TW200824914A - Inkjet nozzle assembly having moving roof portion defined by a thermal bend actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams - Google Patents

Inkjet nozzle assembly having moving roof portion defined by a thermal bend actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams Download PDF

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Publication number
TW200824914A
TW200824914A TW096107555A TW96107555A TW200824914A TW 200824914 A TW200824914 A TW 200824914A TW 096107555 A TW096107555 A TW 096107555A TW 96107555 A TW96107555 A TW 96107555A TW 200824914 A TW200824914 A TW 200824914A
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TW
Taiwan
Prior art keywords
beam
nozzle assembly
actuator
comprises
inkjet nozzle
Prior art date
Application number
TW096107555A
Other languages
Chinese (zh)
Other versions
TWI468301B (en
Inventor
Gregory John Mcavoy
Kia Silverbrook
Original Assignee
Silverbrook Res Pty Ltd
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Publication date
Priority to PCT/AU2006/001831 priority Critical patent/WO2008067581A1/en
Application filed by Silverbrook Res Pty Ltd filed Critical Silverbrook Res Pty Ltd
Publication of TW200824914A publication Critical patent/TW200824914A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of TWI468301B publication Critical patent/TWI468301B/en

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Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J2/00Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed
    • B41J2/005Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed characterised by bringing liquid or particles selectively into contact with a printing material
    • B41J2/01Ink jet
    • B41J2/135Nozzles
    • B41J2/14Structure thereof only for on-demand ink jet heads
    • B41J2/14427Structure of ink jet print heads with thermal bend detached actuators
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J2/00Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed
    • B41J2/005Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed characterised by bringing liquid or particles selectively into contact with a printing material
    • B41J2/01Ink jet
    • B41J2/135Nozzles
    • B41J2/14Structure thereof only for on-demand ink jet heads
    • B41J2/14427Structure of ink jet print heads with thermal bend detached actuators
    • B41J2002/14435Moving nozzle made of thermal bend detached actuator
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J2202/00Embodiments of or processes related to ink-jet or thermal heads
    • B41J2202/01Embodiments of or processes related to ink-jet heads
    • B41J2202/15Moving nozzle or nozzle plate

Abstract

An inkjet nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly comprises a nozzle chamber comprising a floor and a roof. The roof has a nozzle opening defined therein, and a moving portion moveable towards the floor. The assembly further comprises a thermal bend actuator, having a plurality of cantilever beams, for ejecting ink through the nozzle opening. The moving portion of the roof comprises the actuator.

Description

200824914 (1). [Technical Field] The present invention relates to a thermal bending actuator which has been developed mainly for providing an improved ink jet nozzle which ejects ink by thermal bending actuation. [Prior Art] This application has previously inserted an excessive phenomenon of a micro-electromechanical mechanical (MEMS) nozzle using thermal bending. Thermal bending actuation generally refers to a bending motion relative to another material produced by thermal expansion of a material having electrical current. The resulting bending motion can be used to selectively eject ink from the nozzle opening by movement of the vanes or vanes. The vanes or vanes generate pressure waves within the nozzle chamber. Some representative types of thermally curved inkjet nozzles are exemplified in the patents or patent applications listed in the cross-referenced section above. I would like to refer to the contents of these cases for reference. The ink jet nozzle' described in U.S. Patent No. 6,410,167, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. The actuator is in the form of an active beam beneath a conductive material (e.g., titanium nitride) that is fused to a driven beam above a non-conductive material (e.g., cerium oxide). The actuator is coupled to the arm by receiving a slot in the wall of the nozzle chamber. When current passes through the lower active beam, the actuator bends upwardly, with the result that the blade moves toward the nozzle opening defined at the top of the nozzle chamber, thereby ejecting ink droplets. The advantage of this design is the simplicity of its construction, which has the disadvantage of working with two relatively viscous inks facing the interior side of the nozzle chamber. -4 - 200824914 (2) The inkjet nozzle described in the Applicant's US Pat. No. 6,260, 953, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. The actuator is in the form of a serpeiitiiie core encasing the conductive material with a polymeric material. When actuated, the actuator bends toward the bottom of the nozzle chamber, increasing the pressure within the chamber and forcing ink droplets out of the nozzle opening defined in the top of the chamber. The nozzle opening is defined in the non-moving portion of the top. The advantage of this design is that only one face on the top of the motion has to work against the relatively viscous ink on the inside of the nozzle chamber. The disadvantage of this design is the structure of the actuator that coats the serpentine conductive element with the polymer material. It is difficult to obtain in the micro motor mechanical method. The ink jet nozzle described in the applicant's U.S. Patent No. 6, 623,001 contains a nozzle chamber having a movable top having a nozzle opening defined therein. The movable top is connected by an arm to a thermal bending actuator located outside the nozzle chamber. The actuator takes the form of an upper active beam and a lower passive beam. By separating the active beam from the passive beam, the thermal bending efficiency is maximized because the φ passive beam cannot be used as a heat sink for the active beam. When current is passed through the upper active beam, the movable top having the nozzle opening defined therein is rotated toward the bottom plate of the nozzle chamber, thereby being ejected through the nozzle opening. Since the nozzle opening moves with the top, the direction in which the droplet moves can be controlled by appropriately modifying the shape of the nozzle edge. The advantage of this design is that only one face of the top of the motion must work against ink that is relatively viscous on the inside of the nozzle chamber. Another advantage is that heat loss can be minimized by separate active and passive beam members. A disadvantage of this design is that the spaced apart active and passive beam members lose structural rigidity. There is therefore a need to improve the design of thermally curved inkjet nozzles to achieve more efficient -5 - 200824914 (3) ^ rate droplet ejection and improved mechanical robustness. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A first aspect of the present invention provides an inkjet nozzle assembly comprising: a nozzle chamber including a bottom portion and a top portion, the top portion having a nozzle opening defined therein, the top portion having a movement movable toward the bottom portion And a thermal bending actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams for ejecting ink through the nozzle opening. The actuator includes: a first active beam for connecting to the driving fe road, and a 'table passive unit' mechanically interlocking the first probe so that when current passes through the first beam, the first A beam expands relative to the second beam, causing the actuator to bend. Wherein the moving part comprises the actuator. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least 30% of the total area of the top. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least a portion of the outer surface of the top portion. φ Optionally, the nozzle opening is defined within the moving portion such that the nozzle opening is movable relative to the base. Optionally, the actuator is moveable relative to the nozzle opening. Optionally, the twisted beam member defines the first beam, the twisted beam member having a plurality of contact beam members. Optionally, the plurality of contact beam members comprise a plurality of longer beam members and at least one shorter beam member extending along a longitudinal axis of the first beam, the shorter beam members Extending across the transverse axis of the first beam and interconnecting the longer beam members. -6 - 200824914 (4) Stomach Optionally, one of the plurality of beams comprises a porous material. Optionally, the porous material is a porous oxidized chop having a dielectric constant of 2 or less. Optionally, the thermal bending actuator further comprises a third insulating beam between the first beam and the second beam. Optionally, the third insulating beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, the first beam is fused or joined to the second beam. Optionally, the second beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, at least a portion of the first beam and the second beam are spaced apart. Optionally, the first beam comprises a material selected from the group consisting of titanium nitride, titanium aluminum nitride, and aluminum alloy. Optionally, the first beam comprises an aluminum alloy. Optionally, the aluminum alloy comprises aluminum and at least one other metal having a Young's modulus of more than 1 〇〇 Gpa. Optionally, the at least one metal is selected from the group consisting of vanadium, manganese, chromium, 0, and nickel. Optionally, the alloy comprises aluminum and vanadium. Optionally, the alloy comprises at least 80% aluminum. A second aspect of the invention provides a thermal bending actuator having a plurality of elements. The actuator includes: a first active component for connecting to the driving circuit; and a second passive component mechanically interlocking the first component such that when current passes through the first component, the first component is opposite The second element expands causing the actuator to bend. Wherein the first component comprises an aluminum alloy. 200824914 (5), optionally, the aluminum alloy comprises aluminum and at least one other metal having a Young's modulus of more than 1 〇〇 Gpa. Optionally, the at least one metal is selected from the group consisting of vanadium, manganese, chromium, cobalt, and nickel. Optionally, the alloy comprises aluminum and vanadium. Optionally, the alloy comprises at least 80% aluminum. Optionally, the first and second elements are cantilever beams. Optionally, the first beam is fused or joined to the second beam along its longitudinal axis. Optionally, at least a portion of the first beam and the second beam are spaced apart thereby insulating the first beam and a portion of the second beam. Optionally, one of the plurality of elements comprises a porous material. Optionally, the porous material has a dielectric constant of about 2 or less. Optionally, a third insulating beam is interposed between the first beam and the second beam. The third insulating beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, the second beam comprises a porous material. Another aspect of the present invention provides an inkjet nozzle assembly comprising: a nozzle chamber having a nozzle opening and an ink inlet; and a thermal bending actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams for ejecting ink through the nozzle opening . The actuator includes: a first active beam for connecting to the driving circuit; and a second passive beam mechanically interlocking the first beam such that when current passes through the first beam, the first beam is opposite The second beam expands, causing the actuation -8 - 200824914 (6) ' to bend. Wherein the first beam comprises an aluminum alloy. - Optionally, the nozzle chamber comprises a bottom and a top having a moving portion whereby actuation of the actuator moves the moving portion towards the bottom. Optionally, the moving portion includes an actuator. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least 30% of the total area of the top. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least a portion of an outer surface of the nozzle chamber. Optionally, the nozzle opening is defined within the moving portion such that the nozzle opening is movable relative to the base. A third aspect of the invention provides a thermal bending actuator having a plurality of elements. The actuator includes: a first active component for connecting to the driving circuit; and a second passive component mechanically interlocking the first component such that when current passes through the first component, the first component is opposite The second element expands causing the actuator to bend. Wherein one of the plurality of elements comprises a porous material. Optionally, the porous material has a dielectric constant of about 2 or less. Optionally, the porous material is porous ceria. Optionally, the first and second beams are cantilever beams. In another aspect, a thermal bending actuator is provided that further includes a third insulating beam between the first beam and the second beam. Optionally, the third insulating beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, the first beam is fused or joined along its longitudinal axis to the ninth - 200824914 (7) ^ two beam. _ Optionally, the second beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, the first component comprises a material selected from the group consisting of titanium nitride, titanium aluminum nitride, and aluminum alloy. Optionally, the first beam comprises an aluminum alloy. Optionally, the aluminum alloy comprises aluminum and at least one other metal having a Young's modulus in excess of 00 Gpa. Optionally, the at least one metal is selected from the group consisting of vanadium, manganese, chromium, cobalt, and nickel. Optionally, the alloy comprises aluminum and vanadium. Optionally, the alloy comprises at least 80% aluminum. Another aspect of the present invention provides an inkjet nozzle assembly comprising: a nozzle chamber having a nozzle opening and an ink inlet; and a thermal bending actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams for ejecting ink through the nozzle opening . The actuator includes: a first active beam for connecting to the drive circuit; and φ a second passive beam mechanically interlocking the first beam such that when current passes through the first beam, the first beam The actuator is bent relative to the expansion of the second beam. Wherein one of the plurality of beams comprises a porous material. Optionally, the nozzle chamber includes a bottom portion and a top portion having a moving portion whereby actuation of the actuator moves the moving portion toward the bottom portion. Optionally, the moving portion includes an actuator. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least 30% of the total area of the top. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least a portion of the nozzle chamber -10- 200824914 (8) * outer surface. Optionally, the nozzle opening is defined within the moving portion such that the nozzle opening is movable relative to the bottom portion. A fourth aspect of the invention provides an inkjet nozzle assembly 'comprising: a nozzle chamber including a bottom portion and a top portion, the top portion having a nozzle opening defined therein, the top portion having a moving portion movable toward the bottom portion; and a A thermal bending actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams for ejecting ink through the nozzle opening. The actuator includes: a first active beam for connecting to the driving circuit; and a second passive beam mechanically interlocking the first beam such that when current passes through the first beam, the first beam is opposite The second beam expands, causing the actuator to bend. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least 30% of the total area of the top. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least a portion of the outer surface of the top portion. φ Optionally, the nozzle opening is defined within the moving portion such that the nozzle opening is movable relative to the base. Optionally, the actuator is moveable relative to the nozzle opening. Optionally, the twisted beam member defines the first beam, the twisted beam member having a plurality of contact beam members. Optionally, the plurality of contact beam members comprise a plurality of longer beam members and at least one shorter beam member, the plurality of longer beam members extending along the longitudinal axis of the first beam 'the shorter beam members Extending across the transverse axis of the first machine and interconnecting the longer beam members. -11 - 200824914 (9) _ Optionally, one of the plurality of beams comprises a porous material. Optionally, the porous material is a porous cerium oxide having a dielectric constant of 2 or less. Optionally, the thermal bending actuator further comprises a third insulating beam between the first beam and the second beam. Optionally, the third insulating beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, the first beam is fused or joined to the second beam. Optionally, the second beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, at least a portion of the first beam and the second beam are spaced apart. Optionally, the first beam comprises a material selected from the group consisting of titanium nitride, titanium aluminum nitride, and aluminum alloy. Optionally, the first beam comprises an aluminum alloy. Optionally, the aluminum alloy comprises aluminum and at least one other metal having a Young's modulus of more than 100 Gpa. Optionally, the at least one metal is selected from the group consisting of vanadium, manganese, chromium, φ cobalt, and nickel. Optionally, the alloy comprises aluminum and vanadium. Optionally, the alloy comprises at least 80% aluminum. A fifth aspect of the invention provides an inkjet nozzle assembly comprising: a nozzle chamber including a bottom portion and a top portion, the top portion having a nozzle opening defined therein, the top portion having a moving portion movable toward the bottom portion; and a A thermal bending actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams for ejecting ink through the nozzle opening. The actuator includes: a first active beam for connecting to the driving circuit; and a second passive beam mechanically interlocking the first beam such that when -12-200824914 (10) current flows through the first beam The first beam expands relative to the second beam, causing the actuator to bend. Wherein the first active beam defines at least a portion of the outer surface of the top portion. Optionally, the moving portion comprises the actuator. Optionally, the first active beam defines at least 30% of the total area of the top. Optionally, the nozzle opening is defined within the moving portion such that the nozzle opening is movable relative to the base. Optionally, the actuator is moveable relative to the nozzle opening. Optionally, the twisted beam member defines the first beam, the twisted beam member having a plurality of contact beam members. Optionally, the twisted beam element comprises a plurality of longer beam members and at least one shorter beam member, each longer beam member extending along a longitudinal axis of the first beam and being traversed by the first beam The shorter beam members of the transverse axis are interconnected. Optionally, one of the plurality of beams comprises a porous material. Alternatively, the porous material is a porous cerium oxide having a dielectric constant of 2 or less. Optionally, the thermal bending actuator further comprises a third insulating beam between the first beam and the second beam. Optionally, the third insulating beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, the first beam is fused or joined to the second beam. Optionally, the second beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, at least a portion of the first beam and the second beam are spaced apart. -13- 200824914 (11) ^ Optionally, the first beam comprises a material selected from the group consisting of titanium nitride, titanium aluminum nitride, and aluminum alloy. Optionally, the first beam comprises an aluminum alloy. Optionally, the aluminum alloy comprises aluminum and at least one other metal having a Young's modulus of more than 100 Gpa. Optionally, the at least one metal is selected from the group consisting of vanadium, manganese, chromium, cobalt, and nickel. Optionally, the alloy comprises aluminum and vanadium. Optionally, the alloy comprises at least 80% aluminum. A sixth aspect of the invention provides a thermal bending actuator having a plurality of elongated cantilever beams. The actuator includes a first active beam for connecting to a drive circuit, a twisted beam member defining the first beam, the twisted beam member having a plurality of contact beam members, and a second passive beam mechanically coupled The first beam is such that when current passes through the first beam, the first beam expands relative to the second beam, causing the actuator to bend. Wherein the plurality of contact beam members comprise a plurality of longer beam members and at least one shorter beam member extending along a longitudinal axis of the first beam, the shorter beam members being transverse The transverse axis of the first beam extends and interconnects the longer beam members. Optionally, the first beam is coupled to the drive circuit by a pair of electrical contacts located at one end of the actuator. Optionally, the first contact is coupled to the first end of the twisted beam member and the second electrical contact is coupled to the second end of the twisted beam member. Optionally, one of the plurality of beams comprises a porous material. Optionally, the porous material has a dielectric constant of 2 or less -14-200824914 (12) pore cerium oxide. In another aspect, a thermal bending actuator is provided that further includes a third insulating beam between the first beam and the second beam. Optionally, the third insulating beam comprises a porous material. Optionally, the first beam is fused or joined to the second selectively, the second beam comprising a porous material. Optionally, at least a portion of the first beam and the second selectively, the first beam comprises a material selected from the group consisting of titanium aluminum nitride, and aluminum alloy. In another aspect, the present invention provides an ink jet nozzle assembly having a nozzle chamber having a nozzle opening and an ink inlet; and a device having a plurality of cantilever beams for ejecting ink through the actuator including: a first active a beam for connecting to the flexure beam member defining the first beam, the twisted beam member including a composite member; and a second passive operation for mechanically interlocking the first current through the first beam, the first member The actuator is bent relative to the first. Where the plurality of contact beam members are long beam members and at least one shorter beam member, the plurality is extending along a longitudinal axis of the first beam, the shorter beam member beams extending transversely and interconnecting Long beam members. Optionally, the nozzle chamber includes a bottom portion and is actuated whereby actuation of the actuator selectively moves the moving portion toward the bottom portion, the moving portion containing an actuator. Optionally, the first active beam defines the entirety of the top portion being included in the beam. The beams are separated. Containing titanium nitride, body, including: Thermal bending actuated nozzle opening. The moving circuit, the twisted contact beam, causes the two beams to expand, including a plurality of longer beam members traversing the top of the first moving portion. The area of the area is -15-200824914 (13) less than 30% 〇 Optionally, the first active beam defines at least a portion of the outer surface of the nozzle chamber. Optionally, the nozzle opening is defined within the moving portion such that the nozzle opening is movable relative to the base. Optionally, the actuator is moveable relative to the nozzle opening. In another aspect, an injection nozzle assembly is provided that further includes a pair of electrical contacts located at one end of the actuator. The electrical contacts provide an electrical connection between the torsion beam member and the drive circuit. Optionally, a first electrical contact is coupled to the first end of the twisted beam member and a second electrical contact is coupled to the second end of the twisted beam member. [Embodiment] A micro-mechanical mechanical system thermal bending actuator (or thermoelastic actuator) typically includes a pair of elements in the form of an active element and a passive element that limits the linear expansion of the active element. The active element is subject to greater thermoelastic expansion relative to the passive element, thereby providing a bending motion. The active and passive components can be fused or bonded together for maximum structural integration or phase separation to minimize heat loss from the passive components. So far, we have described titanium nitride as a suitable choice for active thermoelastic elements in thermal bending actuators (candidate^ see, for example, US 641 61 67). Other suitable materials such as those described in U.S. Patent No. 6,428,133, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. Because of its high thermal expansion and low density, aluminum is the preferred choice for active thermoelastic -16-200824914 (14)^ components. However, aluminum suffers from a relatively low Young's modulus, which detracts from the overall thermoelastic efficiency of aluminum. Therefore, aluminum was not previously considered to be a suitable material for use as an active thermoelastic component. However, aluminum alloys have now been found to be excellent materials for use as thermoelastic active elements because of their combined properties of thermal expansion, low density, and tube Young's modulus. Aluminum is usually alloyed with at least one metal having a Young's modulus greater than 100 GPa. The aluminum is usually formed into an alloy with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of vanadium, niobium, chromium, indium, and nickel. It is surprising that it has been found that when aluminum and these metals form alloys, the excellent thermal expansion properties of aluminum are not impaired. The alloy optionally comprises at least 60%, optionally at least 70%, optionally at least 80%, or alternatively at least 90% aluminum (A1). 1 shows a bimorph thermal bending actuator 200 formed in a cantilever beam 201 that is secured to a post 202. The cantilever beam 201 includes a lower active beam 210 bonded to the passive beam 220 above the ceria. The thermoelastic efficiency of the actuator 200 is compared to that of (1) 100% Α1, (Π) 95% Al (aluminum) / 5% V (vanadium), (ΙΠ) 9〇% A1/10% V. The thermoelastic efficiency is compared by stimulating the active beam 2 1 0 with a short electrical pulse and measuring the energy required to establish a 3 m/s peak-to-peak oscillation speed (determined by laser measurements). The results are shown in the table below: -17- 200824914 (15)

The energy required for the active probe material to reach the peak-to-peak oscillation speed is 100% A1 466 nJ 95% Al/5% V 224 nJ 90% Al/10% V 219 nJ Therefore, the alloy of 95% Al/5% V is compared 100% A1 device _ requires 2.08 times less energy. Furthermore, the 90% A1/10% V alloy requires 2.12 times less energy than the comparable 100% A1 unit. The conclusion is therefore that aluminum alloys are an excellent choice for use as active thermoelastic components in the range of microelectromechanical applications, including thermal bending actuators for inkjet nozzles. Inkjet Nozzle Comprising a Thermal Bending Actuator A typical inkjet nozzle will be described hereinafter which can be combined with a thermal bending actuator having an active element comprising an aluminum alloy. Nozzle assembly incorporating a fused thermal bending actuator Referring to Figures 2(A) and 3, there is shown a schematic illustration of the nozzle assembly 100 of the first embodiment. As described in US Pat. No. 6,416,67, the nozzle assembly 100 is formed in the passivation layer 2 of the ruthenium substrate 3 in a micromechanical mechanical system. The nozzle assembly 100 includes a nozzle chamber 1 having a top portion 4 and side walls 5. The ink 6 fills the nozzle chamber 1 by the ink inlet channel 7, and the ink inlet channel 7 is etched through the substrate 3. The nozzle chamber 1 further includes a nozzle opening 8 to eject ink from the nozzle chamber. As shown in Fig. 2(A), the ink meniscus 20 is bundled around the entire edge (i:im) 21 of the nozzle opening 8 by about -18-200824914 (16). The nozzle assembly 100 further includes a vane 9 positioned inside the nozzle chamber 1 which is interconnected via a wall 11 to an actuator 10 located outside the nozzle chamber. As shown more clearly in Figure 2, the arms extend through slots 12 in the nozzle chamber 1. The surface tension of the ink within the slot 12 is sufficient to provide a fluid tight seal to the ink contained within the nozzle chamber j. The actuator 10 includes a plurality of elongated actuator units 13 that are spaced apart in the lateral direction. Each actuator unit extends between the arm shank and a mounting post 14 mounted on the passivation layer 2. In turn, the post 14 provides a pivot for the bending motion of the actuator 10. Each actuator unit 13 includes a first active beam 15 and a second passive beam 16 fused to the upper surface of the active beam. The active beam 15 is conductive and is connected to a drive circuit within the CMOS layer of the substrate 3. Passive beam 16 is typically non-conductive. Referring now to FIG. 2(B), when current flows through the active beam 15, the active beam is heated by φ and subjected to thermal expansion relative to the passive beam 16. This causes the actuator 10 to bend upwardly, which is amplified into the rotational motion of the blade 9. The resulting blade motion causes the pressure around the ink meniscus 20 to generally increase, as shown in Fig. 2(B), the ink meniscus 20 rapidly expands and expands. Then, the actuator stops actuating, which causes the blade 9 to return to its rest position (Fig. 2(C)). During this pulse cycle, the ink droplets 17 are ejected from the nozzle opening 8 and the ink 6 is simultaneously introduced through the ink. The orifice 7 is recirculated into the nozzle chamber 1. As shown in Fig. 2(C), the forward momentum of the ink outside the nozzle edge 21 and the corresponding back -19-200824914 (17) ^ flow, resulting in the general necking and separation of the droplets 17. The droplet continues to the nematic Printing media. The collapsed meniscus 20 causes the ink 6 to be drawn into the nozzle chamber 1 via the ink inlet 7. The nozzle chamber 1 is refilled to reach the position of Fig. 2(A) again, and the nozzle assembly 1 is ready to eject another ink droplet. Referring to Figure 3, it can be seen that the actuator unit 13 is pushed out relative to its transverse axis with a narrower end connected to the post 14 and a wider end connected to the arm 11. This push-out ensures that the maximum resistive heating occurs near the column 14, thereby maximizing the thermoelastic bending motion. The passive beam 16 typically contains dioxin® or cerium tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). As shown in Figure 2_4, the arms 11 are made of the same material. . In the present invention, the active beam 15 comprises an aluminum alloy, preferably the above-described aluminum-vanadium alloy. Nozzle Assembly Comprising a Isolated Thermal Bending Actuator Referring now to Figures 5-8, a nozzle assembly 300 of the second embodiment is shown. φ Referring to Figures 5-7 of the drawings, a nozzle assembly 300 (in the art of a micro-electromechanical machine) is constructed on a substrate 301. The substrate 301 defines an ink supply aperture 312 that communicates with the chamber 304 via a hexagonal inlet 303 (which may be of any suitable configuration). The chamber is defined by a bottom 3 05, a top 306, and surrounding side walls 3 07, 308 that overlap in a telescopic manner. The dimensions of the side wall 3 07 (downward from the top 3 06) are designed such that it can move up and down within the side wall 3 08 (extending upward from the bottom 3 05). The spray nozzle is formed by an edge 309 located in the top portion 306 to define an opening for ejecting ink from the nozzle chamber, as will be described below. -20- 200824914 (18) 'The top 3 06 and the downwardly extending side wall 307 are supported by a bending actuator 310. The bending actuator 310 is typically made of a layer formed by a Joule heating cantilever. 'The Joule heating cantilever is limited by the unheated cantilever. Therefore, heating the Joule heating cantilever produces a differential expansion between the Joule heating cantilever and the unheated cantilever, which causes the bending actuator 310 to bend. The proximal end 311 of the bending actuator is fixed to the base plate 301 and is prevented from moving backward by the anchor member 312, which will be described below. The distal end 313 is secured to and supports the top 3 06 and side wall 307 of the ink jet nozzle. In use, the ink is supplied into the nozzle chamber through passage 302 and opening 3 3 in any suitable manner, but is generally as described in the prior patent application. When it is desired to eject ink droplets from the nozzle chamber, current is supplied to the bending actuator 310, causing the actuator to flex to the position shown in Figure 6 and moving the top 306 downward toward the bottom 305. This relative motion reduces the deposition of the nozzle chamber such that the ink projects upward through the nozzle edge 3 09 (Fig. 6) as shown at 314, which forms a droplet by the surface tension in the ink. When the current is withdrawn from the bending actuator 310, the actuator returns to the straight configuration as shown in Figure 7, moving the top 306 of the nozzle chamber up to its original position. The momentum that partially forms the ink droplets causes the droplets to continue to move upwardly, forming an ink droplet as shown in Figure 7, which is projected onto an adjacent paper surface or other item to be printed. In one form of the invention, the opening 303 in the bottom 305 is relatively large compared to the cross section of the nozzle chamber. When the top portion 3 06 moves downward, the viscous tension in the supply tube through the hole in the side wall of the hole 306 and from the ink reservoir (not connected) to the opening - 21 · 200824914 (19) ^ 302 The ink droplets are ejected through the nozzle edge - 309. In order to prevent ink from leaking from the nozzle chamber during actuation (i.e., during bending of the bending actuator 310), a fluid seal is formed between the side walls 307 and 308, as will now be described with reference to Figures 7 and 8. By. During the relative movement of the top 306 and the bottom plate 305, the ink is retained in the nozzle chamber by ensuring that the ink is held in the geometry of the ink chamber with surface tension. For this purpose, a very small gap is provided between the downwardly extending side wall 307 and the mutually facing surfaces 316 of the side walls 308 extending. As can be clearly seen in Figure 8, by the proximity of the two side walls, the ink (showing as a black shaded area) is confined within the aperture between the downwardly extending side wall 307 and the inwardly facing surface of the upwardly extending side wall 31. The proximity of the two side walls ensures that the ink of the entire free opening 31 is "self-sealing" by the surface tension. In order to prevent the possibility of damaging the surface tension by impurities or other factors that may damage the surface tension, the side wall 308 extending upwardly φ is provided in such a manner as to face the upper channel, the channel having not only the inner surface 3 16 but also the spacing Parallel outer surface 3 1 8 and a U-shaped channel 3 1 9 is formed between the two surfaces. The ink droplets that have detached from the surface tension between the surfaces 3 07 and 3 16 overflow into the U-shaped channel. The overflowed ink is held in the channel instead of "wicking" to the entire surface of the nozzle bottom. In this way, a double wall fluid seal is formed and it is capable of efficiently holding the ink within the moving nozzle mechanism. Referring to Figure 8, it can be seen that the actuator 310 includes a first active beam 3 58 disposed above and spaced apart from the second passive beam 360. By separating the two beams, heat transfer from the active beam 358 to the passive beam 360 can be minimized. Therefore, this -22-200824914 (20) compartment configuration has the advantage of maximizing thermoelastic efficiency. In the present invention, the active beam 2 58 may comprise an aluminum alloy, as described above, such as an aluminum vanadium alloy. Thermal Bending Actuator Defining the Top of the Moving Nozzle The embodiment illustrated in Figures 5-8 shows a nozzle assembly 3 00 that includes a nozzle chamber 304 having a top portion 306 that moves relative to the bottom portion 305 of the chamber. The movable top 306 is actuated to move toward the bottom 305 by a double layer thermal bending actuator 310 disposed outside of the nozzle chamber 305. Since only one side of the motion structure must work against viscous ink, the top of the motion reduces the droplet ejection energy. However, it is necessary to increase the amount of power that the droplets emit. By increasing the amount of power, a shorter pulse width can be used to provide the same amount of energy. Improved droplet ejection characteristics are obtained by a shorter pulse width. One means of increasing the power of the actuator is to increase the size of the actuator. However, in the nozzle design shown in Figures 5-8, increasing the size of the actuator obviously adversely affects the space of the nozzle, which is undesirable for making high resolution page wide print heads. The nozzle assembly 400 shown in Figures 9-1 2 provides a solution to this problem. The nozzle assembly 400 includes a nozzle chamber 401 formed on a passive metal oxy-compound (CMOS) layer 402 of the ruthenium substrate 403. The nozzle chamber is defined by a top portion 404 and a side wall 405 extending from the top to the passive gold-oxygen complementary semiconductor layer 402. The ink is supplied to the nozzle chamber 401 by the ink inlet 406 in fluid communication with the ink supply channel 407. The ink supply channel 407 receives ink from the back side of the substrate. The ink is ejected from the nozzle chamber by the jet -23-200824914 (21) - nozzle opening 408 defined in the top 4〇4. The nozzle opening 408 is offset relative to the ink inlet 406. As shown more clearly in Figure 10, the top portion 404 has a moving portion 409 that defines a substantial portion of the entire area of the top portion. The motion portion 409 generally defines at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, or at least 50% of the total area of the top portion 404. In the embodiment illustrated in Figures 9-1 2, nozzle opening 408 and nozzle edge 41 5 are defined in moving portion 409 such that nozzle opening 408 and nozzle edge 415 move with moving portion 409. The nozzle assembly 400 is characterized in that the moving portion is defined by a thermal bending actuator 410 having a flat upper active beam 41 and a flat lower passive beam 412. Thus, actuator 410 generally defines at least 20°/ of the entire area of top portion 404. At least 30%, at least 4%, or at least 50%. Correspondingly, the upper active beam 411 generally defines at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, or at least 50% of the total area of the top portion 404. As shown in Figures 9 and 10, at least a portion of the upper active beam 41 1 and the lower passive beam 0 412 are spaced apart to maximize thermal insulation of the two beams. More specifically, the titanium layer is used as the bridge level 413 between the upper active layer 411 (containing titanium nitride) and the lower passive layer 412 (containing cerium oxide). This gap 41 4 improves the overall efficiency of the actuator 410 by minimizing heat transfer from the active layer 411 to the passive layer 41 2 . However, it will of course be appreciated that in another embodiment, the active beam 411 can be directly fused or bonded to the passive beam 4 1 2 to improve structural rigidity. This design modification is still within the scope of the art and is included in the scope of the invention - 24 - 200824914 (22) ' With the titanium bridge layer, the active beam 4 1 1 is connected to a pair of contacts 4 1 6 (positive ^ and ground) The contact is connected to the driving circuit in the MOS layer. When it is required to eject ink droplets from the nozzle chamber 401, a current flows between the two contacts 4 16 to obtain the active beam 411. The active beam 411 is rapidly heated by the current' and expands relative to the passive beam 412, thereby causing the actuator 41 0 (which defines the moving portion 409 of the top portion 404) to bend downward toward the substrate 403. The movement of the actuator 401 causes the ink to be ejected from the nozzle opening 408 by rapidly increasing the pressure inside the nozzle chamber 40 1 . When the current stops flowing, the moving portion 409 of the top portion 404 is allowed to return to its rest position, which draws ink from the inlet 406 into the nozzle chamber 401 to prepare for the next injection. Therefore, the principle of droplet ejection is similar to that described above with respect to nozzle assembly 300. However, due to the thermal bending actuator 410 defining the moving portion 409 of the top portion 404, a greater amount of power is available for droplet ejection because the active beam 411 has a larger area than the overall size of the nozzle assembly 400. φ Referring to Figure 12, it can be appreciated that the nozzle assembly 40 (and all of the nozzle assemblies described herein) can be replicated into an array of nozzle assemblies to define a print head or a circuit-integrated print head. The integrated print head includes a ruthenium substrate, an array nozzle assembly formed on the substrate (usually arranged in a row), and a drive circuit for the nozzle assembly. A plurality of integrated circuit-integrated printheads may be contiguous or connected to form a pagewidth inkjet printhead, as described, for example, in the applicant's earlier U.S. Patent Application No. 1/0,449, filed on Serial No. 1 0/014732 (2004/1 2/20 application) as described in the application. The contents of these applications are hereby incorporated by reference. -25- 200824914 (23) A nozzle assembly 500 shown in Figs. 13 to 15 is similar to the nozzle assembly 400. - A thermal bending actuator 5i0 having an upper active beam 5 1 1 and a lower passive beam 5 1 2 defining a moving portion of the top 504 of the nozzle chamber 501. Therefore, the nozzle assembly 500 achieves the same advantages as the nozzle assembly 400 in terms of increased power. However, in contrast to nozzle assembly 400, nozzle opening 508 and edge 515 are not defined by the moving portion of top portion 504, but rather by the fixed portion of top portion 504 such that during ejection of the droplet, actuator 5 1 0 moves independently of the nozzle opening and edge. The advantage of this structure is that it provides easier control of the direction of flight of the droplets. It is of course understood that the aluminum alloy (due to its inherent advantages in improving the thermal bending efficiency) can be used as the active beam of either of the thermal bending actuators 410 and 5 10 described above with respect to the embodiment shown in Figures 9 - 15. The nozzle assemblies 400 and 500 can be constructed in a manner similar to that of the applicant's earlier inkjet nozzle manufacturing methods of U.S. Patent Nos. 606,167 and 6,788,809, using suitable microelectromechanical techniques. The contents of φ of these patent cases are hereby incorporated by reference. Active Beam with Optimal Stiffness in the Bending Direction Referring now to Figures 11-15, it can be seen that the upper active beams 4 1 1 , 5 1 1 of the actuators 410 and 510 both contain twisted beam elements that have a bend (at The case of beam 4丨) or serpentine (in the case of beam 5 1 1). The twisted beam element is elongate and has a relatively small cross-sectional area suitable for resisting heating. In addition, the twisted structure allows the ends of the beam members to be connected to the joints at one end of the actuator, simplifying the overall design of the nozzle assembly and the structure of -26-200824914 (24). Referring specifically to Figures 14 and 15, the elongate beam member 520 has a serpentine configuration defining an elongate active cantilever beam 511 of the actuator 510. The serpentine beam 52A has a flat twist path that connects the first electrical contact 51 and the second electrical contact 51. The electrical contacts (positive and ground) are located at one end of the actuator 5 1 , and provide an electrical connection between the drive circuit and the active beam 511 in the gold-oxygen complementary semiconductor layer 502. The serpentine beam element 520 is fabricated from standard lithography etching techniques and is defined by a plurality of contact members. In general, the beam member can be defined as a solid portion of the beam material that extends generally linearly along, e.g., longitudinally or laterally. The beam member of the beam member 520 includes a longer beam member 521 and a shorter beam member 522. The longer beam members 521 extend along the longitudinal axis of the elongate cantilever beam 51 1 and the shorter beam members 522 extend across the transverse axis of the elongate cantilever beam 51 1 . An advantage of this serpentine beam element 520 structure is that it provides maximum stiffness of the cantilever beam 511 in the direction of bending. The stiffness in the direction of the bend is advantageous because it facilitates the bending of the actuator 5 10 back to its rest position after each actuation, and the curved active beam structure for the nozzle assembly 400 shown in Figure 11 should be understood. The same or similar advantages as described above with respect to the structure of the nozzle assembly 500. In Fig. 11, the longitudinally extending longer beam members are shown as 421' and the laterally extending interconnected shorter beam members are shown as 422. Use of a porous material to improve thermal efficiency. In all of the above embodiments, and other thermal bending actuators described in the Applicant's application, the active beam is bonded to the passive beam for construction. - Ruggedness (see Figures 1 and 2), or the active and passive beams are spaced apart for maximum thermal efficiency (see Figure 8). The thermal efficiency provided by the air gap between the beams is of course desirable. However, this improvement in thermal efficiency is often at the expense of structural robustness and the tendency to buck the thermal bending actuator. U.S. Pat. β The material is formed by depositing niobium carbide or oxidizing a carbon component to form porous ceria. The porosity of the produced porous cerium oxide can be increased by increasing the ratio of carbon to cerium. Porous ceria is known to be used as a passivation layer in integrated circuits to reduce parasitic impedance. However, applicants of this type have discovered that this type of multi-material can be used to improve the efficiency of thermal bending actuators. The porous material can be used as an insulating layer between the active beam and the passive beam, or as a passive beam itself. φ Figure 16 shows a thermal bending actuator 600 comprising an upper active beam 601, a lower passive beam 602, and an insulating layer 6〇3 between the upper active beam and the lower passive beam. The insulating beam comprises porous ceria, and the active beam 601 and the passive beam 6〇2 may comprise any suitable material, such as titanium nitride and ceria, respectively. The porosity of the insulating layer 603 provides excellent thermal insulation between the active beam 601 and the passive beam 6〇2. The insulating layer 6 〇 3 also provides an actuator 650 having a structural robustness. Thus, the actuator 6 is combined with the advantages of the two types of thermal bending actuators described in relation to Figures 1, 2, and 8 above. In another embodiment, and as shown in Figure 7, the porous material can be simply formed into a passive layer of a double-layer thermal bending actuator -28 - 200824914 (26). Thus, the thermal bending actuator 650 includes an upper active beam 651 (which includes titanium nitride), and a lower passive beam 652 (which includes porous ceria). It will of course be appreciated that the thermal bending actuator of the type illustrated in Figures 16 and 17 can be incorporated into any suitable ink jet nozzle or other micro-mechanical mechanical system device. Improvements in thermal efficiency and structural rigidity have made such actuators attractive in any micro-electromechanical system application requiring mechanical actuators or transducers. The thermal bending actuator of the type shown in Figures 16 and 17 is particularly suitable for use in the above described ink jet nozzle assemblies 400, 500. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that appropriate modifications of the thermal bending actuators 410, 510 can achieve the above improvements in thermal efficiency and structural rigidity. It will be appreciated that the active beam members 61, 65 1 of the thermal bending actuators 600, 650 described above may comprise an aluminum alloy as described herein to further improve thermal bending efficiency. It is to be understood that the invention is described by way of example only, and the details of the invention BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Figure 1 is a schematic side view of a two-layer thermal bending actuator comprising an active beam formed of an aluminum-vanadium alloy; Figures 2(A)-(C) are schematic illustrations of an inkjet nozzle assembly Side cross-sectional view including the operation of a fused thermal bending actuator at various stages; 29- 200824914 (27) Figure 3 is a perspective view of the nozzle assembly shown in Figure 2(A); Figure 4 is a portion incorporating the circuit A perspective view of a printhead comprising a nozzle assembly as shown in Figures 2(A) and 3; Figure 5 is an exploded perspective view of the inkjet nozzle assembly including spaced apart thermal bending Figure 6 is a cut-away perspective view of the ink jet nozzle assembly of Figure 5 in an actuated configuration; Figure 7 is an exploded perspective view of the ink jet nozzle assembly of Figure 5 when it is just activated Figure 8 is a side cross-sectional view of the ink jet nozzle assembly of Figure 6; Figure 9 is a side cross-sectional view of the ink jet nozzle assembly including a top portion having a moving portion defined by a thermal bending actuator; 10 is an excised perspective view of the nozzle assembly shown in FIG. 9; FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the nozzle assembly shown in FIG. Figure 1 is an exploded perspective view of the array nozzle assembly of Figure 10; Figure 13 is a side cross-sectional view of another embodiment of the ink jet nozzle assembly including a top portion having a thermal bending actuator Figure 14 is an exploded perspective view of the nozzle assembly of Figure 13; Figure 15 is a perspective view of the nozzle assembly of Figure 13; Figure 16 is a schematic representation of a three-layer thermal bending actuator A side view comprising an insulating beam formed of a porous material sandwiched therebetween; and Figure 17 is a schematic side view of a three layer thermal bending actuator comprising a passive beam formed of a porous material. -30- 200824914 (28) ^ [Explanation of main component symbols] . 1 : (nozzle) chamber 2 : passivation layer 3 : (矽) substrate 4 : top 5 : side wall 6 : ink 7 : (ink inlet) channel 8 : (nozzle) opening 9 : blade 1 〇 : actuator 1 1 : arm 12 : slot 1 3 : actuator unit 1 4 : fixed column 0 15 : (first) active beam 16 : (second) passive beam 17: (ink) droplet 20: (ink) meniscus 21: edge 100: nozzle assembly 200: (thermal bending) actuator 201: cantilever beam 202: column 200824914 (29) 2 10: 220: 3 00 : 3 01 : 3 02 : 3 03 : 3 04 : 3 05 :

3 06 : 3 07 : 3 08 : 3 09 : 3 10: 3 11: 3 12:

3 14 3 15 3 16 3 16 3 17 3 18 3 19 (bottom) active beam (top) passive beam nozzle assembly substrate channel ((ink supply) hole) opening (inlet) chamber bottom top side wall (nozzle) edge (bending) actuator proximal anchor member distal projection (ink) droplets (facing each other) surface (toward) inner surface free opening outer surface = channel 3 5 8 : active beam 200824914 (30) 3 60 : 400 : 401 : 4 02 : 403 : 404 : 4 06 : 407 :

408: 408 : 409 : 410 : 411 : 412 : 413 : 414 : 415 : 416 : 421 : 422 : 501 502 504 508 Passive beam nozzle assembly (nozzle) chamber (passive) gold-oxygen complementary semiconductor layer (矽) Substrate top (ink) inlet (ink supply) channel (nozzle) opening (nozzle) opening moving part (hot bending) actuator (top) active beam (lower) passive beam bridge layer gap (nozzle) edge contact longer Beam member shorter beam member (nozzle) chamber oxy-complementary semiconductor layer top (nozzle) opening -33 200824914 (31) 510 : 5 11: 5 11: 512 : 5 15 : 5 16 : 520 : 521 :

5 22 : 600 : 601 : 602 : 603 : 650 65 1 652 (hot bending) actuator (top) active beam active cantilever beam (lower) passive beam edge (first, second) electrical contact beam components Long beam members shorter beam members (hot bending) actuators (top) active beams (lower) passive beam insulation (thermal bending) actuators (top) active beams (lower) passive beams

Claims (1)

  1. 200824914 (1). X. Patent application scope. I. An inkjet nozzle assembly comprising: a nozzle chamber including a bottom portion and a top portion, the top portion having a nozzle opening defined therein, the top portion having a movable direction toward the bottom portion a moving portion; and a thermal bending actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams for ejecting ink through the nozzle opening, the actuator comprising: a first active beam for connecting to the driving circuit; and a second passive a beam that mechanically interlocks the first beam such that when the current® passes through the first beam, the first beam expands relative to the second beam, causing the actuator to bend, wherein the moving portion includes the actuator . 2. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the first active beam defines at least 30% of the total area of the top. 3. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 7, wherein the first active beam defines at least a portion of an outer surface of the top portion. 4. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the nozzle opening is defined within the moving portion such that the nozzle opening is movable relative to the bottom portion. 5. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the actuator is movable relative to the nozzle opening. 6. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the twisted beam member defines the first beam, the twisted beam member having a plurality of contact beam members. 7. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 6, wherein the plurality of contact beam members comprise a plurality of longer beam members and at least one shorter -35-200824914 (2)-beam member, the plural A longer beam member extends along a longitudinal axis of the first beam, the shorter beam member extending across the transverse axis of the first beam and interconnecting the longer beam members. 8. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein one of the plurality of beams comprises a porous material. 9. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 8, wherein the porous material is a porous oxidized cut having a dielectric constant of 2 or less. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the thermal bending actuator further comprises a third insulating beam interposed between the first beam and the second beam. II. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the third insulator comprises a porous material. 12. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the first beam is fused or joined to the second beam. 1 3 The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the second beam comprises a porous material. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein at least a portion of the first beam and the second beam are spaced apart. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the first material comprises a group selected from the group consisting of titanium nitride, titanium aluminum nitride, and aluminum alloy. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the first beam comprises an alloy of the name. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 16, wherein the aluminum alloy comprises aluminum and at least one other metal having a Young's modulus of more than 100 Gpa. . 18. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 17, wherein the at least one metal is selected from the group consisting of vanadium, manganese, chromium, cobalt, and nickel. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 16, wherein the alloy comprises aluminum and vanadium. 20. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 16, wherein the alloy comprises at least 80% aluminum. 2 1 - An inkjet nozzle assembly comprising: a nozzle chamber including a bottom portion and a top portion, the top portion having a nozzle opening defined therein, the top portion having a moving portion movable toward the bottom portion; and a thermal bending An actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams for ejecting ink through the nozzle, the actuator comprising: a first active beam for connecting to the drive circuit; and φ a second passive beam, mechanically Interacting the first beam such that when current passes through the first beam, the first beam expands relative to the second beam, causing the actuator to bend, wherein the first active beam defines at least a portion of the outer surface of the top . The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein the moving portion comprises the actuator. 23. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 2, wherein the first active beam defines at least 30% of the total area of the top. 24. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein the nozzle opening is defined in the moving portion such that the nozzle opening is movable for the bottom portion. 25. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein the actuator is moveable relative to the nozzle opening. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein the twisted beam member defines the first beam, the twisted beam member having a plurality of contact beam members. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 26, wherein the twisted beam member comprises a plurality of longer beam members and at least one shorter beam member, each longer beam member along the first The longitudinal axis of the beam extends and is interconnected by shorter beam members that extend across the transverse axis of the first beam. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein one of the plurality of beams comprises a porous material. 29. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 28, wherein the porous material is porous cerium oxide having a dielectric constant of 2 or less. Φ 3 喷墨 The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 2, wherein the thermal bending actuator further comprises a third insulating beam interposed between the first beam and the second beam. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 30, wherein the third insulating beam comprises a porous material. 32. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein the first beam is fused or joined to the second beam. 33. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 32, wherein the second beam comprises a porous material. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein at least a portion of the first beam and the second beam are spaced apart. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein the first beam comprises a material selected from the group consisting of titanium nitride, titanium aluminum nitride, and aluminum alloy. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 21, wherein the first beam comprises an aluminum alloy. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 3, wherein the aluminum alloy comprises aluminum and at least one other metal having a Young's modulus of more than 1 〇〇 Gpa. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 3, wherein the at least one metal is selected from the group consisting of vanadium, manganese, chromium, cobalt, and nickel. The ink jet nozzle assembly of claim 36, wherein the alloy comprises aluminum and vanadium. The inkjet nozzle assembly of claim 36, wherein the alloy comprises at least 80% aluminum. •39-
TW96107555A 2006-12-04 2007-03-05 Inkjet nozzle assembly having moving roof portion defined by a thermal bend actuator having a plurality of cantilever beams TWI468301B (en)

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