EP0141168B1 - Presetting of inking units - Google Patents

Presetting of inking units Download PDF

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Publication number
EP0141168B1
EP0141168B1 EP84110697A EP84110697A EP0141168B1 EP 0141168 B1 EP0141168 B1 EP 0141168B1 EP 84110697 A EP84110697 A EP 84110697A EP 84110697 A EP84110697 A EP 84110697A EP 0141168 B1 EP0141168 B1 EP 0141168B1
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EP
European Patent Office
Prior art keywords
ink
printing
inking unit
roller
vibrator
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EP84110697A
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German (de)
French (fr)
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EP0141168A2 (en
EP0141168A3 (en
Inventor
Jürgen Dipl.-Ing. Kramp
Peter Dipl.-Ing. Schramm
Gerhard Augsberg
Gerd Dipl.-Ing. Steiner
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Manroland Druckmaschinen AG
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Manroland Druckmaschinen AG
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Priority to DE3338143A priority patent/DE3338143C2/de
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41FPRINTING MACHINES OR PRESSES
    • B41F31/00Inking arrangements or devices
    • B41F31/02Ducts, containers, supply or metering devices
    • B41F31/04Ducts, containers, supply or metering devices with duct-blades or like metering devices
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41FPRINTING MACHINES OR PRESSES
    • B41F31/00Inking arrangements or devices
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41FPRINTING MACHINES OR PRESSES
    • B41F33/00Indicating, counting, warning, control or safety devices
    • B41F33/0027Devices for scanning originals, printing formes or the like for determining or presetting the ink supply
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41PINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO PRINTING, LINING MACHINES, TYPEWRITERS, AND TO STAMPS
    • B41P2213/00Arrangements for actuating or driving printing presses; Auxiliary devices or processes
    • B41P2213/70Driving devices associated with particular installations or situations
    • B41P2213/73Driving devices for multicolour presses
    • B41P2213/734Driving devices for multicolour presses each printing unit being driven by its own electric motor, i.e. electric shaft
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41PINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO PRINTING, LINING MACHINES, TYPEWRITERS, AND TO STAMPS
    • B41P2233/00Arrangements for the operation of printing presses
    • B41P2233/10Starting-up the machine
    • B41P2233/11Pre-inking

Description

  • The invention relates to a method for quickly adjusting the inking unit of a printing press to the conditions required in the printing process by generating a defined ink layer thickness on the rollers of the inking unit, which in addition to the inking unit rollers includes an ink fountain, ink metering elements, an ink fountain roller and a lifting roller, with the aid of setting values which be taken by plate scanning, storing pre-orders or scanning a print template.
  • The printing process in a printing press essentially consists of transporting printing ink from a storage container via an inking unit to a printing form and generating a printing image from this printing form on a printing medium. In the case of offset printing, there is also the fact that the printing plate has to be moistened and the print image is transferred from the printing plate to the printing medium via a rubber blanket. Paper in the form of sheets or webs generally acts as the print medium. In offset printing in particular there is the problem that a printing ink of relatively high viscosity has to be used. This is due to the fact that with the aid of only small ink layer thicknesses, sufficient surface coverage, ie a sufficient ink layer on the print carrier, is to be achieved in order to obtain an optically sufficient print image. For this purpose, the offset printing inks contain very highly concentrated color pigments and, in order to be processable at all, must be used in a very tough state. The high toughness of the printing ink plays a role in the distribution of the printing ink in the inking unit. The design of the inking unit is also affected.
  • In order to produce a very thin, even layer of ink, as is required in offset printing, an elaborate inking unit equipped with many rollers is usually necessary. However, the more complex the inking unit is, the longer it takes before changes in the driving feed are also noticeable on the printed image. Experience has shown that around 300 prints are required in continuous printing in order to allow a change in the ink supply, for example due to a change in the ink metering on the ink fountain, to reach the paper completely and to establish a balance of the ink transport through the inking unit. The visual impression in the printed image changes earlier. Especially in offset printing, dampening on the printing plate also plays a role. However, this should not be considered in more detail here.
  • So that a printing press can be operated in continuous printing, it is necessary that the balance of the ink transport is established in the inking unit. Starting from an empty inking unit, ie cleaned about the previous day, a certain amount of ink is first required so that all inking unit rollers are coated with printing ink. As a result, the color flow necessary for the production is achieved relatively quickly. In the usual lifter inking units, however, it would take a very long time to transport the ink layer required for filling into the inking unit simply by means of the lifter cycle. Basically, ink is also used in the inking unit where no ink is removed from the printing plate during production. The formation of the state of equilibrium in the inking unit is additionally influenced by the relationship between printing and non-printing surfaces on the printing plate and where printing and non-printing surfaces are, ie how the subject of the printing plate is structured. In the printing process, rubbing in the inking unit creates a layer of ink even where no printing points on the printing plate can be assigned. The goal of the printer is to accelerate the establishment of the equilibrium state for production printing. For this purpose, so-called spreading rollers are provided on conventional inking units, which are arranged above the first roller of the inking unit following the lifting roller. After filling the ink fountain with ink, the printer will apply a strip of ink to this spreading roller by "spreading" it with a spatula. He will do this especially where little or no printing ink is used because the state of equilibrium is very slow. This is intended to accelerate the distribution, particularly across the inking unit. The printer then manually applies the platen roller to the inking unit that is running but decoupled from the plate cylinder. The amount of ink applied to the spreading roller is thus distributed throughout the inking unit and forms a basic ink layer there. However, this basic color layer is undefined both in terms of its layer thickness and its gradient. On the other hand, however, there is already a sufficient layer of paint, even if there is little color, even if it is too thick. This particularly disturbs the color guidance in the transport direction. The cross transport via the trituration has little influence. The areas with low ink transport during production are saturated more quickly than would be possible using normal inking alone. The profile of the ink metering in the ink fountain aligned with the subject of the printing plate can now be introduced into the prepared inking unit via the lifter. The incoming printing ink no longer has to be tediously distributed over the entire inking unit, but rather an approximately quantity of ink that can be estimated is supplied to the inking unit relatively quickly. The procedure described is essentially based on skill and experience turned off the printer. It is therefore a question of how the printer feels about his machine if the printing process in production is to be adapted as quickly as possible to an optimal printing result. The feeling-dependent distribution of any amount of ink over the inking unit creates an indefinable state from which the balance of the ink transport must first be adjusted.
  • DE-OS 2 922 964 now describes a system for printing press preparation and control. The presetting of the inking unit in procedure 5000 is described therein. The aim here is to derive setting values for the inking unit of a printing press from known printing conditions. The dampening unit settings, machine speed, duct rotation, lifting stroke, plate cylinder and applicator roller diameter and the area coverage of the printing plate are used as parameters. From this, the ink layer thickness required on the applicator roller and, depending on this, the position of the metering elements are determined. In principle, the printing ink is also included in the calculation as a parameter. The prerequisite for the calculation is that the inking unit is in a stable condition. However, this means that there must first be a sufficient amount of printing ink in the inking unit and distribute it there. With the described invention, however, only the setting of the inking unit can be predetermined for the case of continued printing. In connection with the object of the invention, a large amount of waste is deliberately taken into account here, which arises during printing until the inking unit is in equilibrium with respect to the ink transport.
  • Control mechanisms which automate the operating sequence of such machines have been known for a long time in office offset printing machines. The printing plate or the printing film is automatically drawn in, the inking unit and the dampening unit are switched on and the paper transport or printing process is initiated. A control mechanism for an offset printing machine is described in DE-OS 2 637 071. It has a ratchet gear with a ratchet arrangement, with the aid of which the operating sequence from the plate feeder to the printing of the first sheet of paper is automated. The feeding of the paper should be delayed until the plate has been pre-moistened and provided with sufficient ink via the inking unit and has produced a saturated print image on the rubber cylinder. Only then should the first sheet be printed and immediately show a good print image. However, this device requires that a very short inking unit and a printing ink with a relatively low viscosity are used. In addition, in printing presses that are only used for single-color printing, the requirement for a color profile is very low. This means that an even layer of ink is required across the width of the inking unit, which can be produced easily and quickly. It is also important for the operation of an office offset machine that nothing should be set on the inking unit when the printing plate is inked and printing begins. The conditions for filling such an inking unit are therefore different than in offset printing presses with larger inking units that store the ink. For this reason, a fixed gear arrangement is used in the control mechanism mentioned, which always produces the same operating sequence, that is, it cannot be adjusted. The inking of the inking unit is therefore the same for all applications and offers no possibility of adapting the ink supply to special cases.
  • The invention is therefore based on the object of developing a method with which an inking unit of the type mentioned can be brought into an equilibrium state suitable for continued printing as quickly and easily as possible by generating defined ink layer thicknesses which take into account the ink consumption during printing.
  • This object is achieved by a method according to the characterizing part of claim 1. By generating a defined ink layer thickness distribution on the inking unit rollers before the start of printing, the ink balance in the inking unit can be achieved very quickly and it is possible to as close as possible to the ink distribution in the inking unit possible to bring to the state as it prevails in the printing. The equilibrium state in production printing has several features:
    • 1.) There is a base color layer at all points of the inking unit that have an equivalent in a printing point on the printing plate. This basic color layer is, for example, about 5 micrometers thick.
    • 2.) A so-called color gradient is built up on this primary color layer. The color gradient arises from the fact that the amount of printing ink required for coloring the printing plate is transported over the various rollers of the inking unit. In any case, it is necessary that, depending on the area coverage on the printing plate, the necessary amount of printing ink is fed into the inking unit from above, since otherwise the printing plate would be undersupplied with printing ink and the printed image would be insufficient. The size of the color gradient depends on the amount of printing ink that is required according to the ratio of the printing area to the total area.
    • 3.) Due to different sized ink requirements across the inking unit, which corresponds to the ink profile on the ink fountain roller, there are also different sized ink gradients across the inking unit. The lateral rubbing makes them even, but not eliminated. In this way, color is also carried into areas in which there is no coloring at all on the plate. In the areas corresponding to the non-printing areas on the inking rollers, a layer of ink is thus created, for which a state of equilibrium must be established.
    • 4.) There is a dampening solution distribution in the inking unit. Experience has shown that the influence of this dampening solution distribution on the ink transfer is great.
  • The origin of the gradient in the ink layer thickness in the inking unit will now be examined again. It is determined by the relationships between the print color drawn off on the printing plate and the respective splitting states between the individual rollers. If a lot of printing ink is removed from the printing plate, there is a greater gradient than if only a little printing ink is removed. For example, with a fully covered printing area, printing ink is always drawn off the inking roller over the entire printing area. The removed printing ink has to be added continuously. However, it is necessary that a certain layer of ink is present on the inking roller before it comes into contact with the printing plate. The same ink layer thickness is necessary if only about 10% of the printing plate is covered with the printing area. In order to adequately color printing areas, at least the basic color layer must always be present. When the printing plate is colored in one Fall over the entire area of printing ink removed, otherwise only a tenth of the previous amount of ink. In the case of 100% area coverage, this creates a much greater gradient within the ink layer thickness over the length of the inking unit.
  • These relationships can be seen in the representations of FIGS. 1 and 2. There inking rollers W1 to W4 are each assigned to a printing plate D as a simplified inking unit. In Fig. 1, the printing plate D is provided with a distribution V at printing points corresponding to 100% area coverage. In Fig. 2 the pressure plate D is provided with a distribution V corresponding to 10% area coverage.
  • Starting with Fig. 1, the origin of the gradient of the ink layer thickness in an inking unit will now be explained. It is assumed that there is a residual ink layer thickness of 3 µm on the printing plate after printing and a basic ink layer thickness of 5 µm on roller W1, which corresponds to an inking roller. According to the laws of color splitting, in the simplest case of splitting by dividing the color layer in half in the splitting zone, a layer with a layer thickness of 4 µm is formed after the splitting zone. The printing plate D feeds this layer to the printing process, the roller W1 introduces its portion into the next splitting zone between the rollers W1 and W2. It is known that after this cleavage zone, a layer thickness of 5 μm must be present on the roller W1, which also occurs on the roller W2 after the cleavage zone with the roller W1 according to the simplified splitting law mentioned. The resulting total layer thickness of 10 μm therefore requires a supply of 6 μm on the roller W2 to the 4 μm of the roller W1. Accordingly, the split between the rollers W2 and W3 on the roller W3 in front of the splitting zone 7 µm ink layer thickness and on the roller W4 before the splitting between W3 and W4 8 µm ink layer thickness necessary. The ratio of the layer thicknesses on the roller W4 before and after the splitting results in an ink supply of 1 μm. The cleavage and cleavage in the inking unit from the printing plate D to the roller W4 has resulted in a gradient in the ink layer thickness from 5 μm to 8 μm.
  • The case of poor color guidance is shown in FIG. 2. On the printing plate D, only 10% of the area of the printing ink is accepted, corresponding to the distribution V of the printing area. However, the same ink layer thickness of 5 µm is required at the printing points as in the case of 100% area coverage. Starting with a residual ink layer of 3 µm on the printing plate D and a 5 µm base ink layer on the roller W1 before it comes into contact, the overall ink layer is 8 µm. It splits up in such a way that 4 µm is still present on the printing areas of the printing plate, but on the roller W1 after the splitting zone there is still an average of 4.9 µm, since only 10% of the total area of the printing ink corresponds to 0.1 µm layer thickness was removed.
  • In order to get the basic color layer of 5 µm again after the splitting zone between the rollers W1 and W2, 5.1 µm color layer must be added to the 4.9 µm color layer on the roller W1 via the roller W2. Accordingly, 5.2 μm of ink layer are required on the W3 roller and 5.3 μm on the W4 roller in front of the corresponding cleavage zone in order to supply the required amount of printing ink. On the roller W4, the ratio of the ink layer thicknesses before and after the cleavage zone results in an ink supply of 0.1 μm ink layer. Here a gradient of 5 µm ink layer on roller W1 up to 5.3 µm ink layer on roller W4 has arisen. This corresponds to a tenth of the gradient in the case of 100% area coverage on the printing plate D.
  • However, the relationships shown each represent a state of equilibrium. This corresponds to the gradient GF in the production run. 4 and 5, the gradient GF is shown in dashed lines, in FIG. 6 it can be seen as a solid line which represents the gradient actually generated in the inking unit. The width of the diagrams in the horizontal represents the layer thickness of the printing ink, the vertical direction indicates the position of the transport direction of the inking units, whereby the gradient is to be seen as a straight line.
  • The inertia of the inking unit plays a role in building up these gradients and transporting changes in the ink dosage. The larger an inking unit is in relation to the surface of its inking unit rollers, the slower it will react to changes in the amount of ink to be transported. The sluggishness of the reaction also increases the lower the total amount of paint transported.
  • The build-up of the described gradients in the layer thickness is difficult and lengthy. In order to save time for the production run, the inking unit should be brought as close as possible to the production run condition beforehand. On the one hand, the basic ink layer thickness must be present on the application rollers and, on the other hand, the gradient must be achieved as soon as possible. The importance of the invention is all the more larger, the greater the storage effect of an inking unit and the more emphasis is placed on the presetting of the inking unit. It is only necessary to apply the basic ink layer to the inking unit once, when the inking unit is completely free of color. The introduction of the color gradient into the inking unit must, however, be carried out in principle before each start-up of the printing press, since the color gradient always breaks down when the printing process is interrupted.
  • According to the invention, the approach to the pressure drop is adjusted to different extents before the start of printing. A simplified version of the method for presetting the inking unit is based on the fact that an ink layer which is uniformly thick transversely to the transport direction is distributed as quickly as possible in the inking unit. The non-uniformity in the introduction of a quantity of ink determined by the feeling is eliminated here because the printing ink is supplied with the lifting roller starting from a uniform setting of the metering elements. When the printing ink is fed in after this process step, a gradient occurs within the layer thickness of the printing ink on the inking unit rollers as seen in the transport direction. This gradient is important for the later formation of the printing gradient and is therefore consciously accepted. Through targeted control of the running-in process, it is in fact possible to design the gradient so that the production pressure gradient can be set up as quickly as possible. This gradient is expediently designed in such a way that it corresponds approximately to the mean of the gradients occurring in the production run. In some places, there will be too little ink in other places compared to the production status, but too much ink. So the balance can change fairly quickly on both sides adjust to the printing conditions and thus ensure good prints at an early stage. The described procedure makes it possible to relieve the pressure on the printer, to bring the inking unit into a defined initial state for continued printing and to automate the entire process in parallel with other work. As a result, the time for filling the inking unit can be eliminated as a non-productive time and it is fully available to the printer for other work, for example for continued printing or readjusting the color profile.
  • The more refined version of the process makes it easier to get good prints. The basic step corresponds to the simplified process by introducing a basic amount of printing ink into the inking unit. In a further step, the resulting gradient is reduced by an equalization process. In addition, the inking unit runs for a defined time without ink supply and removal. The resulting basic ink layer then corresponds to the amount of ink required in the production run on the inking rollers. The equalization processes follow an e-function and can be considered complete after a certain time. The period of time must be optimized in relation to the distance from the ideal state and the consumption of operating time. While the ink layer is being evened out, the ink profile on the ink fountain roller can be adjusted over the width of the printing plate according to the ink requirements. In a further run-in phase, it is then overlaid on the primary color layer. By introducing the color profile into the inking unit, the process of forming the production balance can be almost completely completed before the start of printing. To do this, only the known same process step is repeated. Then the printing process can be seamlessly transferred and the optimal production status will be reached very quickly, taking corrections to the color dosage into account.
  • The use of this method is particularly advantageous if a device for scanning the printing plate or another printing template is used to set the inking unit in order to determine the color distribution in the inking unit required in the production run. With the chosen procedure, the machine can be brought into a condition from which the application of the measured profile quickly leads to good printing results. It is not necessary to first wait in the production run until sufficient printing ink has run in and the color gradient necessary for the printing process has built up. A further improvement is possible if the dampening solution distribution in the inking unit is also taken into account. The distribution of the printing ink and the distribution of the dampening solution run counter to one another. On the one hand, too little dampening solution can be distributed in the printing ink, on the other hand too much. The color distribution must be modified so that the dampening solution distribution in the inking unit is compensated. The setting of the control must be gained from empirical values both for the running-in of the printing ink, ie the amount of printing ink that is transported into the inking unit, and for the modification of the ink distribution in relation to the dampening. It can be matched to the respective printing plate and entered in a control table. It is then possible, depending on the type of printing plate, the printing ink and the subject, to automatically predetermine the automated running-in process and the adjustment of the gradient to the ink consumption in connection with the scanning of a print template.
  • The method is described in more detail below with the variants mentioned. This also results in further application possibilities and advantages of the invention. For further explanation, further details are shown in the drawings.
  • Show it:
  • Fig. 1 + 2
    schematic ink works with different gradients;
    Fig. 3
    a schematic representation of an inking unit,
    4A, B + C
    Diagrams of the gradient of the ink layer thickness in accordance with section lines in FIG. 3,
    5 + 6
    Diagrams of the gradient of the ink layer thickness according to the variants of the presetting procedure.
  • In Fig. 3, an inking unit from rollers W1 to W4 is shown schematically. The associated printing plate D has a distribution V of the area coverage, as shown at the bottom of the inking unit. According to this distribution V, when the printer is manually preset, the metering elements on the ink fountain are set. This creates a rough profile P of the ink layer thickness on the first roller W1 of the inking unit. In order to fill the inking unit faster, the printer manually puts an estimated amount of printing ink onto the roller W2, as a result of which an additional layer Z of printing ink reaches the inking unit. Layer Z partially overlaps with the machine feed Profile P. From this ink supply, different gradients in the layer thickness of the printing ink along the rollers W initially arise transversely to the inking unit, as shown in FIGS. 4A to C. FIG. 4A shows the slope at X1 in FIG. 3. There is a large area coverage on the printing plate D and consequently also an increased ink supply according to the profile P. This printing ink is distributed after several machine revolutions to the gradient G1 shown in FIG. 4A. The gradient GF required in production printing, which leads to a basic color layer A, is drawn in dashed lines. The area between G1 and GF is hatched and represents the need B for printing ink, which must be fed to the inking unit until it is in equilibrium. In any case, the basic ink layer A must be present on the last roller W4, which corresponds to an inking roller. FIG. 4B shows the gradient G2 in the area of line X2 according to FIG. 3. The gradient G2 is composed of a portion corresponding to the profile P and a further portion from the additional color layer Z. The ink layer Z is assumed to be uniform in thickness, which does not correspond to reality. Here there is an excess of color Ü, indicated by the hatched area, compared to the gradient GF of the production run. Here too, the basic color layer A must be produced again, but now by removing the excess printing ink via the printing process. Finally, in FIG. 4C the gradient G3 is shown in the area of line X3 according to FIG. 3. Here, almost only printing ink is brought into the inking unit via the additional ink layer Z. The gradient G3 is overall above the very low pressure gradient GF. Here too, this means that printing ink must only be removed again during production.
  • A comparison of these three diagrams shows that the deviations in the ink layer thicknesses from the state of equilibrium required in continuous printing are sometimes quite large and strongly dependent on the art of the printer. There are overlaps and opposing processes in the color flow within the inking unit. In order to compensate for this, it is proposed according to the invention to run the printing ink into the inking unit in a controlled manner. The presetting of the printing press is accordingly carried out in the manner described below.
  • To prepare for the printing process, the distribution V of the area coverage on the printing plate D is measured. The measurement corresponds to ink zones that can be set in the inking unit and is transferred to the inking unit control. If the printing plate D is clamped in the printing press, printing ink must be brought into the inking unit. The transport of the printing ink from the ink fountain to the inking unit then takes place in the following manner according to the method of the invention:
    First, all ink zones are supplied with the same ink layer thickness via their corresponding ink metering elements, ie the ink metering elements are all moved to the same distance from the ink fountain roller. Then the speed of the ink fountain roller is set to a certain value. The lifter roller is moved back and forth between the ink fountain roller and the first inking roller in the same cycle by a lifting movement at two machine revolutions. Depending on the speed of the machine, the lifter roller is always on the ink fountain roller for the same length. However, if the ink fountain roller rotates faster, the transferred ink stripe on the lifting roller becomes wider. The lifting strip required for filling the inking unit results from empirical values and measurements of the amount of ink contained in the inking unit. Once the ink fountain roller speed has been set, the lifter roller is switched on for a certain number of lifter cycles and thus a certain amount of printing ink is transported into the inking unit. Experience has shown that a sufficient amount of basic ink can be transported into the inking unit with about 10 siphon strokes and an about 25mm wide squeegee strip with about 60% open ink metering elements. This ink layer is then completely evenly distributed over the width of the inking unit, but has a gradient from the ink fountain roller to the inking rollers. After the basic ink quantity is available in the inking unit, the ink metering elements can be adjusted to the values for the ink guidance measured on the printing plate D over the width of the inking unit. The distribution V on the printing plate D is then converted to the positions of the ink metering elements. When all dosing elements have been set, the machine can be started up. After that, a period of time, even in normal operation, is necessary until the balance in the inking unit has largely adjusted to the color profile generated.
  • 5 shows in a diagram how the gradient in the ink layer thickness is established for this process sequence. Only an average is indicated here. The basic ink quantity is distributed in the inking unit according to the gradient G4 by the filling process. However, this gradient G4 deviates from the gradient GF required in the production run for the state of equilibrium. The gradient G4 corresponds to an averaging over the entire width of the inking unit. It represents an average of all the different gradients GF occurring in the production run for the individual ink zones. Partly there is excess ink U, partly ink requirement B in the hatched areas recognizable. In the waste phase, the transition from the gradient G4 from the default setting to the production pressure gradient GF will take place relatively quickly. It can be clearly seen that the difference in the color flow is smaller and the adjustment is easier than with manual operation. The gradient G4 can of course also be set such that the basic ink layer A is just reached on the inking rollers in accordance with G4 ', G4 ". Then, when the ink flow is adjusted for all ink zones from the same position, a defined amount of ink is available for printing at an early stage The adjustment then consists in the fact that zonal excess of ink or ink requirement compared to the printing gradient GF must be compensated for over the length of the entire inking unit in the waste paper phase, whereas with a central position, as indicated in FIG. 5, a color reserve for the formation of the printing gradient already exists GF is present.
  • It can then be assessed whether the set color profile P corresponds to the wishes of the customer or the printer in relation to the print. Manual corrections are made following this run-in process during printing. The color profile P in the inking unit has been generated in a defined manner in this way and has been carried out, apart from a few taste corrections, regardless of the feeling of the printer. The advantage of the process is not only the saving of waste and the resulting time saving, but also the fact that the ink runs in independently of the printer and his attention.
  • In a refined variant of the method, the gradient GF should now be generated even more precisely. For this, a certain amount of color is controlled transported to the inking unit by the speed of the ink fountain roller, a number of lifting cycles and the running-in period. In order to be sure that only the basic ink layer A is still present everywhere in the inking unit, a further equalization phase is interposed when the lifter roller is switched off, in that the inking unit is operated for a while without ink being removed. After this equalization phase, it can be assumed that the printing ink is distributed throughout the inking unit into a uniformly thick ink layer, namely the basic ink layer A. This basic color layer A of about 5 µm is required in any case on the application rollers. The color profile P on the ink metering elements can then be set in accordance with the values of the distribution V of the area coverage measured on the printing plate D. Now a running-in phase is switched on again, in that printing ink according to the color profile P is transported into the inking unit via a certain speed of the ink fountain roller, a certain number of lifting cycles and a certain running-in period. This phase should last so long that the ink gradient GF between the ink fountain and the inking rollers that is present in the production run can largely occur on the rollers of the inking unit. If this is the case, the process will be seamless.
  • 6 shows the structure of the production pressure gradient GF according to this process sequence. The base color layer A is generated from the gradient G5 in the equalization phase. It is then present in the entire inking unit. In the second phase, the amount of ink is fed to the inking unit, from which the printing gradient GF is generated. The machine is then ready to print and immediately delivers good sheets, since the inking unit is balanced. Here will. then the time between the introduction of the color profile P and the formation of the color gradient GF or the final equilibrium in the production run is saved. This also eliminates a certain amount of waste that would still have to be printed even if the simplified procedure for presetting was used.
  • In addition, an ink / fountain solution balance is established in the inking unit. This can now be dealt with during the running-in process by modifying the color profile P and resulting adaptation of the printing gradient GF. In areas where there is a relatively large amount of dampening solution, the ink supply must in principle be increased, since there the inking is impeded by the dampening solution contained in the printing ink. This dampening solution distribution in the inking unit depends on the subject, since in weakly covered areas a relatively large amount of dampening solution is naturally transported from the printing plate to the inking unit because the printing plate is heavily moistened there. The ink-fountain solution balance also adjusts itself according to the amount of ink transported, since the printing ink absorbs different amounts of fountain solution depending on the amount transported. However, the more dampening solution penetrates into the printing ink, the more the inking of the printing plate is impeded.
  • A device for executing the described method could be integrated into the control of the printing press. It then uses the drives of the dosing elements, the ink fountain roller, the lifting roller and the inking rollers. All that is required is a control program in which these drives are matched to one another and switched on in a corresponding manner. To do this, memories must be available in the machine control system that work together with such a device for presetting. The measured values are distributed over the distribution V into the device the area coverage on the printing plate D and stored there as setting values for the dosing elements. At the beginning of the running-in process, the control brings the dosing elements to a predetermined distance from the ink fountain roller. In addition, the drive of the ink fountain roller is set to a certain speed. Then the controller starts up the inking unit, but the inking rollers are not placed against the printing plate D. After a certain number of lifting cycles, i.e. a certain number of machine rotations, the control switches the machine off again and on the one hand sets the drive of the ink fountain roller to the value required for introducing the color profile P and on the other hand guides the ink metering elements in accordance with those in the color profile P. contained color distribution after. During this entire process, the sheet feed to the machine is still blocked, so that the inking of the inking unit is not disturbed by inadmissible ink take-off. In the refined procedure, only two steps are switched on, namely the homogenization phase for producing the basic color layer A and the supply of the color profile P into the inking unit. After all of these processes have been completed, sheet travel is released and the machine can be started up.

Claims (7)

  1. Process for pre-adjustment of the inking unit of a printing press to conditions required in the printing process with the aid of adjustment values acquired by sensing a printing plate, a print master or a print, by generating a defined ink layer thickness on the inking unit rollers with the aid of an ink fountain, a plurality of metering elements arranged on this in the axial direction of an ink fountain roller and a vibrator roller, characterised in that, before the beginning of printing, an exactly defined quantity of ink is fed to the inking unit rollers via the vibrator roller and from this, on the ink fountain rollers, an exactly predetermined ink layer thickness distribution (G4, G5, A) is generated.
  2. Process according to Claim 1, characterised in that, on the ink fountain rollers in the direction of the ink flow, a gradient in the layer thickness of the printing ink is generated which represents an average value of the gradients arising in continuous printing, so that it matches itself at all places as rapidly as possible to the gradient which adjusts itself for the continuous printing.
  3. Process according to Claim 1 or 2, characterised in that all ink metering elements are adjusted to an exactly the same size metering gap with respect to the ink fountain roller across the entire width of the inking unit, that the width of the vibrator strip is adjusted to a defined value, that the vibrator roller is set in action for a given time or for a given number of vibrator movements, whereon simultaneously the ink applicator rollers are not set against the printing plate, that the vibrator roller is then stopped again and the ink metering elements are adjusted in the axial direction relative to the ink fountain roller to a desired profile P dependent upon the printed image and that, after the adjustment of the ink metering elements, the inking unit is connected in customary fashion to the drive of the printing press.
  4. Process according to Claim 1, characterised in that, on the inking unit rollers, a base ink layer A is generated of overall even layer thickness and that on the base ink layer A, a further ink layer corresponding to the gradients GF of the layer thickness of the printing ink is generated, as adjusts itself in the equilibrium condition arising in continuous printing.
  5. Process according to Claim 1 or 4, characterised in that all ink metering elements are adjusted to an evenly sized metering gap with respect to the ink fountain roller across the entire width of the ink unit, that the width of the vibrator strip is adjusted to a defined value, that the vibrator roller is set in motion for a given time or given number of vibrator movements at a defined ratio of the vibrator movement to the machine speed, wherein simultaneously the ink applicator rollers are not set against the printing plate, that the vibrator roller is then stopped again and the ink fountain rollers are run further for a defined time without contact to the ink fountain and to the printing plate, that during this time the ink metering elements are adjusted to a desired profile P dependent upon the printed image in the axial direction of the ink fountain roller, that the vibrator roller is set in motion for a given time or for a given number of vibrator movements at a defined ratio of the vibrator movement to the machine speed, wherein simultaneously the ink applicator rollers are not set against the printing plate and that, after a defined time, the inking unit is connected in customary fashion to the drive of the printing press.
  6. Process according to Claim 3 or 5, characterised in that, on switching on the printing press, the inking unit for pre-adjustment is put into operation, wherein the ink metering elements and the vibrator strip width are adjusted in such a fashion that the desired ink layer thickness distribution adjusts itself in the inking unit after at most 25 machine rotations, that, after 25 machine rotations, the pre-adjustment process is interrupted and the machine converted correspondingly to the second phase of the pre-adjustment or to test printing.
  7. Process according to Claim 1 to 6, characterised in that, for the adjustment of the inking unit in an offset printing press, the dampening agent distribution on the printing plate and in the inking unit are taken into account in such a fashion that an equilibrium suited for continuous printing of the ink flow is adjusted in that the ink flow is increased or diminished depending upon how strongly the inking of the printing plate is influenced by the dampening agent distribution.
EP84110697A 1983-10-20 1984-09-07 Presetting of inking units Expired - Lifetime EP0141168B1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE3338143 1983-10-20
DE3338143A DE3338143C2 (en) 1983-10-20 1983-10-20

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AT84110697T AT62626T (en) 1983-10-20 1984-09-07 Ink print set.

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EP0141168A2 EP0141168A2 (en) 1985-05-15
EP0141168A3 EP0141168A3 (en) 1989-02-01
EP0141168B1 true EP0141168B1 (en) 1991-04-17

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US (1) US4660470A (en)
EP (1) EP0141168B1 (en)
JP (1) JPH044947B2 (en)
AT (1) AT62626T (en)
DE (1) DE3338143C2 (en)

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Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP0141168A3 (en) 1989-02-01
JPH044947B2 (en) 1992-01-29
DE3338143A1 (en) 1985-05-09
AT62626T (en) 1991-05-15
EP0141168A2 (en) 1985-05-15
JPS60101048A (en) 1985-06-05
DE3338143C2 (en) 1986-12-18
US4660470A (en) 1987-04-28

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