JP4724488B2 - Integrated microelectromechanical system - Google Patents

Integrated microelectromechanical system Download PDF

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JP4724488B2
JP4724488B2 JP2005226233A JP2005226233A JP4724488B2 JP 4724488 B2 JP4724488 B2 JP 4724488B2 JP 2005226233 A JP2005226233 A JP 2005226233A JP 2005226233 A JP2005226233 A JP 2005226233A JP 4724488 B2 JP4724488 B2 JP 4724488B2
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cavity
insulating film
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JP2006263902A (en
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隆史 松村
夏樹 横山
宏 福田
裕子 花岡
司 藤森
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日立オートモティブシステムズ株式会社
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B81MICROSTRUCTURAL TECHNOLOGY
    • B81CPROCESSES OR APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS
    • B81C1/00Manufacture or treatment of devices or systems in or on a substrate
    • B81C1/00015Manufacture or treatment of devices or systems in or on a substrate for manufacturing microsystems
    • B81C1/00222Integrating an electronic processing unit with a micromechanical structure
    • B81C1/00246Monolithic integration, i.e. micromechanical structure and electronic processing unit are integrated on the same substrate
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B81MICROSTRUCTURAL TECHNOLOGY
    • B81BMICROSTRUCTURAL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS, e.g. MICROMECHANICAL DEVICES
    • B81B2201/00Specific applications of microelectromechanical systems
    • B81B2201/02Sensors
    • B81B2201/0228Inertial sensors
    • B81B2201/0235Accelerometers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B81MICROSTRUCTURAL TECHNOLOGY
    • B81BMICROSTRUCTURAL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS, e.g. MICROMECHANICAL DEVICES
    • B81B2201/00Specific applications of microelectromechanical systems
    • B81B2201/02Sensors
    • B81B2201/0264Pressure sensors
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B81MICROSTRUCTURAL TECHNOLOGY
    • B81CPROCESSES OR APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS
    • B81C2201/00Manufacture or treatment of microstructural devices or systems
    • B81C2201/01Manufacture or treatment of microstructural devices or systems in or on a substrate
    • B81C2201/0101Shaping material; Structuring the bulk substrate or layers on the substrate; Film patterning
    • B81C2201/0128Processes for removing material
    • B81C2201/013Etching
    • B81C2201/0135Controlling etch progression
    • B81C2201/014Controlling etch progression by depositing an etch stop layer, e.g. silicon nitride, silicon oxide, metal
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B81MICROSTRUCTURAL TECHNOLOGY
    • B81CPROCESSES OR APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS
    • B81C2203/00Forming microstructural systems
    • B81C2203/07Integrating an electronic processing unit with a micromechanical structure
    • B81C2203/0707Monolithic integration, i.e. the electronic processing unit is formed on or in the same substrate as the micromechanical structure
    • B81C2203/0714Forming the micromechanical structure with a CMOS process
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B81MICROSTRUCTURAL TECHNOLOGY
    • B81CPROCESSES OR APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS
    • B81C2203/00Forming microstructural systems
    • B81C2203/07Integrating an electronic processing unit with a micromechanical structure
    • B81C2203/0707Monolithic integration, i.e. the electronic processing unit is formed on or in the same substrate as the micromechanical structure
    • B81C2203/0742Interleave, i.e. simultaneously forming the micromechanical structure and the CMOS circuit

Description

  The present invention relates to a micro electro mechanical system (MEMS) and a manufacturing technique thereof, and more particularly to a technique effective when applied to an integrated micro electro mechanical system in which a semiconductor integrated circuit and a MEMS are integrated. is there.

  Using microfabrication technology that has realized high performance and high integration of semiconductor integrated circuit devices, mechanical sensors such as pressure sensors and acceleration sensors, micro mechanical parts such as micro switches and vibrators, and mechanical systems are formed. Microelectromechanical system (hereinafter referred to as MEMS) technology has been developed. MEMS are roughly classified into bulk MEMS for processing the silicon substrate itself and surface MEMS formed by repeating a process of depositing and patterning a thin film on the surface of the silicon substrate. The manufacturing process of the surface MEMS is close to the manufacturing process of the semiconductor integrated circuit device. These MEMS technologies are discussed in, for example, Applied Physics, Vol. 73 (No. 9), pages 1158 to 1165 (September 2004, published by Japan Society of Applied Physics) (Non-patent Document 1).

  US Pat. No. 6,635,506 (Patent Document 1) discloses a technique for accurately forming the shape of a cavity using a sacrificial layer when forming the cavity for forming a MEMS.

  US Pat. No. 6,667,245 (Patent Document 2) discloses an example in which a switch is formed as a MEMS. The standard technology used for forming the multilayer wiring of the integrated circuit is used for forming the switch, so that the switch can be formed at low cost.

  US Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0145056 (Patent Document 3) describes a metal layer formed using a standard CMOSFET (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) (hereinafter abbreviated as CMOS) manufacturing technique. And forming a MEMS using a sacrificial layer is described.

US Pat. No. 5,596,219 (Patent Document 4) discloses a technique for monolithically forming an integrated circuit and a sensor (actuator). This sensor is formed on a sensor layer made of, for example, polysilicon using surface micromachine technology.
Applied Physics, Japan Society of Applied Physics, September 2004, Vol. 73, No. 9, pp. 1158 to 1165 US Pat. No. 6,635,506 US Pat. No. 6,667,245 US Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0145056 US Pat. No. 5,596,219

  For example, in MEMS sensor applications, mechanical deformation of a mechanism due to external force or the like is converted into an electrical signal and output as a piezoresistance change or a capacitance change. Further, the output is usually signal-processed by a semiconductor integrated circuit device (LSI; Large Scale Integration, LSI includes a CMOS). Moreover, in MEMS vibrator applications, the input and output of these vibrators are connected to a high frequency circuit. As described above, MEMS is often used in combination with LSI. Also, MEMS not only operate mechanically, but many of its applications require conversion of different physical quantities (often electrical signals and mechanical displacements). This conversion mechanism is called a transducer.

  When the MEMS is used in combination with the signal processing LSI as described above, each of them becomes a separate chip, so that it is difficult to downsize the entire system. Since both MEMS and LSI are normally formed on a silicon substrate, the direction of monolithically integrating both on the same substrate is natural and has already been applied to some products.

  For example, an acceleration sensor or a vibration gyro using a weight made of a polysilicon film having a thickness of about 2 μm to 4 μm is integrated with an analog circuit such as a capacitance voltage conversion circuit or an operational amplifier. The sensor mechanism part (partially disposed on the silicon substrate via a gap) and the analog circuit part are disposed in different (adjacent) regions on the substrate plane. The entire sensor mechanism is covered with a cover and sealed.

  In addition, a movable metal film whose surface is a reflective surface is arranged in a matrix, and each direction is electrostatically controlled to turn on and off light, thereby realizing a digital mirror device (Digital Mirror Device) that realizes an image device. ) Has been commercialized. The upper part of the device is sealed with a transparent plate that transmits light.

  In addition, a technique for forming an RF-MEMS (switch, filter) on an LSI by a so-called Cu damascene wiring process has been reported. In this technique, both the movable part and the cavity part are formed by the damascene method. And it describes also about the method of sealing after forming a movable part. Further, a method for forming a MEMS mechanism part and a transducer (signal part) using a multilayer wiring of LSI has been reported.

  The above is in the category of surface MEMS, but techniques for integrating bulk MEMS with LSI have also been reported. In bulk MEMS, since the silicon wafer itself becomes a movable part, in order to perform sealing and mounting, it is usually necessary to bond to another substrate.

  The problem to be solved is that the conventional MEMS requires a special cavity forming process and a special sealing process. In other words, a special technique is required in addition to the normal CMOS manufacturing technique in manufacturing the MEMS. In particular, in a vibrator or the like, vacuum sealing is necessary to obtain a large vibration Q value, and confidentiality is important for maintaining characteristics over a long period of time. The same applies to an integrated MEMS in which LSI and MEMS are mixedly mounted. Even in the case where the mechanism portion is formed using multilayer wiring, it is usually preferable to seal the whole except for special applications. In this case, the substrate on which the MEMS is formed and another substrate to be a lid are bonded together. There is a need. Further, in the example in which the cavity is formed by the damascene process, a special process such as embedding a sacrificial layer in the interlayer insulating film is necessary. As described above, in manufacturing the conventional MEMS, a special technique is required in addition to the normal CMOS manufacturing technique.

  Second, in order to form a weight having a sufficient mass required for acceleration sensors and gyros, a film much thicker than a film used in a standard LSI is required. This is particularly difficult in the case of integrated MEMS in which LSI and MEMS are mixedly mounted for the following reasons. First, it is difficult to form a thick film with controlled stress by a standard LSI process. Even if possible, it is difficult to make this compatible with the process of forming a fine CMOS due to the heat treatment temperature condition and the like. Further, when SOI (Silicon On Insulator) or the like is used, a special process such as deep hole etching is required, which makes the process complicated and expensive.

  Third, in an integrated MEMS in which LSI and MEMS are mixedly mounted, the manufacturing process becomes complicated or the chip area increases.

  An object of the present invention is a special manufacturing technique for an integrated MEMS in which a semiconductor integrated circuit device (CMOS or the like) and a micromachine are monolithically integrated on a semiconductor substrate, which is different from a normal manufacturing technique for a semiconductor integrated circuit device. An object of the present invention is to provide a technology capable of manufacturing an integrated MEMS without using a process.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide a technology capable of easily and inexpensively manufacturing a weight having a sufficient mass required for an acceleration sensor or a gyro in the manufacturing technology of an integrated MEMS including an acceleration sensor or a gyro. There is.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide a technique capable of simplifying the manufacturing process of the integrated MEMS and reducing the manufacturing cost of the product.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide a technique capable of reducing the size of an integrated MEMS.

  The above and other objects and novel features of the present invention will be apparent from the description of this specification and the accompanying drawings.

  Of the inventions disclosed in the present application, the outline of typical ones will be briefly described as follows.

  An integrated microelectromechanical system according to the present invention is an integrated microelectromechanical system in which a micromachine and a semiconductor integrated circuit device formed using a manufacturing technology of a semiconductor integrated circuit device are formed on a semiconductor substrate. The machine includes: (a) a sealed cavity formed by removing a part of an interlayer insulating film formed between wirings; and (b) a structure formed inside the cavity. The cavity is formed using a MOSFET wiring formation technique and is sealed using the MOSFET wiring formation technique.

  Further, an integrated microelectromechanical system manufacturing method according to the present invention is an integrated microelectromechanical system in which a micromachine and a semiconductor integrated circuit device are formed on a semiconductor substrate by using a semiconductor integrated circuit device manufacturing technique. A manufacturing method comprising: (a) a step of forming a structure that is a part of the micromachine; (b) a step of forming a layer that covers the structure; and (c) the structure being included therein. A step of forming a cavity, and (d) a step of sealing the cavity, wherein the step (a), the step (b), the step (c), and the step (d) A wiring formation technique is used.

  The present invention uses a standard CMOS manufacturing process, or a standard wiring process that is part of a CMOS manufacturing process, to make a MEMS (micromachine) structure (without a special sealing process). The first main feature is to form a cavity for installation. Specifically, first, a movable part / electrode or the like which is a part of a MEMS structure is formed in an interlayer insulating film using a CMOS process (multilayer wiring process). Then, after forming a (metal) thin film layer having a microhole on the upper part, the interlayer insulating film around the movable portion and electrode is removed by etching through the microhole, and the microhole is finally sealed.

  At this time, the structure of the micromachine is installed in the cavity formed by removing a part of the interlayer insulating film formed between the multilayer wirings below the thin film layer. For the thin film layer, a material (for example, an upper wiring layer) having a sufficiently low etching rate for etching the interlayer insulating film is used.

  After the etching of the interlayer insulating film is completed, the etching micropores formed in the thin film layer are sealed by depositing a thin film (such as a CVD insulating film) having relatively isotropic deposition characteristics on the thin film layer. Stopped. The thin film formation and the etching for removing the interlayer insulating film are performed within the range of a normal CMOS process. The movable part / electrode formed in the cavity is, for example, a metal film, a silicon-germanium film, a silicon nitride film, a silicon oxide film, a single crystal silicon film, a polysilicon film, an amorphous silicon film, or a polyimide film. It is formed so that it may contain.

  In addition, the present invention provides a single integrated structure (including a weight and a movable body that can be mechanically regarded as an integrated structure) by using a plurality of LSI layers or wiring layers. A second main feature is that a movable weight having a sufficiently large mass required for an acceleration sensor or a gyro can be formed by using a wiring process of a typical CMOS process. The movable part of the structure is preferably formed in the cavity and is fixed to an interlayer insulating film surrounding the cavity by an (elastic) deformable LSI material or metal wiring. The structure is designed such that its mechanical properties are determined by the dimensions of the structure itself and do not depend on the shape of the cavity. Specifically, in the structure, (1) a fixed part fixed to an interlayer insulating film around the cavity and having a size that can be regarded as not substantially elastically deformed, (2) a movable part, (3 ) By providing an elastically deforming part that connects the fixed part and the movable part, the dimensional accuracy of the cavity does not affect the mechanical characteristics of the MEMS. Therefore, the dimensional accuracy of the cavity can be formed with a gradual accuracy compared to the case where the mechanical characteristics of the structure depend on the shape of the cavity. The dimensional accuracy of this structure is usually defined by the accuracy of the LSI wiring pattern. Since this dimensional accuracy is generally much higher than the processing accuracy of bulk MEMS or the like in the prior art, high-precision mechanical characteristics are guaranteed.

  Since the structure is formed using a wiring layer, in addition to a mechanical function as a weight, the structure itself also serves as an electrical function such as an electrode and a wiring. Driving and sensing are performed by an electrostatic force and a capacitance between the electrically independent electrode fixed to the interlayer insulating film and the movable part / electrode. For example, an acceleration sensor or a vibration gyro (angular velocity sensor) is realized by using the movable portion of the integrally structured body as a weight. Mechanical connection (fixed part and elastic deformation part, for example, beam) and electrical connection (wiring, drive (actuator) and detection capacitor, etc.) between the movable part and the interlayer insulating film surrounding it constitute an LSI. You may carry out by another layer. Reliability can be improved by sandwiching the movable part between the multilayer wiring layers and limiting the movable range of the movable part.

  Further, the present invention is characterized in that a MEMS vibration sensor, acceleration sensor, gyroscope, switch, and vibrator are mixedly mounted on an LSI, and the MEMS structure is formed in the same layer as an LSI wiring layer (including pads). And Alternatively, it is characterized in that MEMS is stacked and formed on an upper part of an LSI wiring (in a region overlapping in a plane).

  Among the inventions disclosed in the present application, effects obtained by typical ones will be briefly described as follows.

  Since LSI (including CMOS) and MEMS can be monolithically integrated using a standard CMOS process (LSI process), downsizing and cost reduction of the integrated MEMS can be realized.

  In the following embodiments, when it is necessary for the sake of convenience, the description will be divided into a plurality of sections or embodiments. However, unless otherwise specified, they are not irrelevant to each other. There are some or all of the modifications, details, supplementary explanations, and the like.

  Further, in the following embodiments, when referring to the number of elements (including the number, numerical value, quantity, range, etc.), especially when clearly indicated and when clearly limited to a specific number in principle, etc. Except, it is not limited to the specific number, and may be more or less than the specific number.

  Further, in the following embodiments, the constituent elements (including element steps and the like) are not necessarily indispensable unless otherwise specified and apparently essential in principle. Needless to say.

  Similarly, in the following embodiments, when referring to the shape, positional relationship, etc., of components, etc., unless otherwise specified, and in principle, it is considered that this is not clearly the case, it is substantially the same. Including those that are approximate or similar to the shape. The same applies to the above numerical values and ranges.

  In all the drawings for explaining the embodiments, the same members are denoted by the same reference symbols in principle, and the repeated explanation thereof is omitted. Even a plan view may be hatched.

  Embodiments of the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the drawings.

  In the following embodiments, after an LSI transistor is fabricated on a silicon (Si) substrate, a multilayer wiring layer is formed on the transistor, and at the same time, an interlayer insulating film formed between multilayer wiring layers on the same silicon substrate A MEMS was formed on the substrate, and then a cavity was formed and sealed. Alternatively, after forming a MEMS on a silicon substrate, an LSI was manufactured on the same silicon substrate, and then a cavity was formed and sealed.

(Embodiment 1)
In the first embodiment, a case where a uniaxial acceleration (or vibration) sensor is formed as a MEMS will be described.

  1 to 8 are schematic views (cross-sectional views) for explaining the manufacturing process of the integrated MEMS according to the first embodiment. First, a signal processing transistor 102 and a contact hole 103 of a uniaxial acceleration sensor are formed on a silicon substrate (semiconductor substrate) 101 according to a process for manufacturing a normal CMOS integrated circuit device (FIG. 1). Next, similarly, the etching for forming the first layer wiring (M1 layer) 104 and the cavity of the signal processing transistor 102 and the cavity (process described later) using the process of manufacturing the CMOS integrated circuit device. A stopper film 105 is formed (FIG. 2).

  Next, a multi-layer consisting of a second layer wiring (M2 layer) and a third layer wiring (M3 layer) (the second layer wiring and the third layer wiring are not shown) by a process of manufacturing a normal CMOS integrated circuit device. A wiring layer is formed and planarized using a normal chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Next, after forming the interlayer insulating film 106, a predetermined via hole 107 is formed in the interlayer insulating film 106 (FIG. 3). Then, a fourth-layer wiring (M4 layer) 108 is formed on the interlayer insulating film 106 as necessary, and a movable weight (movable part) 109 of a uniaxial acceleration sensor, and an elastic beam (elastic deformation part) also serving as a wiring. 110 and a fixed beam (fixed part) 111 are formed (FIG. 4). That is, a structure (movable weight, elastic beam, fixed beam) constituting a part of the uniaxial acceleration sensor is formed. As described above, this structure is formed in the same layer as the wiring (for example, the fourth layer wiring 108) constituting the semiconductor integrated circuit device.

  Further, an interlayer insulating film 112 is formed so as to cover the structure, and after planarizing the interlayer insulating film 112 using a CMP method or the like as necessary (FIG. 5), a fifth layer wiring (M5 layer) Thus, the cavity cover film 114 having the fine holes 113 for forming the cavity is formed (FIG. 6). Thereafter, the cavity 115 is formed by etching away the interlayer insulating film 112 and the interlayer insulating film 106 around the movable weight 109 through the fine holes 113 (FIG. 7). At this time, since the etching stopper film 105 exists, the etching does not proceed below the etching stopper film 105. Then, the cavity 115 is sealed by closing the microhole 113 for forming the cavity with an insulating film 116 (FIG. 8).

  Here, tungsten (W) is used as the material of the first layer wiring 104 and the fourth layer wiring 108, aluminum (Al) is used as the material of the second layer wiring and the third layer wiring, and tungsten is used as the fifth layer wiring. Silicide (WSi) was used. The material is not limited to these materials. For example, the first layer wiring 104 may be a laminated film of an aluminum film and a titanium nitride (TiN) film, and the fifth layer wiring may be tungsten or the like. The advantage of using the above-mentioned materials for the first layer wiring 104 and the fifth layer wiring is that a sufficient etching selectivity with respect to the interlayer insulating film 106 and the interlayer insulating film 112 can be secured during the etching for forming the cavity 115. Is a point.

  Next, the configuration and operation of the uniaxial acceleration sensor according to the first embodiment will be described. FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram showing a planar arrangement of structure patterns in each layer constituting the completed uniaxial acceleration sensor. 9A, 9B, and 9C are plan views of the M1, M4, and M5 layers, respectively. In FIG. 9A, the M1 layer etching stopper film 105 functions as a capacitor lower electrode and is connected to an integrated circuit including a signal processing transistor 102 integrated on the same substrate by a first layer wiring 104. In FIG. 9B, the movable weight 109 formed in the M4 layer is connected to the fixed beam 111 via the elastic beam 110 formed in a spiral shape. The movable weight 109 functions as a capacitor upper electrode and is electrically connected to an integrated circuit including the signal processing transistor 102 by the elastic beam 110, the fixed beam 111, and the fourth layer wiring 108. The movable weight 109 formed in the cavity 115 is mechanically fixed to the interlayer insulating film 112 via the elastic beam 110 and the fixed beam 111. With this configuration, the movable weight 109 moves in the direction perpendicular to the paper surface in accordance with the acceleration in the direction perpendicular to the paper surface. As a result, the distance between the capacitor upper electrode made of the movable weight 109 and the capacitor lower electrode made of the etching stopper film 105 changes, and the interelectrode capacitance changes. By detecting this change in capacitance with an integrated circuit (capacitance detection circuit) including the signal processing transistor 102, acceleration can be detected as a change in capacitance. That is, the uniaxial acceleration sensor according to the first embodiment can detect acceleration acting in a direction perpendicular to the silicon substrate 101 (chip).

  In FIG. 9C, the cavity cover film 114 is formed in the M5 layer, and the microhole 113 for forming the cavity 115 is formed in the cavity cover film 114. The cavity 115 is formed by etching using the fine holes 113. After the cavity 115 is formed, the fine hole 113 is embedded.

  As shown in FIG. 9B, the shape of the fixed beam 111 is sufficiently thick at the base portion of the cavity, and is designed so as not to be elastically deformed even when acceleration is applied to the movable weight 109. On the other hand, the elastic beam 110 at the center of the beam is narrower than the fixed beam 111 and has a length that is spiraled, and a desired elastic deformation occurs when a predetermined acceleration is applied. Designed to be Therefore, the mechanical characteristics of the uniaxial acceleration sensor are determined only by the planar pattern shape and film thickness of the M4 layer fixed beam 111, elastic beam 110, and movable weight 109, and do not depend on the size and shape of the cavity 115. The dimensional accuracy of the fixed beam 111, the elastic beam 110, and the movable weight 109 is extremely high because it is determined by the dimensional accuracy of the M4 layer (the dimensional accuracy for forming the wiring). On the other hand, the size and shape of the cavity 115 is determined by etching of the so-called interlayer insulating films 106 and 112, and the accuracy thereof is low, but does not affect the mechanical characteristics of the uniaxial acceleration sensor according to the first embodiment.

  That is, the uniaxial acceleration sensor according to the first embodiment is configured such that the mechanical characteristics are determined by the movable weight 109, the elastic beam 110, and the fixed beam 111. Therefore, the cavity 115 is formed by using an ordinary CMOS integrated circuit device manufacturing technique, that is, an etching technique with a milder accuracy than the case where the mechanical characteristics of the MEMS are determined by the shape of the cavity 115 (etching of the interlayer insulating film itself). ).

  On the other hand, in the prior art document (US Pat. No. 6,635,506), since the mechanical characteristics are affected by the cavity, it is necessary to form the cavity accurately. For this reason, a sacrificial layer made of a material different from that of the interlayer insulating film is formed in the cavity forming region of the interlayer insulating film. Therefore, there is a problem that the process for forming the cavity is complicated.

  On the other hand, in the first embodiment, since it is not necessary to form the cavity 115 accurately, the cavity 115 is formed by etching the interlayer insulating films 106 and 112 themselves from the microhole 113 without using a sacrificial layer. ing. After the cavity 115 is formed, the cavity 115 is sealed by embedding the fine holes 113 with the insulating film 116. In this sealing process, a normal CMOS integrated circuit device manufacturing technique in which an insulating film 116 is deposited is used. That is, in the first embodiment, the process for forming and sealing the cavity 115 can be simplified.

  As described above, according to the first embodiment, the cavity 115 can be formed and sealed by a standard CMOS process. Therefore, as in the case of manufacturing a conventional MEMS, the main causes of a decrease in yield and an increase in manufacturing cost. Thus, the formation and sealing of special hollow portions (mounting process peculiar to MEMS) are not required. Therefore, the first embodiment has advantages such as an improvement in yield, a reduction in manufacturing (mounting) cost, and an improvement in reliability. Further, since the structure of the MEMS (one-axis acceleration sensor) can be formed simultaneously with the wiring of the LSI, there is an advantage that integration with the LSI becomes easy.

  The planar shapes of the movable weight 109, the elastic beam 110, and the fixed beam 111 are not limited to the shapes shown in FIG. For example, you may comprise so that the movable weight in the center may be supported by the elastic beam provided in four corners.

  Next, the capacitance detection circuit will be described. FIG. 10 is a block diagram showing a circuit configuration of an integrated circuit (capacitance detection circuit) including the signal processing transistor 102.

  In FIG. 10, the capacitance detected by the acceleration sensor 117 is converted into a voltage by the CV conversion circuit 118. The voltage converted by the CV conversion circuit 118 is amplified by the operational amplifier 119 and then digitized by the AD conversion circuit 120. Thereafter, based on the data stored in the non-volatile memory 122, various corrections such as temperature and amplifier characteristics are performed by the microprocessor 121 and output as acceleration from the output interface circuit 123. The acceleration detection accuracy can be further improved by simultaneously detecting an appropriate fixed reference capacitance or a capacitance change between the M5 layer and the movable weight 109 and using it as a differential input of the capacitance detection circuit.

  Next, an application of the uniaxial acceleration sensor in the first embodiment will be described. The uniaxial acceleration sensor in the first embodiment is mixed with a pressure sensor for TPMS (tire pressure monitoring system). The acceleration is detected from the displacement of the movable weight due to the centrifugal force when the tire rotates or the vibration of the road surface by the uniaxial acceleration sensor, and the operation state of the automobile, that is, the running state or the non-running state is determined. Based on the detection result of the uniaxial acceleration sensor, the wireless transmission frequency of the tire pressure information and the like output from the pressure sensor is determined. In other words, by providing a uniaxial acceleration sensor, the frequency of transmitting tire pressure information detected by the pressure sensor wirelessly when the automobile is in a running state is increased, while when the automobile is in a non-driving state, the pressure sensor is used. The frequency of wirelessly transmitting the detected tire pressure information can be reduced. Thereby, useless wireless transmission can be reduced and the life of the battery can be extended.

  The pressure sensor can be formed by a wiring process similar to that of the uniaxial acceleration sensor. FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view of a device in which the uniaxial acceleration sensor 130 and the pressure sensor 131 are simultaneously formed in the first embodiment.

  The lower electrode 132 of the pressure sensor 131 is formed in the same layer as the movable weight 109 of the uniaxial acceleration sensor 130. The upper electrode 133 (also serving as a diaphragm film) of the pressure sensor 131 is formed in the same layer as the cavity cover film 114 (sealing film) of the uniaxial acceleration sensor 130. The formation of the cavity part 134 of the pressure sensor 131 and the formation of the cavity part 115 of the uniaxial acceleration sensor 130 are provided in the fine hole 135 provided in the upper electrode 133 of the pressure sensor 131 and the cavity cover film 114 of the uniaxial acceleration sensor 130. Simultaneously through the fine holes 113. Similarly, the upper electrode 133 of the pressure sensor 131 and the cavity cover film 114 of the uniaxial acceleration sensor 130 are sealed at the same time. Thereby, the pressure sensor 131 can be manufactured in parallel with substantially the same process as the uniaxial acceleration sensor 130 in the first embodiment.

  In the pressure sensor 131, the degree to which the upper electrode 133 shown in FIG. 11 is pushed changes with the change in the pressure of the gas around the pressure sensor 131 (the position changes). For this reason, the distance between the upper electrode 133 and the lower electrode 132 changes, and the capacitance between the electrodes changes. Therefore, the pressure sensor 131 can detect the gas pressure by detecting the interelectrode capacitance.

(Embodiment 2)
In the second embodiment, a modification of the first embodiment will be described. First, in the second embodiment, a two-axis acceleration sensor that detects acceleration in two directions (directions orthogonal to each other) in the chip surface will be described. In an acceleration sensor, it is generally necessary to secure a certain mass of weight. Therefore, a structure was formed using a relatively thick pad layer of the wiring layer.

  FIG. 12 is a schematic diagram showing a cross-sectional structure of a biaxial acceleration sensor, and FIG. 13 is a schematic diagram showing a planar configuration of a main layer. In FIG. 12, the movable weight 202, the elastic beam 203 (not shown in FIG. 12), and the fixed capacitance plate (capacitance detection electrode) 204 of the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 are all monolithically integrated with the pad layer of the LSI. The same metal layer as 205 is formed. The biaxial acceleration sensor 201 is formed on an upper portion of a normal LSI 206, and a cavity 207 is sealed around the movable weight 202 by the same method as in the first embodiment. However, when the cavity 207 is formed, the etching stopper film 208 is formed using an appropriate wiring layer immediately below the cavity formation region. The etching stopper film 208 also functions as an electrical shield between the LSI 206 (integrated circuit and multilayer wiring) and the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 located below. As described above, since the MEMS (biaxial acceleration sensor) structure can be formed on top of the LSI (wiring portion and element region), there is an advantage that the chip can be downsized.

  In the etching for forming the cavity 207, a sufficient etching selectivity ratio between the movable weight 202, the etching stopper film 208 and the sealing cavity cover film 209 made of the pad layer material, and the interlayer insulating film 210 to be removed by etching. It is necessary to ensure. Here, the pad layer 205 is a laminated film in which an aluminum (Al) film having a thickness of 1500 nm is sandwiched from above and below by a titanium nitride (TiN) film having a thickness of 100 nm. Thereby, at the time of etching for forming the cavity portion 207, a sufficient etching selection ratio with the interlayer insulating film 210 can be secured. In order to prevent side etching from the side surface of the aluminum film, a side wall made of a titanium nitride film, a silicon nitride film (SiN), or the like may be formed on the side surface as necessary.

  In order to seal the cavity portion 207 having an area sufficient for installing the relatively large movable weight 202 inside, it is necessary to sufficiently secure the strength of the cavity cover film 209. Here, a tungsten silicide (WSi) film having a thickness of 1 μm was used. In order to prevent sticking or destruction of the cavity cover film 209 due to the capillary force of the liquid remaining in the cavity 207 in the drying process after the etching, the cavity 207 is formed by vapor phase etching using vapor hydrofluoric acid. I did it.

  Next, the operation of the biaxial acceleration sensor in the second embodiment will be described. As shown in FIG. 13A, in the cavity 207, the movable weight 202 is fixed to the interlayer insulating film 210 via the elastic beam 203 formed of the same layer. This interlayer insulating film 210 also functions as a fixed beam that can be regarded as not elastically deforming. By making the shape of the elastic beam 203 a zigzag bent shape as shown in FIG. 13A, when a force is applied to the movable weight 202, the elastic beam 203 is elastically deformed so that the position of the movable weight 202 is a hollow portion. It is displaced two-dimensionally within 207. This amount of displacement is detected as a change in capacitance between the movable capacitance plate 211 formed on a part of the movable weight and the fixed capacitance plate 204 fixed to the interlayer insulating film 210 and protruding from the cavity 207. The movable capacitor plate 211 and the fixed capacitor plate 204 that detect displacement in two directions (x and y directions) in the chip plane have a comb-teeth shape formed so as to be mutually offset in the lateral direction. A pair of fixed capacity plates 204 sandwiching one movable capacity plate 211 are electrically independent from each other, and the capacity between each fixed capacity plate 204 and the movable weight 202 is detected separately. For example, when the movable weight 202 moves in the x direction, the distance between the movable capacitor plate 211 and the fixed capacitor plate 204 arranged above and below changes. That is, in the movable capacity plate 211 and the fixed capacity plate 204 arranged above and below, the distance between the pair of fixed capacity plates 204 sandwiching one movable capacity plate 211 is between one fixed capacity plate 204. It becomes wider and becomes narrower with respect to the other fixed capacity plate 204. Since the capacitance changes as the distance changes, the acceleration in the x direction can be detected by detecting this capacitance change. When the movable weight 202 moves in the y direction, the distance between the movable capacitance plate 211 and the fixed capacitance plate 204 arranged on the left and right changes. That is, in the movable capacity plate 211 and the fixed capacity plate 204 arranged on the left and right, the distance between the pair of fixed capacity plates 204 sandwiching one movable capacity plate 211 is between one fixed capacity plate 204. It becomes wider and becomes narrower with respect to the other fixed capacity plate 204. Thereby, the acceleration in the y direction can be detected.

  The fixed capacity plate 204 and the movable weight 202 (including the movable capacity plate 211) in the x and y directions are electrically connected to a signal processing integrated circuit (LSI) integrated on the same semiconductor substrate. Is done. When the movable weight 202 moves in any direction of two axes due to acceleration, the distance between the fixed capacitance plate 204 and the movable capacitance plate 211 changes and the capacitance between the electrodes changes. The acceleration is detected by detecting this change in capacitance with a signal processing integrated circuit (capacitance detection circuit).

  The shape of the beam is sufficiently thick at the base portion of the cavity portion 207, and is designed so as not to be elastically deformed even when acceleration is applied to the weight (fixed portion, fixed beam). On the other hand, the central part of the beam is narrower than the root part, and the length is secured by bending, and it is designed to produce the desired elastic deformation by applying a predetermined acceleration. (Elastic deformation part, elastic beam 203). Therefore, the mechanical characteristics are determined only by the planar pattern shape and film thickness of the beam and the movable weight 202 exposed in the cavity 207, and do not depend on the dimensional shape of the cavity 207. Since the dimensional accuracy of the fixed beam, the elastic beam 203 and the movable weight 202 is determined by the dimensional accuracy of the wiring layer and via layer pattern, it is extremely high accuracy. On the other hand, the dimension and shape of the cavity 207 are determined by etching of the so-called interlayer insulating film 210, and the accuracy thereof is low, but the mechanical characteristics of the biaxial acceleration sensor in the second embodiment are not affected.

  FIG. 13B shows a cavity cover film 209 formed on the upper part of the cavity part 207, and in this cavity cover film 209, fine holes 212 used for forming the cavity part 207 are formed. ing. The fine hole 212 is sealed with an insulating film or the like after the formation of the cavity portion 207 is completed.

  Next, FIG. 14 shows an example in which the biaxial acceleration sensor according to the second embodiment is formed simultaneously with the pressure sensor. FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view of a composite sensor in which the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 in the second embodiment is formed simultaneously with the pressure sensor 220 similar to that in the first embodiment.

  As shown in FIG. 14, the structure of the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 (movable weight 202, fixed capacitance plate 204, etc.) is formed in the same layer as the pad layer 205, and the upper electrode connection wiring 221 and lower portion of the pressure sensor 220 are formed. An electrode connection wiring 222 is formed. Next, an interlayer insulating film 223 is formed, and an upper electrode connection opening and a lower electrode connection opening of the pressure sensor 220 are provided on the pad layer 205.

  Next, the lower electrode 224 of the pressure sensor 220 is formed, and the lower electrode 224 is connected to the lower electrode connection wiring 222. Next, an insulating film (oxide film) pattern 225 for forming a cavity of the pressure sensor 220 is formed. Next, a metal thin film (here, for example, a tungsten film) to be the upper electrode (diaphragm film) 226 of the pressure sensor 220 and the cavity cover film 209 of the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 is formed on the entire surface of the semiconductor substrate. Then, after forming fine holes in the metal thin film on the cavity forming area of the pressure sensor 220 and on the cavity forming area of the biaxial acceleration sensor 201, the interlayer insulating film 223 and the insulating film pattern 225 are passed through the fine holes. Etch. Thereby, the cavity part 227 of the pressure sensor 220 and the cavity part 207 of the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 are formed. Subsequently, the fine holes formed in the metal thin film are sealed.

  Thereafter, the metal thin film is patterned to form the upper electrode 226 of the pressure sensor 220 and the cavity cover film 209 of the biaxial acceleration sensor 201. Then, a passivation film made of a silicon nitride film is deposited, and an opening is formed on the pressure sensor 220 and a predetermined pad (not shown).

  Thus, also in the second embodiment, the pressure sensor 220 and the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 can be manufactured almost simultaneously.

  According to the second embodiment, since the movable weight 202 of the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 can be formed by the same layer wiring as the pad layer (a relatively thick layer) 205, compared to the first embodiment, The mass of the movable weight 202 can be remarkably increased. For this reason, the sensitivity of the biaxial acceleration sensor 201 can be improved. In the second embodiment as well, since the structure of the biaxial acceleration sensor and the formation and sealing of the cavity can be performed using the CMOS process, the same effect as in the first embodiment can be obtained. be able to.

(Embodiment 3)
In the third embodiment, a MEMS switch mixed with an LSI will be described. In the third embodiment, the MEMS switch and the integrated circuit device are monolithically mounted by using a normal CMOS integrated circuit device manufacturing technique (wiring process). Since the MEMS switch is provided on the upper part of the multilayer wiring layer of the integrated circuit device, the effect of not increasing the chip area can be obtained. These MEMS switches are used for switching of circuit blocks, switching of input / output RF elements and antennas according to an RF (Radio Frequency) wireless communication system, and the like. As a result, it is possible to couple with a wireless device or antenna with low power consumption and low loss.

  First, functions and basic operations of the MEMS switch 300 according to the third embodiment will be described. FIG. 15 is a plan view schematically showing the configuration and basic operation of the MEMS switch 300 according to the third embodiment.

  The function of the MEMS switch 300 in the third embodiment is to connect or disconnect the input to the output in accordance with the control signal. The MEMS switch 300 has three states: a connected state, a disconnected state, and a transition state. In the connected state, as shown in FIG. 15C, the two contact portions 301a and 301b of the central movable portion 301 are in contact with the contact portion 302a of the input line 302 and the contact portion 303a of the output line 303. On the other hand, in the non-connected state, as shown in FIG. 15A, the two contact portions 301a and 301b of the central movable portion 301 are separated from the contact portion 302a of the input line 302 and the contact portion 303a of the output line 303, respectively. Yes. In these connected and disconnected states, the input line 302 and the output line 303 of the MEMS switch 300 are each electrically connected to the signal line of the integrated circuit. On the other hand, the transition state shown in FIG. 15B is a state corresponding to the transition from the connected state to the non-connected state or the reverse transition, and the input line 302 and the output line 303 of the MEMS switch 300 are respectively signal lines of the integrated circuit. And electrically connected to the signal line from the switch control unit.

  Here, the function of each component will be described. The input line 302 includes a fixed portion (fixed beam) 306 fixed to an interlayer insulating film 305 formed so as to surround the cavity portion 304, and a movable portion 308 including an elastically deformable spring portion 307 and a contact portion 302a. Become. A part of the movable portion 308 constitutes one electrode 309 a of the displacement comb actuator 309. On the other hand, the other electrode 309 b of the displacement comb actuator 309 is fixed to the interlayer insulating film 305.

  The configuration of the output line 303 is substantially symmetric with respect to the input line 302. That is, the output line 303 is a movable part including a fixed part (fixed beam) 310 fixed to an interlayer insulating film 305 formed so as to surround the cavity part 304, an elastically deformable spring part 311 and a contact part 303a. 312. Part of the movable portion 312 constitutes one electrode 313 a of the displacement comb actuator 313. On the other hand, the other electrode 313 b of the displacement comb actuator 313 is fixed to the interlayer insulating film 305.

  The central movable portion 301 is also composed of substantially the same elements, and a fixed portion (fixed beam) 314 fixed to an interlayer insulating film 305 formed so as to surround the cavity portion 304 and a spring portion 315 that can be elastically deformed. And a movable part 316 including contact parts 301a and 301b. That is, the hollow wiring, one end of which is fixed to the interlayer insulating film 305, is electrically and mechanically connected to the movable portion 316 including the contact portions 301a and 301b via the elastically deformable spring portion 315. A part of the movable portion 316 constitutes one electrode 317a of the displacement comb actuator 317. On the other hand, the other electrode 317 b of the displacement comb actuator 317 is fixed to the interlayer insulating film 305. FIG. 15 is a schematic diagram, and the planar structure of the spring portion and the actuator is simplified.

  Next, the actual operation will be briefly described by taking the transition from the unconnected state to the connected state as an example. In the unconnected state shown in FIG. 15A, none of the three displacement comb actuators 309, 313, and 317 are driven, and force is applied to any of the three spring portions 307, 311 and 315. Absent. Therefore, the input line 302 and the output line 303 are switched from the integrated circuit signal line to the actuator control signal line. A voltage is applied between the pair of electrodes 309 a and 309 b of the displacement comb actuator 309 in the input line 302. Then, the movable portion 308 is electrostatically driven, and the contact portion 302a of the input line 302 is displaced outward. Similarly, a voltage is applied between the pair of electrodes 313 a and 313 b of the displacement comb actuator 313 on the output line 303. Then, the movable part 312 is electrostatically driven, and the contact part 303a of the output line 303 is displaced outward.

  Thereby, the central movable part 301 becomes a state which can move to the vertical direction of a paper surface without an obstruction. Further, by applying a voltage between the pair of electrodes 317a and 317b of the displacement comb actuator 317 in the central movable portion 301, the central movable portion 301 is electrostatically driven and displaced upward (FIG. 15). (B)).

  Subsequently, when the movable portion 308 of the input line 302 and the movable portion 312 of the output line 303 are returned to their original positions, and then the driving of the displacement comb actuator 317 of the central movable portion 301 is stopped, the force of the spring portion 315 Thus, the central movable portion 301 is fixed to the input line 302 and the output line 303. That is, the contact portions 301a and 301b of the central movable portion 301 are connected to the contact portion 302a of the input line 302 and the contact portion 303a of the output line 303, respectively (FIG. 15C). Thereafter, the input line 302 and the output line 303 are switched to the integrated circuit signal line to be in a connected state.

  Next, a manufacturing process (manufacturing process) of the MEMS switch 300 according to the third embodiment will be briefly described. The constituent elements of the MEMS switch 300 are composed of only one wiring layer as in the second embodiment, and the manufacturing process thereof is substantially the same as in the first embodiment or the second embodiment. That is, in accordance with a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, a transistor and a multilayer wiring were formed, and a structure of the MEMS switch 300 was further formed thereon by a method substantially similar to that shown in the second embodiment. That is, in the third embodiment, instead of forming the acceleration sensor structure, the structure of the MEMS switch 300 is formed. Although this structure is formed by using a part of the uppermost layer of the multilayer wiring as in the second embodiment, the structure is not necessarily limited thereto. For example, an intermediate wiring layer may be used on a memory area with a small number of wiring layers.

  Further, when forming the cavity around the structure, a thin film using a wiring layer as an etching stopper film is formed immediately below the structure in the cavity formation region. This thin film acts as an electrical shield between the transistor and the multilayer wiring formed in the lower part.

  In the third embodiment, electrical continuity must be obtained by the contact of structures formed of wiring. For this reason, it is necessary to prevent adhesion of an insulating film or the like on the surface of the structure. In addition, it is necessary to prevent so-called sticking in which so-called metal bodies are not separated from each other after contact. For this reason, it is necessary to carry out the following process shown in FIG. 16 in place of the sealing step (see FIG. 8) described in the first embodiment.

  FIG. 16 is a schematic diagram illustrating a part of the manufacturing process of the MEMS switch 300 according to the third embodiment, and FIG. 17 is a schematic diagram illustrating a planar configuration of main layers constituting the MEMS switch 300. As shown in FIG. 16A, a wiring (not shown) and a MEMS switch structure 320 are formed in a predetermined wiring layer. Then, an interlayer insulating film 321 is deposited on the structure 320, and a thin film made of the same wiring material is formed on the interlayer insulating film 321. Thereafter, holes are formed in the thin film to form the cavity cover film 322. This hole is provided with at least two kinds of fine holes 323 having a relatively small diameter (about 0.2 to 0.3 μm) and large opening holes 324 having a larger diameter. FIG. 17A shows a plan view of the cavity cover film 322 in which the fine holes 323 and the large opening holes 324 are thus formed. As shown in FIG. 17A, the fine hole 323 is arranged on a predetermined cavity forming region, and the large opening hole 324 is arranged at a position where there is no structure immediately below it. A broken line indicates the structure 320 formed below the cavity cover film 322 with the interlayer insulating film 321 interposed therebetween.

  Next, the interlayer insulating film 321 around the structure 320 is removed by etching through the fine hole 323 and the large opening 324 to form the cavity 325. At this time, a plan view of the layer in which the structure 320 is formed is shown in FIG. As shown in FIG. 17B, a cavity 325 is formed in the interlayer insulating film 321, and a structure 320 is formed inside the cavity 325.

  Subsequently, the fine holes 323 are closed with an insulating film 326 having isotropic deposition characteristics (FIG. 16B). At this time, the insulating film 326 adheres to the surface of the structure 320 made of metal, for example, due to the deposition gas that has entered the cavity 325 from the minute hole 323. Therefore, when only the minute hole 323 is provided in the cavity cover film 322, the cavity 325 is sealed with the insulating film 326 attached to the surface of the structure 320. As a result, there is a disadvantage that electrical continuity cannot be obtained when the MEMS switch is connected. However, in the third embodiment, large opening holes 324 are formed in addition to the fine holes 323. Since the large opening 324 is not blocked, the cavity 325 is not sealed.

  Next, the insulating film 326 attached to the surface of the structure 320 in the cavity 325 is etched through the large opening 324, and the etched metal surface is hydrophobized to make it difficult to stick. (FIG. 16 (c)). Thereafter, an insulating film 327 is deposited by anisotropic CVD under reduced pressure, and the large opening 324 is closed. Thus, the cavity 325 is completely sealed (FIG. 16D).

  As described above, according to the third embodiment, since the insulating film 326 formed on the surface of the structure 320 can be removed in the sealing step of the cavity 325, the reliability of the MEMS switch can be improved. In the third embodiment, the structure of the MEMS switch and the formation and sealing of the cavity can be performed using the CMOS process, so that the same effect as in the first embodiment can be obtained. it can.

(Embodiment 4)
In the fourth embodiment, an example using an integral structure movable body composed of a plurality of layers of multilayer wiring will be described. A problem with the acceleration sensor using surface MEMS is that it is relatively difficult to increase the mass of the movable weight. This is because the thickness of the movable weight is determined by the thickness of the wiring layer. In the fourth embodiment, a method and structure capable of increasing the mass of the movable weight will be described. In order to increase the mass of the movable weight, an integrated structure composed of a plurality of layers of multilayer wiring is used as the movable body. The movable weight can be formed simultaneously with the multilayer wiring of the LSI.

  FIG. 18 to FIG. 25 are schematic diagrams for explaining the manufacturing process of the triaxial acceleration sensor according to the fourth embodiment, and FIG. 26 is a schematic diagram showing the planar arrangement of the structures in the respective layers constituting the triaxial acceleration sensor. .

  First, in accordance with a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, a signal processing transistor 402 and a contact hole 403 of a triaxial acceleration sensor are formed on a silicon substrate 401 (FIG. 18). Next, by the same CMOS integrated circuit process, the first layer wiring (M1 layer) 404 of the integrated circuit 404, the movable weight 405 of the triaxial acceleration sensor, and the wiring electrically and mechanically connected to the movable weight 405 are also used. An elastic beam 406 (not shown) and a lower electrode 407, which will be described later, are formed with a metal pattern (FIG. 19). FIG. 26 shows a schematic diagram of the M1 layer pattern of the triaxial acceleration sensor. In FIG. 26, the movable weight 405 is fixed to a fixed beam (interlayer insulating film) via an elastic beam 406.

  Each of the elastic beam 406 and the lower electrode 407 is connected to a predetermined wiring of the signal processing transistor 402 via the first layer wiring 404 or the contact hole. The movable weight 405 is formed with a fine hole 408 for removing an interlayer insulating film located immediately below the movable weight 405 at the rear of the process.

  Thereafter, an interlayer insulating film 409 is deposited using a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, and an opening 411 is formed in the interlayer insulating film 409 corresponding to the first layer via 410 of the integrated circuit and the movable weight 405 of the triaxial acceleration sensor. (FIG. 20). Next, using a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, metal (here, for example, tungsten) is buried in the first layer via 410 and the opening 411, and planarization is performed by CMP. Here, the opening 411 is formed by removing the formation part of the lower electrode 407 from the pattern of the M1 layer. In addition, in order to prevent so-called dishing in the CMP method, a slit (an insulating film remaining pattern) was appropriately inserted in the large area of the movable weight 405 in addition to the etching fine hole 408.

  Next, a movable weight 405, a movable capacitor plate, and a fixed capacitor plate are formed in a metal pattern on the second layer wiring (M2 layer) 412 of the integrated circuit and the triaxial acceleration sensor by a CMOS integrated circuit process (FIG. 21). A schematic diagram of the M2 layer pattern of the triaxial acceleration sensor portion is shown in FIG. As shown in FIG. 26B, a movable capacity plate 412a is formed on the movable weight 405, and a fixed capacity plate 412b is formed so as to face the movable capacity plate 412a. The fixed capacitance plate 412b is fixed to the interlayer insulating film 409.

  Thereafter, an interlayer insulating film 413 is deposited again by using a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, which corresponds to the second layer via 414 of the integrated circuit, the movable weight 405 of the triaxial acceleration sensor, the movable capacitance plate 412a, and the fixed capacitance plate 412b. An opening 415 is formed in the part of the interlayer insulating film 413 (FIG. 22). Next, using a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, metal (for example, tungsten) is embedded in the second layer via 414 and the opening 415, and planarization is performed by CMP. Here, the pattern of the opening 415 was almost the same as the pattern of the M2 layer. However, in order to prevent so-called dishing in the CMP method, a slit (an insulating film remaining pattern) was appropriately inserted into the large area of the movable weight 405.

  Next, using the CMOS integrated circuit process again, the third layer wiring (M3 layer) 416 of the integrated circuit and the movable weight 405, the movable capacitance plate 412a, and the fixed plate are the same as those formed in the M2 layer on the triaxial acceleration sensor. The capacitor plate 412b is formed with a metal pattern (FIG. 23). The pattern of the second layer via 414 and the M3 layer triaxial acceleration sensor is the same as that shown in FIG.

  Further, an interlayer insulating film 417 is deposited, and planarized using a CMP method or the like, if necessary. A fourth layer wiring (M4 layer) is formed on the interlayer insulating film 417 to form a cavity in the center of the movable weight 405. A cavity cover film 419 having fine holes 418 is formed (FIG. 24). A plan view of the cavity cover film 419 of the three-axis acceleration sensor is shown in FIG. A fine hole 418 is provided on the center of the movable weight 405, and the movable weight 405 does not exist immediately below the fine hole 418.

  Thereafter, the interlayer insulating film around the movable weight 405 is removed by etching through the fine holes 418 to form the cavity 420. Etching in the depth direction stops on the silicon substrate 401. Since the etching proceeds isotropically, the cavity 420 has a circular shape. Finally, the fine hole 418 is closed with an insulating film 421 to seal the cavity 420 (FIG. 25). Since the thick insulating film 421 having a strength sufficient to seal the large-area cavity 420 is used, the microhole 418 needs to have a certain size. Further, sealing is performed by forming a relatively thick insulating film 421 under anisotropic deposition conditions.

  Next, the operation of the triaxial acceleration sensor in the fourth embodiment will be described. As shown in FIG. 26A, the movable weight 405 is fixed to the interlayer insulating film through the elastic beam 406 formed of the M1 layer in the cavity 420. The shape of the elastic beam 406 is a square shape as shown in FIG. 26A. When a force is applied to the movable weight 405, the elastic beam 406 is elastically deformed, and the position of the movable weight 405 is 3 in the cavity 420. Dimensionally displaced. However, the shape shown in FIG. 26 (a) is merely schematic and can be optimized in various ways such as a zigzag bent shape as shown in the second embodiment.

  For example, as shown in FIG. 26B, the position displacement of the movable weight 405 in the cavity 420 in the two directions (x and y directions) in the chip plane is caused by the M2 layer and the second in the part of the movable weight 405. Detected as a change in capacitance between the movable capacitor plate 412a formed by the layer via 414 and the M3 layer and the fixed capacitor plate 412b (formed of the same layer as the movable capacitor plate 412a) fixed to the interlayer insulating film and protruding into the cavity 420. Is done. The configuration and detection principle of the movable capacity plate 412a and the fixed capacity plate 412b are the same as those in the second embodiment.

  For detection of displacement in the direction perpendicular to the chip surface (z direction), a part of the movable weight 405 is formed of M2 layers or more, and the lower electrode 407 is fixed to the interlayer insulating film of the M1 layer immediately below the lower weight 407. And detecting the change in capacitance between the movable weight 405 and the movable weight 405.

  These x, y, z, fixed capacitance plate 412b (lower electrode 407) and movable weight 405 in each direction are each electrically connected to an integrated circuit for signal processing integrated on the same silicon substrate 401. The When the movable weight 405 moves in any of three directions due to acceleration, the distance between the movable capacitance plate 412a and the fixed capacitance plate 412b or the distance between the movable weight 405 and the lower electrode 407 changes, and the capacitance between the electrodes changes. To do. The acceleration is detected by detecting this change in capacitance with a signal processing integrated circuit (capacitance detection circuit).

  The shape of the elastic beam 406 is sufficiently thick at the base portion of the cavity, and is designed so as not to be elastically deformed even when acceleration is applied to the weight (fixed portion). On the other hand, the central part of the beam is narrower than the root part, and the length is secured by bending, and it is designed to produce the desired elastic deformation by applying a predetermined acceleration. (Elastically deformed part). Therefore, the mechanical characteristics are determined only by the planar pattern shape and film thickness of the elastic beam 406 and the movable weight 405 in the portion exposed in the cavity 420, and do not depend on the size and shape of the cavity 420. The dimensional accuracy of the elastic beam 406 and the movable weight 405 is extremely high because it is determined by the dimensional accuracy of the wiring layer and via layer patterns. On the other hand, the dimension and shape of the cavity 420 are determined by so-called etching of the interlayer insulating film, and the accuracy thereof is low, but the mechanical characteristics of the triaxial acceleration sensor in the fourth embodiment are not affected. Further, in the fourth embodiment, the elastic beam 406 and the movable capacitor plate 412a are formed of different wiring layers, so that each optimum design is possible without being restricted by the mutual planar arrangement. .

  Further, a convex portion is formed on a part of the M2 layer pattern of the movable weight 405 so as to overlap with a part of the M1 layer pattern and the M3 layer pattern protruding from the interlayer insulating film to the cavity 420 (see FIG. Not shown). Thereby, when the movable weight 405 is largely displaced in the vertical direction, the above-described convex portion of the movable weight 405 collides with the protruding portion of the M1 layer and M3 layer pattern, and the movable range of the movable weight 405 is limited. In addition, since the convex portion and the protruding portion are deformed at the time of collision to reduce the impact of the collision, according to the fourth embodiment, impact resistance and reliability are improved.

  According to the fourth embodiment, since the movable weight is formed using a plurality of wiring layers, the mass of the movable weight can be increased, and the detection sensitivity of the three-axis acceleration sensor can be improved.

  Various designs for the elastic beam 406 are possible. In the fourth embodiment, the elastic beam 406 is formed of only the M1 layer, but the M1 layer, the first layer via 410, the M2 layer, the second layer via 414, the entire M3 layer, or any of these layers A combination is also acceptable. For example, the elastic beam and the movable capacitance plate as shown in the second embodiment may be formed using all layers, or only the wiring layers of the M1, M2, and M3 layers may be used. As shown in (a), three elastic beams 406 may be formed. As a result, the sensitivity (ease of displacement) to acceleration (force) in the vertical direction (z direction) increases. In addition, as shown in FIG. 27B, the elastic beam 406 can be formed in a zigzag bent shape in the vertical direction. Thereby, the displacement in the vertical direction (z direction) is further facilitated. The shapes, dimensions, film thicknesses, and the like of the movable weight 405 and the elastic beam 406 are designed from the viewpoint of a desired acceleration range to be detected and impact resistance.

  Furthermore, a thick film made of another material may be additionally formed as the movable weight 405, and the mass of the movable weight 405 may be increased. That is, the material of the movable weight 405 according to the fourth embodiment is not limited to the wiring material of the integrated circuit, and may be other inorganic or organic insulating films. However, it is necessary to use a material that is not removed when the interlayer insulating film is etched. When the interlayer insulating film is an oxide film, various metal films, silicon-germanium films (SiGe films), silicon nitride films (SiN films), silicon oxide films, single crystal silicon films, amorphous silicon films, polysilicon films, A polyimide film or the like can be used. Further, as described below, a film other than an oxide film may be used as the interlayer insulating film.

  A manufacturing process of a structure in which a thick film is additionally formed as a movable weight with respect to the triaxial acceleration sensor according to the fourth embodiment is shown in FIGS.

  A thick film resist 425 is applied on the structure formed through substantially the same steps as those shown in FIGS. 18 to 23, and normal exposure and development are performed. An opening is formed above the movable weight 405 by the M3 layer. A portion 426 is formed (FIG. 28). Next, a nickel (Ni) film 427 is formed inside the opening 426 by using an electroless plating method (FIG. 29) (after forming the nickel film, the surface is polished if necessary).

  Thereafter, the thick film resist 425 is removed, and a nickel film 427 serving as a thick film movable weight structure is exposed on the movable weight 405 of the M3 layer (FIG. 30). Further, after a polyimide film 428 is applied so as to cover the nickel film 427 and heat treatment is performed, a tungsten (W) thin film is further formed as a cavity cover film 429 by a sputtering method (FIG. 31).

  A fine hole 430 for etching is formed in the tungsten thin film (cavity cover film 429) by a normal exposure method, and the polyimide film 428 around the nickel film 427 is removed by etching through the fine hole 430 (FIG. 32). Further, the interlayer insulating film around the movable structure by the wiring film underneath is etched away to form the cavity 431. Thereafter, the fine hole 430 for etching was closed with an insulating film 432 to seal the cavity 431 (FIG. 33).

  Thus, since the movable weight 405 including the nickel film 427 can be formed, the mass of the movable weight 405 can be further increased, so that the detection sensitivity of the three-axis acceleration sensor can be further improved.

  In the fourth embodiment also, the structure of the acceleration sensor, the formation of the cavity, and the sealing can be performed using the CMOS process, so that the same effect as in the first embodiment can be obtained. it can.

(Embodiment 5)
In the fifth embodiment, another example using an integrated structure composed of a plurality of layers of multilayer wiring will be described. In the structure according to the fifth embodiment, a movable portion having a multilayer wiring structure and surrounded by an insulating film such as an oxide film is similarly formed inside the cavity formed in the interlayer insulating film. It is fixed to the interlayer film around the cavity by an elastic beam having a wiring structure and covered with an insulating film such as an oxide film. In the embodiments described so far, since one movable body is composed of one continuous conductor, it electrically functions only as one electrode or wiring. However, in the fifth embodiment, since a plurality of independent wirings can be introduced into the structure, more complex driving of the movable body and signal detection are possible.

  34 to 39 are schematic diagrams for explaining a manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor (vibration gyro) according to the fifth embodiment.

  First, according to a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, a signal processing transistor 502 and a contact hole 503 of a vibration gyro are formed on a silicon substrate 501 (FIG. 34). Next, a sacrificial layer 506 is formed in a region corresponding to the cavity under the movable weight 505 of the vibrating gyroscope and the first layer wiring (M1 layer) 504 of the integrated circuit using a CMOS integrated circuit process. Next, after depositing an interlayer insulating film 507, an opening 509 is formed in a region corresponding to a cavity surrounding the first layer via 508 of the integrated circuit and the movable weight 505 of the vibrating gyroscope (FIG. 35). Next, using a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, metal (here, for example, tungsten) is embedded in the first layer via 508 and the opening 509, and planarization is performed by CMP.

  Subsequently, using a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, the sacrificial portion of the second layer wiring (M2 layer) 510 of the integrated circuit and the region corresponding to the cavity surrounding the movable weight 505 and the beam (not shown) of the vibrating gyroscope are sacrificed. The layer 511 is formed, and the wiring 512 is formed inside the movable weight 505 and the beam. Subsequently, after depositing an interlayer insulating film 513, an opening 515 is formed in a region corresponding to a cavity surrounding the second layer via 514 of the integrated circuit and the movable weight 505 of the vibrating gyroscope. At the same time, a via portion 516 for connecting the upper and lower wirings in the movable weight 505 (and the inside of the beam if necessary) is formed (FIG. 36).

  Next, a sacrificial layer 518 is formed in a region corresponding to a cavity surrounding the third layer wiring (M3 layer) 517 of the integrated circuit, the movable weight 505 of the vibrating gyroscope, and the beam by using a normal CMOS integrated circuit process. . At the same time, the wiring 519 is formed inside the movable weight 505 and the beam. At this time, part of the wiring 519 is formed as an independent wiring without being connected to the wiring 512. That is, a plurality of independent wirings are formed inside the movable weight 505.

  Similarly, after the interlayer insulating film 520 is deposited, an opening 522 is formed in a region corresponding to the cavity surrounding the third layer via 521 of the integrated circuit and the movable weight 505 of the vibrating gyroscope (FIG. 37). Next, by using a CMOS integrated circuit process, a fourth layer wiring (M4 layer) 523 of the integrated circuit and a sacrificial layer 524 in a region corresponding to the cavity on the movable weight 505 of the vibrating gyroscope are formed. Further, an insulating film is deposited to form an interlayer insulating film 526 having a fine hole 525 for forming a cavity (FIG. 38).

  Thereafter, the sacrificial layers 506, 511, 518, and 524 using the wiring material are removed by etching through the fine holes 525, thereby forming the cavity portion 527. Finally, the etching microhole 525 is closed with an insulating film 528 to seal the cavity (FIG. 39). For example, the wiring and the sacrificial layer are all formed of an aluminum film, but may be a tungsten film or the like.

  Since the Al etchant used for etching the sacrificial layer has a large selection ratio with respect to the insulating film, when etching the sacrificial layer, the movable weight 505 formed inside the cavity 527 and the insulating film (oxide film) on the surface of the beam ) Is extremely small. In this manner, the movable weight 505 having a plurality of independent wirings formed therein can be formed.

  Next, the structure of the angular velocity sensor (vibration gyro) formed using the manufacturing process described above will be described with reference to FIG.

  A frame-like structure 531 is formed in the cavity 530. The frame-like structure 531 is fixed to the interlayer insulating film 533 around the cavity 530 via a beam 532 whose rigidity in the detection axis (y) direction is much larger than the rigidity in the drive axis (x) direction. . That is, the frame-like structure 531 easily vibrates in the direction of the drive axis (x), but at this time, hardly moves in the direction of the detection axis. Inside the frame-like structure 531, a movable weight 534 is fixed to the frame-like structure 531 via a beam 535 whose rigidity in the drive axis (x) direction is much larger than that in the detection axis (y) direction. Is done.

  The comb-shaped first drive electrode 536 fixed to the interlayer insulating film 533 around the cavity 530 is connected to a predetermined LSI wiring. The comb-shaped second drive electrode 537 fixed to the frame-like structure 531 is connected to a predetermined LSI wiring outside the cavity 530 through the wiring in the beam 532. An AC voltage is applied between the first drive electrode 536 and the second drive electrode 537 by the oscillator 538.

  The comb-shaped first detection electrode 539 fixed to the frame-like structure 531 and the second detection electrode 540 electrically independent of the first detection electrode 539 are a predetermined LSI outside the cavity 530 via the wiring in the beam 532. Connected to wiring.

  The comb-like third detection electrode 541 fixed to the movable weight 534 is connected to a predetermined LSI wiring outside the cavity 530 via the beam 535 wiring, the frame-like structure 531 and the beam 532 wiring. ing. A capacitance detection circuit 542 is connected between the first detection electrode 539 and the third detection electrode 541, and a capacitance detection circuit 543 is connected between the second detection electrode 540 and the third detection electrode 541. Yes.

  All the electrodes described above have their surfaces covered with an insulating film. Further, all the electrodes described above are formed of a laminated film of M2 layer and M3 layer. Wirings connected to the second drive electrode 537 are formed in the M3 layer, and wirings connected to the other electrodes are all formed in the M2 layer.

Next, the operation of the vibrating gyroscope according to the fifth embodiment will be described with reference to FIG.
Hereinafter, the drive axis and the detection axis are considered as a coordinate system fixed to the cavity 530. First, by applying an AC voltage between the first drive electrode 536 and the second drive electrode 537, the frame-shaped structure 531 is vibrated in the drive axis direction. At this time, since the beam 535 connecting the frame-shaped structure 531 and the movable weight 534 has a large rigidity in the drive axis direction, the movable weight 534 vibrates in the drive axis direction together with the frame-shaped structure 531 (FIG. 41A). .

  Next, when rotation occurs around an axis perpendicular to the drive axis and the detection axis (axis perpendicular to the drawing sheet), the movable weight 534 starts to vibrate in the direction of the detection axis due to the Coriolis force. At this time, the frame-like structure 531 does not vibrate in the detection axis direction because the rigidity of the beam 532 for fixing the frame-like structure 531 around the cavity 530 is very large in the detection axis direction. Therefore, the third detection electrode 541 moves relative to the first detection electrode 539 and the second detection electrode 540 in the detection axis direction, and the capacitance between the third detection electrode 541 and the first detection electrode 539, Alternatively, the capacitance between the third detection electrode 541 and the second detection electrode 540 changes. By detecting this change in capacitance, the Coriolis force is measured and the angular velocity is detected (FIG. 41 (b)).

  According to the vibration gyro according to the fifth embodiment, since a plurality of independent wirings can be formed in the structure, independent circuits can be connected to the structure. Therefore, since it is not necessary to separate the vibration direction from the detected signal, there is an advantage that the angular velocity can be detected with extremely high accuracy and the signal processing can be greatly simplified. In the fifth embodiment, the vibration gyro structure can be formed and the cavity can be formed and sealed using the CMOS process, so that the same effect as in the first embodiment can be obtained. it can.

(Embodiment 6)
In the sixth embodiment, an example will be described in which the MEMS structure is formed by a process other than the wiring process, and the cavity is formed and sealed by the wiring process. As shown in the embodiments so far, when the beam and the movable part are formed of a wiring material, that is, a metal, in an application using the MEMS structure as a vibrating body, the vibration Q value is small due to the characteristics of the metal material. . In this case, it is appropriate to use a material such as silicon (Si) that can obtain a relatively large Q value. In the sixth embodiment, an example in which a structure of a vibrating gyroscope formed by an SOI (Silicon On Insulator) process is sealed by a wiring process will be described.

  42 to 47 are schematic views for explaining the manufacturing process of the vibrating gyroscope according to the sixth embodiment, and FIG. 48 is a schematic view showing the planar arrangement of the structures in the respective layers constituting the vibrating gyroscope. First, in order to form a vibrating body in the SOI substrate 601, an opening 604 from the surface of the SOI substrate 601 to the buried insulating film 603 is formed in the SOI layer 602 around the pattern to be a vibrating body (weight and beam). Further, the opening 604 is filled with a CVD oxide film (HLD film) 605 (FIG. 42).

  Next, in accordance with a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, a transistor 606 and a contact hole 607 for driving and signal processing of the vibration gyro are formed on the SOI substrate 601 (FIG. 43). At this time, a field oxide film 608 is formed on the vibrator forming region and the surrounding region above the SOI layer 602.

  Subsequently, the detection electrode 610 is formed on the first layer wiring (M1 layer) 609 of the integrated circuit and the center of the vibrating body forming region of the vibrating gyroscope using a CMOS integrated circuit process (FIG. 44). Thereafter, a multilayer wiring after the second layer wiring (M2 layer) 611 is formed on the integrated circuit by a normal CMOS integrated circuit process. At this time, only the interlayer insulating film is deposited on the vibrating body forming region and the surrounding region. After the uppermost wiring is formed, an interlayer insulating film 612 is further deposited, and planarization is performed using a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) method or the like as necessary. Then, a cavity cover film 614 having fine holes 613 for etching is formed on the interlayer insulating film 612 (FIG. 45).

  Thereafter, the interlayer insulating film above the vibrating body 615 through the fine holes 613, the CVD oxide film 605 embedded in the opening 604, and the buried insulating film 603 of the SOI substrate 601 below the vibrating body (weight and beam) 615, Etching is performed to form a cavity 616 around the vibrating body 615 (FIG. 46). Etching in the depth direction stops at the silicon substrate 601 below the buried insulating film 603. Finally, the fine hole 613 for etching is closed with an insulating film 617 to seal the cavity 616 (FIG. 47).

  In the application using the vibration characteristics of the structure (vibrating body) as in the sixth embodiment, the influence of gas resistance around the structure cannot be ignored. For this reason, it is desirable to make the inside of the cavity 616 as close to a vacuum as possible. However, in a CVD film having isotropic deposition characteristics used for filling the fine holes 613, the gas pressure during deposition remains in the cavity 616, and vacuum sealing is difficult. On the other hand, since the formation pressure of the anisotropic deposited film used for sealing the large opening shown in the third embodiment is close to vacuum, it can be almost vacuum sealed. Therefore, also in the sixth embodiment, as in the third embodiment, at least two kinds of holes are provided in the cavity cover film 614, the planar shape of the cavity portion 616 is defined by the fine holes, and finally the large opening hole Was vacuum sealed. However, in the sixth embodiment, unlike the third embodiment, the etching of the insulating film formed on the surface of the structure and the surface hydrophobization treatment are not necessarily required before sealing the large opening hole.

  Next, the configuration of an angular velocity sensor (vibration gyro) formed using the above-described process will be described with reference to FIG. FIG. 48A is a plan view of an SOI layer. The vibrating gyroscope includes a vibrating body 615 including a frame-like structure 620 and a weight 621, a first drive electrode 622 fixed to the outside of the cavity 616, and a frame-like structure. The second driving electrode 623 is fixed to the body 620. In the cavity 616, a frame-like structure 620 formed of an SOI layer is provided around the cavity 616 via a beam 624 whose rigidity in the drive axis (x) direction is smaller than that in the other directions. Fixed to an interlayer insulating film 625. That is, the frame-like structure 620 easily vibrates in the direction of the drive axis (x), but at this time, hardly moves in the direction of the detection axis (direction perpendicular to the paper surface) and the rotation axis (y).

  Inside the frame-like structure 620, a weight 621, which is also formed of an SOI layer, has a frame-like shape via a beam 626 in which the rigidity in the drive axis direction and the rotation axis direction is sufficiently larger than the rigidity in other directions. Fixed to the structure 620. That is, the weight 621 easily vibrates in the direction of the detection axis (z), but hardly moves in other directions.

  The two electrodes, the first drive electrode 622 and the second drive electrode 623, were formed by forming a diffusion layer by ion implantation, and connected to an integrated circuit for driving and signal processing through contact holes and multilayer wiring. These electrodes are shaped by etching when the opening 604 is formed. By applying an AC voltage between the first drive electrode 622 and the second drive electrode 623, the vibrating body 615 vibrates in the drive axis direction in the figure.

  FIG. 48B is a plan view of the detection electrode 610 formed of the M1 layer. By detecting the electrostatic capacitance between the detection electrode 610 and the weight 621, the displacement of the detection axis (direction perpendicular to the paper surface of FIG. 48 or the substrate surface of the chip) is detected. The facing area of the weight 621 and the detection electrode 610 does not change even if the weight 621 vibrates (moves) in the drive axis direction. Accordingly, the capacitance between the weight 621 and the detection electrode 610 almost depends only on the distance (distance) between them.

  The shape of the beam 626 is designed to be sufficiently thick at the root portion of the cavity and not to fluctuate within the design vibration range. Accordingly, the mechanical characteristics are determined only by the planar shape and film thickness of the weight 621 in the portion exposed in the cavity portion 616, and do not depend on the dimensional shape of the cavity portion 616, so that the accuracy is extremely high.

  Next, the operation of the angular velocity sensor according to the sixth embodiment will be described with reference to FIG. By applying an AC voltage between the first drive electrode and the second drive electrode, the frame-shaped structure 620 is vibrated in the drive axis direction. At this time, the beam 626 connecting the frame-shaped structure 620 and the weight 621 has a large rigidity in the drive axis direction, so that the weight 621 vibrates in the drive axis direction together with the frame-shaped structure 620 (FIG. 49A). Next, when rotation occurs around the rotation axis, the weight 621 starts to vibrate in the detection axis direction due to the Coriolis force. As a result, the capacitance between the weight 621 and the detection electrode 610 changes. By detecting this, the angular velocity is monitored (FIG. 49 (b)).

  As described above, in the sixth embodiment, the weight 621 is formed only by the SOI layer. However, even if a contact layer and a multilayer wiring layer are stacked on the SOI layer as the weight 621 in order to further increase the weight of the weight 621, Good. The process is briefly described below.

  First, in order to form a vibrating body in the SOI substrate 601, an opening 604 from the surface of the SOI substrate 601 to the buried insulating film 603 is formed in the SOI layer 602 around the pattern to be a vibrating body (weight and beam). Further, the opening 604 is filled with a CVD oxide film (HLD film) 605 (FIG. 50).

  Next, in accordance with a normal CMOS integrated circuit process, a transistor 606 and a contact hole 607 for driving and signal processing of the vibration gyro are formed on the SOI substrate 601 (FIG. 51). At this time, the opening 630 is also formed on the upper part of the SOI layer 602 in the vibration body forming region and the surrounding region.

  Subsequently, a multilayer wiring after the first layer wiring (M1 layer) 631 is formed on the integrated circuit by a normal CMOS integrated circuit process. At this time, the multilayer wiring 632 constituting the vibrating body is also formed on the opening 630. Then, after forming the interlayer insulating film 633, the third layer wiring (M3 layer) 634 is formed on the integrated circuit, and the detection electrode 635 is formed on the vibrating body forming region. In this modification, the detection electrode 635 is formed in the same layer as the M3 layer. However, the present invention is not limited to this, and the detection electrode 635 can be formed using an appropriate layer in the multilayer wiring. Next, after forming an interlayer insulating film 636 on the M3 layer and the detection electrode 635, a cavity cover film 638 having fine holes 637 for etching is formed on the interlayer insulating film 636 (FIG. 52).

  Thereafter, the interlayer insulating film above the vibrating body 615 through the fine hole 637, the CVD oxide film 605 embedded in the opening 604, and the buried insulating film 603 on the SOI substrate 601 below the vibrating body (weight and beam) 615, Etching is performed to form a cavity 639 around the vibrating body 615 (FIG. 53). Etching in the depth direction stops at the silicon substrate 601 below the buried insulating film 603. Finally, the etching microhole 637 is closed with an insulating film 640 to seal the cavity 639 (FIG. 54).

  In this way, since the vibrating body 615 is configured to use not only the SOI layer but also a multilayer wiring layer, the mass of the vibrating body 615 can be increased and the detection sensitivity of the vibrating gyroscope can be improved. it can.

  The vibrator may be formed of thick polysilicon instead of the SOI layer. In this case, if a substrate in which an oxide film and a polysilicon film having a predetermined thickness are sequentially stacked on a silicon substrate is used instead of the SOI substrate, the sixth embodiment can be applied almost as it is.

  Patterning of a vibrating body made of an SOI layer or thick film polysilicon, that is, defining the planar shape of the vibrating body and its peripheral part by etching and embedding an oxide film (sacrificial film) in the etched part is a transistor formation of an integrated circuit. It may be performed before or after formation.

  The gist of the sixth embodiment is that an angular velocity sensor is first constituted by a combination of a vibrating body formed by stacking an SOI layer or this and a multilayer wiring layer, and a detection electrode formed by the multilayer wiring layer. Second, the vibrating body of the angular velocity sensor is disposed in a cavity portion sealed and formed in the interlayer insulating film, and does not define the design characteristics of the angular velocity sensor. Accordingly, the above-described planar shape and arrangement are merely schematic, and can be changed and optimized as appropriate.

  In the sixth embodiment as well, the vibration gyro structure and the cavity can be formed and sealed using the CMOS process, so that the same effect as in the first embodiment can be obtained. it can.

  Next, application examples of the MEMS described in the first embodiment will be described in the seventh to ninth embodiments.

(Embodiment 7)
The overall configuration of the gas pressure monitoring system in the tire using MEMS will be described with reference to FIGS. 55 to 57. Here, FIG. 55 shows a configuration of a gas pressure monitoring system in the tire as viewed from the bottom of the vehicle. The gas pressure monitoring system includes a vehicle 701, tires 702a to 702d arranged on the front, rear, left and right, tires Tire pressure measurement modules 703a to 703d and a vehicle-mounted machine 704 are installed in each of the interiors 702a to 702d. 56 and 57 are block diagrams of the tire pressure measurement module 703 (703a to 703d) and the vehicle-mounted machine 704, respectively.

  FIG. 56 is a block diagram of the tire pressure measurement module 703, which includes an IC chip 705 formed of one chip and a battery 706 having a voltage VBAT for supplying power to the IC chip 705. The IC chip 705 includes a pressure sensor circuit 707, a temperature sensor circuit 708, an acceleration sensor circuit 709, analog / digital conversion circuits (A / D) 710, 711, 712, a calculation processing control unit 713, a storage circuit 714, a transmission circuit 715, and a reception. A circuit 716 is included. Here, the pressure sensor circuit 707 and the temperature sensor circuit 708 are circuits for measuring the gas pressure and temperature in the tire, respectively. The acceleration sensor circuit 709 is a circuit that determines whether the tire is rotating. In the pressure sensor circuit 707 and the acceleration sensor circuit 709, a MEMS (micromachine) constituting the pressure sensor and the acceleration sensor is formed. That is, an integrated circuit is formed on the IC chip 705, and a MEMS serving as a pressure sensor or an acceleration sensor is formed. The pressure sensor formed in the pressure sensor circuit 707 of the seventh embodiment and the acceleration sensor formed in the acceleration sensor circuit 709 are, for example, the pressure sensors described in the first, second, and fourth embodiments. And acceleration sensors are used.

  Since the MEMS formed on the IC chip 705 can be formed and sealed by a standard CMOS process as described in the above-described embodiment, the conventional MEMS is manufactured. Thus, the formation and sealing of special cavities (mounting process peculiar to MEMS), which are the main factors of yield reduction and manufacturing cost increase, are not required. For this reason, the seventh embodiment has advantages such as improvement in yield of the IC chip 705, reduction in manufacturing (mounting) cost, and improvement in reliability. Further, since the MEMS structure can be formed simultaneously with the LSI wiring, there is an advantage that integration with the LSI becomes easy.

  The analog-digital conversion circuits 710, 711, and 712 are circuits that convert analog voltage values output from the pressure sensor circuit 707, the temperature sensor circuit 708, and the acceleration sensor circuit 709 into digital voltage values.

  The calculation processing control unit 713 includes (1) input of a digital voltage value converted by the analog / digital conversion circuits 710, 711, and 712, and (2) a correction operation for correcting the pressure measurement value measured by the pressure sensor circuit 707, (3) Change of control state according to output from acceleration sensor circuit 709, (4) Data output to transmission circuit 715, (5) Data reception from reception circuit 716, (6) Pressure sensor circuit 707 based on EN signal The temperature sensor circuit 708, the acceleration sensor circuit 709, the transmission circuit 715, and the reception circuit 716 are controlled to be turned on and off individually.

  The storage circuit 714 is a circuit for registering a correction value for correcting the pressure measurement value measured by the pressure sensor circuit 707, an ID of the tire pressure measurement module 703, and the like. The ID number (for example, 32 bits) is used for identifying tires attached to the host vehicle and other vehicles, and identifying tire positions.

  The transmission circuit 715 is a circuit that wirelessly transmits data such as measurement values corrected and calculated by the calculation processing control unit 713 to the vehicle-mounted machine 704 shown in FIG. The frequency of the carrier used for this wireless transmission is a UHF band, for example, 315 MHz, and transmission is performed by performing ASK modulation or FSK modulation on the carrier with transmission data.

  On the other hand, the reception circuit 716 is a circuit that wirelessly receives data such as a control signal from the vehicle-mounted device 704 and transmits the data to the calculation processing control unit 713. As the frequency of the carrier wave received by the receiving circuit 716, an LF band, for example, 125 kHz is used, and a carrier wave that is ASK-modulated by transmission data is received.

  Antennas 717 and 718 are connected to the transmission circuit 715 and the reception circuit 716, respectively. Further, as the battery 706 that supplies power to the IC chip 705, for example, a coin-type lithium battery (voltage 3V) is used.

  Next, FIG. 57 is a block diagram of the vehicle-mounted machine 704. As shown in FIG. 57, the vehicle-mounted machine 704 is connected to a calculation processing control unit 719 that performs data input / output and calculation, a reception circuit 720, a transmission circuit 721, an antenna 722 connected to the reception circuit 720, and a transmission circuit 721. And a display portion 724 for displaying a measurement value and a warning.

  The calculation processing control unit 719 receives data wirelessly transmitted from the tire pressure measurement module 703 (703a to 703d) shown in FIG. 55 via the receiving circuit 720, and displays a caution / warning such as a pressure measurement value or a pressure drop. This is displayed on the part 724. Further, the calculation processing control unit 719 transmits control data to the tire pressure measurement module 703 (703a to 703d) via the transmission circuit 721. The electric power required for the vehicle-mounted machine 704 is supplied from a battery (not shown) mounted on the automobile.

  According to the seventh embodiment, the tire pressure measurement module 703 (703a to 703d) is configured by using the MEMS formed using a standard CMOS process, so that the tire pressure measurement module 703 (703a to 703d) is configured. ) And the reliability can be improved. Therefore, the reliability of the gas pressure monitoring system in the tire can be improved.

(Embodiment 8)
The overall configuration of a vehicle skid prevention apparatus using MEMS will be described with reference to FIGS. Here, FIG. 58 shows the configuration of a vehicle skid prevention device as seen from the bottom of the vehicle. The skid prevention device includes a vehicle 801, tires 802a to 802d, tires 802a to 802d arranged in the front, rear, left and right. Are provided with braking force control actuators 803a to 803d for controlling brakes (brakes) mounted on each of them, and a skid prevention control circuit 804 for controlling the braking force control actuators 803a to 803d. FIG. 59 is a block diagram of the skid prevention control circuit 804. The skid prevention control device 804 has a one-chip IC chip 805 and a braking force calculation circuit 806.

  The IC chip 805 includes acceleration sensor circuits 807 and 808 that detect accelerations in the coordinate axis x and y directions shown in FIG. 58 and an angular velocity sensor circuit 809 that detects a rotational angular velocity around the coordinate axis z. The angular velocity sensor circuit 809 and the acceleration sensor circuits 807 and 808 are formed with MEMS constituting the angular velocity sensor and the acceleration sensor. That is, an integrated circuit is formed on the IC chip 805, and a MEMS serving as an angular velocity sensor or an acceleration sensor is formed. The angular velocity sensor formed in the angular velocity sensor circuit 809 of the eighth embodiment and the acceleration sensor formed in the acceleration sensor circuits 807 and 808 include, for example, the acceleration sensor described in the first and second embodiments. The angular velocity sensor described in the fifth and sixth embodiments is used.

  Since the MEMS formed on the IC chip 805 can be formed and sealed by a standard CMOS process as described in the above-described embodiment, the conventional MEMS is manufactured. Thus, the formation and sealing of special cavities (mounting process peculiar to MEMS), which are the main factors of yield reduction and manufacturing cost increase, are not required. For this reason, the eighth embodiment has advantages such as improvement in yield of the IC chip 805, reduction in manufacturing (mounting) cost, and improvement in reliability. Further, since the MEMS structure can be formed simultaneously with the LSI wiring, there is an advantage that integration with the LSI becomes easy.

  The IC chip 805 includes analog / digital conversion circuits (A / D) 810, 811, 812, a correction arithmetic circuit 813, and a storage circuit 814. The analog-digital conversion circuits 810, 811 and 812 are circuits that convert the analog voltage values output from the angular velocity sensor circuit 809 and the acceleration sensor circuits 807 and 808 into digital voltage values. The correction calculation circuit 813 is a circuit for correcting a deviation from the ideal output characteristics of the angular velocity sensor circuit 809 and the acceleration sensor circuits 807 and 808, and the coefficient of the correction value is registered in the storage circuit 814 in advance.

  The skid prevention apparatus according to the eighth embodiment is configured as described above, and the outline of the operation will be described below. First, the angular velocity sensor circuit 809 and the acceleration sensor circuits 807 and 808 formed on the IC chip 805 detect the angular velocity and acceleration applied to the vehicle. The steering angle (steering operation angle) is also detected. Furthermore, the vehicle speed, the amount of brake operation, etc. are detected from the outside. When the skid prevention control circuit 804 inputs information such as angular velocity, acceleration, rudder angle, vehicle speed, and brake operation amount, a control signal is sent from the skid prevention control circuit 804 to the braking force control actuator 803 (803a) so that the vehicle does not skid. To 803d). Then, the braking force of the tires 802a to 802d is controlled by the braking force control actuator 803 (803a to 803d). As a result, a side slip of the vehicle can be prevented.

  According to the eighth embodiment, since the IC chip 805 is formed using MEMS formed using a standard CMOS process, the yield of the IC chip 805 can be improved or the reliability can be improved. . Therefore, it is possible to improve the reliability of the vehicle skid prevention device.

(Embodiment 9)
The overall configuration of the vehicle air suspension control device will be described with reference to FIGS. 60 and 61. Here, FIG. 60 shows a block diagram of the air suspension control device 901. The air suspension control device 901 includes a one-chip IC chip 902, a spring constant / damping constant calculation circuit 903, and an internal pressure of the air suspension. And an actuator 904 for controlling the above. The IC chip 902 includes a pressure sensor circuit 905, a temperature sensor circuit 906, an acceleration sensor circuit 907, analog-digital conversion circuits (A / D) 908, 909, and 910, a correction arithmetic circuit 911, and a storage circuit 912. Here, the pressure sensor circuit 905 and the temperature sensor circuit 906 are circuits for measuring the gas pressure and temperature in the air suspension, respectively. The acceleration sensor circuit 907 is a circuit that measures acceleration in the vertical direction as viewed from the vehicle and mainly detects road irregularities and vertical movement of the vehicle. The pressure sensor circuit 905 and the acceleration sensor circuit 907 are formed with MEMS constituting the pressure sensor and the acceleration sensor. That is, an integrated circuit is formed on the IC chip 902, and a MEMS serving as a pressure sensor or an acceleration sensor is formed. The pressure sensor formed in the pressure sensor circuit 905 of the ninth embodiment and the acceleration sensor formed in the acceleration sensor circuit 907 are, for example, the pressure sensors described in the first, second, and fourth embodiments. And acceleration sensors are used.

  Since the MEMS formed on the IC chip 902 can be formed and sealed by a standard CMOS process as described in the above-described embodiment, the conventional MEMS is manufactured. Thus, the formation and sealing of special cavities (mounting process peculiar to MEMS), which are the main factors of yield reduction and manufacturing cost increase, are not required. For this reason, the ninth embodiment is advantageous in that the yield of the IC chip 902 can be improved, the manufacturing (mounting) cost can be reduced, or the reliability can be improved. Further, since the MEMS structure can be formed simultaneously with the LSI wiring, there is an advantage that integration with the LSI becomes easy.

  The analog-digital conversion circuits 908, 909, and 910 are circuits that convert analog voltage values output from the pressure sensor circuit 905, the temperature sensor circuit 906, and the acceleration sensor circuit 907 into digital voltage values. The correction arithmetic circuit 911 is a circuit for correcting a deviation from ideal output characteristics of the pressure sensor circuit 905 and the acceleration sensor circuit 907, and the coefficient of the correction value is registered in the storage circuit 912 in advance.

  FIG. 61 is a view as seen from the side of the vehicle, and shows the configuration of the vehicle equipped with an air suspension. In FIG. 61, an automobile has a vehicle body 913, tires 914a and 914b (only one side surface shown here) arranged on the front, rear, left and right sides, an air suspension control device 901 (901a and 901b) mounted therein, and tires 914a and 914b. Air suspensions 915a and 915b using air springs for suspending the vehicle body 913 are provided.

  The air suspension control device 901 is configured as described above, and an outline of its operation will be described below.

  First, the pressure and acceleration applied to the vehicle are detected by the pressure sensor circuit 905 and the acceleration sensor circuit 907 formed on the IC chip 902. Further, the vehicle speed is detected from the outside. When the air suspension control device 901 acquires information such as pressure, acceleration, and vehicle speed, a control signal is output to the actuator 904 so that the vehicle does not vibrate up and down. Then, the spring constants and damping constants of the air suspensions 915a and 915b are controlled to suppress the vertical vibration of the vehicle.

  According to the ninth embodiment, since the IC chip 902 is formed using the MEMS formed using a standard CMOS process, the yield of the IC chip 902 or the reliability can be improved. . Therefore, the reliability of the vehicle air suspension control device can be improved.

  As mentioned above, the invention made by the present inventor has been specifically described based on the embodiment. However, the present invention is not limited to the embodiment, and various modifications can be made without departing from the scope of the invention. Needless to say.

  The MEMS structure described in the above embodiment includes any one of a metal film, a silicon-germanium film, a silicon nitride film, a silicon oxide film, a single crystal silicon film, a polysilicon film, an amorphous silicon film, or a polyimide film. You may form as follows.

  The integrated MEMS according to the present invention can be used in, for example, automobiles, portable devices, amusement devices, wireless devices, information appliances, computers, and the like.

It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor in Embodiment 1 of this invention. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor following FIG. FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process following FIG. 2. FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process subsequent to FIG. 3. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor following FIG. FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram illustrating a manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor subsequent to FIG. 5. FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process following FIG. 6. FIG. 8 is a schematic diagram illustrating a manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor subsequent to FIG. 7. (A), (b), (c) is a schematic diagram which respectively shows the plane arrangement | positioning of the main layer which comprises an acceleration sensor. It is a circuit block diagram which shows the circuit structure of a capacity | capacitance detection circuit. It is a schematic diagram which shows the cross-sectional structure which formed the acceleration sensor and the pressure sensor simultaneously. 6 is a schematic diagram showing a cross-sectional structure of an acceleration sensor according to Embodiment 2. FIG. (A), (b) is a schematic diagram which shows the plane arrangement | positioning of the main layer which comprises an acceleration sensor, respectively. It is a schematic diagram which shows the cross-sectional structure which formed the acceleration sensor and the pressure sensor simultaneously. (A), (b), (c) is the schematic diagram which showed the structure and basic operation | movement of the MEMS switch in Embodiment 3, respectively. (A), (b), (c), (d) is a schematic diagram which shows a part of manufacturing process of a MEMS switch, respectively. (A), (b) is a schematic diagram which shows the planar arrangement | positioning of the main layer of a MEMS switch, respectively. FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor in the fourth embodiment. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor following FIG. FIG. 20 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process following FIG. 19. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor following FIG. FIG. 22 is a schematic diagram illustrating a manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor following FIG. 21. FIG. 23 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process following FIG. 22. FIG. 24 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process following FIG. 23. FIG. 25 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process following FIG. 24. (A), (b), (c) is a schematic diagram which shows the planar arrangement | positioning of the main layer which comprises an acceleration sensor, respectively. (A), (b) is a schematic diagram which shows the cross-section of the acceleration sensor in the modification of Embodiment 4, respectively. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor in the modification of Embodiment 4. FIG. 29 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process following FIG. 28. FIG. 30 is a schematic diagram illustrating a manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor following FIG. 29. FIG. 31 is a schematic diagram illustrating an acceleration sensor manufacturing process following FIG. 30. FIG. 32 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor following FIG. 31. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the acceleration sensor following FIG. FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process of an angular velocity sensor (vibration gyro) in a fifth embodiment. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. FIG. 36 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process for the angular velocity sensor continued from FIG. 35. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram illustrating a configuration of an angular velocity sensor according to a fifth embodiment. (A), (b) is a schematic diagram which shows the operation | movement of the angular velocity sensor in Embodiment 5, respectively. FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process of an angular velocity sensor in a sixth embodiment. FIG. 43 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process for the angular velocity sensor continued from FIG. 42. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. (A), (b) is a schematic diagram which shows the planar arrangement | positioning of the main layer which comprises an angular velocity sensor, respectively. (A), (b) is a schematic diagram which shows the operation | movement of the angular velocity sensor in Embodiment 6, respectively. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor in the modification of Embodiment 6. It is a schematic diagram which shows the manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. FIG. 52 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. 51. FIG. 53 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process of the angular velocity sensor following FIG. 52. FIG. 54 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing process for the angular velocity sensor continued from FIG. 53. It is a figure which shows the structure of the gas pressure monitoring system in the tire seen from the vehicle bottom face of the motor vehicle. It is a block diagram of a tire pressure measurement module. It is a block diagram of a vehicle mounting machine. It is a figure which shows the structure of the skid prevention apparatus seen from the vehicle bottom face of the motor vehicle. It is a block diagram of a skid prevention device. It is a block diagram of an air suspension control device. It is a figure which shows the structure of the air suspension control apparatus seen from the vehicle side surface of a motor vehicle.

Explanation of symbols

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 101 Silicon substrate 102 Signal processing transistor 103 Contact hole 104 First layer wiring 105 Etching stopper film 106 Interlayer insulating film 107 Via hole 108 Fourth layer wiring 109 Movable weight 110 Elastic beam 111 Fixed beam 112 Interlayer insulating film 113 Micro hole 114 Cavity cover Membrane 115 Cavity 116 Insulating Film 117 Acceleration Sensor 118 CV Conversion Circuit 119 Operational Amplifier 120 AD Conversion Circuit 121 Microprocessor 122 Non-Volatile Memory 123 Output Interface Circuit 130 Uniaxial Acceleration Sensor 131 Pressure Sensor 132 Lower Electrode 133 Upper Electrode 134 Cavity 135 Micro hole 201 Biaxial acceleration sensor 202 Movable weight 203 Elastic beam 204 Fixed capacity plate 205 Pad layer 206 LSI
207 Cavity 208 Etching stopper film 209 Cavity cover film 210 Interlayer insulation film 211 Movable capacitance plate 212 Micro hole 220 Pressure sensor 221 Upper electrode connection wiring 222 Lower electrode connection wiring 223 Interlayer insulation film 224 Lower electrode 225 Insulation film pattern 226 Upper part Electrode 227 Cavity part 300 MEMS switch 301 Central movable part 301a Contact part 301b Contact part 302 Input line 302a Contact part 303 Output line 303a Contact part 304 Cavity part 305 Interlayer insulating film 306 Fixed part 307 Spring part 308 Movable part 309 Displacement comb tooth Actuator 309a Electrode 309b Electrode 310 Fixed part 311 Spring part 312 Movable part 313 Displacement comb actuator 313a Electrode 313b Electrode 314 Fixed part 315 Spring part 316 Movable part 317 Displacement comb-tooth actuator 317a Electrode 317b Electrode 320 Structure 321 Interlayer insulating film 322 Cavity cover film 323 Micro hole 324 Large aperture 325 Cavity 326 Insulating film 327 Insulating film 401 Silicon substrate 402 Signal processing transistor 403 Contact hole 404 First Layer wiring 405 Movable weight 406 Elastic beam 407 Lower electrode 408 Micro hole 409 Interlayer insulating film 410 First layer via 411 Opening 412 Second layer wiring 412a Movable capacitor plate 412b Fixed capacitor plate 413 Interlayer insulating film 414 Second layer via 415 Opening Portion 416 Third layer wiring 417 Interlayer insulating film 418 Fine hole 419 Cavity cover film 420 Cavity 421 Insulating film 425 Thick film resist 426 Opening 427 Nickel film 428 Polyimide film 429 Cavity cover film 43 Microhole 431 Cavity 432 Insulating film 501 Silicon substrate 502 Signal processing transistor 503 Contact hole 504 First layer wiring 505 Movable weight 506 Sacrificial layer 507 Interlayer insulating film 508 First layer via 509 Opening 510 Second layer wiring 511 Sacrificing layer 512 wiring 513 interlayer insulating film 514 second layer via 515 opening 516 via portion 517 third layer wiring 518 sacrificial layer 519 wiring 520 interlayer insulating film 521 third layer via 522 opening 523 fourth layer wiring 524 sacrificing layer 525 microhole 526 Interlayer insulating film 527 Cavity part 528 Insulating film 530 Cavity part 531 Frame-like structure 532 Beam 533 Interlayer insulation film 534 Movable weight 535 Beam 536 First drive electrode 537 Second drive electrode 538 Oscillator 539 First detection electrode 540 Second detection Electrode 541 Third detection Electrode 542 Capacitance detection circuit 543 Capacitance detection circuit 601 SOI substrate 602 SOI layer 603 buried insulating film 604 opening 605 CVD oxide film 606 transistor 607 contact hole 608 field oxide film 609 first layer wiring 610 detection electrode 611 second Layer wiring 612 Interlayer insulating film 613 Micro hole 614 Cavity cover film 615 Vibrating body 616 Cavity 617 Insulating film 620 Frame structure 621 Weight 622 First drive electrode 623 Second drive electrode 624 Beam 625 Interlayer insulation film 626 Beam 630 Opening 631 First layer wiring 632 Multilayer wiring 633 Interlayer insulating film 634 Third layer wiring 635 Detection electrode 636 Interlayer insulating film 637 Micro hole 638 Cavity cover film 639 Cavity 640 Insulating film 701 Vehicle 702a to 702d Tire 703 Tire Measurement modules 703a to 703d Tire pressure measurement module 704 Vehicle-mounted machine 705 IC chip 706 Battery 707 Pressure sensor circuit 708 Temperature sensor circuit 709 Acceleration sensor circuit 710-712 Analog-digital conversion circuit 713 Calculation processing control unit 714 Storage circuit 715 Transmission circuit 716 Reception Circuit 717, 718 Antenna 801 Vehicle 802a to 802d Tire 803 Braking force control actuator 803a to 803d Braking force control actuator 804 Side slip prevention control circuit 805 IC chip 806 Braking force calculation circuit 807 Acceleration sensor circuit 808 Acceleration sensor circuit 809 Angular velocity sensor circuit 810 812 Analog-digital conversion circuit 813 Correction arithmetic circuit 814 Memory circuit 901 Air suspension control device 901a-90 d Air suspension control device 902 IC chip 903 Spring constant / damping constant arithmetic circuit 904 Actuator 905 Pressure sensor circuit 906 Temperature sensor circuit 907 Acceleration sensor circuit 908-910 Analog-digital conversion circuit 911 Correction arithmetic circuit 912 Storage circuit 913 Car body 914a, 914b Tire 915a, 915b Air suspension

Claims (11)

  1. An integrated microelectromechanical system in which a micromachine and a semiconductor integrated circuit device are formed on a semiconductor substrate,
    The micromachine is
    (A) an interlayer insulating film formed on the semiconductor substrate;
    (B) a cavity formed by removing a part of the interlayer insulating film;
    (C) a structure formed inside the cavity,
    (D) a sealing portion that seals the hollow portion;
    The structure is
    (C1) a fixed beam fixed to the interlayer insulating film around the cavity,
    (C2) an elastic beam connected to one end of the fixed beam;
    (C3) a movable weight connected to one end of the elastic beam;
    The width of the fixed beam is larger than the width of the elastic beam,
    The integrated microelectromechanical system , wherein the sealing portion is formed of a cavity cover film in which a hole is closed with an insulating film .
  2.   2. The integrated micro electro mechanical system according to claim 1, wherein the cavity is formed without using a sacrificial film having a different etching characteristic from the interlayer insulating film.
  3.   2. The integrated micro electro mechanical system according to claim 1, wherein the structural body is formed in the same layer as a wiring constituting the semiconductor integrated circuit device.
  4. The integrated microelectromechanical system according to claim 1, wherein the structure is formed of a plurality of conductive films .
  5. The micromachine is an acceleration sensor or a gyro,
    The movable weight is integrated micro electromechanical system according to claim 1, characterized in that the weight to be used for the acceleration sensor or the gyro.
  6. The movable weight is formed so as to include any of a metal film, a silicon-germanium film, a silicon nitride film, a silicon oxide film, a single crystal silicon film, a polysilicon film, an amorphous silicon film, or a polyimide film. The integrated microelectromechanical system according to claim 1 .
  7. Wherein the movable weight, electrically independent integrated micro electromechanical system according to claim 1, wherein a plurality of lines are formed.
  8.   2. The integrated micro electro mechanical system according to claim 1, wherein the micromachine is formed by being laminated on an upper part of a wiring constituting the semiconductor integrated circuit device.
  9. The micromachine has a pressure sensor and an acceleration sensor,
    2. The integrated micro electro mechanical system according to claim 1, wherein the upper electrode of the pressure sensor and the sealing film of the acceleration sensor are formed of the same layer.
  10. The sealing portion has a first hole and a second hole having a diameter larger than that of the first hole,
    2. The integrated micro electro mechanical system according to claim 1, wherein both the first hole and the second hole are sealed with an insulating film.
  11. 9. The integrated microelectromechanical system according to claim 8, further comprising an electrode which is a conductor layer between the structure of the micromachine and the semiconductor integrated circuit device.
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EP05255278.3A EP1695937B1 (en) 2005-02-25 2005-08-26 Integrated micro electro-mechanical system and manufacturing method thereof
US12/216,359 US8129802B2 (en) 2005-02-25 2008-07-02 Integrated micro electro-mechanical system and manufacturing method thereof
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