WO2006010244A1 - Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays - Google Patents

Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2006010244A1
WO2006010244A1 PCT/CA2005/000807 CA2005000807W WO2006010244A1 WO 2006010244 A1 WO2006010244 A1 WO 2006010244A1 CA 2005000807 W CA2005000807 W CA 2005000807W WO 2006010244 A1 WO2006010244 A1 WO 2006010244A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
luminance pattern
effective luminance
light source
point spread
spread function
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/CA2005/000807
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Lorne A. Whitehead
Helge Seetzen
Wolfgang Heidrich
Gregory John Ward
Original Assignee
The University Of British Columbia
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US59182904P priority Critical
Priority to US60/591,829 priority
Application filed by The University Of British Columbia filed Critical The University Of British Columbia
Publication of WO2006010244A1 publication Critical patent/WO2006010244A1/en
Priority claimed from US11/627,936 external-priority patent/US8217970B2/en

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F9/00Indicating arrangements for variable information in which the information is built-up on a support by selection or combination of individual elements
    • G09F9/30Indicating arrangements for variable information in which the information is built-up on a support by selection or combination of individual elements in which the desired character or characters are formed by combining individual elements
    • G09F9/33Indicating arrangements for variable information in which the information is built-up on a support by selection or combination of individual elements in which the desired character or characters are formed by combining individual elements being semiconductor devices, e.g. diodes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G3/00Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes
    • G09G3/20Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters
    • G09G3/34Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters by control of light from an independent source
    • G09G3/3406Control of illumination source
    • G09G3/342Control of illumination source using several illumination sources separately controlled corresponding to different display panel areas, e.g. along one dimension such as lines
    • G09G3/3426Control of illumination source using several illumination sources separately controlled corresponding to different display panel areas, e.g. along one dimension such as lines the different display panel areas being distributed in two dimensions, e.g. matrix
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2320/00Control of display operating conditions
    • G09G2320/06Adjustment of display parameters
    • G09G2320/0626Adjustment of display parameters for control of overall brightness
    • G09G2320/0646Modulation of illumination source brightness and image signal correlated to each other
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G3/00Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes
    • G09G3/20Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters
    • G09G3/34Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters by control of light from an independent source
    • G09G3/3406Control of illumination source
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G3/00Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes
    • G09G3/20Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters
    • G09G3/34Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters by control of light from an independent source
    • G09G3/36Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters by control of light from an independent source using liquid crystals
    • G09G3/3611Control of matrices with row and column drivers

Abstract

Apparatus and methods are provided that employ one or more of a variety of techniques for reducing the time required to display high resolution images on a high dynamic range display having a light source layer and a display layer. In one technique, the image resolution is reduced, an effective luminance pattern is determined for the reduced resolution image, and the resolution of the effective luminance pattern is then increased to the resolution of the display layer. In another technique, the light source layer's point spread function is decomposed into a plurality of components, and an effective luminance pattern is determined for each component. The effective luminance patterns are then combined to produce a total effective luminance pattern. Additional image display time reduction techniques are provided.

Description

RAPID IMAGE RENDERING ON DUAL-MODULATOR

DISPLAYS

Cross-Reference to Related Application [0001] This application claims priority from United States patent application No. 60/591,829 filed on 27 July 2004 and entitled RAPID FRAME RENDERING FOR HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE DISPLAYS. For purposes of the United States of America, this application claims ' the benefit under 35 U. S. C. §119 of United States patent application No. 60/591 ,829 filed on 27 July 2004 and entitled RAPID FRAME RENDERING FOR HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE DISPLAYS.

Technical Field

[0002] This invention pertains to systems and methods for displaying images on displays of the type that have two modulators. A first modulator produces a light pattern and a second modulator modulates the light pattern produced by the first modulator to yield an image.

Background

[0003] International patent publication WO 02/069030 published 6 September 2002 and international patent publication WO 03/077013 published 18 September 2003, both of which are incorporated by reference herein, disclose displays which have a modulated light source layer and a modulated display layer. The modulated light source layer is driven to produce a comparatively low-resolution representation of an image. The low-resolution representation is modulated by the display layer to provide a higher resolution image which can be viewed by an observer. The light source layer may comprise a matrix of actively modulated light sources, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs). The display layer, which is positioned and aligned in front of the light source layer, may be a liquid crystal display (LCD). [0004] If the two layers have different spatial resolutions (e.g. the light source layer's resolution may be about 0.1 % that of the display layer) then both software correction methods and psychological effects (such as veiling luminance) prevent the viewer from noticing the resolution mismatch.

[0005] Electronic systems for driving light modulators such as arrays of LEDs or LCD panels are well understood to those skilled in the art. For example, LCD computer displays and televisions are commercially available. Such displays and televisions include circuitry for controlling the amount of light transmitted by individual pixels in an LCD panel. The task of deriving driving from image data signals to control a light source layer and display layer can be computationally expensive. Deriving such signals can be executed by a processor of a computer's video/graphics card, or by some other appropriate processor integral to a computer, to the display itself or to a secondary device.

[0006] The task of deriving from image data signals to control a light source layer and display layer can be computationally expensive. Deriving such signals can be executed by a processor of a computer's video/graphics card, or by some other appropriate processor integral to a computer, to the display itself or to a secondary device. Performance limitations of the processor can undesirably limit the rate at which successive image frames can be displayed. For example, if the processor is not powerful enough to process incoming video data at the frame rate of the video data then an observer may detect small pauses between successive frames of a video image such as a movie. This can distract the observer and negatively affecting the observer's image viewing experience. [0007] There is a need for practical, cost effective and efficient systems for displaying images on displays of the general type described above.

Brief Description of Drawings

[0008] The appended drawings illustrate non-limiting embodiments of the invention.

[0009] Figure 1 graphically depicts segmentation of a point spread function (PSF) into narrow and wide base Gaussian segments. [0010] Figures 2A, 2B and 2C graphically depict the splitting of a

16-bit point spread function (PSF) into two 8-bit (high and low byte) segments.

[0011] Figure 3 graphically depicts the transitional behaviour of

8-bit high and low byte point spread function values relative to a 16-bit range.

[0012] Figure 4 graphically depicts high and low byte point spread functions corresponding to the point spread function depicted in Figure

1.

[0013] Figure 5 graphically depicts application of an iteratively- derived interpolation function to derive an interpolated effective luminance pattern (ELP) closely approximating an actual effective luminance pattern (ELP).

[0014] Figure 6 is a schematic diagram of a display.

[0015] Figure 7 is a flowchart illustrating a method for displaying an image on a display having a controllable light source layer and a controllable display layer.

[0016] Figure 8 is a flowchart illustrating a method for determining an effective luminance pattern.

[0017] Figure 9 is a flowchart illustrating a method for determining an effective luminance pattern or a component of an effective luminance pattern. Description

[0018] Throughout the following description, specific details are set forth in order to provide a more thorough understanding of the invention. However, the invention may be practiced without these particulars. In other instances, well known elements have not been shown or described in detail to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the invention. Accordingly, the specification and drawings are to be regarded in an illustrative, rather than a restrictive, sense.

[0019] The invention may be applied in a wide range of applications wherein an image is displayed by producing a light pattern that is determined at least in part by image data, and modulating the light pattern to yield an image. The light pattern may be produced by any suitable apparatus. Some examples include: • A plurality of light sources driven by driver circuits that permit brightnesses of the light sources to be varied. • A fixed or variable light source combined with a reflection type or transmission type modulator that modulates light from the light source. The following description relates to non-limiting example embodiments in which the light pattern is produced on one side of an LCD panel by an array of light-emitting diodes and the LCD panel is controlled to modulate the light of the light pattern to produce a viewable image. In this example, the array of LEDs can be considered to constitute a first modulator and the LCD panel constitutes a second modulator.

[0020] In general, rendering image frames or a frame set for display on an LED/LCD layer display entails the following computational steps: 1. Obtaining image data (which may be full screen or partial screen image data). 2. Deriving from the image data appropriate driving values for each LED of the first modulator, using suitable techniques well known to persons skilled in the art (e.g. nearest neighbour interpolation which may be based on factors such as intensity and colour). 3. The derived LED driving values and the point spread functions of LEDs on the LED layer as well as the characteristics of any layers between the LED layer and the LCD layer are used to determine the effective luminance pattern which will result on the LCD layer when the LED driving values are applied to the LED layer.

4. The image defined by the image data is then divided by the effective luminance pattern to obtain raw modulation data for the LCD layer.

5. In some cases, the raw modulation data is modified to address issues such as non-linearities or other artifacts arising in either of the LED or LCD layers. These issues can be dealt with using suitable techniques well known to persons skilled in the art (e.g. scaling, gamma correction, value replacement operations, etc.). For example, creating the modified modulation data may involve altering the raw modulation data to match a gamma correction curve or other specific characteristics of the LCD layer.

6. Final modulation data for the LCD (which may be the raw modulation data or the modified modulation data) and the driving data for the LEDs are applied to drive the LCD and LED layers to produce the desired image.

[0021] Various ways to reduce the computational cost of (i.e. to speed up) generating the final modulation data for use in displaying images are described herein. These include: • Performing at least some parts of the computation in a lower precision domain (for example, by performing computations in the 8-bit domain instead of in the 16-bit domain); and, • Implementing one or more of the options for efficiently establishing an effective luminance pattern that are described herein.

While these techniques may be implemented individually, any suitable combinations of the techniques described herein may be used.

Effective Luminance Pattern Determination

[0022] The point spread function of each LED in an LED layer is determined by the geometry of the LED. A simple technique for determining an LED layer's total effective luminance pattern is to initially multiply each LED's point spread function (specifically, the point spread function of the light which is emitted by the LED and passes through all optical structures between the LED and LCD layers) by a selected LED driving value and by an appropriate scaling parameter to obtain the LED's effective luminance contribution, for that driving value, to each pixel on the LCD layer.

[0023] In this way, the luminance contributions of every LED in the LED layer can be determined and summed to obtain the total effective luminance pattern, on the LCD layer, that will be produced when the selected driving values are applied to the LED layer. However, these multiplication and addition operations are very computationally expensive (i.e. time consuming), because the effective luminance pattern must be determined to the same spatial resolution as the LCD layer in order to facilitate the division operation of step 4 above.

[0024] The computational expense is especially great if the LED point spread function has a very wide "support." The "support" of an LED point spread function is the number of LCD pixels that are illuminated in a non-negligible amount by an LED. The support can be specified in terms of a radius, measured in LCD layer pixels, at which 5 000807

- 7 - the LED point spread function becomes so small that is perceptually irrelevant to an observer. The support corresponds to a number of LCD pixels that are illuminated in a significant amount by each LED.

[0025] For example, consider a hexagonal LED array in which the centre of each LED is spaced from the immediately adjacent LEDs by a distance equal to 50 of the LCD layer's pixels. If each LED has a point spread function having a support of 150 LCD pixels then each pixel in the center portion of the LCD layer will be illuminated by light from approximately 35 of the LEDs. Calculation of the effective luminance pattern for this example accordingly requires 35 operations for each pixel of the LCD layer, in order to account for the light contributed to each pixel by each relevant LED. Where the LCD layer has a high spatial resolution, this is very computationally expensive (i.e. time consuming).

Resolution Reduction

[0026] The time required to determine the effective luminance pattern produced on the LCD can be reduced by computing the effective luminance pattern at a reduced spatial resolution that is lower than that of the high resolution image which is to appear on the LCD layer. This is feasible because the point spread functions of individual light sources are generally smoothly varying. Therefore, the effective luminance pattern will be relatively slowly varying at the resolution of the LCD. It is accordingly possible to compute the effective luminance pattern at a lower resolution and then to scale the effective luminance pattern up to a desired higher resolution, without introducing significant artifacts.

[0027] The scaling may be done using suitable linear, Gaussian or other interpolation techniques. Such spatial resolution reduction yields an approximately linear decrease in the computational cost of establishing the effective luminance pattern. Many available interpolation methods that can be used to scale up an effective luminance pattern computed at a lower resolution are computationally inexpensive as compared to the computational cost of computing the effective luminance pattern at the resolution of the LCD or other second light modulator.

[0028] Using the foregoing example, a 10-times resolution reduction in both the width and height directions yields an approximate 100-times reduction in computational cost. This is because the total number of pixels in the reduced resolution image is 100-times fewer than the total number of pixels in the high resolution image which is to appear on the LCD layer. Each pixel in the reduced resolution image still receives light from 35 LEDs, necessitating 35 computational operations per pixel— but those operations are applied to 100-times fewer pixels in comparison to a case in which the computations are performed separately for every pixel in the actual high resolution image which is to appear on the LCD layer.

Point Spread Function Decomposition [0029] The computational cost of image rendering can also be reduced by decomposing the point spread function of each light source (e.g. each LED) into several components (e.g. by performing a Gaussian decomposition) in such a way that the recombination of all of the components yields the original point spread function. An effective luminance pattern can then be determined separately for each component. Once an effective luminance pattern has been determined for each component, those effective luminance patterns can be combined to produce a total effective luminance pattern. The combination may be made by summing, for example. [0030] Computing the effective luminance patterns contributed by the components may be performed at the resolution of the LCD layer or at a reduced resolution, as described above.

[0031] A speed benefit is attained even if the effective luminance pattern for each component is computed at the resolution of the LCD layer since hardware components specially adapted to perform rapid computations based upon standard point spread functions (e.g. Gaussian point spread functions) are commercially available. Such hardware components are not normally commercially available for the typically non-standard point spread function of the actual LEDs in the display's LED layer— necessitating resort to considerably slower computational techniques using general purpose processors.

[0032] A greater speed benefit is attained if the resolution reduction technique described above is used to determine an effective luminance pattern for each component. Moreover, different spatial resolutions can be applied to different components of the point spread functions to yield even greater speed benefits. For example, Figure 1 depicts (solid line) an example LED point spread function having a steep central portion 10 and a wide tail portion 12. In this situation, the actual point spread function can be decomposed into a narrow base Gaussian component 14A and a wide base Gaussian component 14B, as depicted.

[0033] The wide base Gaussian component 14B (dotted line) contributes relatively little image intensity, in comparison to narrow base Gaussian segment 14A (dashed line). Further, wide base Gaussian component 14B is more slowly varying than narrow base Gaussian component 14A. Accordingly, an effective luminance pattern for narrow base Gaussian component 14A may be determined at a moderately high spatial resolution while an effective luminance pattern for the wide base Gaussian component 14B can be computed at a significantly lower spatial resolution. This preserves a substantial portion of the image intensity information contained in narrow base Gaussian component 14A and is still relatively fast since the effective support of the narrow base Gaussian segment is small and thus few LCD pixels are covered by that component. By contrast, since wide base Gaussian component 14B contains relatively little image intensity information, that component can be processed relatively quickly at low resolution without substantially degrading the resolution of the total effective luminance pattern produced by combining the patterns derived for each component.

8-bit Segmentation

[0034] Image data is typically provided in 16-bit word form.

High-end (i.e. more expensive) graphic processors typically perform computations in the 16-bit domain. Such processors may have dedicated 16-bit or floating point arithmetic units that can perform 16-bit operations quickly. The need for a high-end processor capable of performing 16-bit operations quickly can be alleviated by computing the effective luminance pattern in the 8-bit domain. Such computations can be performed reasonably quickly by less expensive processors.

[0035] Each LED's point spread function is a two dimensional function of intensity versus distance relative to the center of the LED. Such a point spread function may be characterized by a plurality of 16-bit data words. Where the point spread function is represented by a look up table, many 16-bit values are required to define the point spread function; for example, one value may be provided for every LCD pixel lying on or within a circle centered on the LED and having a radius corresponding to the support of the point spread function.

[0036] Each one of those 16-bit data words has an 8-bit high byte component and an 8-bit low byte component (any 16-bit value A can be divided into two 8-bit values B and C such that A = B *28 + C, where B is the "high byte" and C is the "low byte"). The 8-bit values are preferably extracted only after all necessary scaling and manipulation operations have been applied to the input 16-bit data. Figure 2 A depicts a 16-bit point spread function; Figures 2B and 2C respectively depict the 8-bit high and low byte components of the Figure 2A 16-bit point spread function.

[0037] A 16-bit data word is capable of representing integer values from 2°-l to 216-1 (i.e. from 0 to 65535). An 8-bit byte is capable of representing integer values from 2°-l to 28-l (i.e. from 0 to 255). The "support" (as previously defined) of a point spread function characterized by an 8-bit high byte component is much smaller (narrower) than the support of the point spread function as a whole. This is because the 8-bit high byte component reaches the lowest value (zero) of its 255 possible values, when the 16-bit data word characterizing the point spread function as a whole reaches the value 255 out of its range of 65535 possible values. The remaining 255 values are provided by the low byte component with the high byte component's value equal to zero. The effective luminance pattern corresponding to the narrow base 8-bit high byte component can accordingly be rapidly determined, without substantial loss of image intensity information. The resolution reduction and/or other techniques described above may be used to further speed up the determination of the effective luminance pattern for the 8-bit high byte component.

[0038] The support of a point spread function characterized by an 8-bit low byte component is comparatively wide. Specifically, although the 8-bit low byte component has only 255 possible values, those values decrease from 255 to 0 (out of 65535 values for the point spread function as a whole) and those 255 values correspond to the 255 lowest intensity levels (i.e. levels at which the value of the high byte component is equal to zero). Those 255 levels represent the valued of the point spread function in its peripheral parts.

[0039] The low byte component can be separated into two regions. A central region, lying within the boundary on which the point spread function characterized by the high byte component reaches zero. In the central region the low-byte component typically varies in an irregular saw-tooth pattern (as depicted in Figure 3) if the original 16-bit point spread function is reasonably smooth. This is because, in the central region, the portion of the point spread function characterized by the low byte component augments the portion of the point spread function characterized by the high byte component.

[0040] For example, consider a transition from the 16-bit value 10239 to the 16-bit value 9728. The 16-bit value 10239 has a high byte component value of 39 and a low byte component value of 255 (i.e. 39*256+255= 10239). Consequently, the low byte component's contribution to the point spread function is initially 255 and the high byte component's contribution is initially 39. The value of the high byte component's contribution remains at 39, while the value of the low byte component's contribution smoothly decreases from 255 to 0— the point at which the original 16-bit point spread function has the value 9984 (i.e. 39*256+0). The value of the high byte component's contribution to the point spread function then changes smoothly from 39 to 38, but that change is accompanied by an abrupt change (from 0 to 255) in the value of the low byte component's contribution to the point spread function.

[0041] As seen in Figure 4, inside a radius R of the original point spread function (and where the value of the high byte component's contribution to the point spread function is non-zero) the resulting saw-tooth pattern of the low byte component's contribution to the point spread function is characteristic of the original point spread function. Outside the radius R, the value of the high byte component's contribution to the point spread function is zero, and the value of the low byte component's contribution changes smoothly.

[0042] The contributions from the low-byte component of the point spread function can be processed differently in these two regions (i.e. the regions inside and outside the radius R) to avoid unwanted artifacts. For example, to preserve a substantial portion of the image intensity information contained in the region inside the radius R, the effective luminance pattern for that region is preferably determined using the same relatively high resolution used to determine the effective luminance pattern for the high byte component's contribution to the point spread function, as previously described. By contrast, the effective luminance pattern for the region outside the radius R can be determined using a much lower resolution, without substantial loss of image intensity information.

[0043] After the three point spread function segments (i.e. the high byte component, the region of the low byte component inside the radius R, and the region of the low byte component outside the radius R) have been processed as aforesaid, the results are individually up-sampled to match the resolution of the LCD layer, then recombined with appropriate scaling factors being applied. Recombination typically involves summation of the values for the two low byte component regions and the value for the high byte component, after the value for the high byte component has been multiplied by 256.

Interpolation [0044] If an effective luminance pattern value is determined using a resolution lower than the resolution of the LCD layer, it is necessary to up-sample that value to match the resolution of the LCD layer. Interpolation techniques for up-sampling low resolution images into high resolution images are well known, with both linear and Gaussian based techniques being common. Although such prior art techniques can be used in conjunction with the above described techniques, accuracy, or speed, or both may be improved by utilizing an interpolation technique which is optimized for a particular display configuration. Optimization facilities higher resolution image compression, minimizes introduction of unwanted interpolation artifacts, and reduces the image rendering time. In extreme cases, an interpolation technique can be used to reduce the resolution of the effective luminance pattern resolution to match the resolution of the LED layer.

[0045] Prior art interpolation techniques are often restricted to use with specific pre-interpolation data, or to use with specific interpolation functions. The interpolation techniques used to match the resolution of the effective luminance pattern to that of the LCD display do not need to satisfy such restrictions, provided convolution of the pre-interpolation data with the selected interpolation function will yield an effective luminance pattern having adequate similarity to the actual effective luminance pattern.

[0046] The required degree of similarity depends on the display application. Different applications require different degrees of similarity— in some applications relatively small deviations may unacceptably distract an observer, whereas larger deviations may be tolerable in other applications (such as applications involving television or computer game images in which relatively large deviations nonetheless yield images of quality acceptable to most observers). Consequently, it is not necessary to apply the interpolation technique directly to the actual LED driving values or to the actual LED point spread function. [0047] For example, Figure 5 depicts the result obtained by using an iteratively-derived interpolation technique to reduce the resolution of the effective luminance pattern to match the resolution of the LED layer. The pixel values at the LED layer's resolution are not the LED driving values— they are the luminance values of the effective luminance pattern before interpolation. The interpolation function can be determined using standard iteration methods and a random starting condition. As seen in Figure 5, convolution of the iteratively-derived interpolation function with the effective luminance pattern values yields results which are reasonably close to the actual effective luminance pattern.

[0048] Many different interpolation techniques can be used. There need not be any correlation between the interpolation function and the LEDs' point spread function, the LED driving values, or any other characteristic of the display, provided the selected interpolation function and the input parameters selected for use with that function yields a result reasonably close to the actual effective luminance pattern.

Example Embodiments

[0049] Figures 6 to show some example embodiments of the invention. Figure 6 shows a display 30 comprising a modulated light source layer 32 and a display layer 34. Light source layer 32 may comprise, for example: • an array of controllable light sources such as LEDs;

• a fixed-intensity light source and a light modulator disposed to spatially modulate the intensity of light from the light source;

• some combination of these.

In the illustrated embodiment, light source layer 32 comprises an array of LEDs 33. [0050] Display layer 34 comprises a light modulator that further spatially modulates the intensity of light incident on display layer 34 from light source layer 32. Display layer 34 may comprise an LCD panel or other transmission-type light modulator, for example. Display layer 34 typically has a resolution higher than a resolution of light source layer 32. Optical structures 36 suitable for carrying light from light source layer 32 to display layer 34 may be provided between light source layer 32 and display layer 34. Optical structures 36 may comprise elements such as open space, light diffusers, collimators, and the like.

[0051] In the illustrated embodiment a controller 40 comprising a data processor 42 and suitable interface electronics 44A for controlling light source layer 32 and 44B for controlling display layer 34 receives image data 46 specifying images to be displayed on display 30.

Controller 40 drives the light emitters (e.g. LEDs 33) of light source layer 34 and the pixels 35 of display layer 34 to produce the desired image for viewing by a person or persons. A program store 46 accessible to processor 42 contains software instructions that, when executed by processor 42 cause processor 42 to execute a method as described herein.

[0052] Controller 40 may comprise a suitably programmed computer having appropriate software/hardware interfaces for controlling light source layer 32 and display layer 34 to display an image specified by image data 48.

[0053] Figure 7 shows a method 50 for displaying image data on a display of the general type shown in Figure 6. Method 50 begins by receiving image data 48 at block 52. In block 54 first driving signals for light source layer 32 are derived from image data 48. Suitable known methods may be applied to obtain the first driving signals in block 54. [0054] In block 56 method 50 computes an effective luminance pattern. The effective luminance pattern may be computed from the first driving signals and known point spread functions for the light sources of light source layer 32. Block 56 computes the effective luminance pattern at a resolution that is lower than a resolution of display layer 34. For example, block 56 may compute the effective luminance pattern at a resolution that is a factor of 4 or more smaller in each dimension (in some embodiments a factor in the range of 4 to 16 smaller in each dimension) than the resolution of display layer 34.

[0055] In block 60 the effective luminance pattern computed in block 58 is upsampled to the resolution of display layer 34. This may be done through the use of any suitable interpolation technique for example. In block 62 second driving signals for the display layer are determined from the upsampled effective luminance pattern and the image data. The second driving signals may also take into account known characteristics of the display layer and any desired image corrections, colour corrections or the like.

[0056] In block 64 the first driving signal obtained in block 54 is applied to the light source layer and the second driving signals of block 62 are applied to the display layer to display an image for viewing.

[0057] Figure 8 shows a method 70 for computing an effective luminance pattern. Method 70 may be applied within block 56 of method 50 or may be used in other contexts. Method 70 begins by computing an ELP for each component of the point spread function for the light sources of light source layer 32 (blocks 72A, 72B and 72C - collectively blocks 72). Blocks 72 may be performed in any sequence or may be performed in parallel with one another. Figure 8 shows three PSF components 73 A, 73B and 73C and three corresponding blocks 72. The method could be practised with two or more PSF components 73.

[0058] The components of the point spread function (PSF) will typically have been predetermined. A representation of each component is stored in a location accessible to processor 42. Each of blocks 72 may comprise, for each light source of light source layer 32, multiplying values that define a component of the point spread function by a value representing the intensity of the light source. In block 74 the effective luminance patters determined in blocks 72 are combined, for example by summing, to yield an overall estimate of the effective luminance pattern that would be produced by applying the first driving signals to light source layer 32.

[0059] Figure 9 illustrates a method 80 that may be applied for computing effective luminance patterns. Method 80 may be applied to:

• computing the effective luminance pattern in block 56 of method 50; or

• computing the effective luminance patterns for individual components of a point spread function in blocks 72 of method 70; or

• applied in other contexts.

[0060] Method 80 begins in block 82 with data characterizing a point spread function (or a PSF component) for a light source of light source layer 32 and data indicative of how intensely the light source will operate under the control of the first driving signals. Method 80 combines these values (e.g. by multiplying them together) to obtain a set of values characterizing the contribution of the light source to the effective luminance pattern at various spatial locations. [0061] Block 84 obtains high-order and low-order components of the resulting values. In some embodiments, the resulting values are 16- bit words, the high-order component is an 8-bit byte and the low-order component is an 8-bit byte.

[0062] Contributions to the ELP are determined separately for the high-order and low-order components in blocks 86 and 88. For each light source, the area of support for which values are included in the high-order contribution of 86 is typically significantly smaller than the area of support for which values are included in the low-order contribution of block 88.

[0063] Block 88 typically computes the low-order contribution for points located within the area of support of the high-order contribution (block 90) separately than for points located outside of the area of support of the high-order contribution (block 92). Blocks 86, 90 and 92 may be performed in any order or simultaneously.

[0064] In block 94 the contributions from blocks 86, 90 and 92 are combined to yield an overall ELP. The computations in blocks 86 90 and 92 may be performed primarily or entirely in the 8-bit domain (i.e. using 8-bit operations on 8-bit operands) in the case that the high-order and low-order components are 8-bit bytes or smaller.

[0065] Certain implementations of the invention comprise computer processors which execute software instructions which cause the processors to perform a method of the invention. For example, one or more processors in a computer or other display controller may implement the methods of Figures 7, 8 or 9 by executing software instructions in a program memory accessible to the processors. The invention may also be provided in the form of a program product. The program product may comprise any medium which carries a set of computer-readable signals comprising instructions which, when executed by a data processor, cause the data processor to execute a method of the invention. Program products according to the invention may be in any of a wide variety of forms. The program product may comprise, for example, physical media such as magnetic data storage media including floppy diskettes, hard disk drives, optical data storage media including CD ROMs, DVDs, electronic data storage media including ROMs, flash RAM, or the like or transmission-type media such as digital or analog communication links. The computer-readable signals on the program product may optionally be compressed or encrypted.

[0066] Where a component (e.g. a member, part, assembly, device, processor, controller, collimator, circuit, etc.) is referred to above, unless otherwise indicated, reference to that component (including a reference to a "means") should be interpreted as including as equivalents of that component any component which performs the function of the described component (i.e., that is functionally equivalent), including components which are not structurally equivalent to the disclosed structure which performs the function in the illustrated exemplary embodiments of the invention.

[0067] As will be apparent to those skilled in the art in the light of the foregoing disclosure, many alterations and modifications are possible in the practice of this invention without departing from the spirit or scope thereof. For example, • The light source layer may comprise a number of different types of light source that have point spread functions different from one another; • The display may comprise a colour display and the computations described above may be performed separately for each of a number of colours. [0068] While a number of example aspects and embodiments have been discussed above, those of skill in the art will recognize certain modifications, permutations, additions and sub-combinations thereof. It is therefore intended that the following appended claims and claims hereafter introduced are interpreted to include all such modifications, permutations, additions and sub-combinations as are within their true scope.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. A method for displaying an image on a display comprising a light source layer and a display layer, the method comprising: determining driving values for light sources of the light source layer; determining an effective luminance pattern of the light source layer at a first spatial resolution lower than a spatial resolution of the display layer; and, increasing the spatial resolution of the effective luminance pattern to a second spatial resolution corresponding to the resolution of the display layer.
2. A method according to claim 1 wherein the resolution of the display layer is at least 4 times greater than the resolution used in determining the effective luminance pattern in at least one dimension.
3. A method according to claim 2 wherein the resolution of the display layer is at least 8 times greater than the resolution used in determining the effective luminance pattern in each of two dimensions.
4. A method according to claim 1, 2 or 3 wherein increasing the spatial resolution of the effective luminance pattern comprises performing interpolation on data defining the effective luminance pattern.
5. A method according to any one of claims 1 to 4 wherein determining the effective luminance pattern of the light source layer comprises: determining a contribution to the effective luminance pattern for each of a plurality of components of a point spread function for light sources of the light source layer; and, combining the contributions to the effective luminance pattern of each of the components.
6. A method according to claim 5 wherein each of the components is a Gaussian component.
7. A method according to claim 5 or claim 6 wherein the point spread function is the sum of all of the components of the plurality of components.
8. A method according to one of claims 5 to 7 wherein each of the components is represented at the first spatial resolution.
9. A method according to one of claims 5 to 7 wherein two or more of the components are represented at spatial resolutions different from one another.
10. A method according to claim 8 or 9 comprising, before combining the contributions to the effective luminance pattern, increasing the spatial resolution of each of the components to the second spatial resolution.
11. A method according to claim 5 or 6 wherein combining the contributions to the effective luminance pattern comprises applying a mathematical inverse of an operation applied to decompose the point spread function into the plurality of components.
12. A method according to any one of claims 5 to 11 wherein determining a contribution to the effective luminance pattern for each of a plurality of components of a point spread function is performed over a different support area for each of two of the components of the point spread function.
13. A method according to any one of claims 1 to 12 wherein determining the effective luminance pattern of the light source layer comprises: for each of a plurality of light sources of the light source layer: separately determining contributions to the effective luminance pattern of higher-order and lower-order parts of a set of point spread function values; and, combining the contributions to the effective luminance pattern of the higher-order and lower-order point spread function values.
14. A method according to claim 13 wherein the point spread function values comprise 16 bit words and the higher-order and lower- order parts of the set of point spread function values comprise 8- bit words.
15. A method according to claim 13 or claim 14 wherein determining contributions to the effective luminance pattern of higher-order and lower-order parts of the set of point spread function values is performed over a larger support area for the lower-order parts of the set of point spread function values than for the higher-order parts of the set of point spread function values.
16. A method according to claim 15 wherein determining contributions to the effective luminance pattern of the lower-order parts of the set of point spread function values comprises separately determining a contribution for each of: the intersection of the support area of the higher-order and lower-order parts of the point spread function values; and, the part of the support area for the lower-order parts of the point spread function values that is outside of the support area for the higher-order parts of the point spread function values.
17. A method according to one of claims 13 to 16 comprising identifying a support area for the higher-order parts of the point spread function values by determining a radius R at which the point spread function of the higher-order part of the point spread function values is equal to zero.
18. A method according to any of claims 13 to 18 comprising determining the contribution to the effective luminance pattern of the lower-order parts of the set of point spread function values at different resolutions within and outside of the support area of the higher-order parts of the point spread function values.
19. A method according to claim 18 comprising determining the contribution to the effective luminance pattern of the lower-order parts of the set of point spread function values at a higher resolution within the support area of the higher-order parts of the point spread function values and at a lower resolution outside of the support area of the higher-order parts of the point spread function values .
20. A computer-readable medium carrying computer instructions that, when executed by a processor, cause the processor to execute a method according to any one of claims 1 to 19.
21. Apparatus for controlling a display comprising a light source layer and a display layer, the apparatus comprising: a controller configured to: determine first driving values for light sources of the light source layer from image data; determine an effective luminance pattern of the light source layer at a first spatial resolution lower than a spatial resolution of the display layer; increase the spatial resolution of the effective luminance pattern to a second spatial resolution corresponding to the resolution of the display layer; and, determine second driving values for the display layer based on at least the image data and the effective luminance pattern; a first interface connectable to the light source layer to apply the first driving values to the light source layer; and, a second interface connectable to the display layer to apply the second driving values to the display layer.
22. Apparatus according to claim 21 comprising a light source layer connected to the first interface and a display layer connected to the second interface.
23. Apparatus according to claim 22 wherein the light source layer comprises a plurality of individually-controllable light sources.
24. Apparatus according to claim 22 wherein the light source layer comprises an array of light-emitting diodes.
25. Apparatus according to claim 22 wherein the light source layer comprises a light source and a modulator disposed to modulate light emitted by the light source.
26. Apparatus according to any one of claims 21 to 25 wherein the display layer comprises a transmission-type modulator having a plurality of individually-controllable pixels.
27. Apparatus according to any one of claims 21 to 26 wherein the display layer comprises an LCD panel.
28. Apparatus according to any one of claims 21 to 25 wherein a resolution of the display layer is at least 4 times greater than the first spatial resolution.
29. Apparatus according to claim 28 wherein the resolution of the display layer is at least 8 times greater than the first spatial resolution in each of two dimensions.
30. Apparatus according to any one of claims 21 to 29 comprising a means for increasing the spatial resolution of the effective luminance pattern by performing interpolation on data defining the effective luminance pattern.
31. Apparatus according to any one of claims 21 to 31 comprising a data store accessible to the controller and containing information defining a plurality of components of a point spread function for light sources of the light source layer wherein the controller is configured to separately evaluate and combine contributions to the effective luminance pattern corresponding to each of the components.
32. Apparatus according to claim 31 wherein each of the components is a Gaussian component.
33. Apparatus according to claim 32 comprising a hardware processor providing a function that operates directly on Gaussian components.
34. Apparatus according to any one of claims 1 to 33 comprising an upsampler for increasing the spatial resolution of the contributions to the effective luminance pattern corresponding to each of the components to the second spatial resolution.
35. Apparatus according to any one of claims 21 to 34 comprising a means for determining a component of the effective luminance pattern corresponding to higher-order parts of data and a component of the effective luminance pattern corresponding to lower-order parts of the data.
36. Apparatus according to claim 35 wherein the means for determining a component of the effective luminance pattern corresponding to higher-order parts of data comprises software instructions that cause a processor of the controller to perform operations primarily in the 8-bit domain.
37. Apparatus according to claim 35 or 36 wherein the means for determining a component of the effective luminance pattern corresponding to lower-order parts of data comprises software instructions that cause a processor of the controller to perform operations primarily in the 8-bit domain.
38. A method for displaying an image on a display comprising a light source layer and a display layer, the method comprising: determining based at least in part on image data driving values for light sources of the light source layer; determining an effective luminance pattern of the light source layer by a method including: determining a contribution to the effective luminance pattern for each of a plurality of components of a point spread function for light sources of the light source layer; and, combining the contributions to the effective luminance pattern of each of the components to yield effective luminance pattern data; and, determining driving values for the display layer based at least in part on the effective luminance pattern data and the image data.
39. Display apparatus comprising: a light source layer a display layer, a controller configured to: determine, based at least in part on image data, first driving values for light sources of the light source layer; determine an effective luminance pattern of the light source layer by a method including: determining a contribution to the effective luminance pattern for each of a plurality of components of a point spread function for light sources of the light source layer; and, combining the contributions to the effective luminance pattern of each of the components to yield effective luminance pattern data; and, determine second driving values for the display layer based at least in part on the effective luminance pattern data and the image data; a first interface connected to the light source layer to apply the first driving values to the light source layer; and, a second interface connected to the display layer to apply the second driving values to the display layer.
40. A method for displaying an image on a display comprising a light source layer and a display layer, the method comprising: determining based at least in part on image data driving values for light sources of the light source layer; determining an effective luminance pattern of the light source layer by a method including: for each of a plurality of light sources of the light source layer: separately determining contributions to the effective luminance pattern of higher-order and lower-order parts of a set of point spread function values; and, combining the contributions to the effective luminance pattern of the higher-order and lower-order point spread function values to yield effective luminance pattern data; and, determining driving values for the display layer based at least in part on the effective luminance pattern data and the image data.
41. Display apparatus comprising: a light source layer a display layer, a controller configured to: determine, based at least in part on image data, first driving values for light sources of the light source layer; determine an effective luminance pattern of the light source layer by a method including: for each of a plurality of light sources of the light source layer: separately determining contributions to the effective luminance pattern of higher-order and lower-order parts of a set of point spread function values; and, combining the contributions to the effective luminance pattern of the higher-order and lower-order point spread function values to yield effective luminance pattern data; and, determine second driving values for the display layer based at least in part on the effective luminance pattern data and the image data; a first interface connected to the light source layer to apply the first driving values to the light source layer; and, a second interface connected to the display layer to apply the second driving values to the display layer.
42. A method comprising any new, useful and inventive step, act, combination of steps and/or acts or sub-combination of steps and/or acts described herein.
43. Apparatus comprising any new, useful and inventive feature, combination of features and/or means, or sub-combination of features and/or means disclosed herein.
PCT/CA2005/000807 2004-07-27 2005-05-27 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays WO2006010244A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US59182904P true 2004-07-27 2004-07-27
US60/591,829 2004-07-27

Applications Claiming Priority (15)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CA2572968A CA2572968C (en) 2004-07-27 2005-05-27 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays
KR1020077001836A KR101121131B1 (en) 2004-07-27 2005-05-27 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays
EP05748546.8A EP1779362B1 (en) 2004-07-27 2005-05-27 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays
DK05748546.8T DK1779362T3 (en) 2004-07-27 2005-05-27 Quick image reproduction on screen dual modulator
JP2007522879A JP5419352B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2005-05-27 Fast image rendering on dual modulator displays
ES05748546.8T ES2575929T3 (en) 2004-07-27 2005-05-27 Fast image processing on dual-display visual display screens
US11/627,936 US8217970B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2007-01-26 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays
US11/831,854 US8174546B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2007-07-31 Apparatus and methods for rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays
HK07113857A HK1108756A1 (en) 2004-07-27 2007-12-19 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays
US13/466,065 US8624944B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2012-05-07 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays
US14/148,060 US9269312B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2014-01-06 Rapid estimation of effective illuminance patterns for projected light fields
US14/979,422 US9478176B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2015-12-27 Rapid estimation of effective illuminance patterns for projected light fields
US15/283,575 US9934733B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2016-10-03 Rapid estimation of effective illuminance patterns for projected light fields
US15/899,570 US10186211B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2018-02-20 Rapid estimation of effective illuminance patterns for projected light fields
US16/214,258 US20190114977A1 (en) 2004-07-27 2018-12-10 Rapid estimation of effective illuminance patterns for projected light fields

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/627,936 Continuation US8217970B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2007-01-26 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2006010244A1 true WO2006010244A1 (en) 2006-02-02

Family

ID=35785864

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/CA2005/000807 WO2006010244A1 (en) 2004-07-27 2005-05-27 Rapid image rendering on dual-modulator displays

Country Status (9)

Country Link
EP (1) EP1779362B1 (en)
JP (3) JP5419352B2 (en)
KR (1) KR101121131B1 (en)
CN (2) CN101266758B (en)
CA (4) CA2572968C (en)
DK (1) DK1779362T3 (en)
ES (1) ES2575929T3 (en)
HK (1) HK1108756A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2006010244A1 (en)

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2008094153A1 (en) 2007-01-31 2008-08-07 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Multiple modulator displays and related methods
WO2009015483A1 (en) 2007-07-30 2009-02-05 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
JP2009139910A (en) * 2007-12-04 2009-06-25 Samsung Electronics Co Ltd Light source module, its driving method, and display device comprising the same
US7753530B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2010-07-13 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation HDR displays and control systems therefor
WO2010085505A1 (en) 2009-01-21 2010-07-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Apparatus and methods for color displays
US7800822B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2010-09-21 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation HDR displays with individually-controllable color backlights
WO2011005792A1 (en) 2009-07-07 2011-01-13 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Edge-lit local dimming displays, display components and related methods
WO2011011446A1 (en) 2009-07-22 2011-01-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Control of array of two-dimensional imaging elements in light modulating displays
WO2011011250A1 (en) 2009-07-24 2011-01-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Image control for displays
WO2011011249A1 (en) 2009-07-22 2011-01-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Image display based on multiple brightness indicators
WO2011031802A2 (en) 2009-09-11 2011-03-17 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Displays incorporating leaky reflectors
WO2011056430A1 (en) 2009-10-28 2011-05-12 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Stereoscopic dual modulator display device using full color anaglyph
WO2011103083A1 (en) 2010-02-22 2011-08-25 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and systems for reducing power consumption in dual modulation displays
WO2011163114A1 (en) 2010-06-21 2011-12-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Displaying images on local-dimming displays
EP2419785A2 (en) * 2009-04-15 2012-02-22 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Thin displays having spatially variable backlights
WO2012030526A1 (en) 2010-08-31 2012-03-08 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Method and apparatus for adjusting drive values for dual modulation displays
WO2012078262A1 (en) 2010-12-06 2012-06-14 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and apparatus for image adjustment for displays having 2d and 3d display modes
US8233738B2 (en) 2007-07-30 2012-07-31 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
WO2013056117A1 (en) 2011-10-13 2013-04-18 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and apparatus for backlighting dual modulation display devices
US8471807B2 (en) 2007-02-01 2013-06-25 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Calibration of displays having spatially-variable backlight
US8681189B2 (en) 2008-09-30 2014-03-25 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation System and methods for applying adaptive gamma in image processing for high brightness and high dynamic range displays
US8687271B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2014-04-01 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation N-modulation displays and related methods
JP2014146034A (en) * 2014-02-26 2014-08-14 Dolby Lab Licensing Corp Plurality of modulator displays and related method
US9099046B2 (en) 2009-02-24 2015-08-04 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Apparatus for providing light source modulation in dual modulator displays
US9135864B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2015-09-15 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Systems and methods for accurately representing high contrast imagery on high dynamic range display systems
US9224320B2 (en) 2011-03-09 2015-12-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection display providing additional modulation and related methods
EP3046101A4 (en) * 2013-09-13 2017-03-22 Seiko Epson Corporation Image display device and method for controlling image display device
US9607556B2 (en) 2012-06-15 2017-03-28 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Systems and methods for controlling dual modulation displays
US9692946B2 (en) 2009-06-29 2017-06-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation System and method for backlight and LCD adjustment
US9711111B2 (en) 2008-06-25 2017-07-18 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation High dynamic range display using LED backlighting, stacked optical films, and LCD drive signals based on a low resolution light field simulation
US9747866B2 (en) 2011-11-22 2017-08-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Optimizing light output profile for dual-modulation display performance

Families Citing this family (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2006330400A (en) * 2005-05-26 2006-12-07 Sony Corp Transmission-type liquid crystal color display
CN102177529B (en) * 2008-10-14 2014-05-14 杜比实验室特许公司 Backlight simulation at reduced resolutions to determine spatial modulation of light for high dynamic range images
KR101612455B1 (en) * 2009-04-16 2016-04-15 삼성디스플레이 주식회사 Method of correcting pixel data, and display apparatus for performing the method
WO2011030587A1 (en) * 2009-09-09 2011-03-17 シャープ株式会社 Display device
US20120115016A1 (en) * 2010-11-04 2012-05-10 Myung-Chul Kim Battery module
KR20140037760A (en) 2012-09-19 2014-03-27 돌비 레버러토리즈 라이쎈싱 코오포레이션 Quantum dot/remote phosphor display system improvements
JP6081618B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2017-02-15 ドルビー ラボラトリーズ ライセンシング コーポレイション Dual modulation display technology with light conversion
US10262603B2 (en) 2014-03-26 2019-04-16 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Global light compensation in a variety of displays
CN108873477A (en) 2014-08-21 2018-11-23 杜比实验室特许公司 For driving the method, equipment and storage medium of local dimming display

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA2318235A1 (en) * 1998-02-04 1999-08-12 Ims Industrial Micro Systems Ag Optical signaling or display device
US6559826B1 (en) * 1998-11-06 2003-05-06 Silicon Graphics, Inc. Method for modeling and updating a colorimetric reference profile for a flat panel display
US20030090455A1 (en) 2001-11-09 2003-05-15 Sharp Laboratories Of America, Inc. A Washington Corporation Backlit display with improved dynamic range

Family Cites Families (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS6275878A (en) * 1985-09-30 1987-04-07 Toshiba Corp Picture processor
GB9123210D0 (en) * 1991-11-01 1991-12-18 Marconi Gec Ltd Filter
JP3766231B2 (en) * 1999-05-10 2006-04-12 Necビューテクノロジー株式会社 Liquid crystal display
JP4355977B2 (en) * 1999-11-12 2009-11-04 ソニー株式会社 Image display device and illumination control method in image display device
CN1321912A (en) 2000-05-02 2001-11-14 邱励楠 Field sequential mode colour liquid crystal display device
JP2001332394A (en) * 2000-05-23 2001-11-30 Sharp Corp Optically-modulated information display device and lighting control device
JP2002014649A (en) * 2000-06-28 2002-01-18 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Picture display device
JP2002072980A (en) * 2000-08-31 2002-03-12 Nec Corp Color video display method and device
JP3971892B2 (en) * 2000-09-08 2007-09-05 株式会社日立アドバンストデジタル Liquid crystal display
JP3523170B2 (en) * 2000-09-21 2004-04-26 株式会社東芝 Display device
EP2309314A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2011-04-13 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation A method and device for displaying an image
JP3898012B2 (en) * 2001-09-06 2007-03-28 シャープ株式会社 Display device
CN2511994Y (en) 2001-12-28 2002-09-18 邱虹云 Household liquid crystal projection TV-set with durable and highly bright large screen
AU2003212146A1 (en) * 2002-03-13 2003-09-22 The University Of British Columbia High dynamic range display devices
JP2005309338A (en) * 2004-04-26 2005-11-04 Mitsubishi Electric Corp Apparatus and method for image display

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA2318235A1 (en) * 1998-02-04 1999-08-12 Ims Industrial Micro Systems Ag Optical signaling or display device
US6559826B1 (en) * 1998-11-06 2003-05-06 Silicon Graphics, Inc. Method for modeling and updating a colorimetric reference profile for a flat panel display
US20030090455A1 (en) 2001-11-09 2003-05-15 Sharp Laboratories Of America, Inc. A Washington Corporation Backlit display with improved dynamic range

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
See also references of EP1779362A4 *

Cited By (86)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7942531B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2011-05-17 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Edge lit locally dimmed display
US9412337B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2016-08-09 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection displays
US8684533B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2014-04-01 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection displays
US8408718B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2013-04-02 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Locally dimmed display
US8277056B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2012-10-02 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Locally dimmed display
US8419194B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2013-04-16 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Locally dimmed display
US7753530B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2010-07-13 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation HDR displays and control systems therefor
US9804487B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2017-10-31 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection displays
US7801426B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2010-09-21 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation High dynamic range display devices having color light sources
US8172401B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2012-05-08 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Edge lit locally dimmed display
US10261405B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2019-04-16 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection displays
US7800822B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2010-09-21 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation HDR displays with individually-controllable color backlights
US8890799B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2014-11-18 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Display with red, green, and blue light sources
US8199401B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2012-06-12 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation N-modulation displays and related methods
US8687271B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2014-04-01 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation N-modulation displays and related methods
US9270956B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2016-02-23 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Image display
US10416480B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2019-09-17 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Image display
US8446351B2 (en) 2002-03-13 2013-05-21 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Edge lit LED based locally dimmed display
JP2010517111A (en) * 2007-01-31 2010-05-20 ドルビー ラボラトリーズ ライセンシング コーポレイション Multiple modulator displays and related methods
EP2126787A1 (en) * 2007-01-31 2009-12-02 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Multiple modulator displays and related methods
US8531353B2 (en) 2007-01-31 2013-09-10 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Multiple modulator displays and related methods
WO2008094153A1 (en) 2007-01-31 2008-08-07 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Multiple modulator displays and related methods
EP2126787A4 (en) * 2007-01-31 2011-01-05 Dolby Lab Licensing Corp Multiple modulator displays and related methods
US8471807B2 (en) 2007-02-01 2013-06-25 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Calibration of displays having spatially-variable backlight
US8135230B2 (en) 2007-07-30 2012-03-13 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
US8824829B2 (en) 2007-07-30 2014-09-02 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Coporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
WO2009015483A1 (en) 2007-07-30 2009-02-05 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
US8233738B2 (en) 2007-07-30 2012-07-31 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
EP2183723A1 (en) * 2007-07-30 2010-05-12 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
EP2183723A4 (en) * 2007-07-30 2011-11-16 Dolby Lab Licensing Corp Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
US8582913B2 (en) 2007-07-30 2013-11-12 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
US8948537B2 (en) 2007-07-30 2015-02-03 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Enhancing dynamic ranges of images
JP2009139910A (en) * 2007-12-04 2009-06-25 Samsung Electronics Co Ltd Light source module, its driving method, and display device comprising the same
US9711111B2 (en) 2008-06-25 2017-07-18 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation High dynamic range display using LED backlighting, stacked optical films, and LCD drive signals based on a low resolution light field simulation
US8681189B2 (en) 2008-09-30 2014-03-25 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation System and methods for applying adaptive gamma in image processing for high brightness and high dynamic range displays
EP3422337A1 (en) 2009-01-21 2019-01-02 Guangdong OPPO Mobile Telecommunications Corp., Ltd. Apparatus and methods for color displays
EP3422339A1 (en) 2009-01-21 2019-01-02 Guangdong OPPO Mobile Telecommunications Corp., Ltd. Apparatus and methods for color displays
EP3422338A1 (en) 2009-01-21 2019-01-02 Guangdong OPPO Mobile Telecommunications Corp., Ltd. Apparatus and methods for color displays
US8711085B2 (en) 2009-01-21 2014-04-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Apparatus and methods for color displays
WO2010085505A1 (en) 2009-01-21 2010-07-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Apparatus and methods for color displays
US9099046B2 (en) 2009-02-24 2015-08-04 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Apparatus for providing light source modulation in dual modulator displays
US9911389B2 (en) 2009-02-24 2018-03-06 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Locally dimmed quantum dot display
US9478182B2 (en) 2009-02-24 2016-10-25 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Locally dimmed quantum dots (nano-crystal) based display
EP2419785A2 (en) * 2009-04-15 2012-02-22 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Thin displays having spatially variable backlights
EP2419785A4 (en) * 2009-04-15 2013-11-20 Dolby Lab Licensing Corp Thin displays having spatially variable backlights
US8810503B2 (en) 2009-04-15 2014-08-19 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Thin displays having spatially variable backlights
US9692946B2 (en) 2009-06-29 2017-06-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation System and method for backlight and LCD adjustment
WO2011005792A1 (en) 2009-07-07 2011-01-13 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Edge-lit local dimming displays, display components and related methods
US8786643B2 (en) 2009-07-07 2014-07-22 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Edge-lit local dimming displays, display components and related methods
WO2011011249A1 (en) 2009-07-22 2011-01-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Image display based on multiple brightness indicators
US8867115B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2014-10-21 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Control of array of two-dimensional imaging elements in light modulating displays
WO2011011446A1 (en) 2009-07-22 2011-01-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Control of array of two-dimensional imaging elements in light modulating displays
US8890910B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2014-11-18 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Image display based on multiple brightness indicators
WO2011011250A1 (en) 2009-07-24 2011-01-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Image control for displays
US9390660B2 (en) 2009-07-24 2016-07-12 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Image control for displays
WO2011031802A2 (en) 2009-09-11 2011-03-17 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Displays incorporating leaky reflectors
US9341887B2 (en) 2009-09-11 2016-05-17 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Displays with a backlight incorporating reflecting layer
US9251740B2 (en) 2009-10-28 2016-02-02 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Stereoscopic dual modulator display device using full color anaglyph
WO2011056430A1 (en) 2009-10-28 2011-05-12 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Stereoscopic dual modulator display device using full color anaglyph
US9544579B2 (en) 2009-10-28 2017-01-10 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Stereoscopic dual modulator display device using full color anaglyph
US8736643B2 (en) 2010-02-22 2014-05-27 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and systems for reducing power consumption in dual modulation displays
WO2011103083A1 (en) 2010-02-22 2011-08-25 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and systems for reducing power consumption in dual modulation displays
US9135864B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2015-09-15 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Systems and methods for accurately representing high contrast imagery on high dynamic range display systems
EP3051530A1 (en) 2010-06-21 2016-08-03 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Displaying images on local-dimming displays
US9576555B2 (en) 2010-06-21 2017-02-21 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Displaying images on local-dimming displays
WO2011163114A1 (en) 2010-06-21 2011-12-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Displaying images on local-dimming displays
US10121454B2 (en) 2010-06-21 2018-11-06 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Displaying images on local-dimming displays
US9548028B2 (en) 2010-08-31 2017-01-17 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Method and apparatus for adjusting drive values for dual modulation displays
WO2012030526A1 (en) 2010-08-31 2012-03-08 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Method and apparatus for adjusting drive values for dual modulation displays
US8717278B2 (en) 2010-08-31 2014-05-06 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Method and apparatus for adjusting drive values for dual modulation displays
WO2012078262A1 (en) 2010-12-06 2012-06-14 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and apparatus for image adjustment for displays having 2d and 3d display modes
US10275932B2 (en) 2010-12-06 2019-04-30 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and apparatus for image adjustment for displays having 2D and 3D display modes
US10306216B2 (en) 2011-03-09 2019-05-28 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection display providing additional modulation and related methods
US9912939B2 (en) 2011-03-09 2018-03-06 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection display providing additional modulation and related methods
US10123002B2 (en) 2011-03-09 2018-11-06 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection display providing additional modulation and related methods
US9224320B2 (en) 2011-03-09 2015-12-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection display providing additional modulation and related methods
US9626921B2 (en) 2011-03-09 2017-04-18 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Projection display providing additional modulation and related methods
WO2013056117A1 (en) 2011-10-13 2013-04-18 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and apparatus for backlighting dual modulation display devices
US9299293B2 (en) 2011-10-13 2016-03-29 Dobly Laboratories Licensing Corporation Methods and apparatus for backlighting dual modulation display devices
US10157592B2 (en) 2011-11-22 2018-12-18 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Optimizing light output profile for dual-modulation display performance
US9747866B2 (en) 2011-11-22 2017-08-29 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Optimizing light output profile for dual-modulation display performance
US10235947B2 (en) 2012-06-15 2019-03-19 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation System and methods for controlling dual modulation displays
US9607556B2 (en) 2012-06-15 2017-03-28 Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation Systems and methods for controlling dual modulation displays
US9978315B2 (en) 2013-09-13 2018-05-22 Seiko Epson Corporation Image display apparatus and method of controlling image display apparatus
EP3046101A4 (en) * 2013-09-13 2017-03-22 Seiko Epson Corporation Image display device and method for controlling image display device
JP2014146034A (en) * 2014-02-26 2014-08-14 Dolby Lab Licensing Corp Plurality of modulator displays and related method

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
DK1779362T3 (en) 2016-06-27
KR101121131B1 (en) 2012-03-20
EP1779362A1 (en) 2007-05-02
EP1779362A4 (en) 2009-08-12
CN101266758A (en) 2008-09-17
CN101266758B (en) 2010-11-17
HK1108756A1 (en) 2010-03-19
ES2575929T3 (en) 2016-07-04
CA2572968C (en) 2014-04-08
EP1779362B1 (en) 2016-04-20
CA2572968A1 (en) 2006-02-02
CA2992935C (en) 2019-07-02
JP6163505B2 (en) 2017-07-12
CN101010712A (en) 2007-08-01
KR20070049143A (en) 2007-05-10
CA2840548A1 (en) 2006-02-02
CN100507988C (en) 2009-07-01
CA2992935A1 (en) 2006-02-02
JP2014056240A (en) 2014-03-27
JP2015118384A (en) 2015-06-25
JP5419352B2 (en) 2014-02-19
CA3043550A1 (en) 2006-02-02
CA2840548C (en) 2018-03-13
JP5973403B2 (en) 2016-08-23
JP2008507735A (en) 2008-03-13

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
KR101207105B1 (en) Method and device for computing computer-generated video holograms
CN102089705B (en) Display with two binary spatial light modulators
US7224335B2 (en) DMD-based image display systems
JP5184635B2 (en) Increase the dynamic range of images
US8059082B2 (en) Display device comprising an ajustable light source
CN101533600B (en) Display System
EP2569668B1 (en) High dynamic range displays using filterless lcd(s) for increasing contrast and resolution
EP1465149B1 (en) Driving device of an image display device, program and storage medium thereof, image display device, and television receiver
JP5656742B2 (en) Display device and liquid crystal display device
US8411022B2 (en) Multiprimary color display with dynamic gamut mapping
US6690388B2 (en) PDP display drive pulse controller
Seetzen et al. 54.2: A high dynamic range display using low and high resolution modulators
US8199401B2 (en) N-modulation displays and related methods
JP5522918B2 (en) System and method for selectively processing out-of-gamut color conversion
JP2009518682A (en) Display device and display method
EP1927974B1 (en) Liquid crystal display with area adaptive backlight
EP1844462B1 (en) Driving a display comprising a RGBW color space
US8810501B2 (en) Method and system for driving a backlight in a display
Masia et al. A survey on computational displays: Pushing the boundaries of optics, computation, and perception
KR101223217B1 (en) Field sequential display of color images
EP2290435B1 (en) Liquid crystal display device, method for controlling liquid crystal display device, and recording medium
CN1264128C (en) Method and device for processing vedio data on display device
US10462437B2 (en) High luminance projection displays and associated methods
JP2009512896A (en) Display device, display control device, and display method
US20110025728A1 (en) Image processing apparatus and image display apparatus

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BW BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DK DM DZ EC EE EG ES FI GB GD GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KM KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MA MD MG MK MN MW MX MZ NA NG NI NO NZ OM PG PH PL PT RO RU SC SD SE SG SK SL SM SY TJ TM TN TR TT TZ UA UG US UZ VC VN YU ZA ZM ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): BW GH GM KE LS MW MZ NA SD SL SZ TZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HU IE IS IT LT LU MC NL PL PT RO SE SI SK TR BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2572968

Country of ref document: CA

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 1020077001836

Country of ref document: KR

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2007522879

Country of ref document: JP

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2005748546

Country of ref document: EP

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 200580029193.2

Country of ref document: CN

WWP Wipo information: published in national office

Ref document number: 2005748546

Country of ref document: EP