WO2012066651A1 - Power management system and power management method - Google Patents

Power management system and power management method Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2012066651A1
WO2012066651A1 PCT/JP2010/070463 JP2010070463W WO2012066651A1 WO 2012066651 A1 WO2012066651 A1 WO 2012066651A1 JP 2010070463 W JP2010070463 W JP 2010070463W WO 2012066651 A1 WO2012066651 A1 WO 2012066651A1
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Prior art keywords
power
management
information
power management
consumer
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PCT/JP2010/070463
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French (fr)
Japanese (ja)
Inventor
浩仁 矢野
安東 宣善
角本 喜紀
河村 英之
洋平 河田
芳樹 松浦
鶴貝 満男
冨田 泰志
広考 高橋
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株式会社日立製作所
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Priority to PCT/JP2010/070463 priority Critical patent/WO2012066651A1/en
Publication of WO2012066651A1 publication Critical patent/WO2012066651A1/en

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/38Arrangements for parallely feeding a single network by two or more generators, converters or transformers
    • H02J3/46Controlling of the sharing of output between the generators, converters, or transformers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E60/00Enabling technologies; Technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation

Abstract

The present invention efficiently uses regional power by consuming surplus power in the region in which the surplus power is generated. A CEMS (10) acquires information expressing power supply and demand from intraregional consumer devices (HEMS (20), BEMS (30), FEMS (40), EV-EMS (50), etc.). The CEMS (10) estimates surplus power generated in the region, calculates an incentive for promoting the consumption of surplus power, and notifies consumers of the incentive.

Description

Power management system and power management method

The present invention relates to a power management system and a power management method.

A path and electrical equipment for supplying commercial power from a power supplier such as an electric power company to each consumer (personal house, building, factory, etc.) are called a power system. Conventionally, except for some large-scale customers, each customer uses only commercial power from the power system.

However, in recent years, the response to so-called low-carbon societies has been urgently required, and the spread of power sources with low impact on the natural environment, such as solar power generation, wind power generation, heat pumps, and fuel cells, is desired. Since these power sources are provided for each consumer, they are called distributed power sources for conventional large-scale power plants that are located away from the city (Patent Documents 1 and 2).

JP 2007-336796 A JP 2008-271777 A

When the spread rate of the distributed power source was low and the amount of power generation was relatively small, the distributed power source was used as an auxiliary to suppress the consumption of power supplied from the power system. On the other hand, in recent years, the penetration rate of distributed power sources has increased and the amount of power generation has also increased.

Therefore, for example, during the daytime hours, the power generated by each consumer is larger than the power consumed by each consumer, and surplus power may be generated. For example, in a residential area during the day, since a part of the family goes out, the power consumption of the house decreases. However, the photovoltaic power generator generates power regardless of the presence or absence of a resident. When the amount of power generated by the solar power generation device exceeds the power consumption of the house, surplus power is generated.

Surplus power can be sold to power suppliers. However, in general, a distributed power source that uses natural energy has a large amount of power generation. Therefore, in order for the power system to receive power from the distributed power source, it is necessary to improve or reinforce the substation equipment and the distribution network. This is because if the amount of power flowing from each distributed power source into the power system varies, the frequency of the power supplied from the power system to each consumer varies and the quality deteriorates.

Furthermore, in the conventional technology, the distributed power source is managed for each consumer, and it is difficult for one consumer to supply and consume surplus power to other consumers.

Thus, in the conventional technology, the power output from each distributed power source in the region cannot be used effectively, and the sale to the power system is also stopped within the allowable range of the existing facilities. That is, surplus power in the region is often wasted and is not effectively used.

On the other hand, in order to effectively use the power of each distributed power source in the region, it is necessary to grasp the configuration of the distribution network that connects each customer in the region and the power system. For example, a distribution network is indispensable in order to pass power from a house with a large amount of power generation to a house with a large amount of power consumption. However, since the configuration of the distribution network is important and confidential information, it is difficult to obtain and manage.

Therefore, an object of the present invention is to provide a power management system and a power management method that can reduce surplus power by predicting surplus power in a predetermined area. Another object of the present invention is to provide a power management system and a power management method capable of reducing surplus power in a predetermined area and estimating the configuration of a distribution network based on the location and map of consumers and facilities. It is to provide. Further objects of the invention will become clear from the description of the embodiments described later.

In order to solve the above problems, a power management system according to the present invention includes a first power management device provided for each predetermined area including a plurality of consumers, and a second power management device provided for each consumer. It is a management system, each 2nd power management apparatus monitors the electric power state in each consumer, transmits the 2nd management information which shows an electric power state to the 1st power management apparatus, and the 1st power management apparatus Based on the second management information, the total amount of power demand and the amount of power generation in the predetermined area are predicted, and the surplus power amount in the predetermined area is calculated from the difference between the total amount of power demand and the total amount of power generation. First management information including information for reducing the amount of power is created, and the first management information is transmitted to each second power management device.

Examples of “customers” include private houses (detached houses and apartment houses), various buildings, factories, and the like. A “customer” is a unit for managing power consumption and power generation. Therefore, a consumer can be called a power management unit.

“Predetermined area” means an area managed by the first power management apparatus. For example, an area where there are a plurality of consumers connected to the power system through a common electric wire can be defined as a predetermined area.

At least one first power management device is provided in a predetermined area. The second power management apparatus is provided for each consumer. The first power management apparatus transmits first management information including information for reducing surplus power to each second power management apparatus.

The “second management information” can include, for example, the power consumption and power generation amount of each consumer, the state of one or more electrical devices (electrical loads) possessed by each consumer, the time, and the like. Each second management information may be associated with a priority in advance. The first power management apparatus can process each second management information based on the priority.

The “first management information” includes, for example, information indicating the time zone and amount of surplus power generation, information obtained by converting surplus power into carbon dioxide emissions, and a predetermined amount for encouraging consumption of surplus power by each consumer. Information etc. can be included. The predetermined information includes, for example, information on points given by using surplus power, information indicating that surplus power is set at a lower price than normal electricity charges, and consumption of surplus power in the global environment. Information that shows a positive effect can be mentioned.

Each second power management apparatus may output the received first management information as it is or after processing it. For example, information that prompts consumption of surplus power may be output via a display device or an audio output device provided in a consumer.

The first power management device is based on customer location information indicating the location of each customer, facility location information indicating the location of the facility for supplying power to each customer, and information on a map including a predetermined area. Thus, it is possible to predict a power distribution network connecting the equipment and each consumer.

The first power management apparatus may be connected to a third apparatus that can provide information related to power to each consumer. The third device can set a monitoring condition for monitoring each second management information in the first power management device. The first power management apparatus monitors whether there is information that matches the monitoring condition among the second management information, and notifies the third apparatus when the second management information that matches the monitoring condition is found. be able to.

The present invention can be grasped as the first power management apparatus or the power management method. Furthermore, at least a part of the configuration of the present invention may be realized as a computer program or a hardware circuit. The computer program can be distributed, for example, via a communication medium such as the Internet, a recording medium such as a hard disk or a flash memory device. Furthermore, other combinations other than the combinations of the above viewpoints are also included in the scope of the present invention.

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram showing the entire power system and power management system. FIG. 2 shows the functional configuration of the first power management device (CEMS) and the connection between the first power management device and each second power management device (HEMS, BEMS, FEMS, EV-EMS, regional power generation / storage). It is explanatory drawing shown. FIG. 3 is an overall view showing a physical configuration of the power management system. FIG. 4 shows the configuration of the CEMS. FIG. 5 is a block diagram illustrating a configuration of a house including a HEMS. FIG. 6 is a block diagram illustrating a configuration of a building including BEMS. FIG. 7 is a block diagram illustrating a configuration of an apartment house including BEMS. FIG. 8 is a block diagram showing a configuration of a factory equipped with FEMS. FIG. 9 is a block diagram illustrating a configuration of a charging station including the EV-EMS. FIG. 10 is an overall view showing a functional configuration of the power management system. FIG. 11 is an explanatory diagram showing a functional configuration of an EMS information hub that constitutes a part of the CEMS. FIG. 12 is an explanatory diagram showing a functional configuration of a consumer side CEMS application that constitutes a part of the CEMS. FIG. 13 is an explanatory diagram showing a functional configuration of a distribution automation system that constitutes a part of the CEMS. FIG. 14 is an explanatory diagram showing a functional configuration of a power supplier side CEMS application that constitutes a part of the CEMS. FIG. 15 is an explanatory diagram showing a functional configuration of an EAM application that constitutes a part of the CEMS. FIG. 16 is an explanatory diagram showing a functional configuration of a common API included in the EMS information hub. FIG. 17 is an explanatory diagram illustrating a state in which the configuration of the power distribution network is estimated based on the location of the customer and the facility and the map. FIG. 18 is an explanatory diagram showing a state in which incentive information is created by predicting a supply and demand balance in a region. FIG. 19 is an explanatory diagram illustrating a configuration example of supply and demand information transmitted from each customer to the CEMS. FIG. 20 is an explanatory diagram illustrating a configuration example of plan information distributed from the CEMS to each consumer. FIG. 21 is an explanatory diagram showing a configuration example of carbon dioxide information distributed from CEMS to each consumer. FIG. 22 is a flowchart showing the overall operation of the CEMS. FIG. 23 is a flowchart showing a process of transmitting supply and demand information from the customer side device. FIG. 24 is a schematic diagram illustrating how the common adapter I / F processes supply and demand information according to priority. FIG. 25 shows an example of a table for managing the priority for each device. FIG. 26 shows an example of a table for managing priorities for each consumer. FIG. 27 is a schematic diagram illustrating how the common data processing function monitors supply and demand information based on monitoring conditions set by a service provider or the like. FIG. 28 is a schematic diagram showing how the common data processing function performs access control. FIG. 29 is a flowchart showing a process when the apparatus on the customer side receives the plan information. FIG. 30 is an example of a screen that displays power supply and demand information. FIG. 31 is an example of a screen that displays carbon dioxide emissions. FIG. 32 shows an example of a screen that displays an incentive for consuming surplus power. FIG. 33 shows another example of a screen displayed on the customer side. FIG. 34 is a schematic diagram showing how measurement data is collected and stored. FIG. 35 shows an example of a distribution network table showing distribution network information.

Hereinafter, embodiments of the present invention will be described with reference to the drawings. In the present embodiment, as will be described in detail below, the first power management device (CEMS 10) provided in the predetermined area communicates with the devices 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 on each customer side existing in the predetermined area. The power supply / demand balance in a predetermined area is predicted. The first power management device calculates surplus power from the prediction result of the supply and demand balance, and prompts each consumer to consume surplus power. Thereby, the electric power generated in the predetermined area can be preferentially consumed in the area, and so-called local production for local consumption is realized.

Furthermore, in this embodiment, as will be described later, the configuration of the power distribution network in a predetermined area can be predicted based on the location information and map information of each customer and facility. Therefore, the electric power produced by a certain consumer can be supplied to other consumers in consideration of the connection state between each consumer. Thereby, the supply and demand of electric power in a predetermined area can be managed more finely.

FIG. 1 is an overall configuration diagram schematically showing a relationship between a power management system and a power system for each area. The power system 1 is a system for supplying electric power generated at the power plants 2 and 3 to each consumer, and includes a power generation function, a power transformation function, a power transmission function, and a power distribution function. In the present embodiment, the power system 1 describes a case where AC power is supplied to each consumer. However, instead of a system that supplies AC power, a system that supplies DC power to each consumer may be used.

The central power supply 2 is a large-scale power plant such as a thermal power plant, a hydro power plant, or a nuclear power plant. The distributed power source 3 is, for example, a relatively large-scale wind power plant, solar power plant, solar thermal power plant, or the like. Since the distributed power source 3 belongs to the system side, it can be called a system side distributed power source. The distributed power supply 3 includes a relatively large-scale storage battery 3A. By storing the power generated by a wind power generator or the like in the storage battery 3A, the power can be used effectively.

The electric power generated by the centralized power supply 2 and the distributed power supply 3 is sent to the power transmission station 4 and boosted to a predetermined high voltage. The power transmission station 4 can also include a storage battery 4A. A part of the power from the centralized power supply 2 or the distributed power supply 3 can be stored in the storage battery 4A.

The power transmission station 4 is connected to each distribution substation 5 (1), 5 (2) via a power transmission network 6, and high-voltage AC power is supplied to each distribution substation 5 (1), 5 ( 2). The power transmission network 6 may include one or a plurality of substations, but is omitted in FIG.

The distribution substations 5 (1) and 5 (2) reduce the voltage value of the power from the power transmission station 4 and supply power of a predetermined voltage to each consumer. When not particularly distinguished, it is referred to as a distribution substation 5. Each distribution substation 5 supplies electric power to each consumer via a plurality of power supply lines 7.

1, one distribution substation 5 (1) includes a plurality of power supply lines 7 (1a) and 7 (1n). The other distribution substation 5 (2) includes a plurality of other power supply lines 7 (2a) and 7 (2n). When not particularly distinguished, it is referred to as a power supply line 7.

Each power supply line 7 is provided with one CEMS 10. Specifically, the CEMS 10 (1a) is provided for the power supply line 7 (1a), the CEMS 10 (1n) is provided for the power supply line 7 (1n), and the CEMS 10 (2a) is provided for the power supply line 7 (2a). A CEMS (2n) is provided in the power supply line 7 (2n). Unless otherwise distinguished, it is called CEMS10. The CEMS 10 corresponds to a “first power management device”.

HEMS (Home Energy Management System) 20, BEMS (Building and Energy Management System) 30, FEMS (Factory Energy Management) shown in FIG.
System) 40 and EV-EMS (Electric Vehicle-Energy Management System) 50 are devices provided in each consumer and correspond to a “second power management device”. Each of these devices 20, 30, 40, 50 is managed by the CEMS 10. Each customer is given reference numerals 200, 300A, 300B, 400, and 500, as will be described later with reference to FIG.

Each power supply line 7 is provided for each predetermined area. For example, the power supply line 7 is provided so as to cover an area of a predetermined area. In the case where the area size of one power supply line 7 is the first size, the area size of the distribution substation 5 including the plurality of power supply lines 7 is larger than the first size. 2 sizes.

Since the CEMS 10 is provided for each power supply line 7, the first area having the first size can be referred to as a CEMS charge area, for example. The second area having the size of the second size that the distribution substation 5 is in charge of can be called, for example, the distribution substation charge area.

In the present embodiment, as will be described later, the power generated in the first region is consumed in the first region as much as possible by the CEMS 10. Furthermore, in this embodiment, power can be interchanged between the power supply lines 7 connected to the same distribution substation 5. Thereby, the electric power generated in the second area can be consumed in the second area. That is, the surplus power in one first region can be supplied to the other first region under the management of the common distribution substation 5. Thus, in this embodiment, renewable energy is efficiently consumed at a plurality of stages according to the size of the management area.

FIG. 2 schematically shows the main functional configuration of the CEMS 10. The physical configuration will be described later with reference to FIGS. The present invention is not limited to the configuration shown in FIG. FIG. 2 is provided for understanding the embodiment and is not intended to limit the scope of the present invention. It is obvious that other drawings than FIG. 2 do not limit the scope of the present invention.

The CEMS 10 is provided for each predetermined area (the first area described above) and manages the power state of each customer belonging to the predetermined area. The power state includes a state of power generation and / or a state of power consumption.

The detailed functional configuration of the CEMS 10 will be described later with reference to FIG. The CEMS 10 in FIG. 2 includes a supply and demand adjustment function 110 and an EMS information control hub function 120 (see FIG. 10). The EMS information control hub function 120 includes, for example, a common adapter I / F 121, a common API (Application Programming Interface) 122, a common data processing function 123, a common data management function 124, a database group 125, and a security function 126. Is provided. The supply and demand adjustment function 110 is called a consumer side CEMS application 110 in FIG. The EMS information control hub function 120 is called an EMS information control hub 120 in FIG.

The supply and demand adjustment function 110 predicts the amount of surplus power generated in the first region in charge of the CEMS 10 and creates information for reducing the surplus power. The supply and demand adjustment function 110 includes, for example, a function of predicting power demand and power supply in the first region, a function of managing actual values of power demand and power supply in the first region, and emission of carbon dioxide gas in the first region. A function for calculating the amount, a function for calculating an incentive for consumption of surplus power, and a function for presenting the calculated incentive to each consumer.

EMS information control hub function 120 processes and stores data collected from devices 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 on each customer side, and provides it to the outside as needed. The station 60 that performs local power generation and / or local power storage will be described later with reference to FIG.

The common adapter I / F 121 is an interface for bidirectional communication with the common adapter CA included in each customer-side device 20, 30, 40, 50, 60. The role of the common adapter CA will be described later with reference to FIG.

The common API 122 is an interface for two-way communication with an external provider such as the service provider 90A or the application developer 90B. The EMS information control hub 120 provides data regarding the local EMS to the external vendors 90A and 90B. The service provider 90A and the application developer 90B may be referred to as external contractors 90.

Examples of the external supplier 90 include a manufacturer or a seller of various products used by each consumer, a weather forecaster that provides weather information, and a consultant company that provides advice on electric power.

The common data processing function 123 processes the data acquired from each customer side device 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, etc. as predefined common data. The common data management function 124 stores common data in the database group 125. The database group 125 stores various information related to the EMS in the first region.

The security function 126 ensures the reliability and safety of communication between the CEMS and each customer-side device 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and the like. The security function 126 authenticates a communication partner and encrypts communication contents.

FIG. 3 is an overall view showing a physical configuration of the power management system. The distribution network will be described first. A distribution substation 5 and a high-voltage substation 5H are connected to the power transmission network 6. For example, the distribution substation 5 converts AC power of tens of thousands of kilovolts into AC power of several thousand kilovolts and supplies the AC power to the power supply lines 7 (1) and 7 (2). The high voltage substation 5H generates AC power having a voltage higher than the output voltage of the distribution substation 5 and supplies the AC power to the high voltage power supply line 7H. Hereinafter, when not particularly distinguished, it is referred to as a power supply line 7.

Each power supply line 7 includes, for example, a section switch 71, an automatic voltage regulator (SVR) 72A, a static reactive power compensator (SVC: Static Var Compensator) 72B, and a voltage regulator 72C. And are provided. Unless otherwise distinguished, it is called a voltage regulator 72. In the example of FIG. 3, the voltage regulator 72C is provided in the high-voltage power supply line 7H, and the SVR 72A and the SVC 72B are provided in the power supply line 7 (1). Further, an interconnection switch 73 is provided between the power supply lines 7.

The segment switch 71 is a switch circuit that opens and closes the power supply line 7. The SVR 72A and the SVC 72B are circuits that automatically adjust the voltage. The interconnection switch 73 is a switch circuit for connecting the power supply lines 7 to each other and blocking the power supply lines 7. By controlling the interconnection switch 73, even when a disconnection or the like occurs in one power supply line 7, power can be supplied from the other power supply line 7 to each consumer.

Each circuit 71, 72A, 72B, 73 provided in the power supply line 7 is connected to a communication master station (RTU: Remote Terminal Unit) 710, 720. As described in FIG. 10, the communication master stations 710 and 720 are connected to the respective circuits 71, 72 </ b> A, 72 </ b> B, and 73 on the power supply line 7 through communication slave stations (FTU: Feeder Terminal Units) 750.

One communication master station 710 is connected via a communication line 711 to a circuit 72C provided in the high-voltage power supply line 7H. The other communication master station 720 includes circuits 71, 72A, 72B provided in the power supply line 7 (1), the power supply line 7 (1), and the power supply line 7 (2) via the communication line 721. Are connected to the interconnection switch 73 that connects the two. Further, the other communication master station 720 connects the circuit 71 provided in the power supply line 7 (2), the power supply line 7 (2), and the power supply line 7H through another communication line 722. Connected to the interconnection switch 73.

The communication master stations 710 and 720 are connected to the CEMS 10. Thereby, the CEMS 10 can remotely monitor the states of the circuits 71, 72A, 72B, 73.

The power supply line 7 is connected to a plurality of pole transformers 74. The power receiving equipment of each customer 200, 300 </ b> A, 300 </ b> B, 400, 500 is supplied with power from the power supply line 7 via the nearest pole transformer 74. Not all consumers receive power via the pole transformer 74. For example, a power cable provided in the ground may be used, or power may be received directly from the power supply line 7.

FIG. 3 shows a plurality of types of consumers, that is, a detached house 200, a building 300A, an apartment house 300B, a factory 400, and a charging station 500. Although the configuration of each consumer will be described later, briefly described, the power generation amount and the power consumption amount of the detached house 200 are managed by a HEMS and a smart meter (SM in the figure). In the building 300A and the apartment house 300B, the power generation amount and power consumption of the entire building and the power generation amount and power consumption of each section included in the building are managed by the BEMS and the smart meter. In the factory 400, the power generation amount and the power consumption amount are managed by the FEMS and the smart meter. The power generation amount and power consumption amount of the charging station 500 are managed by the EV-EMS and the smart meter.

The smart meter is connected to an MDMS (Meter Data Management System) 80 of an AMI (Advanced Metering Infrastructure) 80 via a communication line 810. The CEMS 10 is connected to the MDMS 80, and acquires data (actually measured values) related to the power generation amount and the power consumption amount from the smart meter of each consumer via the MDMS 80.

The CEMS 10 is connected to the HEMS, BEMS, FEMS, and EV-EMS via another communication line 820. The CEMS 10 receives other supply and demand information described later from the HEMS, BEMS, FEMS, and EV-EMS using other communication lines 820, and transmits later described plan information to the HEMS, BEMS, FEMS, and EV-EMS. .

In the area where the distribution substation 5 is in charge, at least one distributed power source (distributed power source on the customer side) 60 that uses natural energy can be provided. The distributed power supply 60 can include, for example, a wind power plant 61, a power storage plant 62, and a solar power plant 63. Furthermore, for example, devices such as a solar thermal power plant and a heat pump can be provided. The power storage station 62 stores renewable power generated by the wind power plant 61, the solar power plant 63, and the like. The power storage 62 may be configured to convert electrical energy into other energy such as heat energy and store the energy.

The CEMS 10 is also connected to a distributed power source 60 provided in the area, and can manage the power generation amount, the power storage amount, and the like of the distributed power source 60.

FIG. 4 shows the physical configuration of the CEMS 10. The CEMS 10 includes a plurality of servers 1101, 1102, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1401, 1402, a plurality of databases 1103, 1204, 1205, 1304, 1305, 1403, and the like. In FIG. 4, “FW” is an abbreviation for FireWall, and “DMZ” is an abbreviation for DeMilitarizedtarZone. The CEMS 10 prevents intrusion from an external network, and an area in consideration of security is provided in the CEMS 10. In the safe area, for example, at least a part of a server and a database for realizing the supply and demand adjustment function 110, the EMS information control hub function 120, the power supplier side CEMS application 140 (see FIG. 10), and the like are provided.

The distribution automation AP server 1301, the distribution automation DB server 1302, the coordination DB server 1303, the master DB 1304, and the slave DB 1305 are configurations for realizing the distribution automation system 130 (see FIG. 10). “AP” is an abbreviation for application, and “DB” is an abbreviation for database.

The distribution automation AP server 1301 provides an application program for automatically controlling distribution. The distribution automation DB server 1302 manages a database for automatically controlling distribution. The cooperation DB server 1303 makes a database cooperate with another system (for example, an EMS information control hub).

The master DB 1304 includes, for example, current system information (SM and TM), facility information, information recording a load, and graphic information. SV is system facility monitoring data. TM is data obtained by remotely measuring the load of the system facility. The facility information is information on various facilities (system side facilities) provided in the distribution network. The graphic information is information indicating the arrangement of the power system and the like.

Data managed by the master DB 1304 is copied to the slave DB 1305. The name of information stored in the slave DB 1305 is omitted in FIG. 4 due to space limitations.

The D-EMS AP server 1401 is a configuration for realizing the CEMS application 140 on the power supplier side together with the D-EMS DB server 1402 and the slave DB 1403. Here, the D-EMS indicates the power supplier side CEMS.

The D-EMS AP server 1401 provides a CEMS application on the power supplier side. The D-EMS DB server 1402 manages the slave DB 1403. The slave DB 1403 is connected to the slave DB 1305 managed by the cooperation DB server 1302 and the master DB 1204 managed by the hub DB server 1203. Accordingly, the slave DB 1403 stores, for example, configuration information, supply and demand information, prediction information, plan information, and system information (SM, TV).

The configuration information is information including the configuration of the distribution network, which is the configuration on the grid side, and the electrical configuration inside each customer. In the present embodiment, as will be described later, the configuration of the distribution network can be predicted based on the position of the customer, the position of the facility, and the map. However, if the distribution network information can be acquired from the power supplier, the distribution network information may be used. Here, the case where distribution network information is acquired from an electric power supplier is more suitable. This is because balance between supply and demand (supply and consumption) is better adjusted from the viewpoint of power transmission loss and / or reverse power flow, because it is preferable to adjust the balance between power distribution networks rather than whether the physical locations are close. .

The supply and demand information is information for managing the actual value of the power consumption and the actual value of the power generation amount for each consumer existing in the region, the power generation amount of the facility on the power system 1 related to the region, and the like.

Prediction information indicates the predicted value of power generation and power consumption for the entire region. The difference between the predicted power generation amount for the entire region and the predicted power consumption amount for the entire region is surplus power (predicted power generation−predicted power consumption = surplus power).

The plan information is information for managing a plan for reducing surplus power in the region. The configuration information, supply and demand information, prediction information, and plan information are copied from the master DB 1204 managed by the hub DB server 1203. The system information is copied from the slave DB 1305 managed by the cooperation DB server 1303.

The customer-side CEMS DB server 1101, the customer-side CEMS AP server 1102, and the slave DB 1103 are configured to realize the customer-side CEMS application 110 (supply / demand adjustment function).

The customer side CEMS DB server 1101 manages the slave DB 1103. The customer side CEMS AP server 1102 provides a customer side CEMS application. The slave DB 1103 is connected to the master DB 1204 managed by the hub DB server 1203. Configuration information, supply and demand information, plan information, weather information, map information, and the like are copied from the master DB 1204 to the slave DB 1103.

The hub front server 1201, the service front server 1203, the hub DB server 1203, the master DB 1204, and the slave DB 1205 are configured to realize the EMS information control hub 120.

The hub front server 1201 exchanges information with each customer, and includes a common adapter I / F 121. The service front server 1202 exchanges information with the service provider 90A or the application developer 90B, and includes a common API 122. The hub DB server 1203 manages the master DB 1204 and the slave DB 1205.

The master DB 1204 is connected to the slave DB 1403 and the slave DB 1103. The master DB 1204 includes, for example, configuration information, demand and supply information of customers, facilities, and regions, prediction information, plan information, weather information, map information, graphic information indicating a position on the customer side, and the like. Information for managing the model number of the device (displayed as “device #”) and service information can be stored.

The device model number is information for identifying an electrical device (for example, an air conditioner, a water heater, a water heater, a refrigerator, a television) and the like possessed by each consumer. The service information is information for managing various services provided to each consumer.

The slave DB 1205 is connected to the slave DB 1305 managed by the cooperation DB server 1303. Equipment information, equipment supply and demand information, and system graphic information are copied from the slave DB 1305 to the slave DB 1205.

FIG. 5 schematically shows an electrical configuration of a general detached house 200. The house 200 includes a HEMS 20, a smart meter 21, a distribution board 22 with a meter, a PCS (Power Conditioning System) 23, a PV (PhotoVoltaic) 24, a battery 25, a plurality of electric devices 26A-26H, PLC (Power Line Communications) 27 is provided.

The HEMS 20 manages the power state (both power generation and power consumption) in the house 200 and is connected to the CEMS 10. The HEMS 20 can be configured as a microcomputer system including, for example, a microprocessor, a memory, a communication interface, and a monitor display. The BEMS 30, FEMS 40, and EV-EMS 50 described below are also configured as a microcomputer system.

The monitor display may be integrated with the HEMS 20 or may be formed separately from the HEMS 20. Furthermore, the structure which utilizes the display apparatus which displays a television broadcast etc. as a monitor display of HEMS20 may be sufficient.

The smart meter 21 communicates with the purchased power meter for measuring the power purchased from the power system 1, the sold power meter for measuring the power sold to the power system 1, and the MDMS 80 in FIG. 3. A communication circuit. The smart meter 21 and the HEMS 20 may be configured to communicate with each other.

The distribution board 22 with a meter is a device for distributing electric power to each room of the house 200, and includes an earth leakage breaker and the like. The distribution board 22 is connected to the HEMS 20.

The PCS 23 controls a PV (solar power generation device) 24 and a battery 25. The PCS 23 is connected to the distribution board 22. Further, the PCS 23 is also connected to the HEMS 20. The electric power generated by the PV 24 is stored in the battery 25. The PCS 23 supplies the power stored in the battery 25 to each device 26A-26H in the house 200 or sells the power to the power system 1 via the smart meter 21 so that voltage fluctuation does not occur. To do.

Furthermore, excess power generated in the house 200 can be supplied to other customers managed by the same CEMS 10. Alternatively, a plurality of CEMSs 10 cooperate to supply surplus power in a certain house to another house 200 or building 300A managed by another CEMS 10 belonging to the same distribution substation 5 or the like. .

Examples of the electric devices in the house 200 include a fuel cell 26A, a heat pump water heater 26B, an air conditioner 26C, a refrigerator 26D, a dryer 26E, a blind 26F, a lighting S6G, and an electric vehicle (EV / PHV). ) 26H.

Blind 26F is provided with an actuator such as an electric motor and opens and closes manually or automatically. The electric vehicle includes, for example, an EV (Electric Vehicle) that runs only with a battery and an electric motor, and a PHV (Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle) that can be charged from an electric outlet of the house 200. In addition, not only an electric vehicle but an electric motorcycle may be used.

The PLC 27 is a device for using the power wiring in the house 200 as a communication line to communicate between the HEMS 20 and each device 26A-26H.

FIG. 6 schematically shows the electrical configuration of the building 300A. The building 300A includes, for example, a BEMS 30, a smart meter 31, a PCS 32A, a PV 32, a PCS 33A, a battery 33, a configuration 34 for each tenant, a power measurement unit 36B, an electric device 37B, a controller 38B, Is provided.

The building 300A includes a common configuration 31, 32, 32A, 33, 33A, 36B, 37B, and 38B, and an individual configuration 34 for each tenant occupying the building. The BEMS 30 manages the power state of each of the common configuration of the building 300A and the individual configuration for each tenant.

BEMS 30 manages the power state in the building. The smart meter 31 measures the amount of power supplied from the power system 1 to the building 300A (amount of power purchased) and the amount of power supplied from the building 300A to the power system 1 (amount of power sold). The smart meter 31 transmits power amount information to the MDMS 80.

The PCS 32A for PV control manages the PV 32 provided on the roof of the building 300A in accordance with the instruction from the BEMS 30. The battery control PCS 33 </ b> A manages the battery 33 in accordance with an instruction from the BEMS 30.

The electric power generated by the PV 32 is supplied via the battery 33 to the equipment 37B as common equipment and / or the equipment 37A of each tenant. Surplus power that could not be consumed in the building 300 </ b> A can be sold to the power system 1. Alternatively, the surplus power in the building 300A is supplied to other customers managed by the same CEMS 10 or to other customers managed by other CEMS 10 belonging to the common distribution substation 5 You can also

The configuration 34 for each tenant includes, for example, a smart meter 35A, a power measurement unit 36A, an electric device 37A, and a controller 38A. The smart meter 35A measures the power consumption of the tenant and transmits it to the MDMS 80. The power measurement unit 36A is provided for each electric device 37A, and measures the power consumption of each electric device 37A (a configuration capable of measuring the power generation amount). Each power measurement unit 36 </ b> A transmits the power consumption of each electrical device 37 </ b> A to the BEMS 20.

Examples of the electrical equipment 37A provided by the tenant include office automation equipment such as an air conditioner, lighting, a personal computer, and a copy machine. The controller 38A controls each electric device 37A in the tenant. The controller 38A is connected to the BEMS 30.

Examples of the electric equipment 37B that is a common facility of the building include a heat pump water heater and a refrigerator. The power measurement unit 36B is provided for each electrical device 37B, measures the power consumption of each electrical device 37B, and transmits it to the BEMS 30. The controller 38B controls the electrical equipment 37B that is a common facility of the building 300A. The controller 38B is connected to the BEMS 30.

FIG. 7 schematically shows the electrical configuration of the apartment house 300B. The collective housing 300B includes configurations 30, 31, 32, 32A, 33, 33A, 36B, 37B, and 38B that are common to the building 300A described in FIG. Furthermore, the apartment house 300B also has the configuration of the house 200 described in FIG. This is because the apartment house 300B is an aggregate of individual houses. Each house 200 in the apartment house 300 </ b> B is managed by each HEMS 20. The common configurations 36B, 37B, and 38B of the apartment house 300B are managed by the BEMS 30.

FIG. 8 schematically shows the electrical configuration of the factory 400. The factory 400 includes, for example, an FEMS 40, a smart meter 41, a PV 42, a PV control PCS 42A, a battery 43, a battery control PCS 43A, a co-generator 44, and configurations 45A, 46A, 47A, 48 relating to production equipment, Configurations 45B, 46B, 47B relating to the environment in the factory are provided.

The FEMS 40 manages the power state of the factory 400. The smart meter 41 measures the amount of power supplied from the power system 1 to the factory 400 and the amount of power supplied from the factory 400 to the power system 1 and transmits it to the MDMS 80.

The PCS 42A controls the operation of the PV 42 according to the instruction from the FEMS 40. The PCS 43A controls the operation of the battery 43 in accordance with an instruction from the FEMS 40. The electric power generated by the PV 42 can be consumed by the devices 46A and 46B in the factory 400 via the battery 43. The surplus power at the factory 400 can be supplied to other customers managed by the common CEMS 10 or to other customers belonging to the common distribution substation 5.

Explain the configuration of production equipment. The factory 400 includes various electric devices 46A such as a press machine, a shearing machine, a welding machine, an injection molding machine, and a packaging machine. The power measurement unit 45A is provided for each electrical device 46A. Each power measurement unit 45 </ b> A measures the power consumption of each electrical device 46 </ b> A (a configuration that can measure the amount of power generation. The same applies hereinafter) and transmits the measured power to the FEMS 40.

Controller 47A controls each electrical device 46A. The controller 47A is connected to the production management system 48. The production management system 48 can give an instruction to the controller 47A based on the plan information notified from the CEMS 10 or the like.

Explain the configuration of the factory environment. Examples of the electrical equipment 46B related to the factory environment include an air conditioner, a boiler, a refrigerator, an air compressor, and the like. The power measurement unit 45B is provided for each electrical device 46B. Each power measurement unit 45B measures the power consumption of each electrical device 46B and transmits it to the FEMS 40.

FIG. 9 schematically shows the electrical configuration of the charging station 500. Charging station 500 is a facility for charging EV (including PHV) 57. The charging station 500 includes, for example, an EV-EMS 50, a smart meter 51, a power measurement unit 52, a charging converter board 53, a PV 54A, a battery 54B, a PCS 55, a quick charging terminal 56A, and a normal charging terminal 56B. And a kiosk terminal 58.

EV-EMS 50 manages the power state of charging station 500. The smart meter 51 measures the amount of power supplied from the power system 1 to the charging station 500 and the amount of power supplied from the charging station 500 to the power system 1, and transmits them to the MDMS 80.

The power measurement unit 52 measures the amount of power at each charging terminal 56A, 56B, etc., and transmits it to the EV-EMS 50.

The PCS 55 controls the PV 54A and the battery 54B according to instructions from the EV-EMS 50. The electric power generated by the PV 54A can be consumed in the charging station 500. The surplus power in the charging station 500 can be supplied to other customers managed by the common CEMS 10 or to other customers belonging to the common distribution substation 5.

The charge converter board 53 is a device for converting the power supplied from the power system 1 or the battery 54B into power having a predetermined high voltage and supplying it to the quick charge terminal 56A. The charge converter board 53 is connected to the EV-EMS 50.

The quick charging terminal 56A is a device that charges the battery of the EV 57 with a voltage higher than that of the normal charging terminal 56B. By using the quick charging terminal 56A, the remaining battery level of the EV 57 can be recovered to a predetermined amount in a relatively short time. The normal charging terminal 56 </ b> B is a device that charges the battery of the EV 57 with normal power supplied from the power system 1, for example.

The kiosk terminal 58 is an information terminal for controlling the quick charging terminal 56A. The kiosk terminal 58 performs, for example, user authentication, charging fee settlement, charging terminal 56A maintenance, coupon ticket issuance, and the like. The usage status of the quick charging terminal 56A can be notified from the kiosk terminal 58 to a user in the area or a user outside the area via the CEMS 10.

FIG. 10 is an overall configuration diagram focusing on the function of the power management system. The CEMS 10 includes, for example, a consumer side CEMS application 110, an EMS information control hub 120, a power distribution automation system 130, a power supplier side CEMS application 140, and an EAM application 150.

A distribution automation system (DMS: Distribution Management System) 130 manages power supply from the power system 1 to each consumer. For example, the distribution automation system 130 controls the voltage so that the voltage value of the electric power supplied to each consumer is within a certain range, or identifies the facility where the failure has occurred.

The distribution automation system 130 is connected to each circuit (shown as SW in FIG. 10) 71, 72, 73 on the power supply line 7 via the RTUs 710, 720 and the FTU 750. The distribution automation system 130 remotely monitors the status of each segment switch 71, voltage regulator 72, interconnection switch 73, etc. via the RTUs 710, 720, and the like. The power distribution automation system 130 will be described later with reference to FIG.

The management devices 20, 30, 40, 50, 50C, 60 on each customer side are connected to the CEMS 10 through the communication line 820. Further, each customer-side smart meter is connected to the MDMS 80 via a communication line 810. Although FIG. 10 shows that the HEMS 20 is connected to the MDMS 80, the smart meter 21 is actually connected to the MDMS 80. Similarly for other consumers, each smart meter is connected to the MDMS 80 via the communication line 810. The MDMS 80 is connected to the distribution automation system 130 and transmits information from each smart meter to the distribution automation system 130.

The communication line 810 can be attached to the smart meter of each consumer via the utility pole 74A, for example. Alternatively, the smart meter and the MDMS 80 may be connected using an underground communication cable or wireless communication.

The EV center 50C is a facility for managing a plurality of EVs 57. For example, users in the area can jointly use a plurality of EVs 57 managed by the EV center 50C.

The consumer-side CEMS application 110 predicts local power demand and power generation amount, calculates surplus power, and generates information for reducing surplus power, for example. The consumer side CEMS application 110 will be described later with reference to FIG.

The EMS information control hub 120 controls, for example, distribution of information (which can be referred to as EMS related information) managed by the CEMS 10. The EMS information control hub 120 can be connected to a server of an external vendor such as the service provider 90A or / and the application developer 90B. Further, the EMS information control hub 120 can be connected to the CEMS 10 that is responsible for other regions. The EMS information control hub 120 will be described later with reference to FIG.

The power supplier side CEMS application 140 manages, for example, facilities on the power system 1 side. The power supplier side CEMS application 140 will be described later with reference to FIG.

The EAM (Enterprise Asset Management) application 150 is responsible for, for example, maintenance of each facility on the power system 1 side. The EAM application 150 will be described later with reference to FIG.

FIG. 11 shows functions of the consumer side CEMS application 110. The consumer-side CEMS application 110 includes, for example, a supply and demand prediction function 111, a supply and demand balance prediction function 112, a carbon dioxide visualization function 113, an incentive calculation function 114, an incentive visualization function 115, a supply and demand performance management function 116, DB 117A-117G and a function 118 for linking supply and demand are provided.

The supply and demand prediction function 111 predicts the supply and demand of power in the next cycle based on the power supply and demand result managed by the supply and demand result function 116 and the weather information 117E. The prediction cycle is set to about 30 minutes, for example. The prediction result is stored in the prediction information DB 117C. Here, the power supply and demand indicates power demand and power supply. The electric power supply is electric power generated from each distributed power source 60, 24, 32, 42, 54A existing in the region.

The supply and demand balance prediction function 112 is a function that predicts the balance between the predicted power demand and the predicted power supply for each hour. In the time zone in which the predicted power demand and the predicted power supply coincide, the power supply and demand is balanced. In this case, since the electric power required by each consumer in the area is supplied from the distributed power supply in the area, it is not necessary to receive power supply from the power system 1.

余 Surplus power is generated in a time period when the predicted power supply is more than the predicted power demand. In this case, plan information for encouraging consumption of surplus power is distributed to each consumer in the area before the time zone when surplus power is generated.

Even if each consumer is encouraged to consume surplus power, the surplus power can be supplied to consumers in other regions via the distribution substation 5. Alternatively, in a time zone in which surplus power is generated, a configuration may be employed in which the distributed power source is disconnected from the power management system and is idled. The idling means that the power generated by the distributed power source is discarded without being used. Or it is good also as a structure which supplies surplus electric power to the other substation 5 for distribution, and supplies it to another distant area. That is, a configuration in which surplus power is allowed to flow backward to the power system 1 may be used.

The carbon dioxide visualization function 113 calculates and visualizes the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the area based on the power state of the area. Many of the distributed power sources in the region use renewable natural energy. Therefore, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted from the area is reduced in the time zone where a large amount of distributed power is consumed in the area. On the other hand, since the concentrated power source 2 consumes oil, coal, or the like, the amount of carbon dioxide emission in the region increases in a time zone in which much power from the power system 1 is consumed. The carbon dioxide visualization function 113 calculates the amount of carbon dioxide discharged in the area, graphs the value, and presents it to each consumer.

The incentive calculation function 114 calculates an incentive for each consumer in the area to actively consume surplus power generated in the area. Examples of incentives include giving points. More points are given to consumers who have consumed more surplus power during the specified time period. The points can be used, for example, as a right to use the EV 57 shared in the region, or can be used for the power purchased from the power system 1.

The incentive visualization function 115 creates plan information based on the calculated incentive. The plan information is information for encouraging consumption of surplus power in a time zone in which surplus power is expected to be generated. The created plan information is stored in the plan information 117D.

The supply and demand performance management function 116 manages the actual power demand and actual power supply values. The supply / demand data is stored in supply / demand information T117B.

The configuration information 117A stores information indicating the electrical configuration of each consumer and information indicating the configuration of the distribution network from the distribution substation 5 to the power receiving facility of each customer. The electrical configuration of each customer can be obtained from the customer when the customer subscribes to the power management service by the CEMS 10. The information indicating the electrical configuration of each consumer can include the type of electrical equipment used by each consumer and the power consumption of the electrical equipment.

The configuration of the distribution network may be obtained from the power supplier if the power supplier supplying power to the area permits it. Even in the case where the power supplier's permission cannot be obtained, in this embodiment, based on the location of each customer, the location of the facility on the power system 1 side, and the map including the region, the distribution network of that region Can be estimated.

The device model number information T117G stores information for identifying an electrical device used by each consumer.

The function 118 for linking supply and demand performs, for example, processing when an intentional power failure or an unintentional power failure occurs, processing for cutting a demand peak, and the like.

FIG. 12 shows the functions of the EMS information control hub 120. As described above, the EMS information control hub 120 controls the distribution of EMS related information. The EMS information control hub 120 is connected to each system 110, 130, 140, 150 in the CEMS 10. Furthermore, the EMS information control hub 120 is also connected to each customer's device 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, etc. existing outside the CEMS 10 and a server of an external supplier 90.

The EMS information control hub 120 includes a common adapter I / F 121, a common API 122, a common data processing function 123, a common data management function 124, a plurality of databases 125A-125G, a security function 126, and an inter-hub cooperation function 127. System monitoring and system operation function 128.

The common adapter I / F 121 is a communication interface for communicating with the common adapter CA included in the HEMS 20, BEMS 30, FEMS 40, and EV-EMS 50 as described above.

The common adapter I / F 121 establishes a connection with the common adapter CA such as each management device 20, 30, 40, 50, grasps the communication state, delivers a message, and manages the transaction. Further, the common adapter I / F 121 performs format conversion, conversion or translation of data items and data values, conversion of identification information (ID), and the like.

The common adapter CA is provided in the management device 20, 30, 40, 50, etc. on the consumer side, and communicates with the common adapter I / F 121. The common adapter CA acquires the actual value of the power supply and demand state of the customer from the management device, converts the actual value into data in a standard format negotiated with the CEMS 10, and transmits the data to the CEMS 10.

Furthermore, the common adapter CA receives the plan information from the CEMS 10 and transmits it to the management device. Further, the common adapter CA performs an authentication process for determining whether or not the communication destination is correct, an encryption process for encrypting data, a decryption process for decrypting encrypted data, and the like.

By using the common adapter CA and the common adapter I / F 121, communication between the CEMS 10 and each customer side is performed without being affected by the type of each consumer and the type of electrical equipment used by the consumer. And can easily cope with future function expansion.

The common API 122 provides a common API to the external contractor 90. Thereby, the external contractor 90 can provide a service to each consumer using at least a part of the EMS related information. By using the common API 122, an external contractor can develop an application or service with less man-hours.

The common data processing function 123 performs common data processing on various types of information collected from each customer via the common adapter I / F 121. Common data processing includes, for example, abnormal value monitoring processing. The common data processing function 123 checks the data received from the common adapter I / F 121 based on a preset condition, and outputs a warning if abnormal data is found.

That is, the common data processing function 123 monitors a large amount of time-series data flowing in at any time in real time, and quickly detects an event. A plurality of event conditions can be set and changed. The event condition can be set by an administrator of the CEMS 10, an external contractor 90, or a customer.

Events include, for example, when an abnormally large amount of power is consumed or when a large amount of power exceeding the normal value is generated. By monitoring the event with the common data processing function 123, it is possible to detect anomalies in the region (including failure of electrical equipment at the customer) at an early stage. Based on the detected event, for example, the occurrence of a fire can be prevented, or a crime at the EV center 50C can be detected. Therefore, it contributes not only to local power management but also to improving local safety.

The common data management function 124 provides a data model and a data processing function for aggregating a large amount of data collected from time to time from each consumer and holding it in a usable form. The common data management function 124 stores a large amount of collected data in a predetermined database 125A-125G and saves it. Here, the database is called “information”.

The equipment model number information T125A manages information for identifying the electrical equipment used by each consumer. Not only the model number but also identification information (ID) may be used. Any name can be used as long as it can identify each electric device, and the name is not particularly limited.

The configuration information T125B manages information related to the electrical configuration on the customer side and information related to the configuration of the local distribution network.

Supply and demand information (customer) 125C manages supply and demand information (information indicating power demand and power supply) acquired from each customer.

The prediction information 125D manages the result of predicting the power demand and power supply in the area for each time zone. For the prediction of power demand and power supply, for example, actual values, weather, effectiveness of incentives, configuration changes on the customer side, and the like can be considered.

The weather information 125E manages the past weather and future forecast of the area. Information about the weather can be obtained from a weather forecaster or the like.

Graphic information (customer) 125F manages the position of each consumer in the area.

The service information 125M manages the contents of services provided to each consumer.

The facility information 125L manages information related to facilities (transformers, storage batteries, generators, etc.) on the power system 1 side.

Supply / demand information (facility) 125K manages power supply / demand information related to facilities on the power system 1 side.

The plan information 125J manages plan information D20 (see FIG. 20) including an incentive for consuming surplus power.

The map information 125H manages an area map. A two-dimensional map or a three-dimensional map may be used. Furthermore, relevant information such as traffic volume may be included.

The graphic information (facility) 125G manages the position of the facility on the power system 1 side.

Since a large amount of time-series data is generated every day, a large amount of storage device is required if it is stored in the same format. Therefore, as will be described later, data within a predetermined period may be stored as time-series data, and data after the predetermined period has elapsed may be compressed and stored.

The security function 126 is a function for ensuring the safety of data (information) handled by the CEMS 10. The power supply / demand information and the like handled by the CEMS 10 is important information related to the privacy, personal information, and property of consumers. Therefore, it must be prevented from being leaked or tampered with by a third party without a legitimate authority.

Therefore, the security function 126 performs data encryption and decryption, authentication of the communication partner, and the like.

The inter-hub cooperation function 127 is a function for cooperation with other CEMS 10. Each CEMS 10 can exchange information via the inter-hub cooperation function 127. Based on the information exchange, surplus power can be interchanged between the CEMSs 10.

The system monitoring and system operation function 128 is a function for adding a database or creating a database backup, for example.

FIG. 13 shows the functions of the distribution automation system 130. The power distribution automation system 130 includes, for example, an online power distribution application 131, an offline power distribution application 132, a basic SCADA function 133, a communication interface 134, and each database 135A-135E.

The online power distribution application 131 includes, for example, a function 1311 for performing an accident recovery operation, a function 1312 for controlling the voltage of the power distribution network to a predetermined voltage, and a function 1313 for calculating a power flow. The tidal current calculation function 1313 includes a so-called reverse power flow analysis in which power generated on the consumer side flows into the grid.

The offline power distribution application 132 includes, for example, an equipment plan on the power system 1 side, an optimal operation plan for the system, a connection analysis of distributed power sources, a training simulator, and the like.

The basic SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) function 133 monitors, for example, the status of the facilities and power supply lines of the power system 1.

The communication interface 134, for example, communicates with each device 71, 72, 73 provided on the power supply line 7 via the RTU and the like, and communicates with the smart meters 21, 31, 41, 51 of each consumer. And an interface for communicating with the EMS information control hub 120.

The current (SV / TM) information 135A is a database that manages the latest values of SV data and TM data. The facility information 135B manages information related to facilities on the power system 1 side. The load record information 135C records the load state of each facility. The graphic information 135D manages the position of each facility in a format such as GIS (Geographic Information System) data.

Information necessary for managing power in cooperation with other CEMS 10 is stored in the information 135D for operation in cooperation with other systems.

FIG. 14 shows functions of the CEMS application 140 on the power supplier side. The power supplier side CEMS application 140 provides an application used by a power supplier such as a power company.

The power supplier side CEMS application 140 includes, for example, an overall management function 141, a short-cycle real-time feedback control function 142, a medium-cycle real-time feedback control function 143, a long-cycle prediction function 144, an operation status monitoring function 145, and a control. A linkage function 146, a data linkage function 147, each database 148A-148E, and a function 149 for linking supply and demand are provided.

The overall control function 141 is a function of controlling the entire power supplier side CEMS application 140.

The short cycle real-time feedback control function 142 monitors, for example, PV and storage batteries in a short cycle (for example, in seconds) and performs feedback control.

The medium cycle real-time feedback control function 143 monitors a device such as a regenerator, for example, in a medium cycle (for example, in units of time) and performs feedback control.

The long cycle prediction function 144 predicts the amount of power generated by each distributed power source in the region, the power demand, the amount of interconnection between systems, etc. in a long cycle (for example, in units of several hours).

The operation status monitoring function 145 manages the operation and monitors the operation status. The control linkage function 146 is used when directly controlling the electrical equipment of each consumer. The data linkage function 147 is a function for linking data between the distribution automation system 130 and the EMS information control hub 120. Data is stored and updated in the databases 148A to 148E by the data linkage.

The configuration information 148A manages the configuration on the customer side and the configuration on the power system 1 side (distribution network, etc.). The supply and demand information 148B manages the supply and demand information (actual value) of local power. The prediction information 148C manages the predicted value of supply and demand of local power. The plan information 148D manages plan information. The TM / SV information 148E manages TM data and SV data.

The function 149 that links supply and demand includes, for example, a function 1491 that stabilizes the system voltage, a function 1492 that cuts the peak of demand, and a function 1493 that optimizes the operation plan.

FIG. 15 shows the functions of the EAM application 150. The EAM application 150 includes, for example, a maintenance function 151, a design and construction function 152, a planning function 153, and databases 154A to 154E.

The maintenance function 151 creates, for example, a plan for inspecting consumer electrical equipment. The design and construction function 152 creates a design and construction plan, for example. The planning function 153 is a function that manages, for example, the progress of the planning, or manages the sections to be preferentially constructed.

The facility information 154A manages information related to the facility. The maintenance plan information 154B manages information related to the maintenance plan. The maintenance performance information 154C manages the maintenance work results. The construction plan information 154D manages information related to the construction plan. The construction performance information 154E manages information related to construction performance.

FIG. 16 shows functions of the common API 122. For example, the supply / demand information (actual value) of the power of each consumer is stored in the supply / demand performance information 125C in association with the common data item and the unique item for each service. The unique item data for each service is encrypted.

The common API 122 sparses a plurality of output protocols 1221, a plurality of output formats 1222, and a plurality of output data conditions 1223, for example. The common API 122 holds a condition 1223 for outputting data for each service provided by the external contractor 90. The common API 122 converts data matching the conditions into data of a predetermined format, and outputs the data to the external vendor 90 using a predetermined protocol.

Examples of output protocols include HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol), SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), and FTP (File Transfer Protocol). Data output formats include, for example, XML (Extensible Markup Language), CSV (Comma-Separated Values), PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor) serialization, JSON (JavaScript Object Notation), and the like.

The common API 122 provides data related to the service only to the provider providing the service (application). The external contractor 90 can acquire only the data related to the service provided by itself from the CEMS 10 via the common API 122 and cannot acquire the data related to the service provided by another person.

FIG. 17 shows processing for predicting the configuration of the local distribution network. For example, the CEMS 10 acquires the map information 125H, the position information 125F of each customer, and the position information 125G of each facility, and collates those information (S10). For example, the CEMS 10 maps the position of each consumer and equipment on a map, and calculates the distance between each element (customer and equipment).

The CEMS 10 estimates that, for example, the customer is receiving power from the nearest pole transformer, and the physically close customers are receiving power from a common facility. Thereby, the CEMS 10 can estimate the configuration of the local distribution network (S11).

The CEMS 10 stores the estimated distribution network configuration in the configuration information 125B as the distribution network information 125B1. The configuration information 125B also stores device connection information 125B2 indicating the electrical connection configuration at each consumer. The device connection information 125B2 is acquired from each customer based on a contract between the manager of the CEMS 10 and each customer.
FIG. 35 shows a specific example of distribution network information. As shown here, the distribution network information is managed by dividing each device known by the CEMS 10 into a plurality of subcommunities. This sub-community is a collection of devices in units of one or more facilities. For example, a plurality of devices connected below one pole transformer constitute one sub-community.

Note that, if accurate distribution network information can be acquired from the power system 1 side, the distribution network information may be used.

FIG. 18 shows a state in which information for consuming surplus power is generated by predicting local power demand and power supply. The processing in FIG. 18 is executed by the supply and demand adjustment function (customer side CEMS application) 110.

The demand / supply prediction function 111 predicts the power supply / demand in units of 30 minutes, for example, based on the actual value of power supply / demand and the weather forecast. Assuming that the period for acquiring supply and demand information from each customer is 3 minutes, the prediction period is set to 10 times that.

The supply and demand balance prediction function 112 compares the predicted value of power supply with the predicted value of power demand for each time period, and predicts whether the demand and supply balance. A graph G10 is a supply prediction graph showing a change in power supply for each time period. The graph G11 is a demand prediction graph showing changes in power demand for each time zone. G12 is a graph showing the difference between the prediction of power supply (G10) and the prediction of power demand (G11). When the power supply exceeds the power demand, surplus power SP is generated.

The carbon dioxide visualization function 113 predicts a temporal change in the amount of carbon dioxide discharged in the region based on the prediction result of the power supply / demand balance. A graph G13 is a carbon dioxide emission graph showing changes in the amount of carbon dioxide emission for each time period.

The incentive calculation function 114 calculates an incentive for consuming surplus power SP. If each consumer operates an electric device during the time when surplus power is generated, the surplus power can be used effectively. For example, if surplus power can be used for a water heater, a regenerator, a storage battery, etc., the power demand of those devices will be shifted as a result, and surplus power can be reduced.

Therefore, the incentive calculation function 114 calculates an incentive for encouraging each consumer to consume surplus power. The incentive calculation function 114 devises an incentive such as “if the heat pump water heater is operated for 2 hours using surplus power, 10 points are given”.

The incentive visualization function 115 causes each customer to transmit plan information including an incentive. When each consumer consumes surplus power according to the plan information, as shown in the graph G14, the surplus power SPa is lower than the predicted value SP (SPa <SP). Since a predetermined electrical device is used in a time zone in which surplus power is generated, the power demand in a time zone in which the electrical device is normally used decreases. The decrease in power demand is indicated as PP1 and PP2 in the graph G14.

The incentive visualization function 115 includes a prediction graph G14 when each local consumer acts according to the plan information in the plan information, together with the plan information, or separately from the plan information. It can be sent and displayed on a monitor display. By presenting the prediction result to each consumer, the motivation for the consumer to act according to the plan information can be enhanced.

FIG. 19 shows power supply and demand information D10 transmitted from each consumer to the CEMS 10. Supply / demand information D <b> 10 is created from each consumer for each device that the consumer has, and is transmitted to CEMS 10.

The supply and demand information D10 includes, for example, a customer ID C10, a device ID C11, a power consumption / power generation amount C12, a time C13, an operation C14, and a state C15. Items other than these may be included.

The customer ID C10 is information for identifying each customer. The device ID C11 is information for identifying each electric device (PV, battery, home appliance, etc.). The power consumption / power generation amount C12 is information indicating the amount of power consumed by the device specified by C11, or information indicating the amount of power generated from the device specified by C11.

The time C13 is information indicating the time when the supply and demand information D10 is created. The operation C14 is information related to the operation of the device such as “operated on”, “operated off”, and “the set temperature has been changed to 18 degrees”. The state C15 is information indicating the state of the device such as “power generation”, “power consumption”, “charging”, “maintenance”, and the like.

FIG. 20 shows plan information D20 distributed from the CEMS 10 to each consumer. The plan information D20 is created for each customer and transmitted to each customer. The plan information D20 includes, for example, customer ID C20, time zone C21, point C22, upper limit value C23 of total power consumption, lower limit value C24 of total power consumption, device ID C25, and upper limit value of power consumption. C26 and the lower limit C27 of power consumption are included. Items other than these may be provided.

Customer ID C20 is information for identifying each customer. The time zone C21 indicates a time zone in which incentives are applied, that is, a time zone in which surplus power is generated in the region. Point C22 is information indicating the contents of the incentive.

The upper limit value C23 of the total power consumption is information indicating the upper limit value of surplus power that can be consumed by the consumer. In this embodiment, an upper limit value is set for each consumer so that surplus power generated in the area can be used fairly by each consumer in the area.

The lower limit C24 of the total power consumption is information indicating the lower limit of surplus power that should be consumed by the consumer. In this embodiment, the amount of surplus power that each consumer should consume is presented. The lower limit value is an effort target value, and no special inconvenience occurs even if it cannot be achieved. However, a configuration in which some penalty is given to a customer who has not used the surplus power more than the lower limit value may be adopted.

Device ID C25 is information for identifying a device owned by a consumer. The upper limit C26 of power consumption indicates the upper limit of surplus power that can be used by the device. The lower limit value C27 of power consumption indicates the lower limit value of surplus power that should be consumed by the device.

In this embodiment, surplus power allocated to a consumer is reassigned for each device that the consumer has. That is, when the upper limit value C26 of power consumption allocated to each device of the consumer is summed, the upper limit value C23 of total power consumption is obtained. Similarly, when the lower limit value C27 of the power consumption of each device is summed, the lower limit value C24 of the total power consumption is obtained.

In the example of FIG. 20, only one device ID is shown, but in reality, the upper limit value and the lower limit value of power consumption for each device (device to be managed by CEMS) possessed by the customer identified by the customer ID. Is set.

FIG. 21 shows carbon dioxide information D30. Carbon dioxide information D30 may be configured to be included in plan information D20, or may be configured separately from plan information D20 and transmitted to each consumer.

The carbon dioxide information D30 includes, for example, the consumer ID C30, the amount of carbon dioxide C31 generated in the region, the amount of carbon dioxide C32 generated by the consumer, and the carbon dioxide for each device of the consumer. Generation amount C33.

In this embodiment, as described above, the power state of each device to be managed by the CEMS 10 is managed by the power measurement unit or the smart meter. Therefore, the power consumption or power generation amount of each device can be measured. Thereby, in a present Example, the carbon dioxide emission amount of a device unit can be calculated based on the measured information.

FIG. 22 is a flowchart showing the overall operation of the CEMS 10. As described above, the CEMS 10 acquires supply and demand information D10 from each customer's device 20, 30, 40, 50, etc. (S20), and determines whether or not the acquired supply and demand information D10 is abnormal (S21). When abnormality is discovered, CEMS10 transmits a warning to the consumer and makes it output on the monitor display etc. which were provided in the consumer. Further, when CEMS 10 determines that it is necessary, for example, a warning is sent to the police station, fire department, hospital, school, workplace, pre-designated individuals, etc. using means such as e-mail or telephone. You can also

The CEMS 10 stores the supply and demand information D10 (S22), and then evaluates the achievement status of the plan information D20 (S23). That is, the CEMS 10 evaluates how much each customer follows the previous plan information. For example, each customer can be ranked according to the achievement status of the plan information D20. High-ranking consumers are likely to follow the plan information D20, and low-ranking consumers are less likely to follow the plan information D20.

The CEMS 10 predicts the power supply / demand state in the next cycle (for example, after 30 minutes) based on the actual value of supply and demand information, the weather forecast, the rank of each customer, and the like (S24). Further, the CEMS 10 predicts whether the demand and supply of power are balanced based on the prediction result of power supply and demand (S25).

The CEMS 10 calculates the amount of carbon dioxide generated in the region based on the balance prediction of power supply and demand (S26). In S26, the amount of carbon dioxide at each consumer and the amount of carbon dioxide for each device can also be calculated.

The CEMS 10 calculates an incentive for encouraging consumption of surplus power, creates plan information D20 (S27), and transmits the plan information D20 to the management devices 20, 30, 40, 50, etc. on each customer side. (S28).

FIG. 23 shows the operation of the management device on the customer side. Each management device 20, 30, 40, 50, etc. on the customer side is referred to as HEMS 20, etc. The HEMS 20 or the like monitors whether the transmission time has arrived (S30). The HEMS 20 and the like are set in advance so as to transmit supply and demand information D10 to the CEMS 10 with a period of about 3 minutes, for example.

When a predetermined transmission time arrives (S30: YES), the HEMS 20 and the like create supply and demand information D10 (S31). The HEMS 20 or the like accesses the CEMS 10 (S32), and transmits supply and demand information D10 to the CEMS 10 (S33). When the HEMS 20 or the like accesses the CEMS 10, a predetermined authentication process is performed. Further, the encrypted supply and demand information D10 is transmitted from the HEMS 20 or the like to the CEMS 10.

FIG. 24 schematically shows how the common adapter I / F 121 processes supply and demand information according to priority. The common adapter I / F 121 includes a data conversion function 1211 and a message distribution function 1212, for example.

The data conversion function 1211 converts the supply and demand information D10 into standard format data using the conversion table T1211 and delivers it to the common data processing function 123.

The message distribution function 1212 uses the priority management table T1212 to distribute the supply and demand information D10 received from each common adapter CA according to the priority. The message distribution function 1212 registers high-priority supply / demand information D10 in the priority processing queue, and registers other supply / demand information D10 in the normal processing queue. In the example shown in FIG. 24, a high priority is set in the supply and demand information D10 (4) transmitted from the local power generation / storage battery 60, and it is processed preferentially.

FIG. 25 shows a table T1212 (1) for managing the priority for each device. The priority management table T1212 (1) for each device includes, for example, a device type 12121C1, a priority 12121C2, and a processing cycle 12121C3.

The device type 12121C1 indicates the type of each device. As the priority 12121C2, the priority of the device is set. For example, the priority may be set with two values, “high” and “low”, or may be set more finely. In the processing cycle 12121C3, a cycle for processing the supply and demand information D10 of the device is set. Supply / demand information D10 having a high priority is processed in a short cycle, and supply / demand information D10 having a low priority is processed in a long cycle. That is, the supply / demand information D10 having a high priority is connected to the priority processing queue and processed promptly, and the supply / demand information D10 having a low priority is connected to the normal processing queue and processed.

∙ Higher power consumption can be set to have higher priority. Furthermore, it is possible to set so that the priority of a device that generates power or a device that stores electricity is higher than that of a device that consumes power. Alternatively, higher priority can be set for devices that require real-time monitoring, such as large storage batteries.

The device type 12121C1 is associated with the device type management table T1212 (2). The device type management table T1212 (2) includes, for example, a device ID 12122C1 and a device type 12122C2.

The message distribution function 1212 determines the device type corresponding to the supply / demand information D10 by referring to the device type management table T1212 (2) based on the device ID C11 (see FIG. 19) of the supply / demand information D10. The message distribution function 1212 refers to the priority management table T1212 (1) based on the determined device type to know the priority and period set for the device.

FIG. 26 shows a table T1212 (3) for managing the priority for each customer. The priority management table T1212 (3) includes, for example, a customer type 12123C1, a priority 12123C2, and a processing cycle 12123C3.

The customer type 12123C1 indicates the type of each customer. For convenience, in FIG. 26, the types of customers are shown as HEMS, BEMS, and FEMS. HEMS indicates a house, BEMS indicates a building or apartment house, and FEMS indicates a factory. A consumer with a large amount of power consumption or power generation is set to a higher priority.

The customer type 12123C1 is associated with the customer type management table T1212 (4). The customer type management table T1212 (4) includes, for example, a customer ID 12124C1 and a customer type 12124C2.

The message distribution function 1212 refers to the device type management table T1212 (4) based on the customer ID C10 (see FIG. 19) of the supply / demand information D10, and determines the consumer type corresponding to the supply / demand information D10. . The message distribution function 1212 refers to the priority management table T1212 (3) based on the determined consumer type to know the priority and period set for the consumer.

In this embodiment, either the configuration for changing the speed of information processing based on the priority for each device (FIG. 25) or the configuration for changing the speed of information processing based on the priority for each consumer (FIG. 26). Can also be performed. Or it is good also as a structure which controls the speed of information processing combining the priority for every apparatus, and the priority for every consumer. In that case, the supply and demand information related to the device having a high priority among the supply and demand information D10 transmitted from the high priority consumer is processed earliest. On the other hand, among the supply and demand information D10 transmitted from the low-priority consumer, the supply-demand information related to the device having the low priority is processed the latest.

FIG. 27 shows the monitoring function that the common data processing function 123 has. The external contractor 90 (90A, 90B) such as a service provider can set the monitoring conditions 1231A, 1231B in the common data processing function 123 via the common API 122.

The common data processing function 123 monitors whether or not the supply and demand information D10 corresponding to the monitoring conditions 1231A and 1231B is present in the supply and demand information D10 flowing from the common adapter CA via the common adapter I / F 121.

For example, when the supply and demand information D10 (2) that matches the monitoring condition 1231A is detected, the common data processing function 123 uses the supply and demand information D10 (2) as it is or performs the processing 1231C to the outside contractor 90. hand over. The delivery destination external trader 90 is a trader for which the monitoring condition 1231A is set. A configuration may be employed in which the outside contractor who sets the monitoring conditions is different from the outside contractor who receives the notification regarding the supply and demand information that matches the monitoring conditions.

Furthermore, the common data processing function 123 can notify the customer who is the transmission source of the supply and demand information that matches the monitoring condition that the monitoring condition is met.

FIG. 28 shows an access control process by the common data management function 124. The external supplier 90 can use at least a part of the supply and demand information in the supply and demand performance information 125 </ b> C via the common API 122. However, since supply and demand information is important information related to the privacy of each consumer, transmission to the external supplier 90 needs to be performed carefully.

Therefore, the common data management function 124 is provided with an access control function 1241 and an access authority management table T1241. The access authority management table T1241 manages, for example, information for identifying the external contractor 90 and information content permitted to the external contractor 90 in association with each other.

As the information content permitted to the external contractor 90, for example, the range of consumers from which the external contractor 90 can acquire information (list of permitted customer IDs or permitted consumer types) and information are acquired. A range of possible devices (list of allowed device IDs or allowed device types) can be mentioned.

The access control function 1241 determines whether or not transmission of information is permitted by referring to the access authority management table T1241 when the server of the external company 90 requests acquisition of information via the common API 122. When permitted, for example, information requested by the external company 90 among the information stored in the supply and demand result information 125 </ b> C is transmitted to the server of the external company 90 via the common API 122. If not permitted, the common data management function 124 notifies the server of the external vendor 90 of the error.

FIG. 29 shows processing when the HEMS 20 or the like receives information from the CEMS 10. When the HEMS 20 or the like receives the plan information D20 from the CEMS 10 (S40: YES), the contents of the information are displayed on the monitor display (S41).

For example, the monitor display displays a time zone in which surplus power is generated, a recommended consumption of surplus power (a lower limit value of total power consumption), points, and the like (S41). An example of the display screen will be described later.

The energy manager of the customer can make a reservation for the operation of the device, inspired by the incentive displayed on the monitor display (S42).

The HEMS 20 or the like can also call attention to the energy manager when a time zone in which the incentive is valid comes or only a predetermined time before the time zone in which the incentive is valid (S43). The HEMS 20 or the like, for example, displays a message such as “The time when surplus power can be used at a reasonable price is approaching” on the monitor display, outputs a voice, or the registered e-mail address of the energy manager. Or send.

FIG. 30 is a screen G20 showing the power supply / demand situation that the HEMS 20 or the like displays on the monitor display. The screen G20 showing the power supply and demand situation includes, for example, a region GP21 for displaying various data in a graph, a region GP22 for displaying various data in numerical values or characters, and a region GP23 for displaying points.

On the screen G20, for example, prediction of power demand in the region, prediction of power supply in the region, prediction of surplus power generated in the region, prediction of power demand in the customer, and The prediction of power supply and the prediction of surplus power at the customer can be displayed. Furthermore, it is possible to display actual values of power demand and power supply, power charges, and the like of regions and consumers on the screen G20.

FIG. 31 shows a screen G30 displaying the amount of carbon dioxide emission. The screen G30 can include a region GP31 indicating the amount of carbon dioxide emission in the entire region and a region GP32 indicating the amount of carbon dioxide emission in the consumer.

FIG. 32 shows a screen G40 that displays an incentive. The screen G40 includes a plurality of areas GP41-GP45.

A region GP41 indicates a change in surplus power when the plan information D20 is achieved. The area GP42 displays a message prompting the use of surplus power. A region GP43 shows an upper limit value and a lower limit value of surplus power. A region GP44 indicates a method for consuming surplus power for each device. A region GP45 indicates a device (such as PV) whose operation should be stopped in a time zone where surplus power is generated.

FIG. 33 shows another example of a screen displayed on the customer side. The information display screen G50 includes, for example, a date column GP51, an incentive information column GP52, and an incentive performance column GP53.

The incentive information column GP52 includes, for example, a target GP521 to which an incentive is given, a content GP522 of the incentive, and a time GP523 to which the incentive is given.

FIG. 33 shows that 1 point is awarded for every 1 kWh when a water heater is used in the time zone from 12:00 to 14:00. Furthermore, it is shown that when the air conditioner is stopped in the time zone from 12:00 to 14:00, 1 point is awarded every time the power consumption of 1 kWh is saved.

The incentive achievement column GP53 includes, for example, the incentive use achievement GP531 and the achievement GP532 of the given points. FIG. 33 shows that 2 points are given because the water heater uses 2 kWh of surplus power. Furthermore, it is shown that 2 points were given because the air conditioner was stopped. In this way, contents that contribute to the consumption of surplus power are collected and managed every day.

FIG. 34 shows how the supply and demand information is compressed and managed. As shown in FIG. 34 (a), the supply and demand information is acquired from each consumer at a short cycle of, for example, about 3 minutes. Accordingly, the amount of supply and demand information stored in the CEMS 10 increases day by day.

Therefore, as shown in FIG. 34 (b), the low frequency component of the supply and demand information is extracted and converted into data indicating a trend. In short, an envelope of a value indicated by supply and demand information every 3 minutes is detected, and data indicating an overall trend is stored in the CEMS 10. Note that recent supply and demand information can be stored as it is, and converted into trend data and stored when a predetermined time has elapsed.

In addition, this invention is not limited to the Example mentioned above. A person skilled in the art can make various additions and changes within the scope of the present invention.

1: Power system, 5: Distribution substation, 10: CEMS, 20: HEMS, 30: BEMS, 40: FEMS, 50: EV-EMS

Claims (16)

  1. A power management system including a first power management device provided for each predetermined area including a plurality of consumers, and a second power management device provided to each consumer,
    Each of the second power management devices monitors a power state at each consumer, and transmits second management information indicating the power state to the first power management device.
    The first power management device includes:
    Based on each second management information, predict the total amount of power demand and the total amount of power generation in the predetermined area,
    Calculating the surplus power amount in the predetermined area from the difference between the total amount of power demand and the total amount of power generation;
    Creating first management information including information for reducing the surplus power,
    Transmitting the first management information to each of the second power management devices;
    Power management system.
  2. Each of the second management information includes power consumption and power generation amount at each consumer,
    The first management information includes information for encouraging each consumer to consume the surplus power in a time zone in which the surplus power occurs.
    The power management system according to claim 1.
  3. The first management information includes information that prompts the use of surplus power in units of consumers, and information that prompts the use of surplus power in units of a plurality of predetermined devices that the consumers have. The power management system according to claim 2.
  4. The first power management device includes:
    Based on the customer location information indicating the location of each customer, the facility location information indicating the location of the facility for supplying power to each customer, and the information on the map including the predetermined area, the facility And a power distribution network connecting each consumer and
    The power management system according to claim 3.
  5. The first power management device is connected to a third device capable of providing information related to power to each consumer.
    The third device sets a monitoring condition for monitoring the second management information in the first power management device,
    The first power management device monitors whether there is information that matches the monitoring condition among the second management information, and if the second management information that matches the monitoring condition is found, Notify the third device,
    The power management system according to claim 4.
  6. The first power management device processes the second management information that matches the monitoring condition and notifies the third device that sets the monitoring condition.
    The power management system according to claim 5.
  7. Priorities are associated with the second management information in advance,
    The first power management device processes the second management information based on the priority.
    The power management system according to claim 6.
  8. The priority is set in advance for each consumer or / and for each device that each consumer has,
    The power management system according to claim 7, wherein the first power management device preferentially processes the second management information having a higher priority.
  9. Each customer includes a plurality of types of customers,
    The second power management device is prepared for each of the plurality of types of consumers,
    Each of the second power management devices includes a common communication adapter for bidirectional communication with the first power management device,
    The first power management device includes a common communication interface unit for communicating with the second power management devices via the common communication adapters.
    The power management system according to claim 8.
  10. A power management system comprising a first power management device and a plurality of second power management devices connected to the first power management device,
    The second power management device acquires power consumption information and power supply status information indicating a power state of one or more electrical devices connected to the second power management device, and Transmitting to the first power management apparatus as second management information indicating the power state;
    The first power management device is configured to generate the second power based on the second management information and distribution network information created from map information including locations where the plurality of second power management devices exist. Predicting the power demand and power generation amount of the electrical equipment managed by the management device,
    Generating first management information for reducing a difference between the demand amount and the power generation amount;
    Transmitting the first management information to each of the second power management devices;
    Power management system.
  11. In the created distribution network information, the second power management device is managed for each sub-community configured by a plurality of the plurality of second power management devices.
    The first power management device includes:
    By adding the second management information for the plurality of second power management devices included in the subcommunity in the subcommunity unit of the created distribution network information, the power demand of the electrical device The power management system according to claim 10, wherein the first management information is generated by predicting an amount and the power generation amount.
  12. A power management system including a first power management device provided for each predetermined area including a plurality of consumers, and a second power management device provided to each previous consumer,
    The second power management device monitors the power state at the consumer and transmits second management information indicating the power state to the first power management device.
    The first power management device includes:
    Based on the customer location information indicating the location of the customer, facility location information indicating the location of the facility for supplying power to the customer, and information on a map including the predetermined area, the facility and the Predict the power distribution network connecting customers,
    Based on the predicted distribution network and the power state of the second management information, calculate the surplus power amount in the predetermined area,
    Creating first management information including information for reducing the surplus power,
    Transmitting the first management information to each of the second power management devices;
    Power management system.
  13. A first power management device communicably connected to a second power management device provided in a plurality of consumers in a predetermined area,
    Based on the customer location information indicating the location of each customer, the facility location information indicating the location of the facility for supplying power to each customer, and the information on the map including the predetermined area, the facility And a power distribution network connecting each consumer and
    Obtaining second management information indicating a power state at each consumer from each second power management device;
    Based on each of the second management information, predict the total amount of power demand and the total amount of power generation in the predetermined area,
    Calculate surplus power from the difference between the total amount of power demand and the total amount of power generation,
    Creating first management information including information for reducing the surplus power,
    Transmitting the first management information to each of the second power management devices;
    First power management device.
  14. A first power management device connected to a second power management device,
    Obtaining power consumption information and power supply status information indicating a power state of an electrical device connected to the second power management device from the second power management device;
    Based on the second management information and the distribution network information created from the map information including the location of the second power management device, the power demand amount of the electrical equipment managed by the second power management device And the amount of power generation
    Generating first management information for reducing a difference between the demand amount and the power generation amount;
    Transmitting the first management information to the second power management device;
    1st power management apparatus.
  15. A power management method for managing a system including a first power management device provided for each predetermined area including a plurality of consumers and a second power management device provided for each consumer,
    Based on the customer location information indicating the location of each customer, the facility location information indicating the location of the facility for supplying power to each customer, and the information on the map including the predetermined area, the facility And a power distribution network connecting each consumer and
    Each said 2nd power management apparatus transmits the 2nd management information which shows the electric power state in each said consumer to the said 1st power management apparatus,
    The first power management device includes:
    Based on each second management information, predict the total amount of power demand and the total amount of power generation in the predetermined area,
    Calculate surplus power from the difference between the total amount of power demand and the total amount of power generation,
    Creating first management information including information for reducing the surplus power,
    Transmitting the first management information to each of the second power management devices;
    Power management method.
  16. A power management method for managing a system comprising a first power management device and a plurality of second power management devices connected to the first power management device,
    The second power management device acquires power consumption information and power supply status information indicating a power state of one or a plurality of electrical devices connected to the second power management device to obtain power of the electrical device. Transmitting to the first power management apparatus as second management information indicating the state;
    The first power management device is configured to generate the second power based on the second management information and distribution network information created from map information including locations of the plurality of second power management devices. Predict the power demand and power generation amount of electrical equipment managed by the management device,
    Generating first management information for reducing a difference between the demand amount and the power generation amount;
    Transmitting the first management information to each of the second power management devices;
    Power management method.
PCT/JP2010/070463 2010-11-17 2010-11-17 Power management system and power management method WO2012066651A1 (en)

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