction chambers, a channel connecting each of said auxiliary suction-chambers with said first named suction-chamber, said channel being smaller than the channel between said auxiliary suction-chamber and said tracker bar, and devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms, and adapted to hold one of said hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, said hammer-holding devices comprising av lever one and oi? which is adapted to engage with said hammer.
5. In a player piano the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammenactuating mechanism; of a suctionchamber, a series of auxiliary suctionchambei each provided with a diaphragm, a second series oi ports in said tracker bar, a channel connecting each or" said second series of ports with one of said auxiliary suction-chambers, a cl'iannel connecting each of said auxiliary suction-chambers with said first named suction-chamber, said channel being smaller than the channel between said auxiliary suction-chamber and said tracker bar, and devices operatively connected with each oi": said diaphragms, and adapted to hold one 01" said hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, said iammenholding de vices comprising a lever provided with a pawl at one end adapted engage with said hammer.
In a player piano the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers and a tracker oar provided with a series of ports operatively con nected with said hammer-actuating mechanism; of a suction-chamber, a series of an: 'liary suction-chambers each provided ith a diaphragm, a second series of ports in said tracker bar, a channel connecting each of said second series of ports with one of said aux iary suction-chambers, a channel connect 0 each of said auxiliary suction-chambers with said first named suction-chamber, said channel being smaller than the channel between said auxiliary suction-chaniber and said tracker bar, and devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms, and adapted to hold one of said hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the san o to move l' ackward when said diaphragm is in another position, said hammer-nolding devices comprising a lever provided with w- 'f' it at one end and a pawl at the other end adapted to engage with said hammer. 71in a player piano the combination with strings, hammers, means for operatsaid lnmmers and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operativcly connected with said hammer-actuating mechanism; of a suctioi'i-chamber,
a series of auxiliary suc ion-chambers each provided with a diapl :agm, a second series of ports in said tracker bar, a channel connecting each or said second series of ports with one of: said an iary suction-chambers, a channel connecting each of said auxiliary suction-chamhers with said first named suctionchamber, said channel being smaller than the channel between said auxiliary suctioncha nber and said tracker bar, and devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms, and adapted to hold one of said hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, said hammer-holding devices comprising a lever having at one end a pawl adapteo. to engage with said hammer, and an adjustable link between said lever and said diaphragm.
8. in a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means -for operating said hammers and a tracker har provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer-actuating mechanism; of a suction-chamber, a series of auxiliary suc tion-chambers each provided with a diaphragm, a second series of ports in said tracker liar, channel connecting each of said second series of ports with one of said auxiliary suction-chambers, a channel connecting each of sail auniliary suctionchambers with said first named suctionchamber, said channel being smaller than the channel between said auxiliary suctionchamber and said. traclrer bar, and devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms, and adapted hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, said hammer holding devices comprising a l ver and a pawl pivotally mounted on said lever adapted to engage with said hammer.
9. In a player piano the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers and a tracker bar pro vided with a series oi ports operatively connected with said hammer-actuating mechanism; or a suction-chamber, a series of. auxiliary suction-chambers each provided with a diaphragm, a second series or ports in said tracker bar, a channel connecting each of said second series of ports with one or said auxiliary suction-chambers, a channel connecting each of said auxiliary suction-chambers with said first named suctionchamher, said channel being smaller than the channel between said auxiliary suctionchamher and said tracker bar, and devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms, and adapted to hold one of said hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, said hammenholding devices comprising a lever, a pawl pivotally mounted on said lever adapted to engage to hold one of said with said hammer, and a spring adapted to normally iold said pawl in engaging position.
10. In a player piano the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer-actuating mechanism; of a suction-chamber, a series of auxiliary suction chambers each provided with a diaphragm, a second series of ports in said tracker bar, a channel connecting each of said second series of ports with one of said auxiliary suction-chambers, a channel connecting each of said auxiliary suction-chambers with said first named suction-chamber, said channel being smaller than the channel between said auxiliary suction-chamber and said tracker bar, and devices operatively connected with each of said diaphragms, and adapted to hold one of said hammers from moving backward when said diaphragm is in one position and to release said hammer and permit the same to move backward when said diaphragm is in another position, said hammer-holding devices comprising a lever, a pawl pivotally mounted on said lever adapted to engage with said. hammer, a spring adapted to normally hold said pawl in engaging position, and a stop adapted to prevent said pawl from rotating in one direction.
11. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected lso with said hammer operating means; of a second series of ports in said tracker bar, and means operatively connected with sald 0 ports and adapted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever provided with a pawl at one end adapted to engage with said hammer.
12. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer operating means; of a second series of ports in said tracker bar, and means operatively connected with said ports and adapted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever provided with a weight at one end and a pawl at the other end adapted to engage with said hammer.
13. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operatingsaid hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected w1th said hammer operating means; of a second series of ports in said tracker bar, and means operatively connected with said ports and adapted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever and a pawl pivotally mounted on said lever adapted to engage with said hammer.
14:. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series oi ports operatively connected with said hammer operating means; of second series of ports in said tracker bar, and means operatively connected with said ports and adapted when. in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever, a pawl pivotally mounted on said lever adapted to engage with said hammer, and a spring adapted to normally hold said pawl in engaging position.
15. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said iammers, and tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer operating means; of a second series of ports in said tracker bar, and means operatively connected with said ports and ada ted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever, a pawl pivotally mounted on said lever adapted to engage with said hammer, a spring adapted to normally hold said pawl in engaging position, and a stop adapted to prevent said pawl from rotating in one direction.
16. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer operating means; of a second series of ports in said tracker bar, means operatively connected with said ports and adapted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving back ward, and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever provided with a pawl at one end adapted to engage with said hammer; and a music sheet adapted to pass over said tracker bar and provided with perforations, some of which perforations are adapted to uncover only ports of said first named series and other of which perforations are adapted to uncover ports of said second named series.
17. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer operating means; of asecond series of ports in said tracker bar in advance of said first named series of ports, means operatively connected with said ports and adapted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever provided with a pawl at one end adapts l to engage with said hammer; and a music sheet adapted to pass over said tracker bar and provided with perforations, some of which perforations are adapted to uncover only ports of said first named series and other of which perforations are adapted to uncover ports of said second named series.
18. in a player piano, the combination with stings, hammers, means for operating said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer operating means; of a second series of ports in said tracker bar, each port of said second series being narrower than the ports of said first named se s, means operatively connected with said ports and adapted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever provided with a pawl at one end adapted to engage with said hammer; and a music sheet adapted to pass over said tracker bar and provided with perforations, some of which perforations are adapted to uncover only ports of said first named series and other of which perforations are adapted to uncover ports of said second named series.
19. In a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating; said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer-actuating means, of a second series of ports in said tracker bar, each port of said second series being narrower than and in advance of a portion of the corresponding port of the first named series, means operatively connected with said ports and adapted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever provided with a pawl at one end adapted to engage with said hammer; and a music sheet adapted to pass over said tracker bar and provided with perforations, some of which perforations are adapted to uncover only ports of said first named series and other of which perforations are adapted to uncover ports of said second named series.
20. in a player piano, the combination with strings, hammers, means for operating said hammers, and a tracker bar provided with a series of ports operatively connected with said hammer actuating means; of second series of ports in said tracker liar, each port of said second series being narrower than and in. advance of a side of the corresponding port of the first named series, means operatively connected with said ports and adapted when in one position to hold one of said hammers from moving backward and when in another position to release said hammer, said means comprising a lever provided with a pawl at one end adapted to enga with said hammer; and a music sheet adapted to pass over said tracker bar and provided with perforations, some of which perforations are adapted to uncover only ports of said first named series and other of which perforations are adapted to uncover ports of said second named series.
THUS. E. ii IONROE.
lVitnesses FEAR ors L. SIUCLLY, Cnns'rnn T. l nonsn.
@oples oi this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.
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