EP1734202A1 - Panel provided with a repositionable adhesive, in particular to cover floors, walls or ceilings - Google Patents

Panel provided with a repositionable adhesive, in particular to cover floors, walls or ceilings Download PDF

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Publication number
EP1734202A1
EP1734202A1 EP20050291280 EP05291280A EP1734202A1 EP 1734202 A1 EP1734202 A1 EP 1734202A1 EP 20050291280 EP20050291280 EP 20050291280 EP 05291280 A EP05291280 A EP 05291280A EP 1734202 A1 EP1734202 A1 EP 1734202A1
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EP
European Patent Office
Prior art keywords
coupling means
panel
locking
characterized
panel according
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
EP20050291280
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German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Xavier Bathelier
Bernard-André Deconinck
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Tarkett Sas
Original Assignee
TARKETT SAS
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Publication date
Application filed by TARKETT SAS filed Critical TARKETT SAS
Priority to EP20050291280 priority Critical patent/EP1734202A1/en
Publication of EP1734202A1 publication Critical patent/EP1734202A1/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F13/00Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings
    • E04F13/07Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor
    • E04F13/08Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/04Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements only of wood or with a top layer of wood, e.g. with wooden or metal connecting members
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/01Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship
    • E04F2201/0153Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship by rotating the sheets, plates or panels around an axis which is parallel to the abutting edges, possibly combined with a sliding movement
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/07Joining sheets or plates or panels with connections using a special adhesive material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/17Three or more coplanar interfitted sections with securing means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/19Sheets or webs edge spliced or joined
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/249921Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/249921Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component
    • Y10T428/249923Including interlaminar mechanical fastener

Abstract

A panel (10), particularly a floor covering panel, includes tongue and groove (24) and tongue (26 ') coupling means designed for angular interlocking essentially without elastic deformation. At least one of the coupling means is provided, on at least a portion of its surface, with a repositionable adhesive deposit (39 ', 40') for securing the panels during coupling. The repositionable adhesive provides a "click" effect and allows a plurality of assemblies / disassemblies.

Description

    Technical area
  • The present invention generally relates to surface coating panels. It relates more particularly floors or so-called floating floors, including panels, commonly called blades or slats for the production of such floors and floors.
  • State of the art
  • Floating floors have been booming for a few years now. As opposed to nailed or glued parquet for which the installation is delicate and exclusively in the field of specialists, the floating floors are particularly appreciated for their simplicity of installation (on an existing flooring type carpet, tiles or vinyl, or even the slab).
  • As is known, the floorboards are conventionally provided on their edges tongue and groove coupling elements which are intended for the interlocking connection of two adjacent blades during the assembly of the floor.
  • Among the different systems proposed for the interlocking of parquet flooring boards for the realization of floating floors, those which meet the most successful with the consumer and consequently tend to spread to the point of probably ousting in the near future all the others are the so-called "angling systems" (or "angling systems"). In these angular interlocking systems, the coupling of two parquet strips is done by engaging the blade to be assembled at a certain angle (generally 45 °) with respect to the already laid blade, then by printing to this blade a movement of rotation whose axis coincides approximately with the edges in contact with the upper edges of the blades, to bring it into the assembly plane.
  • Such a system is for example described in the patent US 4,426,820 delivered to Heinz Terbrack. The floorboards have a rectangular shape and are designed to be assembled by interlocking their opposite longitudinal edges. To do this, one edge is provided with a first coupling element comprising a groove and the other with a second coupling element comprising a tongue and intended to cooperate with the first coupling element of a blade of identical floor. Mechanical locking means are integrated in said coupling elements so that, when two floorboards are coupled in the assembly plane, preventing these floorboards from moving away from each other in a perpendicular direction to that of said songs and parallel to the assembly plane. According to the mating profile presented in US 4,426,820 the groove of the first coupling element is delimited by an upper lip and a lower lip. The lower lip extends beyond the upper lip and includes a projecting locking member. The second coupling means comprises, in addition to the tongue fitting into the groove of the first coupling means, a locking groove cooperating with the projecting locking element in order to block the blade in the transverse direction.
  • Many improvements have since been proposed by manufacturers, the most useful of which is commonly called the "click". The "click" means a partial blocking of the blades together after assembly to maintain them integral by preventing rotation in the direction of uncoupling: if one seeks to separate the last blade engaged, it will only succeed by exerting a certain effort. This partial lock has 2 advantages:
    • It facilitates the pose itself. Indeed, before assembling by their long sides the blades of the last row with the floor during installation it is advisable to assemble them by their small sides (with identical profiles to the large sides) and to keep them in place. using wedges. The "click" effect acting on the short sides makes it possible to secure the row of blades, to limit the number of shims to be used and thus to facilitate the engagement of the complete row.
    • It allows the user to be certain that all blades are fully engaged in each other, since they become interdependent because of the click. It serves as a kind of assembly witness. This function is of real importance, mainly in the case of rolled products based on MDF (Medium Density Fiber) or HDF (High Density Fiber) thin (eg 6 mm) where the grooves are shallow and the protruding parts weakened,
  • This partial locking effect is obtained by generating a friction, and more specifically by acting on the elasticity of the material at the end of the rotation during assembly of the boards.
  • Such a click system is for example described in the patent EP 1 026 341 B1 from UNILIN. In this system, the coupling elements are provided with means which, when inserted into each other of two adjacent parquet strips, exert a mutual tension force which forces the blades one towards the other. other. This is achieved by a particular configuration of the locking groove and the locking projection, which, in the assembled state, results in an elastic deformation of the lower lip of the first coupling element and thus provides the desired tension force.
  • Thus, the "click" effect in known systems typically results from a solicitation of the intrinsic elasticity of the materials constituting the blades. Furthermore, the efforts involved in the click will be more or less strongly solicit the blade in its place generally of the lowest thickness.
  • Finally, it should be noted, and this clearly shows the interests evoked for this system, that this effect is all the more interesting as it is obvious.
  • It is therefore easy to understand that in the case of thin products, for example of the HDF type, it becomes difficult to reconcile resistance of the material and intensity of the "click" effect. Indeed for such materials, the thickness of the blade may be less than mm.
  • Object of the invention
  • There is therefore a need for floorboards of the angular interlocking type, which have a "click" effect making it possible to check that the boards are secured during the laying of a floor, but which does not risk damaging the floorboards. parquet.
  • General description of the invention
  • According to the invention, this objective is achieved by a panel according to claim 1.
  • The panel according to the present invention employs coupling elements designed for angular interlocking essentially without elastic deformation, comparable in this sense to those of the conventional Terbrack system. According to an important aspect of the invention, at least one of the coupling elements is provided with a repositionable adhesive to secure two same panels joined by their respective coupling means. Thus an angular interlocking effect with "click" effect essentially without elastic deformation of the coupling elements and panels, allowing assembly / disassembly of the panels without compromising their integrity.
  • The term repositionable adhesive conventionally means adhesives having an adhesive force, generally called tack or tack, sufficient for immediate adhesion during the stress. Such adhesives allow a large number of collages / takeoffs, normally without decreasing the tackiness. A repositionable adhesive has a tack that is generally lower than that of permanent adhesives, and there is no increase in adhesive strength after contacting.
  • During the nesting, the repositionable adhesive makes it possible to immediately secure the panels, that is to say to immobilize them relative to each other. The fact that the panels become integral is, for the user, an indication of a proper interlocking; he can then manipulate the assembly without risk of separation. If the user wishes to separate panels assembled, it will have to overcome the adhesion force of the glue. In practice, the user will feel resistance to the separation of the panels reminiscent of the "click" systems with elastic deformation.
  • The present invention thus relates to a panel for the coating of surfaces whose coupling elements are designed to allow a use similar to known "click" systems. However, the panel according to the present invention is provided with a "chemical click", which unlike known systems with "mechanical click", does not rely on an elastic deformation of the coupling elements, but on a blocking (immobilization of the means mating relative to each other) due to the physicochemical properties of the materials in contact.
  • According to a preferred embodiment, the first coupling means comprises an upper lip and a lower lip delimiting the groove, the lower lip extending beyond the upper lip. In addition, the mechanical locking means comprise:
    • a locking member projecting upwardly on the lower lip, the locking member having a first locking surface; and
    • a second locking surface on the second coupling means, which is adapted to cooperate with the first locking surface of a similar panel to prevent displacement perpendicular to the edges and parallel to the assembly plane.
  • In this variant, the locking element is preferably on the lower lip beyond said upper lip in the direction perpendicular to the edge. The second locking surface is then defined by a locking groove in the second coupling means, behind the tongue.
  • The first, preferably planar, locking surface may have a locking angle of between 35 and 70 degrees to the horizontal. The larger the angle, the better the cross lock.
  • Typically, for an angular interlocking, the coupling means are designed so that the tongue of a first panel can be inserted, with a certain inclination, into the groove of a second panel, and that the stop of the second panel is insertable into the locking groove of the first panel by a relative rotational movement between these panels about an axis of rotation corresponding to the upper edges of the songs in contact. Advantageously, the repositionable adhesive is provided on surfaces of the coupling means which are only stressed at the end of the rotation during assembly, thus immediately securing the blades and not interfering with the interlocking
  • For the disassembly of two adjacent panels, it will therefore overcome the adhesive strength of the repositionable adhesive. In the present invention, the term "decoupling moment" is the moment to be overcome in order to initiate the rotation of a panel in the disassembly direction. Preferably, this disassembly moment is of the order of 3 to 9 Nm / m, more preferably about 6 Nm / m. These values are of the order of magnitude of those observed on "mechanical click" systems.
  • The "click" effect of the panels according to the invention can be modulated in various ways. In particular, the following parameters can be used: tack of the adhesive; geometry / profile of the coupling means; form of the adhesive deposit; number and position of adhesive deposits.
  • The tack is a function of the selected adhesive (glue) selected. Given the desired disassembly moment, repositionable adhesives will typically be used with a predetermined tack, preferably between 0.05 and 0.30 N / mm 2 , more preferably on the order of 0.15 N / mm 2. . It goes without saying that we are talking here about the stickiness of the adhesive vis-à-vis the panel that will come into contact with the adhesive during assembly, and not the adhesion strength of the adhesive. adhesive relative to the surface of the coupling means to which it has been applied.
  • The repositionable adhesive selected preferably has excellent adhesion to the material constituting the panel (typically HDF, MDF or wood for the production of parquet) during its implementation and subsequently retain a stickiness that will allow it to partially adhere to these same materials or other polymer-like materials (the tackiness still remains less than the adhesion during the implementation), Of course, the adhesive repositionable must have an immediate adhesion during the solicitation, and allow a large number of assemblies / disassemblies. There is a variety of repositionable glues and it will be advisable to make a choice according to the materials, the desired tackiness, the method of application, etc ...
  • Hot-melt adhesives ("hot-melt") are particularly preferred, especially for their ease of implementation. It will be applied in the form of cords at the desired locations of the coupling means. Preferably, thermo-fusible adhesives will be chosen to form, after cooling, cords with a hardness (and cohesion) sufficient to prevent the glue flue to the other panel during disassembly.
  • Advantageously, the repositionable adhesive is provided on surfaces of the coupling means which are only stressed at the end of the nesting (end of rotation) during assembly, thus immediately joining the panels and not interfering nesting.
  • In addition, the repositionable adhesive can be positioned on facing surfaces of the coupling means that are not in contact when the panel is coupled to the same panel. It will therefore be possible advantageously to provide adhesive beads on non-functional surfaces (which are not used for alignment or locking) of the coupling means, for example at assembly games.
  • Such an assembly clearance typically exists behind the locking member, which includes slightly spaced facing surfaces of the locking groove. These surfaces are not normally in contact with other surfaces during nesting. The rear surface of this locking groove, distinct from the second locking surface, is therefore advantageously provided with one or more repositionable adhesive deposits.
  • Positioning the adhesive on the second coupling means, and especially in the locking groove, allows limited exposure of the adhesive deposits and thus prevents their degradation (dust or otherwise).
  • To prevent the rise of moisture from below the panels, it will advantageously provide a repositionable adhesive deposit in the lower part of the second coupling means. Such a deposit may also be provided in the upper part of the coupling means to prevent the penetration of moisture from the upper face of the panels.
  • As shown, the geometry of the profile influences the click effect. In this context, it should be noted that a maximum disassembly moment can be obtained when the adhesive adheres to a surface of the locking element which is included in a plane passing through the axis of rotation during uncoupling. In general, the surfaces of the coupling means provided with an adhesive deposit repositionable or coming into contact with the adhesive in the assembled state are preferably flat.
  • Note that the adhesive deposits are preferably made directly on the panel material, e.g. HDF or MDF, and that these deposit
  • It will also be noted that the surfaces of the coupling means which will come into contact with an adhesive deposit may be in a different material than that of the rest of the coupling means. These surfaces could for example be covered with a polymer. This can help prevent the accumulation of particles of the panel material on the adhesive during disassembly.
  • The panel according to the invention has been particularly developed for flooring and especially for the production of parquet floors. It can therefore have a classic shape (rectangular or square) floorboard. Conventionally, the first coupling means will be provided on a small and a large side, and the second coupling means will be provided on the other small and long side. The repositionable adhesive deposits are then advantageously performed on the coupling means of the small and long sides.
  • Depending on the applications, the shape of the panels and the number of edges may vary (eg polygonal shape), and the coupling means will be distributed adequately.
  • The panel according to the invention can be easily manufactured according to the usual techniques, be it solid wood, laminated or laminated. The application of a heat-fusible repositionable adhesive for example can be easily done by guns at predefined locations of the coupling means, after machining thereof.
  • However, the panel according to the invention can be used for covering surfaces other than floors, such as walls or ceilings. The panels can be made of various materials, depending on the application.
  • In this context, it will be appreciated that the panel according to the invention makes it possible to obtain a "click" effect even with materials which, unlike wood, HDF or agglomerated, do not have real elasticity. Such materials, which for certain applications may prove to be serious competitors with HDF, are, for example, fibrocins or certain highly filled resins which lend themselves well to machining (for the production of an angular interlocking profile) but which do not have no elasticity.
  • In a large number of applications, the panel according to the invention may have a multilayer structure, generally of the type: upper layer / support layer / counterbalance (if necessary). For floors, the top layer can be solid wood glued to the support or made of a melamine-coated sheet (imitating wood or other materials such as stone, ceramic, etc.). The support layer may be a particle board (MDF, HDF, chipboard), or made of wooden battens. Depending on the applications, the upper layer may be ceramic, or polymer. Moreover, as mentioned above, the support may be fiber cement or resin, or other materials that lend themselves well to machining.
  • Description of the drawings
  • Other features and features of the invention will become apparent from the detailed description of an advantageous embodiment presented below, by way of illustration, with reference to the accompanying drawings. These show:
  • Fig.1:
    a cross-sectional view of a preferred embodiment of a floor covering panel according to the invention;
    Fig.2:
    a sectional view illustrating the angular engagement of two identical flooring panels according to the variant of Fig.1;
    Fig.3:
    a view of the two assembled panels; and
    Fig.4:
    a cross-sectional view through a panel assembly according to the invention with a modified coupling profile.
  • In the figures, the same reference signs designate identical or similar elements.
  • Detailed description of a preferred embodiment
  • Fig.1 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a preferred embodiment of a panel 10 according to the invention. In the present variant, the panel 10 is a floor covering panel for producing a floating floor (or floor). This panel, which is then commonly called blade or batten, generally has a rectangular shape and conventionally comprises an upper face 12, an opposite lower face 14 intended to rest in the assembly plane, and two opposite longitudinal edges 16 and 18 respectively provided with coupling means 20 and 22 to be joined to other similar panels. The short sides are also provided with such coupling means.
  • The first coupling means 20 comprises a groove 24 and the second coupling means 22 is provided with a tongue 26. Conventionally, these coupling means 20 and 22 are designed so as to cooperate together for the assembly of the coupling. panel 10 to other panels of this type.
  • The groove 24 of the first coupling means is delimited by an upper lip 28 and a lower lip 30 which extends beyond the upper lip 28 in the direction perpendicular to the edge 16.
  • Mechanical locking means are integrated in the coupling means 20 and 22, so that when the panel 10 is coupled to another identical panel in the assembly plane, these locking means prevent the two panels from moving away from each other in a direction perpendicular to that of the edges 16, 18 and parallel to the assembly plane. In the present variant, the locking means comprise a locking element or stop 32 projecting upwards on the lower lip 30, said stop 32 defining a first locking surface 34. The locking means also comprise a locking groove. 36 in the second coupling means 22, which has a second locking surface 38. As for the tongue 26 and the groove 24, the stop 32 and the groove 36 preferably extend over the entire length of the edges.
  • As shown in the figures, the stop 32 is located on the top of the lower lip 30, beyond the upper lip 28 and thus out of the groove 24. The groove 36 when it is facing down and located behind the tongue 26. The stop 30 and the groove 36 are designed so that in the coupled state (Fig.3), the first and second locking surfaces 34 and 36 are in contact to block the assembled panels in the transverse direction of the panels parallel to the assembly plane. For effective locking, the two locking surfaces are flat and preferably meet in the same plane, which forms an angle α (said locking angle) with the assembly plane (lower face 14 of the panel 10). This angle α can be of the order of 35 to 70 °.
  • The coupling means are therefore designed to allow angular interlocking. The interlocking of two identical panels is shown in Fig.2, where a second identical panel 10 'is joined to the panel 10 which rests in the assembly plane. For this coupling, the 10 'panel is presented with a certain angle of inclination and is manipulated so as to insert its tongue 26' in the groove 24 of the panel 10. The tongue 26 'is therefore gradually inserted into the groove 24 by moving the panel 10' and adapting its inclination, until the upper edges of the edges come into contact at A. Then the second panel 10 'is printed downwardly, centered on an axis passing through A, to bring back the second panel 10 'in the assembly plane and therefore engage the stop 30 of the first panel 10 in the groove 36' of the second panel 10 '.
  • According to an important aspect of the present panel 10, the coupling means are advantageously designed so that during the coupling, then once two adjacent panels joined by their respective coupling means, there is essentially no elastic deformation.
  • Another important aspect is the presence of one or more adhesive deposits repositionable on a surface portion of at least one of the coupling means 20 and 22. This allows immediate adhesion between the edges of two adjacent panels during assembly and thus to manipulate the panels without them uncoupling; but the repositionable nature of the adhesive allows the subsequent separation (uncoupling) of two adjacent panels by exerting a certain force. The panel according to the invention is thus provided with a "chemical click" obtained by this repositionable adhesive, which provides the same comfort of use as the known "mechanical click" systems, but does not therefore result from an elastic deformation coupling means.
  • It is advantageous to use a repositionable adhesive (glue) which has excellent adhesion to the material constituting the blade (generally HDF, MDF or wood) during its use and subsequently retains a residual adhesion capacity (called tack) which it will allow it to partially adhere to these same materials or to other polymer type materials, this residual bonding power remaining always less than the adhesion during the implementation). This type of glue is sometimes called "residual tack glue" or sticky adhesive. There are a variety of repositionable glues and it will be necessary to make a choice depending on the materials, the desired tack, the method of application, etc ...
  • In the present variant, the coupling is based on the classical Terbrack profile as presented in US 4,426,820 and which therefore did not aim at an elastic deformation of the coupling elements. As can be seen in Fig.3, the vertical alignment between two adjacent panels is thus obtained by the groove / tongue interlocking. To do this, there are two so-called "functional" contact zones:
    • between the tongue 26 'and the upper lip 28 inside the groove 24;
    • between the tongue 26 'and the lower lip 30, outside the groove 24 and before the stop 32.
  • In the assembled state, the maintenance in the transverse direction is ensured by the locking means, and there are two other functional contact surfaces:
    • at the upper edges of the songs; and
    • between the locking surfaces 34 and 38.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, a more detailed examination of the profile of the coupling means will make it possible to see how to distinguish a coupling without elastic deformation of a coupling with elastic deformation. It will be understood that with such a profile, a condition of engagement without deformation of the coupling means is that the locking surfaces 34 and 38 do not oppose resistance to the rotation required for the angular interlocking. Assuming that the axis of rotation during coupling passes through point A of contact between the upper edges of the edges, it appears that a rotational engagement without resistance can be obtained only if the locking angle α is not greater than the slope of the tangent to the circle AB at point B. Given the ribs h and l shown in Fig.3 and the angle β between the segment AB and the upper surface of the panel, we obtain the following relation: α 180 ° - arctan h / l
    Figure imgb0001
  • In the present variant, this condition is verified since the angle α is tangent to the circle of radius AB at the point B. A lower angle α would therefore meet the same requirement, however it is advantageous to have a locking angle α the more important to improve the cross lock.
  • As indicated above, the profile of the coupling means of the panel 10 comprises a certain number of functional contact zones. Outside these functional areas, it is not required that the coupling means be in contact. This is for example the case in the rear part of the abutment 32, in which a mounting set is preferably provided.
  • In the present variant, the repositionable adhesive is provided in this non-functional area behind the abutment 32, where it is deposited in the form of beads which preferably extend over the entire length of the edge: a cord 39 , resp.39 ', at the bottom of the groove 38 and a cord 40, resp. 40 ', in the lower region of the second coupling element 22. The thickness of the cord corresponds to the clearance between the coupling means (or is slightly greater), so that at the end of assembly, the cords 39, 40 are slightly crushed between the corresponding surfaces of the coupling means 20 and 22. This slight crushing of the bead improves the adhesion of this type of glue which generally has a certain sensitivity to pressure.
  • It will further be noted that the adhesive deposits 39, 39 ', 40, 40' are preferably made on flat surfaces of the groove 36, and that the abutment surfaces 32 which come into contact with the adhesive deposits are also flat. Moreover, while in the present variant the adhesive deposits 39, 39 ', 40, 40' come into contact, during assembly, directly with the constituent material of the abutment 32, an appropriate polymeric coating could be provided on this stop 32 in order to avoid (which may be interesting for some materials) that the cord causes some particles of the stop during disassembly.
  • It should be noted that the blocking of the panels by the adhesive is achieved without effort, or just with minimal effort ensuring the close contact of the adhesive with the material opposite. It is the physicochemical properties of the materials in contact which ensure the blocking of the panels, which are then not subjected to any strong stresses likely to damage the coupling means or more generally the panel. The very nature of repositionable glues allows a large number of couplings and uncoupling without altering their effectiveness.
  • The desired "click" effect can be modulated by adjusting the following parameters: stickiness of the adhesive; geometry of the coupling profile; position of the adhesive cord (s); shape and dimensions of the adhesive bead; and number of cords. It will be understood that what is important for the click effect is the tackiness with respect to the surface coming into contact with the adhesive deposit during the nesting, and not the adhesive force with respect to the material on which the adhesive deposit was made. ..
  • Preferably, one will play on these various parameters to obtain a "click" effect when disassembling panels according to the invention which is similar to that of a mechanical "click". A measurement campaign carried out on various known "mechanical click" systems made it possible to determine that the average moment to exert to separate two adjacent blades is of the order of 6 Nm for a length of edge of 1 m (denoted 6 Nn / m).
  • Thus, preference will be given to the various parameters stated above so that the adhesion between two panels according to the invention is such that a moment (called disassembly moment) of between 3 and 9 Nm / m, more preferably the order 6 N m / m, is required to initiate the rotation of a panel out of the assembly plane.
  • Such a disassembly moment can be obtained with repositionable glues having a tack between 0.05 and 0.3 N / mm 2 , preferably about 0.15 N / mm 2 .
  • It should be noted, for comparison, that if the panel 10, 10 'was not equipped with repositionable adhesive deposits, the disassembling moment of this panel would depend solely on its weight, since the coupling profile does not deform during disassembly.
  • In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 3, a repositionable adhesive deposited in the form of a bead is used. It is preferably a hot-melt glue (hot-melt), which is applied hot. Depending on their hot viscosity, such glues can be deposited in the form of cords, films or flattened cords. Their application is made by means of pistols on which fit nozzles of different diameters. It will be noted here that the hot-melt adhesive is in hot contact only with the surface on which it is deposited. This glue solidifies and then has a free surface having a stickiness which causes the immediate adhesion, exerting a certain pressure, of the abutment 32, but does not definitively fix the panels together.
  • Thermal-fusible adhesives are generally based on polyolefins, polyurethane (PU), ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA), polyvinyl acetate (PVAC), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), etc. For application with coupling means made of HDF, the hot-melt glue known as INSTAWELD 6615 E (manufactured by NATIONAL Starch & Chemical) can be used.
  • Alternatively, adhesives applicable at room temperature (eg acrylic emulsions) can be used. These glues are for example deposited in film form by licking on a cylinder of suitable dimensions. This type of glue requires contact surfaces of larger dimensions.
  • It will also be noted that what is important is that the glue used perimeter the formation of an adhesive deposit having the behavior of a repositionable adhesive vis-à-vis the material that will come into contact with it during the nesting. This type of deposit may possibly be obtained with glues that are not known (marketed) as repositionable glues, and therefore also fall within the scope of the present invention.
  • As indicated above, the geometry of the coupling profile and the position of the adhesive beads affect the click effect felt by the user. The Fig.4 shows a variant of the embodiment of Figs.1 to 3, wherein the profiles of the abutment 132 and the locking groove 136 have been modified to increase the "click" effect. As can be seen, the rear surface of the abutment 132 (after the locking surface 134 away from the groove 124) is no longer horizontal but is inclined so that its surface is included in a plane passing through A, the upper edge of the songs in contact.
  • In this configuration, the bonding surfaces are perpendicular to the disassembling direction of the panels, thereby maximizing the amount of disassembly moment required to separate the blades 110 and 110 'by counter-clockwise rotation. Thus, for a cord having the same characteristics as in FIG. 3, the configuration of FIG. 4 makes it possible to intensify the "click" effect.
  • There is also a larger area to apply the bead.
  • Finally, note the multilayer structure of the panel 10, which comprises (see FIG. 1) an upper layer 42, a support layer 44 and a counterbalance 46. In the present variant, the upper layer 42, made of solid wood, is laminated on the support layer. The support layer 44 is made of MDF or HDF. The counterbalance 46 is based on cellulose impregnated with resin.
  • Depending on the application, the upper layer may be a melamine decor (laminate) or a ceramic. The support may be of fiber cement or filled resin or other materials suitable for machining. Counterbalancing is not always necessary.

Claims (17)

  1. Panel, particularly for floor covering, comprising:
    a first edge provided with a first coupling means (20) comprising a groove (24; 124);
    a second opposing edge provided with a second coupling means (22) comprising a tongue (26, 26 ';126'), said coupling means being adapted to cooperate so as to allow the coupling of two of these panels (10, 10 '; 110, 110')) in an assembly plane;
    mechanical locking means integrated in said coupling means which, when two panels are coupled in the assembly plane, prevent said panels from moving away from each other in a direction perpendicular to that of said edges and parallel to said assembly plan;
    said coupling means (20, 22) being designed for coupling essentially without elastic deformation thereof;
    characterized in that
    at least one of said coupling means (20, 22) is provided on at least a portion of its surface with a repositionable adhesive (39, 39 ', 40, 40', 139 ', 140'),
  2. Panel according to claim 1, characterized in that
    said first coupling means (20) comprises an upper lip (28; 128) and a lower lip (30; 130) defining said groove (24; 124), said lower lip (30; 130) extending beyond said upper lip (28; 128);
    and said mechanical locking means comprises:
    a locking member (32; 132) projecting upwardly on said lower lip (30; 130), said locking member (32; 132) having a first locking surface (34; 134);
    a second locking surface (38; 138 ') on the second coupling means (22), which is adapted to cooperate with said first locking surface (34; 134) of a similar panel to prevent a displacement perpendicular to said edges and parallel to the assembly plane.
  3. Panel according to claim 2, characterized in that
    said locking member (32; 132) is on said lower lip (30; 130) beyond said upper lip (28; 128) in the direction perpendicular to said edge;
    said second locking surface (38; 138 ') is defined by a locking groove (36,36'; 136 ') in said second coupling means (22) behind said tongue (26,26';').
  4. Panel according to claim 2 or 3, characterized in that said first locking surface (34; 134) has a locking angle between 35 and 70 ° with respect to the horizontal.
  5. Panel according to one of the preceding claims, characterized in that said coupling means (20, 22) are designed such that the tongue (26 ';126') of a first panel (10 ';110') ) may be inclined in the groove (24; 124) of a second panel (10; 110) and that the stop (32; 132) of the second panel (10; 110) is insertable into the locking groove (36 ') 136 ') of the first panel by a relative rotational movement between said panels (10, 10'; 110, 110 ') about an axis of rotation (A) corresponding to the upper edges of the edges in contact.
  6. Panel according to the preceding claim, characterized by a decoupling moment of between 3 and 9 Nm / m.
  7. Panel according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the repositionable adhesive forms a deposit (39, 39 ', 40, 40', 139 ', 140') whose free surface has a stickiness of the order of 0.05 to 0.3 N / mm 2 , preferably 0.15 N / mm 2 .
  8. Panel according to one of the preceding claims, characterized in that said repositionable adhesive (39, 39 ', 40, 40', 139 ', 140') is provided on facing surfaces of said coupling means (20, 22) which come into contact only at the end of the angular interlocking.
  9. Panel according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that said repositionable adhesive is provided for adhering to a surface of said locking element which is included in a plane passing through the axis of rotation during uncoupling.
  10. Panel according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that said repositionable adhesive is applied to the second coupling means.
  11. Panel according to the preceding claim, characterized in that at least one surface portion of said locking groove (36, 36 '; 136) is covered with repositionable adhesive (39, 39', 40, 40 ', 139', 140 '), preferably out of said second locking surface (38, 38'; 138 ').
  12. Panel according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that said repositionable adhesive is a heat-fusible glue applied hot in the form of a bead.
  13. Panel according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized by a multilayer structure comprising at least one upper layer (42) and one support layer (44).
  14. Panel according to claim 13, characterized in that the upper layer (42) is solid wood, a melamine decor, a ceramic plate.
  15. Panel according to claim 13 or 14, characterized in that the support layer (44) is made of MDF, HDF, chipboard, fiber cement or charged resin.
  16. Use of a panel according to any one of the preceding claims for the coating of surfaces such as floors, walls or ceilings.
  17. Coating, in particular parquet or floating floor type, comprising panels according to any one of claims 1 to 15.
EP20050291280 2005-06-14 2005-06-14 Panel provided with a repositionable adhesive, in particular to cover floors, walls or ceilings Withdrawn EP1734202A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
EP20050291280 EP1734202A1 (en) 2005-06-14 2005-06-14 Panel provided with a repositionable adhesive, in particular to cover floors, walls or ceilings

Applications Claiming Priority (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
EP20050291280 EP1734202A1 (en) 2005-06-14 2005-06-14 Panel provided with a repositionable adhesive, in particular to cover floors, walls or ceilings
US11/917,533 US7892617B2 (en) 2005-06-14 2006-06-13 Panel, in particular for floor covering
UAA200800378A UA93680C2 (en) 2005-06-14 2006-06-13 Panel, in particular for floor covering
RU2008100241A RU2387768C2 (en) 2005-06-14 2006-06-13 Panel, in particular for floor covering
CA 2612000 CA2612000C (en) 2005-06-14 2006-06-13 Panel, in particular for floor covering
EP06763677.9A EP1891284B1 (en) 2005-06-14 2006-06-13 Panel, in particular for floor covering
PCT/EP2006/063154 WO2006134109A1 (en) 2005-06-14 2006-06-13 Panel, in particular for floor covering

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
EP1734202A1 true EP1734202A1 (en) 2006-12-20

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EP20050291280 Withdrawn EP1734202A1 (en) 2005-06-14 2005-06-14 Panel provided with a repositionable adhesive, in particular to cover floors, walls or ceilings
EP06763677.9A Active EP1891284B1 (en) 2005-06-14 2006-06-13 Panel, in particular for floor covering

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EP06763677.9A Active EP1891284B1 (en) 2005-06-14 2006-06-13 Panel, in particular for floor covering

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US (1) US7892617B2 (en)
EP (2) EP1734202A1 (en)
CA (1) CA2612000C (en)
RU (1) RU2387768C2 (en)
UA (1) UA93680C2 (en)
WO (1) WO2006134109A1 (en)

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FR2910034A1 (en) * 2006-12-13 2008-06-20 Pierre Geraud Parquet floor forming method, involves crushing filler adhesive after mutual locking of sections so that, after stiffening, elastic connection joint is formed for adhering adjacent strips and authorizing thin angular space between strips
CN102596490A (en) * 2009-09-01 2012-07-18 巴尔特利奥-斯巴诺吕克斯股份公司 Method of manufacturing a covering panel with a profiled edge

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US9169554B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2015-10-27 Alta Devices, Inc. Wafer carrier track
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KR100958396B1 (en) * 2009-03-31 2010-05-18 오광석 Floorboard
US8438813B2 (en) * 2011-08-15 2013-05-14 Eurico Januario Cordeiro Stone click floor coverings
US8935899B2 (en) 2012-02-02 2015-01-20 Valinge Innovation Ab Lamella core and a method for producing it
US8875464B2 (en) * 2012-04-26 2014-11-04 Valinge Innovation Ab Building panels of solid wood
US9140010B2 (en) 2012-07-02 2015-09-22 Valinge Flooring Technology Ab Panel forming
US20140083034A1 (en) * 2012-09-19 2014-03-27 Dubon Associates, Inc. Stable flooring products and method of making same
KR101338385B1 (en) * 2013-06-05 2013-12-10 동화자연마루 주식회사 Wood flooring with elastic adhesive
LT3038803T (en) 2013-08-27 2018-12-10 VƤlinge Innovation AB A method for producing a lamella core
USD755407S1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-05-03 Boral Ip Holdings (Australia) Pty Limited Building material
USD755990S1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-05-10 Boral Ip Holdings (Australia) Pty Limited Building material
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USD788949S1 (en) 2014-08-01 2017-06-06 Boral Ip Holdings (Australia) Pty Limited Siding
USD755991S1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-05-10 Boral Ip Holdings (Australia) Pty Limited Building material
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USD755989S1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-05-10 Boral Ip Holdings (Australia) Pty Limited Building material
USD757960S1 (en) 2014-08-01 2016-05-31 Boral Ip Holdings (Australia) Pty Limited Building material
USD755411S1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-05-03 Boral Ip Holdings (Australia) Pty Limited Building material
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US10480199B2 (en) 2015-06-26 2019-11-19 Tarkett Gdl S.A. Floorboards with horizontally and vertically locking connecting profiles
US9783994B2 (en) * 2015-11-22 2017-10-10 Noel Edmonds Chase Self-aligning and self-spacing tile system
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US20010024707A1 (en) * 1996-11-08 2001-09-27 Kjell Andersson Flooring
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GB2377457A (en) * 2001-06-06 2003-01-15 Finsa Uk Ltd A building panel with pressure sensitive adhesive
US20040168392A1 (en) * 2001-06-17 2004-09-02 Karl-Heinz Konzelmann Panels comprising an interlocking snap-in profile
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FR2910034A1 (en) * 2006-12-13 2008-06-20 Pierre Geraud Parquet floor forming method, involves crushing filler adhesive after mutual locking of sections so that, after stiffening, elastic connection joint is formed for adhering adjacent strips and authorizing thin angular space between strips
CN102596490A (en) * 2009-09-01 2012-07-18 巴尔特利奥-斯巴诺吕克斯股份公司 Method of manufacturing a covering panel with a profiled edge

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2006134109A1 (en) 2006-12-21
RU2008100241A (en) 2009-07-20
EP1891284A1 (en) 2008-02-27
CA2612000A1 (en) 2006-12-21
US7892617B2 (en) 2011-02-22
US20080199676A1 (en) 2008-08-21
UA93680C2 (en) 2011-03-10
RU2387768C2 (en) 2010-04-27
EP1891284B1 (en) 2015-08-12
CA2612000C (en) 2015-03-31

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