US9433339B2 - Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor - Google Patents

Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US9433339B2
US9433339B2 US13667304 US201213667304A US9433339B2 US 9433339 B2 US9433339 B2 US 9433339B2 US 13667304 US13667304 US 13667304 US 201213667304 A US201213667304 A US 201213667304A US 9433339 B2 US9433339 B2 US 9433339B2
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
imaging
assembly
console
feeding
tube
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US13667304
Other versions
US20130303849A1 (en )
Inventor
Robert Allyn
Glen Branconier
Anthony Sacchetti
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Covidien LP
Original Assignee
Covidien LP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J15/00Feeding-tubes for therapeutic purposes
    • A61J15/0003Nasal or oral feeding-tubes, e.g. tube entering body through nose or mouth
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/00002Operational features of endoscopes
    • A61B1/0002Operational features of endoscopes provided with data storages
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/00002Operational features of endoscopes
    • A61B1/00039Operational features of endoscopes provided with data input arrangements for the user
    • A61B1/00041Operational features of endoscopes provided with data input arrangements for the user for user message recording
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/00002Operational features of endoscopes
    • A61B1/00043Operational features of endoscopes provided with signal output arrangements
    • A61B1/00045Display arrangement
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/00002Operational features of endoscopes
    • A61B1/00043Operational features of endoscopes provided with signal output arrangements
    • A61B1/00045Display arrangement
    • A61B1/0005Display arrangement for multiple images
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/00002Operational features of endoscopes
    • A61B1/00059Operational features of endoscopes provided with identification means for the endoscope
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/00112Connection or coupling means
    • A61B1/00114Electrical cables for connection to external units
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/00112Connection or coupling means
    • A61B1/00119Tubes or pipes, e.g. for fluid supply to the endoscope
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/00131Accessories for endoscopes
    • A61B1/00137End pieces, e.g. caps, seals, forceps plugs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/005Flexible endoscopes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/04Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor combined with photographic or television appliances
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/04Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor combined with photographic or television appliances
    • A61B1/05Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor combined with photographic or television appliances characterised by the image sensor, e.g. camera, being in the distal end portion
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/04Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor combined with photographic or television appliances
    • A61B1/05Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor combined with photographic or television appliances characterised by the image sensor, e.g. camera, being in the distal end portion
    • A61B1/051Details of CCD assembly
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/04Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor combined with photographic or television appliances
    • A61B1/05Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor combined with photographic or television appliances characterised by the image sensor, e.g. camera, being in the distal end portion
    • A61B1/053Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor combined with photographic or television appliances characterised by the image sensor, e.g. camera, being in the distal end portion being detachable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/06Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor with illuminating arrangements
    • A61B1/0607Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor with illuminating arrangements for annular illumination
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/06Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor with illuminating arrangements
    • A61B1/0661Endoscope light sources
    • A61B1/0676Endoscope light sources at distal tip of an endoscope
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/06Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor with illuminating arrangements
    • A61B1/0661Endoscope light sources
    • A61B1/0684Endoscope light sources using light emitting diodes [LED]
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/267Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor for the respiratory tract, e.g. laryngoscopes, bronchoscopes
    • A61B1/2676Bronchoscopes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/273Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor for the upper alimentary canal, e.g. oesophagoscopes, gastroscopes
    • A61B1/2736Gastroscopes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0002Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network
    • A61B5/0004Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network characterised by the type of physiological signal transmitted
    • A61B5/0013Medical image data
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0059Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons using light, e.g. diagnosis by transillumination, diascopy, fluorescence
    • A61B5/0082Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons using light, e.g. diagnosis by transillumination, diascopy, fluorescence adapted for particular medical purposes
    • A61B5/0084Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons using light, e.g. diagnosis by transillumination, diascopy, fluorescence adapted for particular medical purposes for introduction into the body, e.g. by catheters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/68Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient
    • A61B5/6846Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient specially adapted to be brought in contact with an internal body part, i.e. invasive
    • A61B5/6847Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient specially adapted to be brought in contact with an internal body part, i.e. invasive mounted on an invasive device
    • A61B5/6852Catheters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/74Details of notification to user or communication with user or patient ; user input means
    • A61B5/742Details of notification to user or communication with user or patient ; user input means using visual displays
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J15/00Feeding-tubes for therapeutic purposes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J15/00Feeding-tubes for therapeutic purposes
    • A61J15/0026Parts, details or accessories for feeding-tubes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J15/00Feeding-tubes for therapeutic purposes
    • A61J15/0026Parts, details or accessories for feeding-tubes
    • A61J15/0069Tubes feeding directly to the intestines, e.g. to the jejunum
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J15/00Feeding-tubes for therapeutic purposes
    • A61J15/0026Parts, details or accessories for feeding-tubes
    • A61J15/008Sensor means, e.g. for sensing reflux, acidity or pressure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J15/00Feeding-tubes for therapeutic purposes
    • A61J15/0026Parts, details or accessories for feeding-tubes
    • A61J15/0073Multi-lumen tubes

Abstract

An imaging system having an imaging assembly having an imaging device for generating imaging signals corresponding to images of anatomy of a patient disclosed. The imaging assembly, which may be a component of a feeding tube assembly, transmits the imaging signals generated to a console, which presents images generated corresponding to the imaging signals on a display. A reference menu is presented on the display including menu items, which correspond to reference materials including photographs, video recordings, audio recordings, diagrams, animations, and/or text. Each of the materials provides information about anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, and/or contact information.

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part application of and claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §120 to co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/228,075, titled CATHETER WITH IMAGING ASSEMBLY, filed Sep. 8, 2011, which claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119 to U.S. Patent Application Nos. 61/482,080, filed May 3, 2011, and 61/380,985, filed Sep. 8, 2010, each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety for all purposes.

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates to catheters and particularly to imaging catheter systems having displaying console with reference materials.

Several medical procedures involve positioning a catheter, such as a feeding tube or endoscope, within a patient through the patient's nose, mouth, or other opening. In many procedures, accurately positioning the catheter is crucial to the success of the procedure and/or to the safety of the patient. For example, a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube may be inserted through the nose, past the throat, and down into the stomach, or past the stomach into the small bowels of the patient to deliver food to the patient via the tube. If the feeding tube is mistakenly positioned in the patient's lung, the feeding solution would be delivered to the patient's lung causing critical and possibly fatal results.

Accordingly, x-ray imaging devices and procedures have been used to confirm accurate positioning of a feeding tube, or other type of catheter, within a patient. Specifically, x-ray images are taken of the patient after a feeding tube has been initially positioned within the patient. The x-ray images are examined to determine whether the feeding tube was properly positioned or whether re-positioning is necessary. The x-ray imaging procedure is repeated until feeding tube has been properly positioned. X-ray imaging procedures, however, are generally expensive and time consuming. Additionally, because a patient often uses a feeding tube for a substantial length of time, the x-ray imaging procedures must be repeated periodically to ensure that the feeding tube has not moved or migrated.

SUMMARY

One or more aspects of the invention can involve a catheter having an imaging assembly. In particular aspects of the invention, the catheter can be a feeding tube having an imaging assembly. In accordance with an aspect of the invention, an imaging catheter system can comprise an imaging catheter including an imaging assembly having an imaging device for generating imaging signals corresponding to images of anatomy of a patient. The imaging assembly transmits the imaging signals generated by the imaging device. The system also includes a console adapted to receive the imaging signals transmitted by the imaging assembly and present images generated from the imaging signals on a display. The console is adapted to selectively present a reference menu on the display including menu items. The menu items correspond to reference materials comprising any one or more of photographs, video recordings, audio recordings, diagrams, animations, and text. The materials provides information about any one or more of anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, contact information, help information, and support information. The console can be further configured to present the reference menu simultaneously with the images generated from the imaging signals on the display. The console is typically configured to present a graphical user interface on the display. For some cases, the display is a touchscreen display adapted to present icons for control of the system by touching the display. The console, in further configurations, can be configured to present the reference materials simultaneously with the images generated from the imaging signals on the display. In still further cases, each of the reference materials is preferably located in a directory having a name corresponding to the corresponding reference material. The display can be adapted to present the reference menu when a user touches the display twice during a preselected period. The period can be, for example, within about one second. Further, at least a portion of the reference material is read-only and, in some cases, can be modified by updating system software. The imaging catheter system can comprise a feeding tube assembly including a feeding tube for delivering enteral feeding liquid to the patient, the tube having an inlet and an outlet and a feeding passage extending between said inlet and said outlet, the imaging catheter being positioned adjacent the outlet for generating imaging signals corresponding to an alimentary canal of the patient, the imaging assembly being sealed from the feeding passage to inhibit enteral feeding liquid in the feeding passage from entering the imaging assembly. The system typically further comprises an interface cable connecting the imaging catheter to the console for use in transmitting the imaging signals generated by the imaging device to the console.

One or more aspects of the invention can be directed to an imaging catheter system, comprising a feeding tube having an inlet connectable to a source of feeding fluid, an outlet distal from and fluidly connected to the inlet through a feeding passage, and an imaging device disposed proximate the outlet, the imaging device configured to generate and transmit imaging signals corresponding to an image of an anatomy of a patient; and a console comprising a display and memory having stored therein a plurality of reference materials selected from the group consisting of photographs, video recordings, audio recordings, diagrams, animations, text, and combinations thereof. In some cases, each of the plurality of reference materials can provide information about at least one of anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, and contact information. Preferably, the console is configured to receive the imaging signals, present at least a portion of at least one image corresponding to the imaging signals on the display, and present a reference menu on the display including menu items corresponding to at least one of the reference materials. The at least one of the plurality of reference materials can include a photograph showing an anatomical landmark. The anatomical landmark can be one of a bronchus, larynx, a tracheal ring, cardia, pyloric sphincter or pylorus, cricoid cartilage, bronchial split, esophageal junction, stomach folds, duodenal folds, and a pyloric orifice.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, a method of operating a medical system having a medical instrument including an imaging device for generating imaging signals corresponding to images of anatomy of a patient and a console adapted to present images generated from the imaging signals on a display comprises accessing reference material on the display. The material includes an image of exemplary anatomy indicative of proper placement of the medical instrument in the patient.

One or more aspects of the invention can be directed to a method of facilitating use of a feeding tube assembly. In one or more embodiments in accordance with such aspects of the invention, the method can comprise providing a feeding tube having an inlet connectable to a source of feeding fluid, an outlet distal from and fluidly connected to the inlet through a feeding passage, and an imaging device disposed proximate the outlet, the imaging device configured to generate and transmit imaging signals corresponding to an image of an anatomy of a patient; and providing a console comprising a display and memory having stored therein a plurality of reference materials selected from the group consisting of audiovisual data such as videos, audio, and photographs, textual data such as diagrams, animations, and text, and combinations thereof. In accordance with some particular embodiments, each of said reference material can provide information about at least one of anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, and contact information. In some cases, the console can be configured to receive the imaging signals, present at least a portion of at least one image corresponding to at least a portion of the imaging signals on the display, and present a reference menu on the display including menu items corresponding to at least one of the reference materials. In some cases, the console can be configured to simultaneously present on the display a photograph from the plurality of reference materials and a video image corresponding to the image signals from the imaging assembly, wherein the photograph provides a representative anatomical marker. The method, in accordance with further aspects of the invention, can comprise at least one of storing additional reference materials into the memory, removing at least one of the reference materials from the memory, and replacing the memory with an updated memory, the updated memory having stored therein an updated reference material. The method, in accordance with other further cases, can comprise receiving the console from a user; and after receiving the console, at least one of storing additional reference materials into the memory, removing at least one reference materials from the memory, and replacing the memory with an updated memory, the updated memory having stored therein at least one updated reference material.

In one aspect, an imaging catheter system generally comprises an imaging catheter and a console. The imaging catheter includes an elongate body having opposite first and second ends. An imaging assembly is at the first end of the elongate body and includes an imaging device for generating imaging signals indicative of images of anatomy of a subject. The imaging assembly is adapted to transmit the imaging signals generated by the imaging device. An electronic memory component has a predefined identifier of the imaging catheter written thereon. The console includes a display. The console is configured for receiving the imaging signals from the imaging assembly and displaying images generated from the imaging signals on the display. The console is configured to read the predefined identifier from the electronic memory component.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration showing a perspective view of an imaging feeding tube assembly, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 2 is schematic illustration showing a perspective view of the feeding tube assembly in FIG. 1, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a schematic illustration showing a side, elevational view of an imaging feeding tube system, including the imaging feeding tube assembly in FIG. 1, and interface cable, and a console, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 4A is schematic illustration showing a perspective view of a console connector of the feeding tube assembly in FIG. 1, showing internal components and including feeding tube segments of a feeding tube, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 4B is a schematic illustration showing another embodiment of an inlet adaptor for the imaging feeding tube assembly, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration showing an enlarged, fragmentary, perspective view of a distal end portion of the feeding tube assembly in FIG. 1, including an exploded imaging assembly, an imaging assembly connector, and a portion of the feeding tube, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a schematic illustration showing an enlarged cross section view of the feeding tube of the feeding tube assembly in FIG. 1, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a schematic illustration showing atop perspective view of a flex circuit assembly of the imaging assembly in FIG. 5, in a folded configuration, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a schematic illustration showing a bottom perspective view of the flex circuit assembly of the imaging assembly in FIG. 4, in the folded configuration, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration showing a fragmentary view of the imaging assembly in FIG. 5, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a schematic illustration showing a perspective view of a cap of the imaging assembly in FIG. 5, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a block diagram of the flex circuit assembly in FIG. 7, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIGS. 12 and 13 are circuit schematic illustrations of the flex circuit embodiment in FIG. 11, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 14 is a schematic illustration showing a top plan view of the flex circuit assembly of the imaging assembly in FIG. 7, in an unfolded configuration, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 15 is a schematic illustration showing a top view of a first substrate of the flex circuit assembly in FIG. 14, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 16 is a block diagram of the flex circuit assembly, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 17 is a block diagram of the flex circuit assembly, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 18 is a block diagram of an exemplary feeding tube system, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 19 is a flow diagram showing an exemplary graphical user interface screen flow, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIGS. 20-31 are schematic illustrations showing exemplary graphical user interface screens displayable by a console, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 32A is a schematic illustration showing a perspective view of an imaging feeding tube assembly, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 32B is a schematic illustration showing an exploded perspective of the imaging feeding tube assembly in FIG. 32A, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 33 is a schematic illustration showing a cross-sectional view of a feeding tube of the imaging feeding tube assembly in FIG. 32A, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 34 is a schematic illustration showing an exploded perspective view of an imaging assembly of the imaging feeding tube assembly in FIG. 32A, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 35 is a schematic illustration showing a perspective view of a rigid-flex circuit assembly, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 36 is a schematic illustration showing a top plan view of a rigid-flex circuit, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 37 is a schematic illustration showing a side, elevational view of a rigid-flex circuit, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 38 is a schematic illustration showing a perspective view of an imaging assembly connector of the imaging feeding tube assembly in FIG. 32A, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 39 is a schematic illustration showing a perspective view of the imaging assembly in FIG. 34, with a housing removed therefrom to show internal components, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 40 is a schematic illustration showing a longitudinal section view of the housing of the imaging assembly in FIG. 34, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 41 is a schematic illustration showing an imaging assembly, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 42 is a schematic illustration showing a cross-sectional view of a console connector of the imaging feeding tube assembly, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 43 is a schematic illustration showing an interface cable, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 44 is a schematic illustration showing a perspective view of a flex circuit assembly, with a flex circuit in a folded configuration, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention; and

FIG. 45 is a schematic illustration showing a perspective view of the flex circuit in FIG. 44 in an unfolded or flat configuration, in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 46 is a schematic illustration showing a partial perspective view of an imaging catheter system in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 47 is a schematic illustration showing a front elevation view of a console of the imaging catheter system in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention;

FIG. 48 is a schematic illustration including copies of photographs showing exemplary markers representative of incorrect and correct paths; and

FIGS. 49A-49C are copies of photographs of exemplary markers with FIG. 49A showing a copy of a photograph of a bronchus, FIG. 49B showing a copy of a photograph of a portion of a stomach, and FIG. 49C showing a copy of a photograph of tracheal rings.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In another aspect, a feeding tube assembly generally comprises a flexible feeding tube having opposite first and second longitudinal ends, a longitudinal axis extending between the first and second longitudinal ends, and a feeding passage defined therein extending along the longitudinal axis between the first and second longitudinal ends. An inlet adaptor is adjacent the second longitudinal end of the tube in fluid communication with the feeding passage. The inlet adaptor is configured for fluid connection to a source of enteral feeding liquid to fluidly connect the source of enteral feeding liquid to the feeding passage. An imaging assembly includes an imaging device. The imaging assembly is configured for generating and transmitting imaging signals indicative of images of the alimentary canal of a subject. The imaging assembly is secured to the tube adjacent the first longitudinal end of the tube and is sealed from the feeding passage to inhibit enteral feeding liquid in the feeding passage from entering the imaging assembly. A feeding outlet is proximate the imaging assembly and in fluid communication with the feeding passage for delivering enteral feeding liquid to the subject. A console connector is communicatively connected to the imaging assembly, the console connector configured for use in communicatively connecting the imaging assembly to a console to allow transmission of the imaging signals to the console.

In yet another aspect, a feeding tube system generally comprises a feeding tube assembly and a console. The feeding tube assembly includes a feeding tube having opposite first and second ends and a feeding passage fluidly connecting the first and second ends. An inlet adaptor is adjacent the second end of the tube in fluid communication with the feeding passage. The inlet adaptor is configured for fluid connection to a source of enteral feeding liquid to fluidly connect the source of enteral feeding liquid to the feeding passage. An imaging assembly including an imaging device and configured for generating and transmitting imaging signals indicative of images of the alimentary canal of a subject can be utilized. The imaging assembly is secured to the tube adjacent the first end of the tube and is sealed from the feeding passage to inhibit enteral feeding liquid in the feeding passage from entering the imaging assembly. A feeding outlet is intermediate the inlet adaptor and the imaging assembly and in fluid communication with the feeding passage for delivering enteral feeding liquid to the subject. The console includes a display, and is operatively coupled to the feeding tube assembly and configured for receiving imaging signals transmitted by the imaging assembly and displaying images generated from the imaging signals on the display.

In another embodiment, a feeding tube assembly generally comprises a flexible feeding tube having opposite first and second longitudinal ends, and a feeding passage defined therein extending between the first and second ends. An inlet adaptor is adjacent the second longitudinal end of the tube in fluid communication with the feeding passage. The inlet adaptor is configured for fluid connection to a source of enteral feeding liquid. An imaging assembly includes an imaging device for generating imaging signals indicative of images of the alimentary canal of a subject. The imaging assembly is secured to the feeding tube adjacent the first end of the tube and is fluidly isolated from feeding passage. A console connector is secured to the feeding tube proximate the inlet adaptor. The console connector is communicatively connected to the imaging assembly, and configured for use in connecting to the imaging assembly to a console to allow transmission of the imaging signals to the console.

In yet another embodiment, an imaging catheter assembly generally comprises an elongate body having a first body end, and an opposite a second body end; and an imaging assembly secured to the first body end. The imaging assembly has a first imaging assembly end remote from the first body end, a second imaging assembly end adjacent the first body end, and an imaging assembly longitudinal axis extending between the first and second imaging assembly ends. The imaging assembly includes a rigid-flex circuit having an electronic component-mounting portion extending along the imaging assembly longitudinal axis from adjacent the second imaging assembly end toward the first imaging assembly end, and a camera-mounting portion adjacent the first imaging assembly end and extending generally transverse to the imaging assembly. The electronic component-mounting portion includes longitudinally spaced first and second rigid sections and a first flexible section disposed between the first and second rigid sections. A first electronic component is mounted on the first rigid section of the electronic component-mounting portion. A second electronic component is mounted on the second rigid section of the electronic component-mounting portion. A camera is mounted on the camera-mounting portion, and the camera is communicatively connected to the first and second electronic components. The rigid-flex circuit is disposed in a housing. The housing circumferentially surrounds at least a portion of the rigid-flex circuit. The first flexible section of the electronic component-mounting portion is free from electronic components mounted thereon such that the rigid-flex circuit is capable of bending at the first flexible section.

In another aspect, an imaging catheter system for use in performing a medical procedure generally comprises an imaging catheter and a console. The imaging catheter includes an elongate body having opposite first and second ends. An imaging assembly at the first end of the body is adapted to be inserted into a subject. The imaging assembly includes an imaging device for generating imaging signals representative of images of anatomy of the subject when the imaging assembly is inserted in the subject. The imaging assembly is adapted to transmit the imaging signals generated by the imaging device. The imaging catheter includes an electronic memory component. The console including a display, and is configured for receiving the imaging signals transmitted by the imaging assembly and displaying images generated from the imaging signals on the display. The console is configured to write data to the electronic memory component during use of the imaging catheter.

In another aspect, an imaging catheter system for use in performing a medical procedure generally comprises an imaging catheter and a console. The imaging catheter includes an elongate body having opposite first and second ends. An imaging assembly at the first end of the body is adapted to be inserted into a subject. The imaging assembly includes an imaging device for generating imaging signals representative of images of anatomy of the subject when the imaging assembly is inserted in the subject. The imaging assembly is adapted to transmit the imaging signals generated by the imaging device. The console includes a display. The console is configured for receiving the imaging signals transmitted by the imaging assembly and displaying images generated from the imaging signals on the display. The console is configured to simultaneously present an image previously received by the console from the imaging assembly and a current image from image data currently being received by the console from the imaging assembly.

Referring now to the drawings and in particular to FIGS. 1-3, an imaging catheter is generally indicated at 10. As disclosed herein, the imaging catheter can be a medical device that is configured for insertion into a subject, e.g., a human or a non-human subject, and configured to provide images, e.g., digital video, of anatomy of the subject as the medical device is inserted into the subject and/or after the medical device is positioned in the subject. In the illustrated embodiment, the imaging catheter is configured as a feeding tube assembly 10 and exemplarily illustrated as a nasogastric feeding tube assembly. The nasogastric feeding tube assembly 10 can be configured to provide digital images of an alimentary canal, or portions thereof, of the subject as the feeding tube assembly is inserted into the subject and after the feeding tube assembly is positioned in the subject to facilitate confirmation of proper placement of the feeding tube assembly in the subject. The nasogastric feeding tube assembly 10 can be also configured to deliver liquid nutrients into the alimentary canal of the subject by enteral feeding, such as after a user, e.g., a medical practitioner, confirms proper placement of the feeding tube assembly in the subject, by viewing the acquired digital images from the imaging feeding tube assembly. It is understood that the imaging catheter 10 may be configured as a different type of feeding tube, such as a gastric feeding tube, or a jejunostomy feeding tube, or may be configured as a different type of medical device, such as an endoscope, or a heart catheter, e.g., a balloon catheter or a heart catheter.

The illustrated feeding tube assembly 10 generally includes an elongate, generally flexible body in the form of a feeding tube, generally indicated at 12, having a longitudinal axis A (FIG. 6), an open first longitudinal end, or a distal end, and an open second longitudinal end, or a proximal end. A feeding passage 14 (FIGS. 4-6), defined by an interior surface of the feeding tube 12, extends longitudinally between the longitudinal ends of the tube for delivering nutrients, e.g., in the form of an enteral feeding solution to the subject. In other embodiments—such as catheters that are not feeding tubes—the elongate body may have other configurations, and may not have a longitudinal passage for delivering fluids to the patient. An inlet adapter, generally indicated at 16, for delivering liquid nutrients into the feeding passage 14 is attached to the second end of the tube, and an imaging assembly, generally indicated at 18, for generating and transmitting real time images, e.g., live video, of the alimentary canal of the patient during and/or following intubation is attached to the first end of the tube 12 by an imaging assembly connector, generally indicated at 20. As used herein with the point of reference being the feeding source, the inlet adaptor 16 defines the proximal end of the feeding tube assembly 10, and the imaging assembly 18 defines the distal end. The feeding tube assembly 10 also can include a console connector, generally indicated at 22, in communication with the imaging assembly 18, to provide communication between the imaging assembly and a console 23 (FIG. 3), on which the images obtained by the imaging assembly 18 may be displayed, as described in detail herein. In the illustrated embodiment, the feeding tube assembly 10, the console 23, and an interface cable 242, which communicatively connects the feeding tube assembly to the console, together constitutes an imaging catheter system, and more specifically, an imaging feeding tube system.

Referring to FIGS. 1-4, the exemplarily illustrated feeding tube 12 comprises two tube segments: a first tube segment 12 a extending between the imaging assembly connector 20 and the console connector 22, and a second tube segment 12 b extending between the console connector and the inlet adaptor 16. As disclosed in more detail below, the first and second tube segments 12 a, 12 b can be secured to the console connector 22 in such a way that the first and second tube segments are in fluid communication with each other to at least partially define the feeding passage 14. In other embodiments of the invention, the tube 12 may be formed as an integral, one-piece component.

The tube 12 may comprise indicia such as graduations (not shown) that show or providing a relative indication of insertion depth to facilitate proper intubation. In one example, the tube 12 may have a length between about 36 inches and about 55 inches, although it may be of other lengths without departing from the scope of the invention.

As shown in FIG. 6, the first tube segment 12 a typically includes one or more electrical conductors 24 (broadly, a signal-transmitting component) typically disposed in the tube wall of the first tube segment. The second tube segment 12 b may be free from such electrical conductors. The electrical conductors 24 of the first tube segment 12 a run longitudinally along the first tube segment, such as along or parallel a longitudinal axis of the feeding passage 14. At least some of the electrical conductors 24 can be configured to transmit imaging signals between the imaging assembly 18 and the console 23, such as through the console connector 22 and the interface cable 242. Other electrical conductors 24 may be configured to transmit power from the console 23 to the imaging assembly 18, and provide a ground. Still other electrical conductors 24 may be configured to provide other communication including, but not limited to, two-way communication, between the console 23 and the imaging assembly 18. The first tube segment 12 a may include a different type of a signal-transmitting component, such as fiber-optic cables or other signal-transmitting components, to effect transmission of signals between the imaging assembly 18 and the console connector 22. In one or more embodiments of the invention, at least one of the electrical conductors 24 is configured to supply power from a power supply, which can be the console 23, to the imaging assembly 18, although other ways of powering the imaging assembly, including the imaging assembly having its own source of power, do not depart from the scope of the present invention.

As exemplarily illustrated, the electrical conductors 24 can be disposed within a conductor passage 26 of the feeding tube 12 so that the conductors are physically separated or at least fluidly isolated from the feeding passage 14 to inhibit or reduce the likelihood of feeding solution in the feeding passage from contacting the conductors. As shown in FIG. 6, the interior surface defining a portion of the feeding passage 14 in the first tube segment 12 a has a generally circular cross section having an arcuate portion 28 extending inwardly and running longitudinally along a lengthwise dimension of the feeding tube assembly or segment. The electrical conductors 24 can be disposed within the tube wall of the first tube segment 12 a between the arcuate portion 28 of the interior surface and the exterior surface of the tube segment which provides a configuration that allows physical separation between the electrical conductors 24 and the enteral feeding solution in the feeding passage 14, as disclosed above, and can maximize the area or volume of the feeding passage. A longitudinal axis A passes through the feeding passage 14. As such, this configuration promotes the flow of fluid in the feeding passage 14 and reduces the likelihood of occlusions in the feeding passage. A substantially uniform wall thickness around passage 14, as shown in FIG. 5, can decrease the amount of material entrapment that may occur, or at least can reduce the likelihood of formation of occlusions. It is understood that the first tube segment 12 a may be of other configurations without departing from the scope of the present invention.

The feeding tube 12, including, for example, the first and second tube segments 12 a, 12 b, may be formed from a thermoplastic polyurethane polymer, such as but not limited to, an aromatic, polyether-based thermoplastic polyurethane, and a radiopaque substance, such as barium. The first and second tube segments 12 a, 12 b may be formed by an extrusion process. The tube 12 may be formed from other materials and may be formed in other ways without departing from the scope of the present invention. In one non-limiting example, the electrical conductors 24 or other signal-transmitting components may be co-extruded with the first tube segment 12 a to embed the conductors in the first tube segment. In another example, the conductors 24 or other signal-transmitting components may be fed through the conductor passage 26 after forming the first tube segment 12 a. Introducing any of the one or more conductors 12 can be facilitated by, for example, internally pressurizing passage 26 with a fluid prior to insertion therein. Other ways of forming the first tube segment 12 a and/or the tube 12 do not depart from the scope of the present invention.

Referring back further to FIGS. 1 and 2, the illustrated inlet adaptor 16 typically includes first and second inlet ports 30, 32, respectively, in fluid communication with a single outlet port 34. The exemplarily illustrated inlet adaptor 16 may be referred to as a Y-port. The first inlet port 30 may be used for connection to a source of liquid nutrients, such as an enteral feeding solution. For example, a barbed connector (not shown), in fluid communication with the source of an enteral feeding solution, may be inserted into the first inlet port 30 and secured therein by a friction-fit. Thus, an aspect of the present invention may involve configurations with the feeding fluid in fluid communication with the feeding tube assembly. An optional cap 35 tethered on the inlet adaptor 16 can be removably receivable in the first inlet port 30 to close the inlet port when it is not being used. The second inlet port 32 may be used for connection to a source of medicine. Optional tethered first and second caps 36, 37, respectively, can be used to variably configure the second inlet port 32 as a connection or port to various or different connectors typically used with various sources of medicine. For example, the first cap 36 can be removably receivable in the second inlet port 32, providing a central opening therethrough that is sized and shaped to mate with a catheter syringe. The second cap 37 can be removably receivable in the central opening in the first cap 36, thereby providing a central opening that is sized and shaped to particularly mate with a tip of an oral syringe. The inlet adaptor 16 may have other shapes, sizes and configurations, or may be entirely omitted, without departing from the scope of the invention.

The inlet adaptor 16 can be secured to the second or proximal end of the tube 12 at an adaptor weld, generally indicated at 38, so that the outlet port 34 of the adaptor 16 is in sealed fluid communication with the feeding passage 14 of the feeding tube. The adaptor weld 38 typically tapers distally from the adaptor 16 to the tube 12 so that the weld has a smooth, generally continuously decreasing diameter. It is to be understood that the adaptor 16 may be secured to the tube 12 in other ways without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, the inlet adaptor 16 may be secured to the tube 12 by solvent bonding, or other securement techniques. The adaptor 16 may be composed of the same material as the feeding tube 12, or a blend of materials, or a different but compatible material. In one example, the adaptor 16 is composed of blend of polyvinyl chloride and polyurethane elastomer. In another example, the adaptor 16 is composed of an aromatic, polyether-based thermoplastic polyurethane or DEHP-free PVC. The adaptor 16 may be formed from other types of materials within the scope of the invention.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2, and 5, the imaging assembly connector 20 can have a first end margin, such as a distal end margin, secured to the imaging assembly 18, and a second end margin, such as a proximal end margin, secured to the first end margin of the first tube segment 12 a. The imaging assembly connector 20 typically defines a feeding outlet 40 that is in fluid communication with the feeding passage 14 of the tube 12. The feeding outlet 40 can comprise one or more openings extending laterally through a side of the imaging assembly connector 20 (only one such lateral opening is illustrated). In the illustrated embodiment, the first or distal end of the tube 12 is received and secured within the imaging assembly connector 20 at the second or proximal end of the imaging assembly connector to provide fluid communication between the feeding passage 14 and the feeding outlet 40. The imaging assembly connector 20 can be closed adjacent the first or distal end to prevent the feeding solution in the feeding passage 14 from entering the imaging assembly 18. Thus, the imaging assembly 18 is typically sealed off from and not in fluid communication with the feeding passage 14. Instead, the feeding solution typically flows laterally out from the outlet 40 relative to the feeding tube 12. When the feeding tube assembly 10 is determined to be appropriately positioned in a patient, feeding solution or other desirable liquid fed into the inlet adaptor 16 can be introduced through the feeding passage 14 of the tube 12, and out through the outlet 40 and into the subject's alimentary canal. As illustrated in FIG. 5, the first end margin of the imaging assembly connector 20 can have a connection portion 42 shaped and sized to fit in the imaging assembly 18. The imaging assembly connector 20 may be formed integrally with the imaging assembly 18 or may be omitted, without departing from the scope of the present invention.

The electrical conductors 24 may be embedded or otherwise received in the wall of the imaging assembly connector 20 so that the conductors are sealed from the feeding outlet 40 and the feeding passage 14 to inhibit feeding solution from contacting the conductors. In one embodiment, the imaging assembly connector 20 may include two distinct parts that are assembled together. The first part may define the feeding outlet 40 that receives liquid from the tube 12, as described above, and a conductor passage (not shown) that is separate and apart from the feeding passage outlet. The second part may define the connection portion 42 and a conductor passage extending to a conductor passage in the first part to facilitate connection of or carry the electrical conductors 24 between the imaging assembly 18 and the tube 12. The imaging assembly connector 20 may be omitted or may have other shapes, sizes, and configurations. Moreover, the imaging assembly 18 may be secured to the tube 12 in other ways without departing from the scope of the present invention.

In one example, the imaging assembly connector 20 may be injection molded onto the end of the feeding tube 12. The direct connection of the imaging assembly connector 20 to the feeding tube provides strain relief for the electrical conductors 24 extending out of the end of the feeding tube 12 to the imaging assembly.

Referring to FIG. 5, the imaging assembly 18 can include a tubular housing 50, a flexible circuit (“flex circuit”) assembly 60 disposed within the tubular housing, and a transparent or translucent cap 70 secured to the tubular housing 50. A flex circuit typically includes a deformable circuit element and components mounted on the deformable circuit element. The deformable circuit element may be a flat substrate, at least prior to being deformed, that can be bent or otherwise deformed, and which includes electrical conductors for making electrical connection among various components that may be mounted on the substrate. The deformable circuit element may only be partially deformable, e.g., only at discrete bend lines, within the scope of the present invention. Among other functions, the tubular housing 50 can provide protection for the flex circuit assembly 60, and the housing may be waterproof to inhibit the ingress of liquid into the imaging assembly 18. The tubular housing 50 has an interior surface defining an axial passage 52 shaped and sized for housing the flex circuit assembly 60 in a folded configuration. In one embodiment, the tubular housing 50 is formed from a generally flexible material that provides protection for the flex circuit assembly 60 and allows the imaging assembly 18 to bend to facilitate maneuverability of the feeding tube assembly 10. A second end, such as a proximal end, of the tubular housing 50 can be configured to receive the connection portion 42 of the imaging assembly connector 20, and can be adhered thereto to secure the imaging assembly to feeding tube 12. The tubular housing 50 may be generally opaque, by being formed from an opaque white material or having an opaque material applied thereon, to reflect illumination from a light source, such as an internal LED 96, and direct the illumination outward from the distal end of the imaging assembly 18 to, for example, a field of view.

The flex circuit assembly 60 typically includes a flex circuit 80 and electronic components (not labeled), described below, attached thereto. In the partially assembled or folded configuration exemplarily shown in FIGS. 5, 7, and 8, the flex circuit assembly 60 can have a length with a first longitudinal end, e.g., a distal end, and an opposite second longitudinal end, e.g., a proximal end. The electrical conductors 24 can be connected to the second longitudinal end, e.g., the proximal end, of the flex circuit assembly 60. A camera-mounting portion 82 is typically disposed at the first longitudinal end, e.g., the distal end of the flex circuit assembly 60. An imaging device such as a digital camera, generally indicated at 84, can be mounted on the camera-mounting portion 82. The camera 84 can have a cuboidal shaped housing 86 with a base 86A, as shown in FIG. 8, sides 86B, 86C, 86D, 86E, and an upper or first surface 86F. The upper surface 86F of the camera 84 can include a lens 88. The lens 88 defines a field of view that projects generally outward from the distal end of the imaging assembly 18. In accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention, the camera 84 comprises an imaging device, such as a CMOS imaging device. In further embodiments of the invention, the camera 84 may comprise a different type of solid state imaging device, such as a charge-coupled device (CCD), or another type of imaging device. Other ways of configuring the electronics and other components of the imaging assembly 18 do not depart from the scope of the present invention and may be implemented as variant embodiments. For example, in another embodiment, the flex circuit assembly 60 may be replaced with a rigid printed circuit board (PCB).

The flex circuit assembly 60 can include a power-mounting portion 90 (FIGS. 5 and 7) and a control or data-mounting portion 92 (FIG. 8) each typically extending from the camera-mounting portion 82 at a fold line toward the first longitudinal end of the flex circuit assembly 60. As will be described in further detail, power supply components are typically disposed on the power-mounting portion 90, and camera control components are typically disposed on the data-mounting portion 92.

Referring to FIGS. 7 and 9, a light-mounting portion 94 of the flex circuit 60 can be disposed at the side 86C of the camera 84. The light-mounting portion 94 is illustratively depicted as extending longitudinally toward the camera 84 from a lateral side edge of the flex circuit at a fold line of the power-mounting portion 90. One or more light sources 96 can be disposed on, for example, the light-mounting portion 94 for illuminating an area or region adjacent to the upper surface 86F of the camera housing 86. In the illustrated embodiment, the light source is a light emitting diode (LED) 96 disposed on the light-mounting portion 94 so that the LED is disposed on the side 86C of the camera housing and below or proximate the upper surface 86F of the camera housing. In the illustrated embodiment, the LED 96 has a light emitting surface 98 substantially perpendicular to the light-mounting portion 94 for projecting light outward from the distal end of the imaging assembly 18. According to the illustrated embodiment (FIG. 9), the LED 96 and the light-mounting portion 94 are positioned relative to the camera 84 and the camera-mounting portion 82 such that the light emitting surface 98 of the LED 96 is a relatively short distance, e.g., 0.408 millimeters, below the upper surface 86F of the camera housing 86. Typically, LED 96 has an illumination zone that is at least partially coincident over an imaging zone or field of view of camera 84, through optional lens 88.

In another embodiment, one or more LEDs may be located distal of the camera. As shown in FIG. 44, one example of flex circuit assembly is generally indicated at reference numeral 60′. As illustrated in a folded or at least partially assembled configuration, a flex circuit 80′ of the flex circuit assembly 60′ can include an electrical component-mounting portion 90′, a camera-mounting portion 82′ on which a camera 84′ is mounted, and an LED-mounting portion 94′ on which one or more light sources, such as four illustrated LEDs 96′, can be mounted. The LED-mounting portion 94′ is typically configured to rest on an upper surface of the camera 84′ so that the LEDs 96′ are distal or offset from the camera. The LED-mounting portion 94′ can include an opening 95′ aligned with the camera lens (not shown) so that the LED-mounting portion 94′ does not obstruct the field of view of the camera 84′. FIG. 45 shows the flex circuit 80′ in the unfolded or flat configuration. The flex circuit may have other configurations and provide alternative locations for mounting of the camera and the light source.

Referring to FIGS. 9 and 10, the camera 84 and the LED 96 are illustratively shown as disposed in the optically transparent cap 70. The cap 70 can be configured to diffuse light emitted from any of the one or more LEDs 96, and, in some cases, to filter the emitted light into a range of or a particular frequency. The cap 70 can have an exterior surface comprising a cylindrical attachment portion 100 that is configured to couple or mate with the distal end of the tubular housing 50, and a dome-shaped portion 102 that may extend outward or project from the tubular housing. In one example, the cylindrical attachment portion 100 can be shaped and sized so that a snug fit is formed with the interior surface of the tubular housing 50. A bonding agent may be used to further secure the cylindrical attachment portion 100 to the tubular housing 50. The connection between the cap 70 and the housing 50 may be substantially waterproof to inhibit the ingress of liquid into the imaging assembly 18.

In some embodiments in accordance with one or more aspects of the invention, the cap 70 has an interior surface that defines a cavity extending inwardly from a proximal end of the cap. The cavity can provide or define a camera-receiving portion 104 and an LED-receiving portion 106. The camera receiving portion 104 can be correspondingly sized and shaped to snugly or tightly receive the sides 86B, 86C, 86D, 86E of the camera 84, and further can have a depth (indicated as “D” in FIG. 9) that is less than the height of the camera (indicated as “h” in FIG. 9) so that the camera extends out of the camera receiving portion 104 at the proximal end of the cap 70. This snug fit of the camera 84 in the camera-receiving portion 104 inhibits movement of the camera relative to the cap 70 and facilitates proper alignment of the cap 70 with the camera 84. The position of the cap 70 relative to the camera 84 may be adjusted or configured to at least partially reduce any effects that undesirably affect the quality of the image generated by the imaging assembly 18. In the exemplarily embodiment, the protruding portion of the camera housing that extends outside of the camera receiving portion can facilitate assembly by enabling the use of a fixture for precise positioning of the camera and the cap. In other variants, the cap may utilize different configuration to interface with the housing or other components of the imaging assembly. For example, one or more variants embodiments may involve having circular cylindrical volumes enclosing any of the one or more of the light sources and the imaging devices.

Referring further to FIG. 9, the interior of the cap 70 can be further configured to reduce unwanted light emitting from the LED 96 from entering the camera 84 and being sensed or detected by the camera. To minimize or at least partially reduce any reflection of undesirable light into the camera 84, an interior camera-opposing surface 108 of the cap 70, opposing the upper surface 86F of the camera housing 86, can be oriented or constructed to be substantially parallel to the upper surface 86F of the camera housing. Moreover, an interior light-opposing surface 110 of the cap 70 opposing the light emitting surface 98 of the LED 96 can be disposed to be spaced longitudinally, i.e., distally, from the camera-opposing surface 108 of the cap. A relatively sharp angle, e.g., a right angle, may be implemented and defined by the camera-opposing surface 108 and an interior surface 112 of the cap 70 that connects the interior surface 110 to the interior surface 108. This configuration should reduce any undesirable internal reflection of light emitted by the LED 96 into the camera 84.

Referring further to FIG. 10, the dome-shaped portion 102 of the exterior surface of the cap 70 includes central distal portion 116 that can be generally flat, e.g., generally planar. Side edges extending from the distal portion 116 to the base, e.g., proximal end of the dome-shaped portion, are round and generally smooth. Moreover, the base of the cap 70 has a cross-sectional size and shape that can be approximately the same as the cross-sectional size and shape of the housing 50 so that the cap transitions smoothly to the housing. Overall, this general shape of cap 70 is referred to herein as a truncated-dome shape. The flat, central distal portion 116 should minimize or at least reduce distortion in the field of view. In the illustrated embodiment, the flat, central distal portion 116 has a generally circular circumference and an area that is the same size or larger than the field of view to further minimize distortion in the field of view. Moreover, the portion of the interior surface of the cap 70 that opposes the flat central portion 116 of the exterior surface and the upper surface 86F of the camera 84 can also be flat and can be substantially in parallel with the flat central portion of the exterior surface, which should further minimize or at least reduce distortion in the field of view. The round edges of the cap 70 can facilitate insertion of the distal portion of the feeding tube assembly 12 into the subject and promotes comfort during intubation.

FIG. 11 shows an electrical block diagram directed to an exemplary electrical system 200 of the flex circuit assembly 60 in accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention. FIGS. 12 and 13 illustratively show circuit diagrams of the exemplary electrical system 200. The electrical system 200 can include an electrical conductor connector 202, such as an insulation displacement connector, for receiving the electrical conductors 24 from the outlet adaptor 20. According to the illustrated embodiment, the electrical conductors 24 include six signal lines. The six signal lines in the illustrated embodiment include two power supply lines, e.g., a power line, 5V, and a ground line, GND, two serial communication lines, e.g., a serial clock line, SCL, and a serial data line, SDA, and a differential pair, e.g., a low voltage differential signal positive line, LVDS_P, and a low voltage differential signal negative line, LVDS_N. The power supply lines (5V and GND) are electrically connected to the LED 96 for energizing the LED 96. In the illustrated circuit system 200, the power supply lines provide 5 Volt power to a white light LED, e.g., part number LW QH8G or LW VH8G available from OSRAM Opto Semiconductor GmnH, Germany. The power supply lines (5V and GND) are also electrically connected to a dual voltage regulator 204, or power supply, for providing power thereto. The dual voltage regulator 204 generates two different voltage lines from the power provided by the power supply lines. In the illustrated circuit system 200, the dual voltage regulator 204, e.g., part number ISL9016IRUJCZ-T available from Intersil Corporation, Milpitas, California, generates a 2.8 Volt power signal, e.g., analog supply voltage signal VAA, and a 1.8 Volt power signal, e.g., digital supply voltage signal VDD. The dual voltage regulator 204 is configured and electrically connected to supply voltage generated therefrom to an oscillator 206, a serial communication device 208, and the camera 84. In the exemplary electrical system 200, the camera 84 can be part number MTV9124M01, available from Aptina Imaging Corp., San Jose, Calif. However, other cameras or image sensors may be used without departing from the scope of the invention.

The oscillator 206, such as a 22 MHz oscillator, can be electrically connected to the camera 84 and configured to provide a timing signal (EXTCLK) thereto. The serial communication device 206, such as, an I2C bus repeater, available from Philips Semiconducor or NXP B.V, Germany, is electrically connected to the two serial communication lines (SDA, SCL) and to the camera 84 for allowing data, i.e., non-image data, to be communicated to and from the camera 84. For example, the serial communication lines (SDA, SCL) may be connected via the console connector 22 to an external computing device. The external computing device receives data representative of one or more camera settings, such as but not limited to resolution and frame rate. The camera settings can be communicated to the camera 84 via the serial communication lines (SDA, SCL) and the serial communication device 208. The camera 84 obtains images of the subject's anatomy in the field of view during and/or following intubation thereof and generates imaging signals such as a serialized digital video signal from the obtained images as a function of the camera settings communicated via the serial communication device 208. Operations performed by the camera 84 are synchronized as function of timing signal (EXTCLK) provided by the oscillator 206. The camera 84 outputs the signals, e.g., serialized digital video signal, to the differential pair lines (LVDS_N, LVDS_P) for transmission to the console connector 22 and to the console 23. The images obtained by the camera 84 may then be delivered, processed, and viewed via the console 23.

FIG. 14 illustrates the flex circuit 80 in an unfolded, or flat, e.g., planar, configuration. In the unfolded configuration, the camera-mounting portion 82, the power-mounting portion 90, the data-mounting portion 92, and the light-mounting portion 94 all lie generally in the same plane and form a single planar surface, e.g., mounting face. In one embodiment, all of the electrical components of the electrical system, e.g., electrical system 200 for the imaging assembly 18 are attached to a single, generally planar mounting surface 250 of the flex circuit 80 when the flex circuit is in the unfolded configuration. Accordingly, the electrical components may be attached to the flex circuit 80 while it is in the unfolded configuration to facilitate manufacturing.

Relative locations of the electrical components of the exemplary electrical system 200 described above are shown in FIG. 14. In particular, the electrical conductor connector 202, e.g., insulation displacement connector, and the power supply 204, e.g., dual voltage regulator, can be attached to the mounting surface 250 of the power-mounting portion 90. A configuration, such as the illustrated configuration, in which the power supply 204 is typically located relatively close to the incoming electrical conductors 24, minimizes or reduces noise on the ground line (GND). The oscillator 206, e.g., timing generator, and the serial communication device 208, e.g., I2C bus repeater, can be attached to the mounting surface 250 of the data-mounting portion 92. The camera 84 can be attached to the mounting surface 250 of the camera-mounting portion 82. The exemplarily illustrated configuration locates the serial communication device 208 further from the electrical conductor connector 202 than the camera 84 because serial communication signals, e.g., serial data and serial clock signals, communicated between the serial communication device 208 and the electrical conductor connector 202 have a lower bandwidth than the video signal communicated from the camera 84 to the electrical conductor connector 202. An LED 96 is attached to the light-mounting portion 94. The camera-mounting portion 82 is shaped and configured so that the light-mounting portion 94 can be disposed to be flush with a side 86C of the camera housing when the flex circuit assembly 60 is in the folded configuration described above.

In one embodiment, the flex circuit 80 of flex circuit assembly 60 is a two-layer circuit. In particular, the flex circuit 80 includes a first substrate and a second substrate, each having top and bottom surfaces. The first and second substrates may be composed of a flexible polyimide film. Electrically conductive material, e.g., copper, selectively disposed on the top surface of the first substrate forms a first circuit pattern, e.g., plurality of selectively connected traces. FIG. 15 illustrates a first circuit pattern for the exemplary electrical system 200 in accordance with some aspects of the invention. Electrically conductive material selectively disposed on the top surface of the second substrate forms a second circuit pattern. The first and second substrates are arranged in parallel with one another, e.g., stacked, so that the top surface of the first substrate directly opposes the bottom surface of the second substrate. The first circuit pattern and the second circuit pattern are electrically connected together by using, for example, vias, and connected with the electrical components attached to the flex circuit to form a two-layer circuit. The flex circuit 80 may be composed of other material and may be formed in other ways without departing from the scope of the present invention.

In one embodiment, the light-mounting portion 94 of the flex circuit 80 is configured to function as a heat sink. The electrically conductive material on the top surface of the first substrate and the electrically conductive material on the top surface of the second substrate and can be connected together using, for example, vias, to conduct heat from the first substrate to the second substrate. The traces formed on the second substrate of the light-mounting portion of the flex circuit can be wider relative to traces formed on other portions of the first and second substrates. For example, the wider traces may have a width of about 0.008 inches. This configuration minimizes or can reduce the likelihood of a temperature increase resulting from heat generated by the LED 96, and can allow a greater current to be provided to LED 96 to maximize or increase the illumination capability generated by the LED 96, while preventing or reducing the likelihood of any damage to the LED 96 and disturbances to the patient caused by undesirable or unacceptable high temperatures.

Referring to FIGS. 7, 8, and 14, in order to convert the flex circuit assembly 60 from the flat configuration to the folded configuration, the power-mounting portion 90 and the data-mounting portion 92 are folded toward each other at first fold lines 97 (FIGS. 7 and 8) to form the camera-mounting surface 82 between the fold lines 97. The power-mounting portion 90 and the data-mounting portion 92 can be folded a second time at second fold lines 99 so that the two portions are generally parallel and in opposing relationship to one another. The light-mounting portion 94 also can be folded inwardly toward the camera-mounting portion 82.

Alignment of the power-mounting portion 90 and the data-mounting portion 92 during assembly can be facilitated because there would be no components disposed on the inner or back surface of the flex circuit, i.e., the components are mounted on the mounting surface. The alignment of the power-mounting portion 90 and the data-mounting portion 92 also can improve the alignment of the camera to a desired orientation. The stresses and forces associated with the foldlines 97 and 99 on either side of the camera-mounting surface 82 balance each other out. As a result, the equivalent or counteracting stresses or forces induces positioning the camera 84 into a particular orientation such that the lens 88 is aligned with the cap 70 and the viewing field of view of the lens 88 is can be coincident with the axis of the tubular housing 50.

FIG. 16 is a block diagram of an exemplary flex circuit electrical system according to an alternative embodiment of the invention. As shown, the electrical conductors include four cables constituting four signal lines. The four signal lines in the illustrated embodiment include two power supply lines, e.g., a power line, 5 V, and a ground line, GND, and a differential pair, e.g., a low voltage differential signal positive line, LVDS_P, and a low voltage differential signal negative line, LVDS_N. A microcontroller 210 cooperates with camera 84 to allow integration into feeding tube assembly 10. The camera 84 includes, for example, an I2C command/control interface and a serialized digital video output interface. The microcontroller 210 can send command and control signals directly to camera 84 rather than transmitting these signals over the length of the tube. Other operating parameters described herein, such as the exemplary embodiments associated with FIGS. 11-13, may be implemented in this variant.

In FIG. 17, the electrical conductors 24 include four cables constituting four signal lines in accordance with one or more further embodiments of the invention. The camera 84 can be customized to operate automatically and/or autonomously to a predefined operating protocol when powered up or energized. In this embodiment, camera 84 does not use or rely on external, incoming command/control signals. The operating parameters of the camera 84, such as, but not limited to, exposure, white balance, can be pre-programmed, pre-set, or permanently set to custom or tailored values for, for example, a particular or predefined application. In one embodiment, for example, the custom values would typically be stored in an associated memory structure. Camera 84 can include a sequencer (not shown), such as a microcontroller integrated in the camera module itself, which has a one time programmable memory (OTPM) (not shown) that can be programmed with the custom values. Alternatively, camera 84 can include hardware registers (not shown) that have the custom values stored therein, in which case the sequencer may be optionally operable. Other operating parameters described herein may be implemented in this embodiment.

FIG. 18 illustrates yet another embodiment of an exemplary flex circuit electrical system. As shown in FIG. 18, the electrical conductors 24 include two cables constituting two signal lines. The two signal lines in the illustrated embodiment include two power supply lines, e.g., a power line, 5V, and a ground line, GND, for supplying power from a console to the flex circuit 60. The console 23 can energize or provide power to the flex circuit 60 and can regulate voltage as needed to power a radio 212A as well as the camera 84 and other components of the flex circuit 60. The camera 84 can then send imaging signals, such as video data, via radio 212A wirelessly to a corresponding radio 212B located at the console. In an alternative embodiment, the console 23 and the camera 84 can communicate bi-directionally via radios 212A, 212B to exchange, for example, non-video data. Providing power to camera 84 in this manner can eliminate the need for a limited-capacity energy source, such as a battery, in the camera module itself.

Reducing the number of signal lines as shown in FIGS. 16-18, especially when combined with a flex circuit, may reduce cost and improve reliability and ease of assembly. Further, fewer conductors can reduce the likelihood of inadvertently switching lines and incorrectly connecting them during assembly.

Referring to FIGS. 2 and 4A, the exemplarily illustrated console connector 22 includes a connector housing 228 and a printed circuit board (PCB) 230, secured to the connector housing. The PCB 230 includes an edge connector 232 extending outward from the housing 228 so that an electrical component-mounting portion of the PCB is disposed in the connector housing 228 and the edge connector is exposed and thus can be generally accessible for a connection thereto. In the illustrated embodiment, the connector housing 228 defines a tube-connection opening 234 in which the first and second tube segments 12 a, 12 b are secured, such as by an adhesive, to fluidly connect the first and second tube segments. The tube-connection opening 234 may partially define the feeding passage 14, or the feeding passage may be entirely defined by the tube segments 12 a, 12 b. In one non-limiting example, a one-piece tube 12, incorporating or in lieu of segments 12 a and 12 b, extends through the tube connection opening 234, such that the feeding passage is entirely defined by the tube and is not in fluid communication with any portion of the console connector 22. The tube 12 may be secured within the tube-connection opening 234, such as by adhesive. The console connector may be of other configurations and may be secured to the feeding tube assembly at other locations.

The electrical conductors 24 extend from the first tube segment 12 a into the connector housing 228 and are electrically connected to the PCB 230. An interface cable 242 or other signal-transmitting component can be removably connectable to the edge connector 232 to effect communication and data exchange between the console 23 and the imaging assembly 18. As explained in more detail below, an electronic memory component 243, such as electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM), may be mounted on the PCB 230 to allow information, i.e., data, to be stored and/or written thereon and to be accessible by the console 23, i.e., a microprocessor 254 of the console 23, or another external device. The PCB 230 may have additional or different electrical components mounted thereon, or the PCB may be omitted such that the electrical conductors are operatively connected to the PCB 230.

In another embodiment, a console connector may be formed on or secured to an inlet adaptor. Referring to FIG. 4B, in one embodiment of the invention, a housing 228′ of a console connector 22′ is formed integrally with an inlet adaptor 16′. The console connector housing 228′ extends laterally outward from an outlet port 34′ of the inlet adaptor 16′. Like the previous embodiment, the current console connector 22′ optionally includes a PCB 230′ with an edge connector 232′ for use in communicatively connecting the imaging assembly with the console. An electronic memory component, such as an EEPROM (not shown) may be mounted on the PCB 230′, as disclosed above and explained in more detail below. The feeding tube assembly may include a different type of connection for connecting the imaging assembly 18 to the console 23.

Referring to FIG. 3, the illustrated interface cable 242 includes first and second interface connectors 244, 246 on opposite longitudinal ends of the cable. The first interface connector 244 is releasably mateable with and electrically connectable to the edge connector 232, and the second interface connector 246 is releasably mateable with and electrically connectable to the console 23. One or both of the interface connectors 244, 246 may be discriminating connectors, i.e., non-universal connectors, that will only mate and connect with respective connectors associated with the feeding tube assembly 10 and the console 23. Moreover, the edge connector 232 or other connector may be disposed within a socket having a shape that selectively and discriminatingly mates with a corresponding, e.g., complementarily configured, first interface connector 244. The socket and the first interface connector 244 may include engagement structures, such as ribs or other components that provide a friction-fit between the connector and the socket to inhibit inadvertent disconnection. The connection between the interface cable 242 and the console connector 22 may be of other configurations without departing from the scope of the present invention.

Referring still to FIG. 3, the interface cable 242 may include a control device, such as a button 248, to allow the user to record a still image, e.g., take a snapshot image, of real time video being displayed on the console 23. Actuating the button 248 or other control device sends a signal to the console 23 instructing the console to record image information, e.g., a still image along with associated temporal information. In one example, the control device 248 can be proximate or on the first interface connector 244; for example, the control device can be closer to the first interface connector than the first interface connector 246. In one or more exemplary embodiments of the invention, the control device can be provided on the first interface connector or within 12 inches of the first interface connector. The console 23 may also include a snapshot control function, e.g., an icon, button, or other actuation device that allows the user to take and record a snapshot image using the console, that can be optionally stored in a memory structure, and which may include ancillary information such as the date and time. In some situations or embodiments it is envisioned that during insertion of the feeding tube assembly 10 in the patient, the console 23 may be located at a distance that is not within reach of the user, such as a medical practitioner. Thus, although the images, e.g., video, may be viewable on the console 23, the user may not be able to reach the console to perform additional operations or functions on the console during insertion of the feeding tube assembly 10. Accordingly, by providing a control device 248 on the interface cable 242, and more specifically, by providing a control device that is adjacent the first interface connector 244, the user can take and record a snapshot image without having to reach for the console 23. The interface cable 242 may be of other configurations without departing from the scope of the present invention.

As shown in FIG. 3, the illustrated console 23 can include a console housing 250, a console display 252, such as an LCD or other electronic display, secured to the housing, and a microprocessor 254 disposed in the housing. In the illustrated embodiment, the microprocessor 254 communicates with the imaging assembly 18 through the interface cable 242 and the electrical conductors 24. The microprocessor 254 can be configured to receive the imaging signal or video signal transmitted by the imaging assembly 18 and display real-time images associated with the imaging signal on the display. As disclosed in more detail below, the microprocessor 254 can be optionally configured to display a graphical user interface on the console display 252, or a different display. The console 23 can include one or more user input devices to allow the user or operator to communicate with the microprocessor 254 to perform various operations using the console 23. The display 252 may be a touchscreen, such as a touchscreen LCD or other types of displays, which also functions as a user input device. In one embodiment, the touchscreen allows the image to be enlarged or reduced by touching the screen with two fingers and either moving apart to enlarge or bringing together to reduce the image size. Other user input devices, in addition to or in lieu of the touchscreen display 242, such as a mouse, a keyboard, a joystick, or other user input devices, may also be provided. Some other devices may include, without limitation, the ability to accept and act on voice commands or upon gestures by the clinician. These latter input devices have the advantage of not requiring that one be able to touch the console. Other ancillary components can be utilized in the console 23, including, but not limited to power supply subsystems and serial buses.

Referring to FIG. 4A, as disclosed above the console connector 22 on the feeding tube assembly 10 may include an electronic memory component 243, such as an EEPROM, for storing and/or writing data thereon that is accessible by the console 23 or other internal or external devices associated with the feeding tube assembly, such as the enteral feeding pump. One or more of the following types of information may be provided on or written to the electronic memory component in one or more embodiments of the present invention.

In one non-limiting example, data relating to the feeding tube assembly 10 may be written, stored, or otherwise incorporated into the electronic memory component 243. For example, data indicating the lot code and/or the item code, e.g., serial number, may be written to the electronic memory component 243, and be retrievable by the console 23 as a predefined identifier. Moreover, a proprietary verification code may be included in the electronic memory component 243 to provide information that can facilitate verification to the console 23 that the feeding tube assembly 10 is a valid feeding tube to be used with the console. The console 23 may be configured, by, for example, executing instructions, to verify that the feeding tube assembly is an acceptable, proper, unexpired, or compatible feeding tube assembly before allowing operation or additional operation. Without proper validation, for example, the console 23 may inhibit images from displaying on the console if the feeding tube assembly 10 does not have valid information, such as an acceptable code or an acceptable predefined identifier. In addition, data indicating whether the feeding tube assembly 10 is sterilized may be written to the electronic memory component 243. Other information relating to the feeding tube assembly 10 may also be written to or otherwise incorporated in the electronic memory component 243. The electronic memory component may thus serve as a validation assembly or key that would provide one or more predefined identifying information, e.g., a predefined identifier, that can be utilized by the console before or during operation thereof.

In another non-limiting example, the data indicating time, i.e., time stamps, relating to the feeding tube assembly 10 may be written to the electronic memory component 243. For example, the date of manufacture of the feeding tube assembly 10 may be written to electronic memory component 243. When the feeding tube assembly 10 is connected to the console 23, such as by the interface cable 242, the console may read the data indicating the date of manufacture. In one non-limiting example, the console 23 may use the date of manufacture to determine if the feeding tube assembly 10 has exceeded its storage life. If the feeding tube assembly 10 has exceeded its predetermined storage life, the console 23 may be configured or execute programmed instructions that perform at least one of initiate an alarm, communicate a message indicating that the storage life is exceeded, and prevent viewing of images from the imaging assembly 18. In another example, upon connection of the feeding tube assembly 10 with the console 23, the console may be programmed to write a start date of service or date of first use on the electronic memory component 243. This start date can be used as a reference to determine when the predefined usage life of the feeding tube assembly 10 has been exceeded or is about to expire. For example, after writing the start date to the electronic memory component 243, the console 23 may be configured to determine the usage duration or use life of the feeding tube assembly, and compare the elapsed usage duration with an expiration date (and time) to determine the remaining usage life or whether the service life, usage time, or both, of the feeding tube assembly will expire or has expired. Other variants may involve periodically, continually, or continuously determining whether the current date or usage date exceeds the expiration date. If the console 23 determines that the usage life of the feeding tube assembly 10 has expired, then the console may be programmed to at least one of initiate an alarm, communicate a message indicating that the usage life is expired, make a record on any recorded images, and prevent viewing of images from the imaging assembly 18. The cumulative use time may be determined by writing time stamps to the electronic memory component 243 to determine the hours of actual use.

The console 23 may be configured to write other information to the electronic memory component 243. For example, the console 23 may be programmed to write a serial number or other identifier associated with the console so that other consoles and other devices, such as enteral feeding pumps, can read the electronic memory component 243 and determine which console was used with the selected feeding tube assembly 10. In another non-limiting example, the console can be configured to write to the electronic memory component 243 patient specific information including, for example, the subject's, e.g., the patient's, name, the subject's identification code, and other information relating to the patient, including but not limited to, the type of enteral product to be fed to the patient as well as the patient's feeding schedule, feeding duration, associated feeding settings, or other historical information. The patient information may be written to the electronic memory component 243 before the feeding tube assembly 10 is connected to the console 23, and the console may be programmed to read the patient information. Alternatively, the user may use the console 23 to write the patient's information to the electronic memory component 243. The patient's information may be encrypted to ensure patient confidentiality.

In yet another non-limiting example, a placement-confirmation time stamp or some other confirmation identifier may be written to the electronic memory component 243 to indicate that the proper placement of the feeding tube assembly 10 in the patient was confirmed. The console 23 may be configured to write the time stamp to the electronic memory component 243 when the user indicates to the console that the feeding tube assembly is properly located. For example, the user may press a button or perform some other operation to confirm proper placement. In addition to a time stamp or other confirmation identifier, a username or other user identification can be written to the electronic memory component 243.

FIGS. 19-31 illustrate one or more features relating to an exemplary graphical user interface of the console. One or more of the features described herein may be incorporated into various embodiments of the invention. FIG. 19 is a flow chart illustrating the operations of the graphical user interface when the console 23 is powered on for the very first time, or when the console is activated after a predetermined time period of non-use by a user. The predetermined period of non-use can be one month, six months, or even one year. Other triggering conditions that may affect a first time start may involve a loss of power.

As illustrated, a user interface screen prompts a user to indicate whether the user is the very first user of the console 23 (“initial user”), or whether the user has already been associated with the console. If the user is the initial user, the console 23 grants the initial user administrator status along with associated privileges for accessing all or predetermined features of the console. Accordingly, at 302, the initial user is prompted to select a language (labeled “Language”) that will be displayed on the user interface screens to communicate with users. At 304, the initial user is prompted to enter the current date and time, and optionally to specify a format for displaying the time (labeled “Date/Time”). At 306, the initial user is optionally prompted to enter time tracking options for display by the user interface (labeled “Time Display”). The initial user can select one of the following options: the current time of day is tracked and displayed by the console 23; the elapsed amount time for the current procedure being conducted by the feeding tube assembly 10, e.g., initiated when patient data is entered, is tracked and displayed by the console; both, the current time of day and the elapsed amount of time for the current procedure being conducted are tracked and displayed by the console. At 308, the initial user is optionally prompted to set up an administrator account by entering a username and a password.

If the user indicates that the user is not the very first user of the console 23, the console, at 310, presents to the user a log-in user interface screen. The user enters a username and password. If the user enters a valid username and password associated therewith, the user is logged in. If the console 23 determines that the username and password are not valid, the console presents the user with a log-in retry, i.e., message and another opportunity to log in. In one embodiment, after a predefined number of log-in attempts, the console 23 may be reset; all patient data, user data, and device data may be deleted, locked or becomes otherwise inaccessible. If the user is successfully logged in, at 312, the user is presented with a main selection user interface screen. The main selection user interface screen can present the user with one or more of the following navigational options: utility functions, procedure screen, file functions, and logout. The navigational options may be presented via text and/or graphical icons. In addition, a portion of the main selection user interface screen (labeled “Preview Video” or graphically represented as a movie reel icon, for example) is dedicated to providing the user with video data if video data is being received from the imaging assembly 18 when the main selection user interface screen is being accessed. As described below, this generally occurs when the user selects the main selection user interface screen after initiating a procedure.

In one embodiment, the console 23 is configured to recognize a plurality of classes or statuses of users and to limit operations that may be performed by the console as a function of a class associated with each user. For example, the console 23 may be configured to recognize four classes of users: operators, administrators, approvers, and maintainers. The console 23 can be configured to authorize the operator class of users to view video data that is received from the imaging assembly 18. The console 23 can be configured to authorize the administrator class of users to create or establish user accounts or other operator accounts, along with respectively associated data storage substructures, and to view video data that is received from the imaging assembly 18. The console 23 is configured to authorize the approver class of users to view video data or imaging data that is received from the imaging assembly 18 and to annotate approval data onto the video data or imaging data received from the imaging assembly. The console 23 can be configured to authorize the maintainer class of users to perform maintenance functions to the console such as software updates. However, the console 23 only authorizes the maintainer class of users to operate the console if the console is not storing any patient data, e.g., patient data must be deleted from console before a maintainer user is authorized to operate the console.

If the user selects the utility functions from the main selection user interface screen, a utility functions user interface screen can be presented to the user. The options presented to the user on the utility functions user interface screen are typically based on the class or status associated with the user. If the user is an operator or an approver, the user can be presented with a utility functions user interface screen. The console can then provide the user with the “Language” option and the “Preview Video” feature discussed above. The utility functions user interface screen also can provide the user with a “User Manager” option which allows the user to navigate to a user manager navigation user interface screen that allows the user to change his/her password. If the user is an administrator, a utility functions user interface screen presented to the user has the “Language,” “Date/Time,” “Time Display,” and “Preview Video” options discussed above. A “User Manager” option can also be provided, which allows the user to navigate to a user manager user interface screen. A user manager user interface for the administrator allows the administrator to add a user via the user interfaces. The utility functions user interface screen presented to the administrator also can also have an option, labeled “Reset/Erase Console,” for resetting, e.g., deleting patient data, user data, and device data, or erasing the console, e.g., deleting patient data and device data, and for performing a software update, labeled “SW Update”. In addition to the options presented to an administrator user, the utility functions user interface screen presented to a maintainer user additionally provides the maintainer user with the option to perform maintainer functions (labeled “Maintainer Functions”). For example, “Maintainer Functions” may include software debugging functions.

Referring again to the main selection user interface screen if the user selects the “Procedure Screen” option, a patient information user interface screen is displayed to the user via the console 23. The patient information user interface screen prompts the user to enter a name and identification for the patient for which the procedure is being performed. If the user enters the name and identification of the patient, the procedure main user interface screen is displayed to the user and the console 23 begins receiving video data from the imaging assembly 18 of the feeding tube assembly 10 so long as the feeding tube assembly 10 is correctly connected to the console. If the user does not enter the name and identification of the patient, e.g., leaves the Patient Name and Patient ID fields blank, the user is presented with the blank patient information user interface screen. The blank patient information user interface screen allows the user to select to proceed without the entering the patient information or to enter the patient information. If the user selects to enter the patient information, the user can be re-directed to the patient information user interface screen. If the user selects to proceed without entering the patient information, the procedure main user interface screen is displayed to the user and the console 23 begins receiving video data from the imaging assembly 18 of the feeding tube assembly so long as the feeding tube assembly 10 is correctly connected to the console. If the feeding tube assembly 10 is not connected or is incorrectly connected to the console, the user is presented with an error message.

In one embodiment, the patient information may be manually entered by the user. In another embodiment, the console 23 may include a bar code scanner (not shown) for scanning the patient's bar code wristband to obtain the patient information. In yet another embodiment, the patient information can be provided on the electronic memory component 243. After communicatively connecting the feeding tube assembly 10 to the console 23, the console may read and record the patient information from the electronic memory component 243. This embodiment may be combined with the bar code scanner embodiment and/or the manual-input embodiment to provide a cross-check for the patient to ensure that the correct medical procedure, e.g., enteral feeding, is being provided to the correct patient.

As illustrated in FIGS. 20 and 21, alternative procedure main user interface screens can display the video data or the rendered or processed imaging data being received by the console 23 from the imaging assembly 18. The procedure main user interface screen also can display any of the current time if selected by the user at 350, the patient name and identification number if entered by the user at 352 and 354, respectively, and the time elapsed for the current procedure if selected by the user at 356. The time elapsed for the current procedure begins when the user enters the patient name and identification or selects to proceed without entering the patient name and identification. The procedure main user interface screen also includes an option, e.g., icon or button with text, for taking a snapshot at 358. The snapshot option 358 allows a user to select to store the current frame of the video data or the rendered imaging data collected by the console from the imaging assembly 18. Identifying information about the snapshot may be automatically provided and/or entered by the user on the console for later identification of the snapshot. As disclosed above, the interface cable 242 may include a control device 248, which may be provided in addition to or in lieu of the snapshot option 358 on the console 23. At 360, the procedure main user interface screen provides the user with the file functions option (labeled “File Functions” or illustrated as a folder icon) which allows the user to access files stored by the console. The “File Functions” option may also be accessed directly from the main selection user interface screen. Upon selecting the “File Functions” options from either the procedure main user interface screen of FIGS. 19A and 19B, for example, or the main selection user interface screen, the user is directed to the file functions user interface screen.

The file functions user interface screen presents a user with a list of directories stored on the console, and also includes the “Preview Video” feature discussed above. Each directory represents the video data or the rendered imaging data that is stored in connection with one particular feeding tube assembly 10. In one embodiment, the console 23 can read a serial number or other unique identifier from the console connector 22. The serial number or other identifier may be specific to the feeding tube assembly 10 such that it distinguishes it from all other feeding tube assemblies. In the illustrated embodiment, the console connector 22 includes the electronic memory component 243 that stores the identifier for the feeding tube assembly 10. All of the data that is received from the feeding tube assembly 10 having a particular serial number or other identifier can be stored under a single directory in the console 23. Data that is received from a feeding tube assembly 10 having a different serial number or other identifier can be stored under a different directory.

A user may select a directory for viewing and/or editing from the file functions user interface screen. When the directory is selected from the file functions user interface screen, the user is directed to the file functions directory selected user interface screen (alternative embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 22 and 23). This user interface presents the list of files, e.g., image files, associated with the selected directory. The image files represent the images selected by the user via the snapshot option. The user is able to select at least one file from the image directory and export the file via the “Export” option 380, rename the file via the “Rename” option 382, delete the file via the “Delete” option 384, and annotate or view the file via the “Annotate/View” option 386.

If the user selects the “Export” option 380 from the file functions user interface screen, the raw/JPEG user interface screen (alternative embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 24 and 25) is displayed. This user interface presents the list of files associated with the previously selected directory and allows the user to select one or more files. The user interface allows the user to specify a particular console universal serial bus (USB) port at 390 through which the selected files will be exported. A suitable number of busses may be provided. In one embodiment two, stacked busses are provided. In another embodiment, the console 23 may additionally or alternatively be configured to export the selected files wirelessly to a receiving device and/or to export the selected files to the receiving device via an Ethernet connection. At 392, the user is also presented at 392 with the option to delete the selected files from the console once the selected files have been exported. At 394 and 396, respectively, the user is prompted to select whether to export the file as an uncompressed file, e.g., raw file, or to export the file as a compressed file, e.g., JPEG file.

If the user selects the “Rename” option 382 from the file functions user interface screen, a rename user interface screen is presented to the user to allow the user to rename the file. In one embodiment the default format of the file is DATE_SUD-SN_PT-NAME_PTID_TIME_SEQ#.img, wherein

    • DATE=the current date (e.g., yyymmdd) set to the console via the “Date/Time” feature
    • SUD-SN=single use device serial number (e.g., the identifier retrieved by the console 23 from the console connector 22)
    • PT-NAME=patient name as entered by the user via the patient information user interface screen
    • PT-ID=patient identifier as entered by the user via the patient information user interface screen
    • TIME=the current time (e.g., hhmmss) set to the console via the “Date/Time” feature
    • SEQ#=the image number as received from the imaging assembly, wherein the first image sent from the imaging assembly has an image number of 1 and the image number for each image received thereafter is incremented by one.

In one embodiment, the “Rename” option 382 allows the user to change only the SEQ# portion of the file name.

If the user selects the “Delete” option 384 from the file functions user interface screen, the delete user interface screen is presented to the user to allow the user to delete files. The delete user interface screen can provide the user with a list of the files included in the previously selected directory. The user can select one more files from the directory and then select the delete option, e.g., delete button or icon. When the user selects the delete option from the delete user interface screen, the user is prompted via the delete confirmation user interface screen, to confirm that the selected files should be deleted from the console. Once the user confirms that the selected files should be deleted, the selected filed are deleted from the console.

If the user selects the “Annotate/View” option 386 from the file functions user interface screen, a view user interface screen as shown in the alternative embodiments of FIGS. 26 and 27 is displayed. The view user interface screen can display the image stored in the selected file. The view user interface screen also can provide the user with an “Annotate” option at 400 and a “Compare to Video” option at 402. If the user selects the “Compare to Video” option at 402, the console 23 presents a compare user interface screen to the user (alternative embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 28 and 29). A first portion 404 of the compare user interface screen displays the image stored in the selected file. A second portion 406 of the compare user interface screen can display video data or rendered imaging data currently being received by the console from the imaging assembly 18. The images on both the first and second portions 404, 406 can in one embodiment be zoomed or panned. By comparing a previously captured image illustrating prior tube placement within a patient to current video data illustrating current tube placement within the patient, a user can determine whether the tube has migrated within the patient. Additionally or alternatively, a user can compare an image of a previously placed tube to current information representative of a current tube placement to facilitate assessment as to whether the tube currently appears to be placed appropriately. It should be noted that the first portion 404 and the second portion 406 of the compare user interface screen are illustrated as being horizontally aligned; however, the first and second portions, 404 and 406 maybe alternatively arranged with respect to one another, e.g., vertically aligned, and may be modified by the user without departing from the scope of the invention.

The compare user interface screen provides the user with an “Annotate” option at 408 and a “Procedure Screen” option at 410. If the user selects the “Procedure Screen” option 410, the console redirects the user to the patient information user interface screen described above. If the user selects the “Annotate” option 408 from the compare user interface screen (FIGS. 28 and 29), or the “Annotate” option 400 from the view user interface screen (FIGS. 26 and 27), the console presents the user with an annotate user interface screen illustrated in the alternative embodiments of FIGS. 30 and 31. The annotate user interface screen presents the user with a “Text” option at 420, and “Line” option at 422, and “Approve” option at 424, an “Undo” option at 426, and an “Undo All” option at 428.

If the user selects the “Text” option 422, the annotate user interface screen allows the user to indicate, e.g., by touching or clicking, the portion of the image being displayed on the annotate user interface screen where the user would like to place the center of the text. After receiving the user input indicating the location of the text, the annotate user interface screen displays additional options to the user. In particular, the annotate user interface screen provides the user with the option to select text naming an anatomical structure from a text list of anatomical structures. The annotate user interface also provides the user with the option to add free-text to the image. If the user selects text naming an anatomical structure from the text list, the selected text appears on the screen centered over the user-selected text location. If the user selects to add free-text to the image, the annotate user interface screen adds a keyboard to the annotate user interface screen and allows the user to enter text accordingly. If the keyboard on the annotate user interface screen covers the user-selected text location, the text entered by the user is moved upward until the user finishes entering the text. Once the text entry has been completed, the entered text can be displayed on the screen centered over the user-selected text location.

If the user selects the “Line” option 422 the annotate user interface screen allows the user to indicate, e.g., by touching or clicking, the portion of the image being displayed on the annotate user interface screen where the user would like to place a first end of a line segment. The user may then indicate, e.g., via a drag and drop operation, where the second end of the line segment should be located on the annotate user interface screen. If the “Undo” option 426 is selected, the last unsaved annotated item, e.g., text, line segment, is removed from the image. This operation can be repeated until there are no unsaved annotated items remaining in the image. If the “Undo All” option 428 option is selected, all unsaved annotated items are removed from the image.

If the user selects the “Approve” option 424, the user can be re-directed to the approver user interface screen. The approver user interface screen prompts a user to enter his/her username and password. Once the username and password are entered, the console attempts to authenticate the user as being associated with approver status. If the user is authenticated, a message, such as “Approved by USERNAME on DATE at TIME” is added to the image, e.g., upper left of image beneath the patient identification information, wherein

    • USERNAME=the username of the current user as entered in the approver user interface screen
    • DATE=the current date (e.g., yyymmdd) set to the console via the “Date/Time” feature
    • TIME=the current time (e.g., hhmmss) set to the console via the “Date/Time” feature

Once an approver user has indicated that he/she approves the placement of the tube, the patient is allowed to be provided with nutrients via the feeding tube assembly 10. For example, the console may be configured to provide a signal that allows operation of feeding pump.

The order of execution or performance of the operations in embodiments of the invention illustrated and described herein is not essential, unless otherwise specified. That is, the operations may be performed in any order, unless otherwise specified, and embodiments of the invention may include additional or fewer operations than those disclosed herein. For example, it is contemplated that executing or performing a particular operation before, contemporaneously with, or after another operation is within the scope of aspects of the invention.

Embodiments of the invention may be implemented with computer-executable instructions. The computer-executable instructions may be organized into one or more computer-executable components or modules. Aspects of the invention may be implemented with any number and organization of such components or modules. For example, aspects of the invention are not limited to the specific computer-executable instructions or the specific components or modules illustrated in the figures and described herein. Other embodiments of the invention may include different computer-executable instructions or components having more or less functionality than illustrated and described herein.

Referring to FIGS. 32A-42, another embodiment of the imaging feeding tube assembly is generally indicated at 510. This embodiment is similar to the various embodiments disclosed above, and like components are indicated by corresponding reference numerals plus 500. Referring to FIGS. 32A and 32B, the imaging feeding tube assembly 510 includes a feeding tube 512, a inlet adaptor, generally indicated at 516, adjacent a second longitudinal end, i.e., a proximal end, of the tube, an imaging assembly, generally indicated at 518, adjacent a first longitudinal end, i.e., a distal end, of the tube, and a console connector, generally indicated at 522, secured to the tube intermediate the inlet adaptor 516 and the imaging assembly 518. The imaging feeding tube assembly 510 may be used with the console 23, or a different console or display, for displaying one or more images generated by the imaging assembly 518, as disclosed above. The inlet adaptor 516 is analogous to the inlet adaptor 16, and therefore, reference is made to the prior inlet adaptor for an explanation of various features of the inlet adaptor 516. Unless otherwise specified below, disclosures relating to the components of the previous feeding tube assembly embodiment 10, set forth above herein, also apply to the components of the current feeding tube assembly embodiment 512.

The tube 512 can be a one-piece tube. Referring to FIG. 33, electrical conductors 524 (broadly, a signal transmission component) extend longitudinally along substantially the entire length of the tube 512 from the imaging assembly 518 to the console connector 522. In the illustrated embodiment, there are six electrical cables 524 for powering the imaging assembly 518 and transmitting data between the console, e.g., console 23, and the imaging assembly, although there may be more or less cables without departing from the scope of the present invention. In the illustrated embodiment the cables 524 are disposed in three separate and distinct conductor passages 526. The cables 524 are provided in pairs, with each pair being disposed within the same conductor passage 526 in the tube wall. In one example, the cables 524 and the tube 512 may be co-extruded so that the cables are embedded in the tube wall. After co-extrusion, the cables 524 may be laser ablated to remove the respective jackets and/or mechanically stripped to expose the wires so that the cables can be electrically connected to the imaging assembly 518 and the console connector 522.

Referring to FIGS. 34-37, the imaging assembly 518 can include an elongate housing 550; a flex circuit assembly, generally indicated at 560 (FIG. 35), including a camera 584 and a light source 596 mounted thereon and received in the housing; and a cap 570 attached to the camera at a first longitudinal end, e.g., distal end, of the imaging assembly. In this embodiment, a flex circuit 580 of the flex circuit assembly 560 can be a rigid-flex circuit including one or more space apart rigid structures 561 mounted on the flex circuit which inhibit bending. The electrical components, such as those described above with respect to the previous embodiment, are mounted on the rigid structures 561. The rigid-flex circuit 560 is capable of bending at bending locations 581 between the rigid structures 561 such that the rigid-flex circuit is capable of selectively deforming solely at the bending locations 581 along the length of the folded rigid-flex circuit. The light source 596 and the camera 584 are mounted on the same distal camera-mounting portion 582 of the rigid-flex circuit 560, which extends generally transverse to the longitudinal axis of the imaging assembly 518. In the illustrated embodiment, the camera-mounting portion 582 can have one of the rigid structures 561 mounted thereon, to which the camera 584 and the light source 596 can be secured.

Electrical components for operating the imaging assembly 518 may be similar or the same as the electrical components disclosed above for operating the previous embodiment of the imaging assembly 18. In addition to those electrical components, the rigid-flex circuit 560 includes decoupling capacitors, generally indicated at 598, for providing a stable supply voltage with low noise to the camera 84. In the illustrated embodiment, the decoupling capacitors 598 are embedded in the camera-mounting portion 582 of the rigid-flex circuit 560 between layers thereof. In this way, the decoupling capacitors 598 are immediately adjacent the camera 584.

Referring to FIGS. 40 and 42, the cap 570 may be similar to the cap 70 except that the cavity in the cap 570 is typically sized and shaped for receiving the camera 584 only, without the camera and the LED 596 as in the previous embodiment. In addition, referring to FIG. 40, the cap 570 includes a plurality of radial locking ribs 589 received in corresponding radial locking grooves 600 formed on the interior surface of the housing 550. The engagement between the locking ribs 589 and the locking grooves 600 inhibit longitudinal movement between the housing 550 and the cap 570. The cap 570 may be of other configurations without departing from the scope of the present invention.

In one non-limiting example (FIG. 40), the housing 550 may be molded and include longitudinally spaced apart reinforcing structures 591, i.e., wall portions of housing 550 with increased thicknesses, and bending locations 593 with wall thickness of housing 550 less that at structures 591 disposed between the reinforcing structures. The reinforcing structures 591 are typically disposed adjacent the electronic components and the rigid structures on the rigid-flex circuit 580, while the bending locations 593 are typically disposed adjacent the bending locations on the rigid-flex circuit. Through this configuration, the cap 550 further promotes bending of the imaging assembly 518 at selected locations along its length and inhibits bending at longitudinal locations where the electronic components are located. The difference in wall thickness of housing 550 with respect to structures 591 and locations 593 can be less than about 25%, less than about 10%, or less than about 5%.

In another non-limiting example (FIG. 41), the housing 550 may be molded over the cap 570, the rigid-flex circuit assembly 560, and the imaging assembly connector 520 to form an integral imaging assembly 518. For example, the cap 570, the rigid-flex circuit assembly 560, and the imaging assembly connector 520 may be placed in a fixture of an overmolding process, and then the housing 550 may be molded over the components. The material for overmolding may comprise urethane or other material. In yet another embodiment, the housing 550 may be pre-formed and the cap 570 and the imaging assembly connector 520 may be secured to the respective ends of the housing, such as by solvent bonding or in other suitable ways.

Referring to FIGS. 32A, 32B, 38, and 39, as with the previous feeding tube assembly 10, the current feeding tube assembly 510 includes an imaging assembly connector, generally indicated at 520. Like the previous embodiment of the imaging assembly connector 20, the current imaging assembly connector 520 defines a feeding passage outlet 540 that is in fluid communication with the feeding passage 514 of the tube 512. In the illustrated embodiment, the first longitudinal end of the tube 512 is received and secured in the feeding passage outlet 540 of the imaging assembly connector 520 to provide fluid communication therebetween. The outlet 540 is closed adjacent to prevent liquid nutrients from entering the imaging assembly 518. Thus, the imaging assembly 518 is not in fluid communication with the feeding passage 514. Instead, the feeding solution is dispensed laterally from the outlet 540 and to the patient (only one such lateral opening is shown in FIGS. 32 and 38).

Referring to FIGS. 38 and 39, a first longitudinal end, e.g., a distal end, of the imaging assembly connector 520 defines an alignment slot 521 for receiving a proximal end of the rigid-flex circuit assembly 560. The alignment slot 521 facilitates proper positioning of the rigid-flex circuit assembly 560 relative to the imaging assembly connector 520. The imaging assembly connector 520 may be of other configurations without departing from the scope of the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 42, the console connector 522 can be secured to the feeding tube 512 and can extend laterally outward therefrom. The present illustrated console connector 522 includes a housing 728, and a PCB 730, an inlet adaptor connector 800, and a feeding tube connector 802 secured to the housing. A connector, such as a USB port connector 532, may be mounted on the PCB 730 for communicatively connecting an interface cable to the PCB 730. In another embodiment, the PCB 730 may include an edge connector, as disclosed above with respect to the previous embodiment. An electronic memory component 743 may be mounted on the PCB 730. The housing 728 can define a socket 736 having a size and shape for mateably receiving an interface connector (not shown) having a corresponding size and shape. A connector cap 737 can be tethered to the housing 728 for selectively closing the socket 736 when it is not in use.

The housing 728 may be molded over the inlet adaptor connector 800 and the feeding tube connector 802 to secure the connectors to the housing. The proximal end of the feeding tube 12 is secured within a connection passage 804 in the feeding tube connector 802. The inlet adaptor connector 800 connects the inlet adaptor 516 to the console connector 522 and defines a passage 806 that fluidly connects the inlet adaptor 516 to the feeding tube 512. In another embodiment (not shown), the one-piece feeding tube 512 may pass through an opening in the console connector 522 and connect directly to the inlet adaptor 516. The housing 728 may be secured to the feeding tube 512 using adhesive or in other ways. The housing 728 may be secured to the inlet adaptor 516, more specifically, to the distal end of the inlet adaptor so that the housing abuts the inlet adaptor. The console connector 522 may have other configurations without departing from the scope of the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 43, another embodiment of an interface cable for connecting the feeding tube assembly 10, 510 to the console 23 is indicated at 742. The interface cable 742 is similar to the interface cable 242 of the previous embodiment. Like the previous interface able embodiment 242, the present interface cable 742 can include first and second interface connectors 744, 746 on opposite ends of the cable. The illustrated first interface connector 744 is sized and shaped to mate, e.g., to be selectively inserted into, the socket 736 of the console connector 522 and to make connection with the USB port connector 532, or an edge connector or another connector associated with the console connector. The first interface connector 744 includes annular ribs or beads 770 that engage an interior surface of the socket 736 to form a substantially liquid-tight seal therewith to prevent the ingress of fluid into the socket. The second interface connector 746 is sized and shaped to mate, e.g., to be selectively inserted into, with a corresponding socket of the console 23 and to make connection with the console. The first and second interface connectors 744, 746 and the corresponding sockets 736 can be configured so that the first interface connector 744 is not mateable with the socket on the console 23 and the second interface connector 746 is not mateable with the socket 736 of the console connector 522. The interface cable 742 may be of other configurations without departing from the scope of the present invention.

In the illustrated embodiment, first interface connector 744 can include an imaging signal buffer component 750, e.g., an I2C buffer component, which drives imaging signals, e.g., I2C signals, between the imaging assembly 18, 518 and the console. By locating the imaging signal buffer component 750 in the first interface connector 744, the capacitance is split approximately equally between the conductors 24, 524, e.g., wires in the cables, in the feeding tube assembly 10, 510 and the conductors, e.g., wires, in the interface cable 742. This configuration minimizes or reduces capacitance in any one segment of the system and maximizes or improves the image signal integrity. Moreover, the first interface connector 744 and the imaging signal buffer component 750 will be desirably adjacent the feeding tube assembly 10, 510 because the console connector 22, 522 is mateable only with the first interface connector, and not the second interface connector 746. The interface cable 742 may not include an imaging signal buffer component 750 and may be of other configurations without departing from the scope of the present invention.

One or more aspects of the invention can involve a catheter can be feeding tube having an imaging assembly with an imaging device or sensor. The imaging assembly can generate and transmit imaging signals generated by the imaging device. The system can include a console adapted to receive the imaging signals and present images corresponding to the imaging signals on a display. Further, the console can be configured to selectively present a reference menu on the display including menu items. The menu items correspond to reference materials comprising any one or more of photographs, video recordings, audio recordings, diagrams, animations, and text. The materials provides information about any one or more of anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, contact information, help information, and support information. One or more aspects of the invention can be directed to an imaging catheter system, comprising a feeding tube having an inlet connectable to a source of feeding fluid, an outlet distal from and fluidly connected to the inlet through a feeding passage, and an imaging device disposed proximate the outlet, the imaging device configured to generate and transmit imaging signals corresponding to an image of an anatomy of a patient; and a console comprising a display and memory having stored therein a plurality of reference materials selected from the group consisting of audiovisual data such as videos, audio, and photographs, textual data such as diagrams, animations, and text, and combinations thereof. In some cases, each of the plurality of reference materials can provide information about at least one of anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, and contact information. Preferably, the console is configured to receive the imaging signals, present at least a portion of at least one image corresponding to the imaging signals on the display, and present a reference menu on the display including menu items corresponding to at least one of the reference materials. The at least one of the plurality of reference materials can include a photograph showing an anatomical landmark. The anatomical landmark can be one of a bronchus, larynx, a tracheal ring, cardia, pyloric sphincter or pylorus, cricoid cartilage, bronchial split, esophageal junction, stomach folds, duodenal folds, and a pyloric orifice.

One or more further aspects of the invention can be directed to a method of facilitating use of or providing a feeding tube assembly. The method can comprise providing a feeding tube having an inlet connectable to a source of feeding fluid, an outlet distal from and fluidly connected to the inlet through a feeding passage, and an imaging device disposed proximate the outlet, the imaging device configured to generate and transmit imaging signals corresponding to an image of an anatomy of a patient; and providing a console comprising a display and memory having stored therein a plurality of reference materials selected from the group consisting of photographs, video recordings, audio recordings, diagrams, animations, text, and combinations thereof. In accordance with some particular embodiments, each of said reference material can provide information about at least one of anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, and contact information. In some cases, the console can be configured to receive the imaging signals, present at least a portion of at least one image corresponding to the imaging signals on the display, and present a reference menu on the display including menu items corresponding to at least one of the reference materials. In some cases, the console can be configured to simultaneously present on the display a photograph from the plurality of reference materials and a video image corresponding to the image signals from the imaging assembly, wherein the photograph provides a representative anatomical marker or landmark. The method, in accordance with further aspects of the invention, can comprise at least one of storing additional reference materials into the memory, removing at least one reference material from the memory, and replacing the memory with an updated memory, the updated memory having stored therein at least one updated reference material. The method, in accordance with other further cases, can comprise receiving the console from a user; and after receiving the console, at least one of storing additional reference materials into the memory, removing at least one reference materials from the memory, and replacing the memory with an updated memory, the updated memory having stored therein at least one updated reference material.

Referring to FIG. 46, an imaging catheter system (broadly, a medical system) is generally designated in its entirety by the reference number 810. The system 810 includes an imaging catheter, generally designated 812, and a console 814, operatively coupled to the imaging catheter by, for example, an interface cable 816. The imaging catheter 812 can include an imaging assembly 820 having an imaging device 822 for generating imaging signals corresponding to objects in the field of view thereof. The imaging device is typically an optical sensor and can be a camera or an optical fiber. The imaging assembly may also include elements such as LEDs for illuminating or providing lighting to the field of view. The imaging assembly can further comprise one or more components such as a processor, a memory device to facilitate capture, transformation of the image of the field of view into imaging signals, and transmission of the imaging signals. The imaging device generates and transmits the imaging signals to the console 14 through cable 816 or wirelessly through any suitable communications procedure or protocol. Other cables may be used without departing from the scope of the present invention.

The console receives and converts the imaging signals from the imaging assembly and presents the images on a display 830 in a housing 832 of the console. As exemplarily shown in FIG. 47, the console can also include a power switch 834 for selectively energizing the console. Other consoles may be used without departing from the scope of the present invention. The display preferably responds to one or more user input or commands, e.g., double tapping the display, to activate and present one or more menus offering a plurality of selections for operating the console and imaging assembly. For example, one of the user inputs causes the display to present a reference menu as illustrated in FIG. 47.

Selections or entries 840 a, 840, and 840 c may be presented for selection and reviewing stored images of prior procedures performed using the system. As illustrated in FIG. 47, the console can be configured to include and provide a selection 42 titled, “REFERENCE_LIBRARY”, which calls from memory a reference menu including menu items corresponding to a library or plurality of reference materials stored in the console memory. For example, the library of reference materials, which may include one or more group of reference materials, may include, for example, photographs, video recordings, audio recordings, diagrams, animations, and/or text. The reference materials provide any one or more of information about anatomy, preparing a patient, preparing the imaging catheter for use, placing the imaging catheter in a patient, console preparation, console operation, console features, overall system operation, overall system features, and/or contact information such as addresses and/or phone numbers that may be used to access further help. Other selections or information that may be provided in the menu may be viewed by manipulating a scroll bar 844 positioned proximate selections 840 a-840 c and 842 on the display. In some embodiments, command, instruction, and/or navigation icons such as a back icon 850 and a view icon 852, can be provided along the bottom of the display.

In some embodiments (not shown), it is envisioned that the display 30 simultaneously presents the reference menu 42 with images generated from the imaging signals provided by the imaging device. In other embodiments (not shown), it is envisioned that the display 30 presents the reference menu upon sensing a unique input, such as when a user touches the display twice within a preselected period of time. In yet other embodiments (not shown), it is envisioned that the display 30 presents an icon that presents the reference menu when selected by the user. Alternatively, the console 14 may include a button that may be pressed to cause the display 30 to present the reference menu.

In some embodiments, the console may present reference materials, such as those identified above, simultaneously with the images generated from the imaging signal. For example, as exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 29, a photograph of a typical anatomical feature or marker may be displayed on a portion of the display and live video generated from imaging signals transmitted by the imaging assembly may be displayed on another portion of the display. Thus, a user can identify where the imaging assembly is positioned in the patient by comparing the live video generated from the imaging signals transmitted by the imaging assembly against a reference photograph including anatomical feature or anatomical landmark. Further, as exemplarily shown in FIG. 31, the reference materials, such as a photograph 864, may be presented on the display with one or textual references or indicia 866, providing identifying information or description, such as the names of the target anatomical feature or anatomical marker. The anatomical marker can be any one of a bronchus, a larynx, a tracheal ring, a cardia, a pyloric sphincter, and a pyloric orifice. As is further apparent by a comparison of FIG. 29 and FIG. 31, the visual reference materials may be presented on only a portion of the display or on the entire display. When only a portion of the display is used to present visual reference materials as shown in FIG. 3, other indicators, such as icons 420, 422, 424, 426, and 428) and one or more visual status identifiers 872 a, 872 b, and 872 c may be shown on the display. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 31, when the entire display is used to present visual reference materials, any one or more of icons 420, 422, 424, 426, and 428 and any one or more of visual status identifiers 772 a-872 c may be presented over the visual reference materials. In other cases, for example, the console can be operated by selecting a menu to display a copy of a photograph of a representative bronchus, as exemplarily presented in FIG. 49A; a copy of a photograph of a representative stomach with stomach folds, as exemplarily presented in FIG. 49B; and a copy of a photograph of a representative tracheal rings, as exemplarily presented in FIG. 49C, without any identifiers or indicia.

The reference materials may also present instructive guidance. For example, the console can be configured to be operated to display a schematic illustration including contrasting correct and incorrect paths, as shown in FIG. 48. Further embodiments contemplate the simultaneous presentation of the schematic illustration of FIG. 48 adjacent real-time or live video images from the imaging apparatus to provide further guidance during use.

In some embodiments of the invention, the materials may be located or stored in a directory having a name corresponding to the particular reference material. For example, portions of a system operation manual could be stored in a directory entitled, “SYSTEM_OPERATION_MANUAL”. In some embodiments, the reference material may be saved as read-only files, ensuring the content remains unchanged. Alternatively, oral comments, marginalia, and other annotations may be entered into reference materials and stored as a new file, with or without particular association or links to any of one or more of each of the reference materials in the reference library.

It is further envisioned that reference material files could be modified when updating software. Thus, each software release could also be used to update and improve reference materials for the system. In other cases, the system that has been used in the field can be sent by a user to a servicing, manufacturing, or repair facility whereat the additional reference information may be included in the memory, with or without removing any stored or existing reference material, or portions thereof. In other cases, the received system at the servicing, manufacturing, or repair facility may be updated by having memory components therein replaced, thereby providing updated reference materials.

Depending upon the particular procedure for which the imaging catheter system is used, the system may also include, for example, a conventional feeding tube assembly having a feeding tube for delivering enteral feeding liquid to a patient. A generally conventional feeding tube includes a feeding passage extending between an inlet and an outlet. The imaging catheter may be positioned adjacent the outlet of the feeding tube for generating imaging signals corresponding to a particular portion of the patient's alimentary canal, e.g., a patient's stomach. In some cases, it would be desirable that the imaging assembly is sealed from the feeding passage of the feeding tube to inhibit enteral feeding liquid in the feeding passage from entering the imaging assembly, causing potential damage. In use, reference material, such as video, photographs, or diagrams, is periodically accessed on the display to verify proper placement of the medical instrument in the patient.

One or more further aspects of the invention can be directed to computer-readable media accessible by the console and having stored thereon a plurality of data structures corresponding to reference materials in a reference library, wherein each of the reference material can be audiovisual information including, for example, photographs, video files, audio files, and combinations thereof, as well as textual or graphical information including, for example, diagrams, sketches, and textual information. The reference materials of the reference library in the computer-readable media provides information regarding at least one of an anatomical reference or feature or anatomical landmark, operating instructions of at least one of the imaging catheter, the console, the feeding tube, and contact information regarding at least one of the system, the feeding tube, and the console. Still further aspects of the invention can be directed to providing the computer-readable media having stored thereon the plurality of data structures including the reference library of reference materials, as well as updating the reference library of reference materials by adding additional to or replacing the existing reference materials with updated or revised reference materials. Non-limiting examples of computer-readable media include memory devices and can be optical media and magnetic media, any of which can be in erasable, programmable, or permanent.

Any of the reference materials of the reference library can be stored in any container format or file type such as, but not limited to aiff, wav, xmf, fits, tiff, avi, asf, wma, wmv, 3gp, flv, f4v, iff, jpg, bmp, mpeg, mp4, rm, ogg, pdf, rtf, and txt, any of which can be in any of native and compressed forms. Any of such reference materials can be protected from modification or deletion in the field by a healthcare provider but can be modified, revised or deleted by qualified technician at, for example, a repair or manufacturing facility, or at a servicing facility.

As explained, the console may be configured to recognize a plurality of classes, i.e., statuses, of users, and to limit operations that may be performed by the console as a function of a class associated with each user. For example, the console may be configured to recognize four classes of users: operators, administrators, approval, and maintenance. Depending upon the user class, the reference menus may be changed to adapt to the skill and needs of the user. For example, the console can be configured to authorize administrator class users to create or establish user accounts or other operator accounts, along with respectively associated data storage substructures, and to view video data. The console may be configured to authorize approval class users to view video data and to annotate approval data onto the video data. The console can be configured to authorize maintenance class users to perform maintenance functions to the console such as software updates and time adjustments. The console could be programmed to only authorize maintenance class users to operate the console if no patient data is stored on the console.

Having described aspects of the invention in detail, it will be apparent that modifications and variations are possible without departing from the scope of aspects of the invention as defined in the appended claims. As various changes could be made in the above constructions, products, and methods without departing from the scope of aspects of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description and shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense. For example, the simultaneous display of reference anatomical markers may involve progressively showing an expected next or sequential marker after an operator or user has indicated that a current reference anatomical marker has been identified by capturing and optionally annotating a photographic image from the imaging system. When introducing elements of aspects of the invention or the embodiments thereof, the articles “a,” “an,” “the,” and “said” are intended to mean that there are one or more of the elements. The terms “comprising,” “including,” and “having” are intended to be inclusive and mean that there may be additional elements other than the listed elements.

Claims (14)

What is claimed is:
1. An imaging catheter system, comprising:
a feeding tube having an inlet connectable to a source of feeding fluid, an outlet distal from and fluidly connected to the inlet through a feeding passage, and an imaging device disposed proximate the outlet, the imaging device configured to generate and transmit imaging signals corresponding to an image of an anatomy of a patient; and
a console comprising a display and memory having stored therein a plurality of reference materials selected from the group consisting of photographic data, video data, audio data, diagrams, animations, and combinations thereof, each of the plurality of reference materials providing information about at least one of anatomy, patient preparation, feeding tube preparation, feeding tube placement, feeding tube operation, feeding tube features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, and contact information, wherein the console is configured to receive the imaging signals, present at least a portion of at least one image corresponding to at least a portion of the imaging signals on the display, and present a reference menu on the display including menu items corresponding to at least one of the reference materials, wherein at least one of the reference materials includes feeding tube placement information comprising a previously captured image illustrating prior tube placement within a patient, and the console is configured so that the feeding tube placement information can be periodically accessed on the display to verify proper placement of the feeding tube in the patient, wherein at least one of the plurality of reference materials comprises a partially schematic illustration including contrasting correct and incorrect paths for inserting the feeding tube into the patient, each path including at least one separate representative anatomical image located along the respective path, and wherein the at least one anatomical image of the correct path comprises an image located along an alimentary canal and the at least one anatomical image of the incorrect path comprises an image located along a respiratory path.
2. The imaging catheter system of claim 1, wherein at least one of the plurality of reference materials includes a photograph showing an anatomical landmark.
3. The imaging catheter system of claim 2, wherein the anatomical landmark is one of a bronchus, larynx, tracheal rings, cardia, pyloric sphincter, cricoid cartilage, bronchial split, esophageal junction, stomach folds, duodenal folds, and pyloric orifice.
4. The imaging catheter system of claim 1, wherein the console is configured to present on the display the reference menu simultaneously with the image generated from the imaging signal.
5. The imaging catheter system of claim 1, wherein the console is configured to present on the display at least one of the reference materials simultaneously with the image generated from the imaging signal.
6. The imaging catheter system of claim 1, wherein the console is configured to simultaneously display the schematic illustration and the image generated from the imaging signal for training.
7. The imaging catheter system of claim 1, wherein the partially schematic illustration comprises a schematic illustration of a patient's alimentary canal and respiratory path, and wherein the partially schematic illustrations indicate where the at least one anatomical image located along the alimentary canal is located and where the at least one anatomical image located along the respiratory path is located.
8. The imaging catheter system of claim 1, wherein each path includes a plurality of representative anatomical images located along the respective paths.
9. A method of facilitating use of a feeding tube assembly, comprising:
providing a feeding tube having an inlet connectable to a source of feeding fluid, an outlet distal from and fluidly connected to the inlet through a feeding passage, and an imaging device disposed proximate the outlet, the imaging device configured to generate and transmit imaging signals corresponding to an image of an anatomy of a patient;
providing a console comprising a display and memory having stored therein a plurality of reference materials selected from the group consisting of photographs, video recordings, audio recordings, diagrams, animations, text, and combinations thereof, each of the plurality of the reference materials providing information about at least one of anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, and contact information, wherein the console is configured to receive the imaging signals, present at least a portion of at least one image corresponding to the imaging signals on the display, and present a reference menu on the display including menu items corresponding to at least one of the reference materials, wherein at least one of the reference materials includes feeding tube placement information; and
providing periodic access to the feeding tube placement information comprising a previously captured image illustrating prior tube placement within a patient on the display to verify proper placement of the feeding tube in the patient, wherein at least one of the plurality of reference materials comprises a partially schematic illustration including contrasting correct and incorrect paths for inserting the feeding tube into the patient, each path including at least one separate representative anatomical image located along the respective path, and wherein the at least one anatomical image of the correct path comprises an image located along an alimentary canal and the at least one anatomical image of the incorrect path comprises an image located along a respiratory path.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein the console is configured to simultaneously present on the display a photograph from the plurality of reference materials and a video image corresponding to the image signals from the imaging assembly, wherein the photograph provides a representative anatomical marker.
11. The method of claim 9, further comprising at least one of storing additional reference materials into the memory, removing at least one reference materials from the memory, and replacing the memory with an updated memory, the updated memory having stored therein an updated reference material.
12. The method of claim 9, further comprising:
receiving the console from a user; and
after receiving the console, at least one of storing additional reference materials into the memory, removing at least one reference materials from the memory, and replacing the memory with an updated memory, the updated memory having stored therein at least one updated reference material.
13. An imaging catheter system comprising:
an imaging catheter including an imaging assembly having an imaging device for generating imaging signals corresponding to images of anatomy of a patient, said imaging assembly transmitting the imaging signals generated by the imaging device; and
a console adapted to receive the imaging signals transmitted by the imaging assembly and present images generated from the imaging signals on a display, the console being adapted to selectively present a reference menu on the display including menu items corresponding to reference materials selected from a group of reference materials comprising at least one of photographs, video recordings, audio recordings, diagrams, animations, and text, each of said materials providing information about at least one of anatomy, patient preparation, imaging catheter preparation, imaging catheter placement, imaging catheter operation, imaging catheter features, console preparation, console operation, console features, system operation, system features, and contact information, wherein at least one of the reference materials includes imaging catheter placement information and the console is configured so that the imaging catheter placement information comprising a previously captured image illustrating prior tube placement within a patient, can be periodically accessed on the display to verify proper placement of the imaging catheter in the patient, and wherein at least one of reference materials comprises a partially schematic illustration including contrasting correct and incorrect paths for inserting the feeding tube into the patient, each path including at least one separate representative anatomical image located along the respective path, and wherein the at least one anatomical image of the correct path comprises an image located along an alimentary canal and the at least one anatomical image of the incorrect path comprises an image located along a respiratory path.
14. The imaging catheter system as set forth in claim 13, further comprising a feeding tube assembly including a feeding tube for delivering enteral feeding liquid to the patient, the tube having an inlet and an outlet and a feeding passage extending between said inlet and said outlet, the imaging catheter being positioned adjacent the outlet for generating imaging signals corresponding to an alimentary canal of the patient, the imaging assembly being sealed from the feeding passage to inhibit enteral feeding liquid in the feeding passage from entering the imaging assembly.
US13667304 2010-09-08 2012-11-02 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor Active 2031-11-04 US9433339B2 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US38098510 true 2010-09-08 2010-09-08
US201161482080 true 2011-05-03 2011-05-03
US13228075 US9538908B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2011-09-08 Catheter with imaging assembly
US13667304 US9433339B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-11-02 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor

Applications Claiming Priority (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13667304 US9433339B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-11-02 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor
CA 2890221 CA2890221A1 (en) 2012-11-02 2013-10-09 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor
CN 201380066809 CN104883963A (en) 2012-11-02 2013-10-09 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor
JP2015540682A JP6039098B2 (en) 2012-11-02 2013-10-09 Methods relating to the console and their having a catheter and a reference library having an imaging assembly
PCT/US2013/064070 WO2014070396A1 (en) 2012-11-02 2013-10-09 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor
EP20130782896 EP2914158A1 (en) 2012-11-02 2013-10-09 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor
KR20157014148A KR20150079897A (en) 2012-11-02 2013-10-09 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13228075 Continuation-In-Part US9538908B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2011-09-08 Catheter with imaging assembly

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20130303849A1 true US20130303849A1 (en) 2013-11-14
US9433339B2 true US9433339B2 (en) 2016-09-06

Family

ID=45807343

Family Applications (9)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13228075 Active US9538908B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2011-09-08 Catheter with imaging assembly
US13347787 Abandoned US20120172665A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-01-11 Assembly with Imaging Electronics
US13667304 Active 2031-11-04 US9433339B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-11-02 Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor
US14036579 Abandoned US20140094652A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Feeding Tube System with Imaging Assembly and Console Connector
US14036549 Abandoned US20140094651A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Imaging Catheter System
US14036566 Active US9585813B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Feeding tube system with imaging assembly and console
US14036592 Abandoned US20140024895A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Imaging Catheter Assembly
US14036613 Abandoned US20140094653A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Imaging Catheter System
US15135467 Pending US20160235629A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2016-04-21 Catheter with imaging assembly

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13228075 Active US9538908B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2011-09-08 Catheter with imaging assembly
US13347787 Abandoned US20120172665A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-01-11 Assembly with Imaging Electronics

Family Applications After (6)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14036579 Abandoned US20140094652A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Feeding Tube System with Imaging Assembly and Console Connector
US14036549 Abandoned US20140094651A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Imaging Catheter System
US14036566 Active US9585813B2 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Feeding tube system with imaging assembly and console
US14036592 Abandoned US20140024895A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Imaging Catheter Assembly
US14036613 Abandoned US20140094653A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-09-25 Imaging Catheter System
US15135467 Pending US20160235629A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2016-04-21 Catheter with imaging assembly

Country Status (7)

Country Link
US (9) US9538908B2 (en)
EP (6) EP2613687B1 (en)
JP (6) JP5651782B2 (en)
KR (2) KR20150042871A (en)
CN (2) CN106037624A (en)
CA (3) CA2912238A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2012033936A3 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150089411A1 (en) * 2013-07-01 2015-03-26 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for changing user interface based on user motion information

Families Citing this family (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2014070396A1 (en) * 2012-11-02 2014-05-08 Covidien Lp Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor
KR20150042871A (en) 2010-09-08 2015-04-21 코비디엔 엘피 Catheter with imaging assembly
US20130231533A1 (en) * 2011-05-23 2013-09-05 Stephanos Papademetriou Medical applications of a miniature videoscope
JP5558600B2 (en) * 2012-03-13 2014-07-23 富士フイルム株式会社 Endoscopic board connector, the endoscope and a manufacturing method thereof
JP5259852B1 (en) * 2012-03-30 2013-08-07 株式会社東芝 Support base, an imaging device, a method of connecting the imaging device
US20150057536A1 (en) * 2012-08-22 2015-02-26 Volcano Corporation Balloon Catheter Junction
US9198835B2 (en) * 2012-09-07 2015-12-01 Covidien Lp Catheter with imaging assembly with placement aid and related methods therefor
USD716841S1 (en) 2012-09-07 2014-11-04 Covidien Lp Display screen with annotate file icon
USD735343S1 (en) 2012-09-07 2015-07-28 Covidien Lp Console
USD717340S1 (en) 2012-09-07 2014-11-11 Covidien Lp Display screen with enteral feeding icon
US9517184B2 (en) * 2012-09-07 2016-12-13 Covidien Lp Feeding tube with insufflation device and related methods therefor
WO2014099986A1 (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-26 Zoll Medical Corporation Ventilation monitoring
US20140282196A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Intuitive Surgical Operations, Inc. Robotic system providing user selectable actions associated with gaze tracking
KR101335477B1 (en) * 2013-06-10 2013-12-02 주식회사 현주인테크 Pectoscope comprising the cap detachably fixed on the tip
CN105828694A (en) * 2013-10-31 2016-08-03 奥普特米德有限公司 Portable inspection system
US9918863B2 (en) 2013-11-13 2018-03-20 Covidien Lp Steerable gastric calibration tube
CN105813540A (en) * 2013-11-25 2016-07-27 柯惠有限合伙公司 Imaging catheter with thermal management assembly
US20160296719A1 (en) * 2014-01-17 2016-10-13 Monitoring For Life, Llc Medical Tube Apparatus
US20150229887A1 (en) * 2014-02-13 2015-08-13 Ut-Battelle, Llc Apparatus and methods for imaging interior surfaces of a tube or the like
US9357906B2 (en) * 2014-04-16 2016-06-07 Engineered Medical Solutions Company LLC Surgical illumination devices and methods therefor
US20150328031A1 (en) * 2014-05-13 2015-11-19 Covidien Lp Illuminated gastric tubes and methods of use
CN106572891A (en) * 2014-05-27 2017-04-19 皇家飞利浦有限公司 Self-authenticating intravascular device and associated devices, systems, and methods
WO2015183785A1 (en) * 2014-05-28 2015-12-03 Covidien Lp Imaging feeding tube with illumination control
WO2016042502A1 (en) * 2014-09-16 2016-03-24 Truphatek International Ltd. Monitoring system including mask removal and oxygen
JP2017537733A (en) * 2014-12-16 2017-12-21 ヴェリトラクト,インコーポレイテッド Feeding tube assembly is optically guided, feeding tube tip, and related methods
US9782061B2 (en) * 2015-03-04 2017-10-10 Velosal Medical, Inc. Video laryngoscopy device

Citations (523)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3633758A (en) 1970-01-09 1972-01-11 North American Instr Corp Catheter storage rack
US3788304A (en) 1971-06-15 1974-01-29 Olympus Optical Co Endoscope
US4146019A (en) 1976-09-30 1979-03-27 University Of Southern California Multichannel endoscope
JPS5449192U (en) 1977-09-12 1979-04-05
US4253447A (en) 1978-10-16 1981-03-03 Welch Allyn, Inc. Color endoscope with charge coupled device and television viewing
US4301790A (en) 1978-08-11 1981-11-24 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Endoscope with electric image transmission
USD267019S (en) 1979-10-22 1982-11-23 Space Odyssey Ltd. Physiological display panel
US4392485A (en) 1981-02-17 1983-07-12 Richard Wolf Gmbh Endoscope
US4491865A (en) 1982-09-29 1985-01-01 Welch Allyn, Inc. Image sensor assembly
US4616630A (en) 1984-08-20 1986-10-14 Fuji Photo Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope with an obtusely angled connecting section
US4621284A (en) 1984-06-09 1986-11-04 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Measuring endoscope
US4769014A (en) 1987-06-02 1988-09-06 Superior Biosystems Inc. Gastroenteric feeding tube for endoscopic placement
US4782819A (en) 1987-02-25 1988-11-08 Adair Edwin Lloyd Optical catheter
EP0299240A2 (en) 1987-07-14 1989-01-18 Richard Wolf GmbH Endoscopic television equipment
US4809680A (en) 1986-09-01 1989-03-07 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope tip
US4846153A (en) 1988-06-10 1989-07-11 George Berci Intubating video endoscope
US4919651A (en) 1988-04-15 1990-04-24 Santa Barbara Medical Foundation Clinic Catheter having a double lumen and a balloon and method of using the same for controlled operative cholangiography
US4996975A (en) 1989-06-01 1991-03-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic endoscope apparatus capable of warning lifetime of electronic scope
US5025778A (en) 1990-03-26 1991-06-25 Opielab, Inc. Endoscope with potential channels and method of using the same
US5059182A (en) 1989-04-12 1991-10-22 David H. Laing Portable infusion device
US5131380A (en) 1991-06-13 1992-07-21 Heller Richard M Softwall medical tube with fiberoptic light conductor therein and method of use
US5168863A (en) 1990-08-27 1992-12-08 Medical Concepts, Inc. Sterile endoscopic system
US5187579A (en) 1990-01-19 1993-02-16 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Medical image displaying method and apparatus
US5220198A (en) 1990-08-27 1993-06-15 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Solid state imaging apparatus in which a solid state imaging device chip and substrate are face-bonded with each other
US5242394A (en) 1985-07-30 1993-09-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Steerable dilatation catheter
US5285778A (en) 1991-04-19 1994-02-15 Mackin Robert A Endotracheal tube wih fibers optic illumination and viewing and auxiliary tube
US5297477A (en) 1993-03-08 1994-03-29 Bert Phillips Educational egg art toy
US5329940A (en) 1990-02-14 1994-07-19 Adair Edwin Lloyd Endotracheal tube intubation assist device
US5334150A (en) 1992-11-17 1994-08-02 Kaali Steven G Visually directed trocar for laparoscopic surgical procedures and method of using same
US5353783A (en) 1991-12-09 1994-10-11 Nakao Naomi L Endoscopic method using sheath
US5400771A (en) * 1993-01-21 1995-03-28 Pirak; Leon Endotracheal intubation assembly and related method
US5409480A (en) 1993-02-16 1995-04-25 Uram; Martin Laser endoscope system console
US5423311A (en) 1992-07-06 1995-06-13 Catheter Imaging Systems Catheter imaging apparatus
US5435339A (en) 1993-04-07 1995-07-25 Kdi American Products Company Manual air relief valve
US5469254A (en) 1992-04-06 1995-11-21 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for measuring three-dimensional position of a pipe from image of the pipe in an endoscopic observation system
US5526928A (en) 1993-01-22 1996-06-18 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Package for packaging a protection cover with channel for endoscope
US5527261A (en) 1994-08-18 1996-06-18 Welch Allyn, Inc. Remote hand-held diagnostic instrument with video imaging
JPH08191440A (en) 1995-01-10 1996-07-23 Fukuda Denshi Co Ltd Method and device for correcting endoscope image
US5604531A (en) 1994-01-17 1997-02-18 State Of Israel, Ministry Of Defense, Armament Development Authority In vivo video camera system
US5610828A (en) 1986-04-14 1997-03-11 National Instruments Corporation Graphical system for modelling a process and associated method
US5636625A (en) 1994-08-30 1997-06-10 Machida Endoscope Co., Ltd. Tracheal airway apparatus
US5638819A (en) 1995-08-29 1997-06-17 Manwaring; Kim H. Method and apparatus for guiding an instrument to a target
US5645519A (en) 1994-03-18 1997-07-08 Jai S. Lee Endoscopic instrument for controlled introduction of tubular members in the body and methods therefor
US5665064A (en) 1993-12-06 1997-09-09 Sherwood Medical Company Gastroenteric feeding tube for endoscopic placement and method of use
US5676635A (en) 1995-08-30 1997-10-14 Levin; Bruce Instrument for insertion of an endotracheal tube
US5720293A (en) 1991-01-29 1998-02-24 Baxter International Inc. Diagnostic catheter with memory
US5740802A (en) 1993-04-20 1998-04-21 General Electric Company Computer graphic and live video system for enhancing visualization of body structures during surgery
US5772693A (en) 1996-02-09 1998-06-30 Cardiac Control Systems, Inc. Single preformed catheter configuration for a dual-chamber pacemaker system
US5817015A (en) 1993-06-22 1998-10-06 Adair; Edwin L. Endoscope with reusable core and disposable sheath with passageways
US5830121A (en) 1993-10-27 1998-11-03 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Endoscopic apparatus having an endoscope and a peripheral device wherein total usage of the endoscope is quantified and recorded
US5848691A (en) 1997-07-07 1998-12-15 Wilson-Cook Medical Inc. Package for sphincterotome or catheter including structure maintaining shape of distal tip
US5873816A (en) 1994-11-02 1999-02-23 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Electronic endoscope having an insertional portion a part of which is a conductive armor
US5896166A (en) 1993-06-02 1999-04-20 Envision Medical Corporation Remote CCD video camera with non-volatile digital memory
US5908294A (en) 1997-06-12 1999-06-01 Schick Technologies, Inc Dental imaging system with lamps and method
US5913816A (en) 1997-10-31 1999-06-22 Imagyn Medical Technologies, Inc. Intubation device and method
US5929901A (en) 1997-10-06 1999-07-27 Adair; Edwin L. Reduced area imaging devices incorporated within surgical instruments
US5932035A (en) 1993-10-29 1999-08-03 Boston Scientific Corporation Drive shaft for acoustic imaging catheters and flexible catheters
US5938603A (en) 1997-12-01 1999-08-17 Cordis Webster, Inc. Steerable catheter with electromagnetic sensor
US5941816A (en) 1997-04-15 1999-08-24 Clarus Medical Systems, Inc. Viewing system with adapter handle for medical breathing tubes
US5967988A (en) 1998-04-08 1999-10-19 Medtronic, Inc. Catheter having echogenicity enhancement
US5986693A (en) 1997-10-06 1999-11-16 Adair; Edwin L. Reduced area imaging devices incorporated within surgical instruments
US5989230A (en) 1996-01-11 1999-11-23 Essex Technology, Inc. Rotate to advance catheterization system
US5989231A (en) 1998-01-15 1999-11-23 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Optical gastrostomy and jejunostomy
US6004263A (en) 1996-03-13 1999-12-21 Hihon Kohden Corporation Endoscope with detachable operation unit and insertion unit
US6043839A (en) 1997-10-06 2000-03-28 Adair; Edwin L. Reduced area imaging devices
US6053313A (en) 1996-10-25 2000-04-25 Ave Connaught Catheter packaging system
US6099354A (en) 1998-08-10 2000-08-08 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Planar connector
US6115523A (en) 1996-10-04 2000-09-05 University Of Florida Plastic optical fiber airway imaging system
US6117071A (en) 1997-07-29 2000-09-12 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Endoscope with movable imaging unit for zooming or focusing
US6120435A (en) 1997-07-16 2000-09-19 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope system in which operation switch sets designed to function and be handled same way are included in endoscope and image processing apparatus respectively
US6198963B1 (en) 1996-07-17 2001-03-06 Biosense, Inc. Position confirmation with learn and test functions
US6237604B1 (en) 1999-09-07 2001-05-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Systems and methods for preventing automatic identification of re-used single use devices
US6245029B1 (en) 1995-02-21 2001-06-12 Nissho Corporation Stylet and connector therefor
USD447569S1 (en) 1999-06-16 2001-09-04 Huntleigh Technology, Plc Medical device casing
WO2001067964A2 (en) 2000-03-16 2001-09-20 Medigus Ltd. Fundoplication apparatus and method
US6310642B1 (en) 1997-11-24 2001-10-30 Micro-Medical Devices, Inc. Reduced area imaging devices incorporated within surgical instruments
US6322498B1 (en) 1996-10-04 2001-11-27 University Of Florida Imaging scope
US6339446B1 (en) 1991-01-14 2002-01-15 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscopic image display system and method for the same that displays on hi-vision monitor
US20020007108A1 (en) 1995-07-24 2002-01-17 Chen David T. Anatomical visualization system
US6364827B1 (en) 1996-07-29 2002-04-02 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Endoscope with at least one sensing and recording device
USD455760S1 (en) 1999-09-30 2002-04-16 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Icon of a user interface for a medical playback device
USD456027S1 (en) 1999-03-30 2002-04-23 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Graphic operating element for a medical monitor
USD459477S1 (en) 2001-07-30 2002-06-25 I.N. Incorporated Ventilator housing and stand
WO2002055126A2 (en) 2001-01-11 2002-07-18 Given Imaging Ltd. Device and system for in-vivo procedures
JP2002214127A (en) 1996-02-27 2002-07-31 Massachusetts Inst Of Technol <Mit> Method and device for performing optical measurement by using optical fiber imaging guide wire, catheter or endoscope
US6447444B1 (en) 1997-11-04 2002-09-10 Sightline Technologies Ltd. Video rectoscope
US20020126960A1 (en) 2000-07-17 2002-09-12 Michael Gurreri Connector and receptacle containing a physical security feature
US6458076B1 (en) 2000-02-01 2002-10-01 5 Star Medical Multi-lumen medical device
US6462770B1 (en) 1998-04-20 2002-10-08 Xillix Technologies Corp. Imaging system with automatic gain control for reflectance and fluorescence endoscopy
US6468212B1 (en) 1997-04-19 2002-10-22 Adalberto Vara User control interface for an ultrasound processor
USD465789S1 (en) 1999-09-30 2002-11-19 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Graphic operating icon of a user interface for a portion of a medical playback device
USD466519S1 (en) 2001-06-05 2002-12-03 Mobigence, Inc. Display arrangement for a keypad
US6520916B1 (en) 2000-08-02 2003-02-18 Medtronic, Inc. Ultrasound imaging system and method for implantable and invasive devices
USD471226S1 (en) 2001-10-10 2003-03-04 Gray David W Set of characters
USD471227S1 (en) 2001-10-10 2003-03-04 Gray David W Set of characters
US20030055314A1 (en) 1993-11-23 2003-03-20 Tony Petitto Technique for depth of field viewing of images using an endoscopic instrument
US20030060678A1 (en) 2001-08-29 2003-03-27 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscopic image filing system
US6543447B2 (en) 1997-12-01 2003-04-08 Saturn Biomedical Systems Inc Intubation instrument
US6547757B1 (en) 1999-07-30 2003-04-15 Biotronik Mess-und Therapiegeräte GmbH & Co. Ingenieurbüro Berlin Catheter
US6550475B1 (en) 1998-03-11 2003-04-22 Oldfield Family Holdings Pty. Limited Endotracheal tube for selective bronchial occlusion
US6553241B2 (en) 2000-08-31 2003-04-22 Mallinckrodt Inc. Oximeter sensor with digital memory encoding sensor expiration data
US6554765B1 (en) 1996-07-15 2003-04-29 East Giant Limited Hand held, portable camera with adaptable lens system
US6565506B2 (en) 2000-07-28 2003-05-20 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope
US20030112921A1 (en) 2000-10-11 2003-06-19 Philipp Lang Methods and devices for analysis of x-ray images
US6585639B1 (en) 2000-10-27 2003-07-01 Pulmonx Sheath and method for reconfiguring lung viewing scope
US6623480B1 (en) 1998-07-24 2003-09-23 University Of Kentucky Research Foundation Flexible recording/high energy electrode catheter with anchor for ablation of atrial flutter by radio frequency energy
EP1347638A1 (en) 2002-03-12 2003-09-24 Karl Storz Imaging Inc. Automatic adjustment of endoscopic video camera systems
US6626828B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2003-09-30 The University Of Tokyo Body cavity-observing apparatus
US6655377B2 (en) 1997-12-01 2003-12-02 Saturn Biomedical Systems Inc. Intubation instrument
USD483872S1 (en) 2002-09-27 2003-12-16 Baxter International Inc. Display portion for a medical machine
US6692432B1 (en) 1996-07-15 2004-02-17 East Giant Limited Hand-held portable camera for producing video images of an object
US6692430B2 (en) 2000-04-10 2004-02-17 C2Cure Inc. Intra vascular imaging apparatus
US6712756B1 (en) 2000-05-19 2004-03-30 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope system having transponder for discriminating endoscope
US6712760B2 (en) 2000-04-10 2004-03-30 Pentax Corporation Television device of portable endoscope
WO2004030526A1 (en) 2002-09-30 2004-04-15 Power Medical Interventions, Inc. Self-contained sterilizable surgical system
US20040097805A1 (en) 2002-11-19 2004-05-20 Laurent Verard Navigation system for cardiac therapies
EP1421913A1 (en) 2002-11-19 2004-05-26 Surgical Navigation Technologies, Inc. Image guided catheter navigation system for cardiac surgery
US20040111081A1 (en) 1999-06-02 2004-06-10 Whitman Michael P. Electro-mechanical surgical device
USD491954S1 (en) 1999-03-30 2004-06-22 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Graphic user interface for a medical monitor
JP2004181237A (en) 2002-11-29 2004-07-02 Siemens Ag Medical system
US6761561B2 (en) 2002-06-07 2004-07-13 Schick Technologies Wireless dental camera
WO2004060158A1 (en) 2002-12-18 2004-07-22 Boston Scientific Limited Systems for guiding catheters using registered images
US20040165833A1 (en) 2003-02-21 2004-08-26 Betker Jay Brian Optical terminus keying
US20040171914A1 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-09-02 Dov Avni In vivo sensing device with a circuit board having rigid sections and flexible sections
US20040181431A1 (en) 2002-12-18 2004-09-16 Rainer Kuth Device for generating standardized medical findings
US20040199088A1 (en) 2003-04-03 2004-10-07 Bakos Gregory J. Guide wire having bending segment
US20040210295A1 (en) 2000-03-24 2004-10-21 Stephen Brushey Anesthesia conduction catheter for delivery of electrical stimulus
US6814727B2 (en) 1998-08-05 2004-11-09 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Automatic/manual longitudinal position translator and rotary drive system for catheters
US20040237048A1 (en) 2002-01-22 2004-11-25 Fujitsu Limited Menu item selecting device and method
US20040239760A1 (en) 2003-05-27 2004-12-02 Olympus Corporation Medical image recording apparatus, endoscopic image display method, endoscopic image capture method, and portable storage medium therefor
US20040252871A1 (en) 2003-06-16 2004-12-16 Tecotzky Raymond H. Communicating computer-aided detection results in a standards-based medical imaging environment
US20050021182A1 (en) 2002-07-25 2005-01-27 Yulun Wang Medical tele-robotic system
US20050038318A1 (en) 2003-08-13 2005-02-17 Benad Goldwasser Gastrointestinal tool over guidewire
US6860611B2 (en) 2002-07-01 2005-03-01 Robert Gentz Camera and light apparatus
US6862467B2 (en) 1998-01-26 2005-03-01 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Imaging catheter assembly with distal end inductive coupler and embedded transmission line
US20050054914A1 (en) 2003-05-05 2005-03-10 Duerk Jeffrey L. MRI probe designs for minimally invasive intravascular tracking and imaging applications
US20050054895A1 (en) 2003-09-09 2005-03-10 Hoeg Hans David Method for using variable direction of view endoscopy in conjunction with image guided surgical systems
US6875169B2 (en) 2002-10-31 2005-04-05 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Camera unit with a coupling for a detachable light and image guide
US20050073017A1 (en) 2003-10-01 2005-04-07 Deok-Hoon Kim Electronic package of photo-image sensors in cellular phone camera modules, and the fabrication and assembly thereof
US6902529B2 (en) 2000-04-10 2005-06-07 Olympus Corporation Endoscope apparatus
USD506195S1 (en) 2004-03-05 2005-06-14 Motion Computing, Inc. Tablet personal computer
US6911027B1 (en) 1997-08-15 2005-06-28 Somnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Device for the ablation of tissue
US20050154262A1 (en) 2003-04-01 2005-07-14 Banik Michael S. Imaging system for video endoscope
US20050177024A1 (en) 2004-02-10 2005-08-11 Mackin Robert A. Endotracheal camera
US6929600B2 (en) 2001-07-24 2005-08-16 Stephen D. Hill Apparatus for intubation
US20050192477A1 (en) 2004-02-26 2005-09-01 Olympus Winter & Ibe Gmbh Rigid endoscope optics with a compound housing
US20050203338A1 (en) 2004-03-10 2005-09-15 Couvillon Lucien A.Jr. Endoscope with fiber optic transmission of digital video
US20050200698A1 (en) 2001-12-28 2005-09-15 Amling Marc R. Updateable endoscopic video imaging system with unified electro-optic cable
US6945929B2 (en) 2003-02-21 2005-09-20 Fujinon Corporation Imaging device assembly for electronic stereoscopic endoscope system
US20050216041A1 (en) 2004-03-26 2005-09-29 Olympus Corporation Treatment method
US6960161B2 (en) 2001-12-28 2005-11-01 Karl Storz Imaging Inc. Unified electrical and illumination cable for endoscopic video imaging system
WO2005102175A2 (en) 2004-04-26 2005-11-03 Super Dimension Ltd. System and method for image-based alignment of an endoscope
US20050251013A1 (en) 2004-03-23 2005-11-10 Sriram Krishnan Systems and methods providing automated decision support for medical imaging
US20050250983A1 (en) 2004-04-16 2005-11-10 Anthony Tremaglio Endoscopic instrument having reduced diameter flexible shaft
US6966876B2 (en) 2000-11-03 2005-11-22 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Device for holding and positioning an endoscopic instrument
US20050277808A1 (en) 2004-05-14 2005-12-15 Elazar Sonnenschein Methods and devices related to camera connectors
US20060004286A1 (en) 2004-04-21 2006-01-05 Acclarent, Inc. Methods and devices for performing procedures within the ear, nose, throat and paranasal sinuses
US6986738B2 (en) 2001-08-06 2006-01-17 Given Imaging Ltd System and method for maneuvering a device in vivo
US20060020171A1 (en) 2002-10-21 2006-01-26 Gilreath Mark G Intubation and imaging device and system
US20060025650A1 (en) 2002-10-03 2006-02-02 Oren Gavriely Tube for inspecting internal organs of a body
USD514558S1 (en) 2004-09-07 2006-02-07 Control4 Corporation Mobile touchscreen
WO2006018841A2 (en) 2004-08-16 2006-02-23 Navicath Ltd. Image-guided navigation for catheter-based interventions
US7011285B2 (en) 2003-07-02 2006-03-14 Inventec Corporation Modular stand structure
US7022075B2 (en) 1999-08-20 2006-04-04 Zonare Medical Systems, Inc. User interface for handheld imaging devices
US7033316B2 (en) 2001-07-06 2006-04-25 Pentax Corporation Endoscope system
US7048687B1 (en) 1999-04-14 2006-05-23 Ob Scientific, Inc. Limited use medical probe
US20060117185A1 (en) 2004-11-30 2006-06-01 Kyocera Mita Corporation Timestamp administration system and image forming apparatus
US20060122460A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2006-06-08 Henry Kamali Airway management
US7063663B2 (en) 2001-09-07 2006-06-20 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Endoscopic system with a solid-state light source
WO2006070360A1 (en) 2004-12-27 2006-07-06 Given Imaging Ltd. In vivo sensing device with a circuit board having rigid sections and flexible sections
WO2006071948A2 (en) 2004-12-28 2006-07-06 Melder Patrick C Endoscopic imaging system
US20060171856A1 (en) 2003-01-17 2006-08-03 Heinrich Jehle High throughput polymer-based microarray slide
US20060171586A1 (en) 2004-11-08 2006-08-03 Bogdan Georgescu Method of database-guided segmentation of anatomical structures having complex appearances
US7090661B2 (en) 2002-04-23 2006-08-15 Medtronic, Inc. Catheter anchor system and method
EP1707102A1 (en) 2004-01-19 2006-10-04 Olympus Corporation Capsule type medical treatment device
US20060224040A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2006-10-05 Given Imaging Ltd. In vivo imaging device and method of manufacture thereof
EP1709899A1 (en) 2004-01-26 2006-10-11 Olympus Corporation Capsule-type endoscope
US20060235274A1 (en) 2004-02-26 2006-10-19 Olympus Winter & Ibe Gmbh Rigid endoscope optics with a compound housing
US7126581B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2006-10-24 Panasonic Automotive Systems Company Of America Multimode multizone interface
US7131873B2 (en) 2002-11-25 2006-11-07 Hirose Electric Co., Ltd. Electrical connector capable of preventing plugging error
US20060264918A1 (en) 2005-05-20 2006-11-23 Laserscope Laser system and delivery device operation logging method and kit
US7151956B2 (en) 2001-07-12 2006-12-19 Moritex Corporation Imaging apparatus and an imaging head used therefor
US20060287576A1 (en) 2004-03-02 2006-12-21 Olympus Corporation Endoscope
US20070049794A1 (en) 2005-09-01 2007-03-01 Ezc Medical Llc Visualization stylet for medical device applications having self-contained power source
US20070075208A1 (en) 2005-10-04 2007-04-05 Avermedia Technologies, Inc. Supporting stand
US20070113204A1 (en) 2000-10-06 2007-05-17 Lg Electronics Inc. Method of displaying menus in mobile telephone
US7223232B2 (en) 2003-01-21 2007-05-29 Pentax Corporation Endoscope probe system having confocal optical systems
US20070162095A1 (en) 2006-01-06 2007-07-12 Ezc Medical Llc Modular visualization stylet apparatus and methods of use
US20070167682A1 (en) 2004-04-21 2007-07-19 Acclarent, Inc. Endoscopic methods and devices for transnasal procedures
US7273452B2 (en) 2004-03-04 2007-09-25 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Vision catheter system including movable scanning plate
US20070225561A1 (en) 2006-03-24 2007-09-27 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope and display device
US20070232882A1 (en) 2006-03-31 2007-10-04 Glossop Neil D System, Methods, and Instrumentation for Image Guided Prostate Treatment
US20070235626A1 (en) 2006-04-05 2007-10-11 Nec Infrontia Corporation Angle adjustment apparatus for electronic device
EP1847214A2 (en) 2006-04-20 2007-10-24 Karl Storz Endovision, Inc. Ultra wide band wireless optical endoscopic device
WO2007121139A2 (en) 2006-04-14 2007-10-25 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. In vivo localization and tracking of tissue penetrating catheters using magnetic resonance imaging
EP1849401A1 (en) 2005-02-14 2007-10-31 Olympus Corporation Endoscope device
US7303528B2 (en) 2004-05-18 2007-12-04 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Serialization of single use endoscopes
US7304277B2 (en) 2005-08-23 2007-12-04 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc Resonator with adjustable capacitor for medical device
USD558351S1 (en) 2006-10-31 2007-12-25 Sonosite, Inc. Ultrasound display apparatus
US20080037850A1 (en) 2006-08-08 2008-02-14 Stefan Assmann Method and processor for generating a medical image
USD562456S1 (en) 2005-09-26 2008-02-19 C. R. Bard, Inc. Ultrasound case
US20080045800A2 (en) 2004-09-24 2008-02-21 Mina Farr Solid state illumination for endoscopy
US20080062624A1 (en) 2006-09-13 2008-03-13 Paul Regen Transformable Mobile Computing Device
US20080077043A1 (en) 2006-08-25 2008-03-27 Manu Malbrain Enteral feeding catheter and apparatus for determining the intra-abdominal pressure of a patient
US20080074492A1 (en) 2006-09-22 2008-03-27 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscopic apparatus and control method for endoscopic apparatus
US20080081949A1 (en) 2006-09-28 2008-04-03 Zvika Gilad In vivo imaging device and method of manufacture thereof
US20080091065A1 (en) 2006-10-04 2008-04-17 Olympus Medical Systems Corporation Medical image processing apparatus, endoscope system and medical image processing system
US7366562B2 (en) 2003-10-17 2008-04-29 Medtronic Navigation, Inc. Method and apparatus for surgical navigation
US20080108869A1 (en) 2006-10-20 2008-05-08 Femsuite Llc Optical surgical device and methods of use
US7373005B2 (en) 2003-04-10 2008-05-13 Micron Technology, Inc. Compression system for integrated sensor devices
US20080123922A1 (en) 2006-09-08 2008-05-29 Medtronic, Inc. Method for planning a surgical procedure
US20080140020A1 (en) 2006-12-08 2008-06-12 Utah Medical Products Inc. Lockable enteral feeding adapter
US20080139896A1 (en) 2006-10-13 2008-06-12 Siemens Medical Solutions Usa, Inc. System and Method for Graphical Annotation of Anatomical Images Using a Touch Screen Display
EP1707123B1 (en) 2001-03-02 2008-06-18 Boston Scientific Limited Imaging catheter for use inside a guiding catheter
US20080147000A1 (en) 2006-12-13 2008-06-19 University Of Washington Catheter tip displacement mechanism
US7391606B2 (en) 2006-06-14 2008-06-24 Qisda Corporation Electronic device
US20080172006A1 (en) 2007-01-15 2008-07-17 Medrad, Inc. Patency Check Compatible Check Valve And Fluid Delivery System Including The Patency Check Compatible Check Valve
US7404794B2 (en) 2002-05-22 2008-07-29 Scholly Fiberoptic Gmbh Microendoscope
US7413543B2 (en) 2003-04-01 2008-08-19 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Endoscope with actively cooled illumination sources
JP2008194334A (en) 2007-02-15 2008-08-28 Fujifilm Corp Endoscope image display method, device, and program
US7423496B2 (en) 2005-11-09 2008-09-09 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Resonator with adjustable capacitance for medical device
US20080240527A1 (en) 2006-08-15 2008-10-02 The Borad Of Regents, The University Of Texas System, A Instiution Of Higher Learning Methods, Compositions and Systems for Analyzing Imaging Data
US20080236575A1 (en) 2007-03-29 2008-10-02 Robert Michael Chuda Intubation device with video, stylet steering, prep and storage system
GB2448421A (en) 2007-04-11 2008-10-15 Forth Photonics Ltd Workstation for a colposcopy
US20080255416A1 (en) 2005-01-27 2008-10-16 Super Dimension, Ltd. Endoscope with Miniature Imaging Arrangement
US20080275301A1 (en) 2003-05-09 2008-11-06 Daltray Pty, Ltd Sigmoidoscope With Integral Obturator
US20080281157A1 (en) 2007-05-08 2008-11-13 Masaaki Miyagi Connector and medical apparatus
US20080281351A1 (en) 2007-05-02 2008-11-13 John Croushorn Portable pneumatic abdominal aortic tourniquet
US20080294007A1 (en) 2006-11-09 2008-11-27 Tadatsugu Takada Bending portion of insertion part of endoscope and endoscope provided with insertion part including bending portion
US20080294000A1 (en) 2007-04-06 2008-11-27 Hoya Corporation Endoscope support system
US20080300456A1 (en) 2007-05-31 2008-12-04 Irion Klaus M Video Endoscope
USD582916S1 (en) 2007-02-26 2008-12-16 Sony Corporation Monitor display
US20080319391A1 (en) 2007-06-21 2008-12-25 Jackson Francis J Self powered enteral tube feeding device
US7471310B2 (en) 2001-12-28 2008-12-30 Karl Storz Imaging, Inc. Intelligent camera head
US20090030283A1 (en) 2007-07-11 2009-01-29 Scholly Fiberoptic Gmbh Endoscope
US20090030276A1 (en) 2007-07-27 2009-01-29 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue visualization catheter with imaging systems integration
US20090043167A1 (en) 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 Lighthouse Imaging Corporation Endoscope
US7491167B2 (en) 2005-07-01 2009-02-17 Hoya Corporation Image capturing unit for endoscope
US20090046906A1 (en) 2007-01-22 2009-02-19 Richard Wohlgemuth Automated imaging device and method for registration of anatomical structures
US20090054803A1 (en) 2005-02-02 2009-02-26 Vahid Saadat Electrophysiology mapping and visualization system
US7497825B2 (en) 2002-05-13 2009-03-03 Micron Technology, Inc. Data download to imager chip using image sensor as a receptor
US20090060425A1 (en) 2006-04-10 2009-03-05 Finisar Corporation Active optical cable with integrated control features
US20090062609A1 (en) 2007-08-27 2009-03-05 Hoya Corporation Endoscope system
US20090069694A1 (en) 2002-11-12 2009-03-12 David Amundson Coronary sinus access catheter with forward-imaging means
JP2009056238A (en) 2007-09-03 2009-03-19 Olympus Medical Systems Corp Endoscope apparatus
US20090082625A1 (en) 2005-07-15 2009-03-26 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope and endoscope apparatus
US20090099417A1 (en) 2003-08-15 2009-04-16 Hartwick Darrell J Disposable endoscope
WO2009049322A2 (en) 2007-10-11 2009-04-16 Avantis Medical Systems, Inc. Endoscope assembly comprising retrograde viewing imaging device and instrument channel
US20090105538A1 (en) 2007-07-26 2009-04-23 Jacques Van Dam Endoscope System
USD591423S1 (en) 2007-09-07 2009-04-28 Sonosite, Inc. Ultrasound platform
US20090118577A9 (en) 2005-12-13 2009-05-07 Gyrus Acmi, Inc. Medical device made with a super alloy
US20090118580A1 (en) 2004-07-02 2009-05-07 Wei-Zen Sun Image-type intubation-aiding device
US20090137893A1 (en) 2007-11-27 2009-05-28 University Of Washington Adding imaging capability to distal tips of medical tools, catheters, and conduits
US20090143651A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2009-06-04 Bengt Kallback Device for Invasive Use
US20090143648A1 (en) 2007-11-30 2009-06-04 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Endoscope system for gastrostomy catheter placement
US20090149706A1 (en) 2006-08-18 2009-06-11 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope apparatus and signal processing method thereof
US20090149705A1 (en) 2007-12-05 2009-06-11 Hoya Corporation Imaging-device driving unit, electronic endoscope, and endoscope system
US7547277B2 (en) 2005-12-15 2009-06-16 Microvision, Inc. Method and apparatus for calibrating an endoscope system
US20090155750A1 (en) 2007-12-12 2009-06-18 Casio Computer Co., Ltd. Electronic dictionary device with a handwriting input function
US20090163769A1 (en) 2007-12-21 2009-06-25 Robertson David W Endoscope including a multifunction conductor
US20090161927A1 (en) 2006-05-02 2009-06-25 National University Corporation Nagoya University Medical Image Observation Assisting System
US20090167851A1 (en) 2008-01-02 2009-07-02 Miller Jeffrey J Imager Assembly For Remote Inspection Device
US20090171148A1 (en) 2007-12-27 2009-07-02 Shih-Chieh Lu Capsule endoscope system having a sensing and data discriminating device and discrimination method thereof
US20090177032A1 (en) 1999-04-14 2009-07-09 Garibaldi Jeffrey M Method and apparatus for magnetically controlling endoscopes in body lumens and cavities
US20090187425A1 (en) 2007-09-17 2009-07-23 Arthur Solomon Thompson PDA software robots leveraging past history in seconds with software robots
US20090198102A1 (en) 2008-01-31 2009-08-06 Tien-Sheng Chen Rectum Examination Device And Rectum Examination Set
US20090198106A1 (en) 2008-02-05 2009-08-06 Ichihashi Masaki Endoscope apparatus
USD598109S1 (en) 2008-08-27 2009-08-11 Deka Products Limited Partnership Graphical user interface module for patient-operated medical device
US20090209826A1 (en) 2008-01-09 2009-08-20 Ezc Medical Llc Intubation systems and methods
US20090216080A1 (en) 2008-02-25 2009-08-27 Kazuhiko Nakamura Electronic communication system and endoscope system
US20090213140A1 (en) 2008-02-26 2009-08-27 Masaru Ito Medical support control system
US20090214089A1 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-08-27 Therametric Technologies, Inc. System and Method for Data Analysis And Capture
WO2009108854A1 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-09-03 The Regents Of The University Of California Feeding tube system
US7585273B2 (en) 2004-08-26 2009-09-08 C2Cure, Inc. Wireless determination of endoscope orientation
US20090225159A1 (en) 2008-03-07 2009-09-10 Scott Schneider Visual inspection device
US20090234220A1 (en) 2008-03-12 2009-09-17 Simens Aktiengesellschaft Catheter and associated medical examination and treatment device
US7591780B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2009-09-22 Sterling Lc Miniaturized imaging device with integrated circuit connector system
US20090237497A1 (en) 2008-03-18 2009-09-24 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Endoscope camera head and method for manufacturing the same
USD601582S1 (en) 2000-01-04 2009-10-06 Apple Inc. User interface for computer display
US20090253955A1 (en) 2005-09-02 2009-10-08 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Electronic endoscope
US20090259097A1 (en) 2008-04-09 2009-10-15 Thompson Ronald J Cannula visualization arrangement
US7604627B2 (en) 2006-05-11 2009-10-20 Kourosh Kojouri Nasopharyngeal sheath for nasogastric intubation
US20090268019A1 (en) 2007-01-16 2009-10-29 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Image pickup apparatus and endoscope
US20090275799A1 (en) 2006-12-21 2009-11-05 Voyage Medical, Inc. Axial visualization systems
US20090299137A1 (en) 2006-05-31 2009-12-03 Wave Group Ltd. Abdominal observation device
US7628752B2 (en) 2005-07-11 2009-12-08 Hoya Corporation Image capturing unit for electronic endoscope
US20090316975A1 (en) 2006-07-28 2009-12-24 Varian Medical Systems International Ag Anatomic orientation in medical images
US20090318757A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2009-12-24 Percuvision, Llc Flexible visually directed medical intubation instrument and method
US20090318798A1 (en) 2008-06-23 2009-12-24 Errol Singh Flexible visually directed medical intubation instrument and method
US20090318797A1 (en) 2008-06-19 2009-12-24 Vision-Sciences Inc. System and method for deflecting endoscopic tools
US20090318758A1 (en) 2004-09-24 2009-12-24 Vivid Medical, Inc. Pluggable vision module and portable display for endoscopy
US20090326481A1 (en) 2008-06-30 2009-12-31 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Discriminating oral-tip adaptor
US20090326321A1 (en) 2008-06-18 2009-12-31 Jacobsen Stephen C Miniaturized Imaging Device Including Multiple GRIN Lenses Optically Coupled to Multiple SSIDs
US20100010302A1 (en) 2007-02-26 2010-01-14 Vision-Sciences Inc. Endoscopic reflector
US20100010334A1 (en) 2005-05-16 2010-01-14 Bleich Jeffery L Spinal access and neural localization
US20100016757A1 (en) 2008-07-10 2010-01-21 Superdimension, Ltd. Integrated Multi-Functional Endoscopic Tool
US7651277B2 (en) 2000-07-17 2010-01-26 Tyco Electronics Corporation Connector and receptacle containing a physical security feature
US20100022824A1 (en) 2008-07-22 2010-01-28 Cybulski James S Tissue modification devices and methods of using the same
USD609350S1 (en) 2009-01-23 2010-02-02 Deka Products Limited Partnership Display for dialysis machine
US20100030057A1 (en) 2004-04-19 2010-02-04 Oren Gavriely Imaging catheter
US20100030138A1 (en) 2004-12-02 2010-02-04 Chek-Med Systems, Inc. Gastrojejunal feeding tube
US20100030020A1 (en) 2006-10-20 2010-02-04 Femsuite Llc Optical surgical device and method of use
US7662151B2 (en) 2006-02-15 2010-02-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Contact sensitive probes
US20100047733A1 (en) 2005-07-12 2010-02-25 Sialo-Lite Ltd. Device, system and method for procedures associated with the intra-oral cavity
US20100063352A1 (en) 2008-09-10 2010-03-11 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscope system and drive control method thereof
US20100063355A1 (en) 2008-09-10 2010-03-11 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscope system and control method for the same
US20100073470A1 (en) 2008-09-22 2010-03-25 Fujifilm Corporation Imaging apparatus and endoscope
US20100081873A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 AiHeart Medical Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for optical viewing and therapeutic intervention in blood vessels
US20100085273A1 (en) 2008-10-02 2010-04-08 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Image display apparatus and image display method
USD614634S1 (en) 2007-12-21 2010-04-27 Laerdal Medical As Icon for a portion of a computer screen for a medical training system
USD615199S1 (en) 2007-11-12 2010-05-04 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Monitor
US7713189B2 (en) 2004-09-11 2010-05-11 Olympus Winter & Ibe Gmbh Video endoscope with a rotatable video camera
US20100121139A1 (en) 2008-11-12 2010-05-13 Ouyang Xiaolong Minimally Invasive Imaging Systems
US20100121155A1 (en) 2008-11-12 2010-05-13 Ouyang Xiaolong Minimally Invasive Tissue Modification Systems With Integrated Visualization
US20100121142A1 (en) 2008-11-12 2010-05-13 Ouyang Xiaolong Minimally Invasive Imaging Device
WO2010066788A2 (en) 2008-12-10 2010-06-17 Ambu A/S Endoscope with a bending portion
US7740578B2 (en) 2006-02-21 2010-06-22 Little Paul K Direct reading endoscopic measuring instrument and method
US20100174141A1 (en) 2009-01-08 2010-07-08 Zvika Gilad Device and method for assembling in vivo sensing devices
US20100179384A1 (en) 2008-04-25 2010-07-15 Hans David Hoeg Wirelessly Powered Medical Devices And Instruments
US20100191053A1 (en) 2009-01-28 2010-07-29 Cani Optical Systems, Llc Portable Endoscope For Diverse Medical Disciplines
US20100198009A1 (en) 2004-09-24 2010-08-05 Vivid Medical, Inc. Disposable endoscope and portable display
US7773122B2 (en) 1999-05-27 2010-08-10 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Image pick-up module and method for assembling such an image pick-up module
USD621515S1 (en) 2009-06-02 2010-08-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Skin analyzing device
US20100204561A1 (en) 2009-02-11 2010-08-12 Voyage Medical, Inc. Imaging catheters having irrigation
US20100204546A1 (en) 2007-05-10 2010-08-12 Noam Hassidov Semi disposable endoscope
US20100211005A1 (en) 2005-02-01 2010-08-19 Edwards Eric S Apparatus and methods for self-administration of vaccines and other medicaments
US7780650B2 (en) 2005-05-04 2010-08-24 Spirus Medical, Inc. Rotate-to-advance catheterization system
US7787939B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2010-08-31 Sterling Lc Miniaturized imaging device including utility aperture and SSID
US7789823B2 (en) 2004-05-14 2010-09-07 Olympus Corporation Endoscope and endoscope apparatus
US20100230140A1 (en) 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Wistron Corporation Rigid-flex printed circuit board module, and manufacturing method and processing method therefor
US20100249507A1 (en) * 2009-03-26 2010-09-30 Intuitive Surgical, Inc. Method and system for providing visual guidance to an operator for steering a tip of an endoscopic device toward one or more landmarks in a patient
US20100249639A1 (en) 2009-01-20 2010-09-30 Samir Bhatt Airway management devices, endoscopic conduits, surgical kits, and methods of using the same
US20100249512A1 (en) 2009-03-27 2010-09-30 EndoSphere Surgical, Inc. Cannula with integrated camera and illumination
US7806121B2 (en) 2005-12-22 2010-10-05 Restoration Robotics, Inc. Follicular unit transplantation planner and methods of its use
WO2010123858A2 (en) 2009-04-20 2010-10-28 Envisionier Medical Technologies, Inc. Imaging system
US20100280316A1 (en) 2007-06-28 2010-11-04 Dietz Dennis R Catheter
US7831070B1 (en) 2005-02-18 2010-11-09 Authentec, Inc. Dynamic finger detection mechanism for a fingerprint sensor
US20100286475A1 (en) 2009-05-08 2010-11-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoscope with distal tip having encased optical components and display orientation capabilities
US20100286477A1 (en) 2009-05-08 2010-11-11 Ouyang Xiaolong Internal tissue visualization system comprising a rf-shielded visualization sensor module
US20100305503A1 (en) 2009-04-09 2010-12-02 John Fang Optically guided feeding tube, catheters and associated methods
US7846091B2 (en) 1999-01-26 2010-12-07 Newton Laboratories, Inc. Autofluorescence imaging system for endoscopy
US7850370B2 (en) 2007-08-01 2010-12-14 Ortronics, Inc. Positional differentiating connector assembly
US7860555B2 (en) 2005-02-02 2010-12-28 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue visualization and manipulation system
US7860556B2 (en) 2005-02-02 2010-12-28 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue imaging and extraction systems
US20110004058A1 (en) 2006-01-30 2011-01-06 Vision - Sciences Inc. Controllable Endoscope
US20110009694A1 (en) 2009-07-10 2011-01-13 Schultz Eric E Hand-held minimally dimensioned diagnostic device having integrated distal end visualization
US20110015614A1 (en) 2008-12-16 2011-01-20 Rykhus Jr Robert L Needleless injection device components, systems, and methods
US20110034769A1 (en) 1997-10-06 2011-02-10 Micro-Imaging Solutions Llc Reduced area imaging device incorporated within wireless endoscopic devices
US20110036965A1 (en) 2009-08-14 2011-02-17 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd Electronic device having adjustable table stand
WO2011018812A1 (en) 2009-08-10 2011-02-17 Alberto Bauer System and method to execute tracheal intubation
US20110037876A1 (en) 2009-08-13 2011-02-17 Olive Medical Corp. System, apparatus and methods for providing a single use imaging device for sterile environments
US7898085B2 (en) 2002-12-25 2011-03-01 Olympus Corporation Solid-state imaging device and manufacturing method thereof
US7896802B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2011-03-01 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope insertion portion
US7901353B2 (en) 2005-04-04 2011-03-08 Invuity, Inc. Illuminated cannula
US7901348B2 (en) 2003-12-12 2011-03-08 University Of Washington Catheterscope 3D guidance and interface system
US7914448B2 (en) 2005-07-01 2011-03-29 invendo medical, GmbH Cooling means for electronic components preferably of an endoscope
US7922654B2 (en) 2004-08-09 2011-04-12 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Fiber optic imaging catheter
US7930016B1 (en) 2005-02-02 2011-04-19 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue closure system
US20110098530A1 (en) 2008-06-17 2011-04-28 Fujifilm Corp. Electronic endoscope
US20110113329A1 (en) 2009-11-09 2011-05-12 Michael Pusateri Multi-touch sensing device for use with radiological workstations and associated methods of use
US7942814B2 (en) 2001-10-19 2011-05-17 Visionscope Technologies Llc Miniature endoscope with imaging fiber system
USD638943S1 (en) 2010-05-21 2011-05-31 Lead Technology Capital Management, Llc Eye tracking device
US20110130627A1 (en) 2009-11-30 2011-06-02 King Systems Corporation Visualization Instrument
US20110130631A1 (en) 2009-11-30 2011-06-02 Romana Geisser Adapter device to couple an endoscope with a medical appliance
US20110137118A1 (en) 2009-10-06 2011-06-09 Apple Biomedical, Inc. Medical inspection device
US20110137127A1 (en) 2009-12-08 2011-06-09 Ai Medical Devices, Inc. Dual screen intubation system
US20110137117A1 (en) 2002-03-18 2011-06-09 Jacobsen Stephen C Miniaturized Imaging Device Including GRIN Lens Optically Coupled to SSID
US20110144481A1 (en) 2008-08-28 2011-06-16 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. A device, apparatus and method for obtaining physiological signals by way of a feeding tube
US20110152613A1 (en) 2008-04-14 2011-06-23 Carnegie Mellon University Articulated device with visualization system
US20110160537A1 (en) 2009-12-24 2011-06-30 Tien-Sheng Chen Stylet with a Camera Device
US20110160535A1 (en) 2006-08-04 2011-06-30 Avantis Medical Systems, Inc. Surgical access port with embedded imaging device
US7976459B2 (en) 2006-10-17 2011-07-12 Intra L.L.C. Portable endoscope for intubation
US20110172687A1 (en) 2010-01-11 2011-07-14 Woodruff Scott A Telemetry Device with Software User Input Features
US7985213B2 (en) 2003-04-25 2011-07-26 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Delivery catheter and method of manufacture
US7993264B2 (en) 2006-11-09 2011-08-09 Ams Research Corporation Orientation adapter for injection tube in flexible endoscope
US20110196204A1 (en) 2010-02-11 2011-08-11 Al Medical Devices, Inc. Shape-conforming intubation device
US7998062B2 (en) 2004-03-29 2011-08-16 Superdimension, Ltd. Endoscope structures and techniques for navigating to a target in branched structure
US20110201882A1 (en) 2010-02-18 2011-08-18 Ai Medical Devices, Inc. Endotracheal tube exchanger and detachable stylet assembly therefor
USD643936S1 (en) 2010-09-17 2011-08-23 Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation Controller for liquid chromatograph analyzer
USD644246S1 (en) 2007-06-23 2011-08-30 Apple Inc. Icon for a portion of a display screen
US20110218400A1 (en) 2010-03-05 2011-09-08 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical instrument with integrated wireless camera
US8016749B2 (en) 2006-03-21 2011-09-13 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Vision catheter having electromechanical navigation
US20110245605A1 (en) 2009-10-01 2011-10-06 Jacobsen Stephen C Needle Delivered Imaging Device
US20110245608A1 (en) 2010-03-31 2011-10-06 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscopic imaging device and endoscope apparatus
US20110245606A1 (en) 2010-03-31 2011-10-06 Kentaro Hayashi Endoscopic gaseous material feed system
US20110245607A1 (en) 2010-03-31 2011-10-06 Kentaro Hayashi Endoscopic gaseous material feed system
WO2011126812A1 (en) 2010-03-29 2011-10-13 Endoclear, Llc Airway cleaning and visualization
US20110251456A1 (en) 2009-10-01 2011-10-13 Jacobsen Stephen C Method and Apparatus For Viewing A Body Cavity
US20110249025A1 (en) 2010-04-07 2011-10-13 Omron Corporation Image processing apparatus
US20110249106A1 (en) 2010-04-07 2011-10-13 Olympus Corporation Image pickup apparatus, endoscope and manufacturing method for image pickup apparatus
US20110257478A1 (en) 2010-04-20 2011-10-20 Spinewindow Llc Method and apparatus for performing retro peritoneal dissection
US20110255760A1 (en) 2006-11-22 2011-10-20 General Electric Company Systems and methods for synchronized image viewing with an image atlas
US20110263938A1 (en) 2009-06-18 2011-10-27 Avi Levy Multi-camera endoscope
US8049061B2 (en) 2008-09-25 2011-11-01 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Expandable member formed of a fibrous matrix having hydrogel polymer for intraluminal drug delivery
US8050746B2 (en) 2005-02-02 2011-11-01 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue visualization device and method variations
US20110270295A1 (en) 2010-02-17 2011-11-03 Reprise Technologies, Llc System and method for image-guided arthroscopy
US8052596B2 (en) 2008-08-14 2011-11-08 Korea Plant Service & Engineering Co., Ltd. Arc-shaped flexible printed circuit film type endoscope using imaging device
US20110275894A1 (en) 2004-02-10 2011-11-10 Mackin Robert A Catheter with camera and illuminator at distal end
US20110282144A1 (en) 2008-11-17 2011-11-17 Mayo Foundation For Medical Education And Research Diagnostic capsules, delivery/retrieval systems, kits and methods
US20110288372A1 (en) 2008-12-10 2011-11-24 Lasse Kjeld Gjoeske Petersen Endoscope having a camera housing and method for making a camera housing
US20110289441A1 (en) 2010-05-20 2011-11-24 General Electric Company Anatomy map navigator systems and methods of use
US8069420B2 (en) 2004-12-29 2011-11-29 Karl Storz Endoscopy-America, Inc. System for controlling the communication of medical imaging data
US20110295061A1 (en) 2010-05-10 2011-12-01 Nanamed, Llc Method and device for imaging an interior surface of a corporeal cavity
US20110294361A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2011-12-01 Andreas Schrader Electric plug-in connection system
US20110295072A1 (en) 2006-04-20 2011-12-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Imaging assembly with transparent distal cap
US20110301415A1 (en) 2007-04-04 2011-12-08 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscopic system that uses overtube
US8075477B2 (en) 2005-01-17 2011-12-13 Olympus Corporation Electric connector for endoscope, endoscope, and method for assembling electric connector
USD650484S1 (en) 2010-10-27 2011-12-13 Panasonic Corporation Medical ultrasound equipment
US8075583B2 (en) 2001-09-19 2011-12-13 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Catheter with a polyimide distal tip
US20110311116A1 (en) 2010-06-17 2011-12-22 Creighton University System and methods for anatomical structure labeling
US20120006950A1 (en) 2010-07-07 2012-01-12 Jesse Vandiver Pivoting stand for a display device
US20120010469A1 (en) 2010-06-03 2012-01-12 Somedics Rd Catheter guiding tool
US20120029279A1 (en) 2010-07-29 2012-02-02 Kucklick Theodore R Arthroscopic System
US20120029290A1 (en) 2009-12-24 2012-02-02 Olympus Corporation Endoscope apparatus and optical adapter used in the endoscope apparatus
US20120058457A1 (en) 2004-11-30 2012-03-08 Savitsky Eric A Multimodal Ultrasound Training System
US20120062714A1 (en) 2009-05-08 2012-03-15 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Real-time scope tracking and branch labeling without electro-magnetic tracking and pre-operative scan roadmaps
WO2012033936A2 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-03-15 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Catheter with imaging assembly
US8139296B2 (en) 2008-02-12 2012-03-20 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Reimaging optical system and endoscope using the same
US20120071723A1 (en) 2010-09-21 2012-03-22 Olympus Corporation Endoscope apparatus and measurement method
US20120078174A1 (en) 2010-09-27 2012-03-29 Kok-Ming Tai Configurable Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube
USD657059S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2012-04-03 Esaote Europe B.V. Portable ecography machine
US20120084680A1 (en) 2010-10-01 2012-04-05 Imerj LLC Gesture capture for manipulation of presentations on one or more device displays
US8152712B2 (en) 2008-03-11 2012-04-10 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscope system and method for inspecting electronic endoscope
US8152560B2 (en) 2010-04-19 2012-04-10 Tyco Electronics Corporation Connectivity sensing assembly
US20120086790A1 (en) 2010-10-12 2012-04-12 Masayuki Takahira Endoscope apparatus
USD658295S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2012-04-24 Esaote Europe B.V. Portable ecography machine
US8162825B2 (en) 2005-02-15 2012-04-24 Olympus Corporation Endoscope
US8162820B2 (en) 2006-05-17 2012-04-24 Kent Moore Stereovideoscope and method of using the same
US20120108960A1 (en) 2010-11-03 2012-05-03 Halmann Menachem Nahi Method and system for organizing stored ultrasound data
US8172864B2 (en) 2003-05-12 2012-05-08 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Balloon catheter with improved pushability
USD659836S1 (en) 2009-12-29 2012-05-15 Cardionet, Inc. Portable heart monitor
US8183510B2 (en) 2008-02-12 2012-05-22 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. Image sensor with buried self aligned focusing element
US20120130171A1 (en) 2010-11-18 2012-05-24 C2Cure Inc. Endoscope guidance based on image matching
US20120131488A1 (en) 2010-11-23 2012-05-24 David Karlsson Gui controls with movable touch-control objects for alternate interactions
US20120136212A1 (en) 2010-11-30 2012-05-31 Komukai Makito Illumination optical unit for endoscope and method of manufacturing the same
US8194122B2 (en) 2002-03-12 2012-06-05 Karl Storz Imaging, Inc. Universal scope reader
US8194121B2 (en) 2002-05-16 2012-06-05 C2Cure, Inc. Miniature camera head
US8199187B2 (en) 2004-09-30 2012-06-12 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Adapter for use with digital imaging medical device
US8206289B2 (en) 2008-03-12 2012-06-26 Olympus Corporation Electric connection portion and adaptor endoscope
US8206374B2 (en) 2010-03-15 2012-06-26 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Catheter having improved traceability
US8211128B1 (en) 2004-10-15 2012-07-03 Facundus Edward C Multifunction gastric bypass apparatus and method
US8216185B2 (en) 2008-10-20 2012-07-10 Berger J Lee Cannulated apertured grooved director
US8228369B2 (en) 2008-03-31 2012-07-24 Olympus Corporation Endoscope apparatus
US20120190922A1 (en) 2011-01-24 2012-07-26 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscope system
US8231522B2 (en) 2008-09-18 2012-07-31 Fujifilm Corporation Electronic endoscope system
US20120197078A1 (en) 2011-01-31 2012-08-02 Eric Stanley Insufflation needle with integrated image sensor
US20120197086A1 (en) 2011-01-31 2012-08-02 Nellcor Puritan Bennett Llc Medical visualization technique and apparatus
US8235887B2 (en) 2006-01-23 2012-08-07 Avantis Medical Systems, Inc. Endoscope assembly with retroscope
US20120203065A1 (en) * 2011-02-04 2012-08-09 The Penn State Research Foundation Global and semi-global registration for image-based bronchoscopy guidance
US8241199B2 (en) 2009-03-23 2012-08-14 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Blood pump, medical apparatus having a blood pump and method for assisting the positioning of a blood pump
US8265732B2 (en) 2000-08-23 2012-09-11 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Catheter locator apparatus and method of use
US8262559B2 (en) 2008-04-11 2012-09-11 Storz Endoskop Produktions Gmbh Apparatus and method for endoscopic 3D data collection
US8262622B2 (en) 2003-10-28 2012-09-11 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Surgical gel seal
US20120242814A1 (en) 2011-03-25 2012-09-27 Kenneth Kubala Miniature Wafer-Level Camera Modules
US8280205B2 (en) 2010-07-23 2012-10-02 Tyco Electronics Corporation Fiber optic connector and alignment mechanism for single lens multi-fiber connector
US8285362B2 (en) 2007-06-28 2012-10-09 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Catheter with deflectable imaging device
US8292874B2 (en) 1998-10-23 2012-10-23 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Catheter having improved bonding region
US8297440B2 (en) 2011-01-04 2012-10-30 Fellowes, Inc. Case with support mechanism for an electronic device having a screen
US8308637B2 (en) 2003-10-06 2012-11-13 Olympus Corporation Endoscope
US8314835B2 (en) 2009-01-23 2012-11-20 Olympus Corporation Endoscope adapter including light emitting diode, and adapter type endoscope
US8317689B1 (en) 1999-09-13 2012-11-27 Visionscope Technologies Llc Miniature endoscope system
US20120316515A1 (en) 2009-12-23 2012-12-13 C.R. Bard ,Inc. Catheter Assembly/Package Utilizing a Hydrating/Hydrogel Sleeve and Method of Making and Using the Same
US8336541B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2012-12-25 Ai Medical Devices, Inc. Endotracheal intubation device
US20130007668A1 (en) 2011-07-01 2013-01-03 James Chia-Ming Liu Multi-visor: managing applications in head mounted displays
US8360964B2 (en) 2007-12-10 2013-01-29 Stryker Corporation Wide angle HDTV endoscope
US20130027533A1 (en) 2010-07-02 2013-01-31 Intuitive Surgical Operations, Inc. Dual optical path prism and camera in a minimally invasive surgical system
US20130030249A1 (en) 2009-02-06 2013-01-31 Endoclear Llc Visualized endotracheal tube placement systems
US8386023B2 (en) 2001-12-31 2013-02-26 Infraredx, Inc. Catheter probe arrangement for tissue analysis by radiant energy delivery and radiant energy collection
US8390995B2 (en) 2011-04-07 2013-03-05 Wistron Corporation Adjusting device of adjusting a view angle of a panel module and computer system having the same
US8388376B2 (en) 2008-07-01 2013-03-05 Fujifilm Corporation Electronic endoscope
US20130066150A1 (en) 2011-09-09 2013-03-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Zoom lens module and endoscope system including the same
US20130067397A1 (en) 2011-09-12 2013-03-14 Microsoft Corporation Control area for a touch screen
US8400767B2 (en) 2010-01-06 2013-03-19 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Electronic apparatus with stable support member system
US8403836B2 (en) 2009-02-13 2013-03-26 Fujifilm Corporation Light guide, light source apparatus and endoscope system
US8408269B2 (en) 2006-07-28 2013-04-02 Novadaq Technologies, Inc. System and method for deposition and removal of an optical element on an endoscope objective
US8409081B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2013-04-02 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Illumination light application structure and endoscope provided with the same
US8408815B2 (en) 2009-06-18 2013-04-02 Senko Advanced Components, Inc. Optical fiber connector and adapter
US8421626B2 (en) 2006-10-31 2013-04-16 Corning Cable Systems, Llc Radio frequency identification transponder for communicating condition of a component
US8425405B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2013-04-23 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Electronic endoscope apparatus
US20130103000A1 (en) 2011-09-09 2013-04-25 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Catheter assembly
US8444802B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2013-05-21 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Catheter having a readily bondable multilayer soft tip
US20130128020A1 (en) 2010-07-23 2013-05-23 Olympus Corporation Image pickup apparatus, endoscope and image pickup apparatus manufacturing method
US8454578B2 (en) 2009-02-18 2013-06-04 AUST Development, LLC Apparatus and methods for making coated liners and tubular devices including such liners
US20130155591A1 (en) 2011-12-20 2013-06-20 Fujitsu Limited Electronic apparatus
US8471392B2 (en) 2010-02-15 2013-06-25 Olympus Corporation Semiconductor apparatus and endoscope apparatus
US20130162789A1 (en) 2011-12-22 2013-06-27 Himax Imaging Limited Endoscope with a light source
US20130172678A1 (en) 2011-12-29 2013-07-04 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Space-optimized visualization catheter with oblong shape
US20130169777A1 (en) 2011-12-28 2013-07-04 Olympus Corporation Imaging mechanism and endoscope apparatus
US20130177222A1 (en) 2012-01-09 2013-07-11 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Systems, methods and computer readable storage media storing instructions for generating an image series
US8486023B2 (en) 2005-06-14 2013-07-16 Stephen T. Pyles Intrathecal catheter having a stylet with a curved tip
US20130184683A1 (en) 2011-07-25 2013-07-18 Mina W.B. Chow Devices and methods for transnasal dilation and irrigation of the sinuses
US20130184584A1 (en) 2012-01-17 2013-07-18 Richard E. Berkey Systems and methods for computerized ultrasound image interpretation and labeling
US20130188030A1 (en) 2010-09-10 2013-07-25 Olympus Corporation Image pickup unit and endoscope distal end portion including the image pickup unit
US8496580B2 (en) 2004-05-14 2013-07-30 G.I. View Ltd. Omnidirectional and forward-looking imaging device
US8496001B2 (en) 2005-06-08 2013-07-30 Dräger Medical GmbH Process and device for the automatic identification of breathing tubes
US8496574B2 (en) 2009-12-17 2013-07-30 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Selectively positionable camera for surgical guide tube assembly
US20130197484A1 (en) 2012-01-31 2013-08-01 Dane T. Seddon Methods and systems for attaching medical device sections
US20130198687A1 (en) 2012-01-30 2013-08-01 Ian Douglas Bird Selection of presets for the visualization of image data sets
US8512232B2 (en) 2009-09-08 2013-08-20 Gyrus Acmi, Inc. Endoscopic illumination system, assembly and methods for staged illumination of different target areas
US8514556B2 (en) 2010-10-28 2013-08-20 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Electronic device with support mechanism
US20130216112A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Joachim Graessner Structured, image-assisted finding generation
US20130231533A1 (en) 2011-05-23 2013-09-05 Stephanos Papademetriou Medical applications of a miniature videoscope
US20130245568A1 (en) 2012-03-13 2013-09-19 Marshall Kerr Catheter having antimicrobial coating
US20130250061A1 (en) 2010-12-09 2013-09-26 Scholly Fiberoptic Gmbh Endoscope and method for recording at least one stereoscopic image by means of an endoscope
US20130253348A1 (en) 2009-10-08 2013-09-26 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan Real time clinical decision support system having linked references
US20130250079A1 (en) 2010-11-26 2013-09-26 Olympus Corporation Fluorescence endoscope apparatus
US8547689B2 (en) 2005-11-09 2013-10-01 George Moser Reconfigurable computer
US20130265403A1 (en) 2011-09-22 2013-10-10 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope
US8556806B2 (en) 2004-09-24 2013-10-15 Vivid Medical, Inc. Wavelength multiplexing endoscope
US20130271588A1 (en) 2010-12-09 2013-10-17 Yaniv Kirma Flexible Electronic Circuit Board for a Multi-Camera Endoscope
US8568159B2 (en) 2011-03-04 2013-10-29 Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd. Connector
US8574192B2 (en) 2007-03-02 2013-11-05 Covidien Lp Catheter tunneling systems, instruments and methods
US8585586B2 (en) 2010-06-08 2013-11-19 Fujifilm Corporation Electronic endoscope system, processor for electronic endoscope, and target tracing method
US8587710B2 (en) 2009-09-24 2013-11-19 Pantech Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for controlling picture using image recognition
US8591407B2 (en) 2001-01-25 2013-11-26 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoscopic vision system
US20130317300A1 (en) 2010-09-23 2013-11-28 George Berci Simultaneous Display Video Laryngoscope And Video Stylet
US8600133B2 (en) 2008-10-01 2013-12-03 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Selection of snapshots of a medical image sequence
US8597179B2 (en) 2009-07-23 2013-12-03 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope apparatus
US8599264B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2013-12-03 Fluke Corporation Comparison of infrared images
US20130324968A1 (en) 2003-05-21 2013-12-05 Jeffrey A. Klein Infiltration cannula
USD695410S1 (en) 2010-11-15 2013-12-10 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Monitor
US8602979B2 (en) 2011-03-31 2013-12-10 Fujifilm Corporation Electronic endoscope having front-view and side-view image capturing
US20140052475A1 (en) 2012-08-16 2014-02-20 Ginger.io, Inc. Method for modeling behavior and health changes

Family Cites Families (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH0549595A (en) * 1991-08-26 1993-03-02 Olympus Optical Co Ltd Injecting apparatus for liquid medicine for endoscope
JP3514979B2 (en) * 1998-08-06 2004-04-05 オリンパス株式会社 Endoscope apparatus
US6464632B1 (en) 1999-02-13 2002-10-15 James M. Taylor Flexible inner liner for the working channel of an endoscope
JP4468525B2 (en) * 1999-11-25 2010-05-26 オリンパス株式会社 The endoscope system
JP2003209751A (en) * 2002-01-16 2003-07-25 Olympus Optical Co Ltd Solid-state imaging apparatus
US20090231419A1 (en) * 2007-02-06 2009-09-17 Avantis Medical Systems, Inc. Endoscope Assembly and Method of Performing a Medical Procedure
WO2006074510A1 (en) * 2005-01-14 2006-07-20 Micronix Pty Ltd Guiding insert assembly for a catheter used with a catheter position guidance system
US20080103375A1 (en) 2006-09-22 2008-05-01 Kiani Massi E Patient monitor user interface
JP4981397B2 (en) * 2006-10-04 2012-07-18 オリンパスメディカルシステムズ株式会社 Medical image processing system
JP2008130659A (en) * 2006-11-17 2008-06-05 Olympus Corp Circuit board module
US8556807B2 (en) * 2006-12-21 2013-10-15 Intuitive Surgical Operations, Inc. Hermetically sealed distal sensor endoscope
DE102007000109A1 (en) * 2007-02-22 2008-08-28 Invendo Medical Gmbh Electrical connector device with integrated hydraulic / pneumatic connections
CN101969840B (en) 2008-03-10 2013-04-03 皇家飞利浦电子股份有限公司 Watertight cardiac monitoring system
US8888686B2 (en) * 2009-09-23 2014-11-18 Entellus Medical, Inc. Endoscope system for treatment of sinusitis
US20110245609A1 (en) * 2010-03-30 2011-10-06 Vadim Laser Video adapter for laryngoscope

Patent Citations (563)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3633758A (en) 1970-01-09 1972-01-11 North American Instr Corp Catheter storage rack
US3788304A (en) 1971-06-15 1974-01-29 Olympus Optical Co Endoscope
US4146019A (en) 1976-09-30 1979-03-27 University Of Southern California Multichannel endoscope
JPS5449192U (en) 1977-09-12 1979-04-05
US4301790A (en) 1978-08-11 1981-11-24 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Endoscope with electric image transmission
US4253447A (en) 1978-10-16 1981-03-03 Welch Allyn, Inc. Color endoscope with charge coupled device and television viewing
USD267019S (en) 1979-10-22 1982-11-23 Space Odyssey Ltd. Physiological display panel
US4392485A (en) 1981-02-17 1983-07-12 Richard Wolf Gmbh Endoscope
USD281081S (en) 1981-09-15 1985-10-22 Font of symbols
US4491865A (en) 1982-09-29 1985-01-01 Welch Allyn, Inc. Image sensor assembly
US4621284A (en) 1984-06-09 1986-11-04 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Measuring endoscope
US4616630A (en) 1984-08-20 1986-10-14 Fuji Photo Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope with an obtusely angled connecting section
US5242394A (en) 1985-07-30 1993-09-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Steerable dilatation catheter
US5610828A (en) 1986-04-14 1997-03-11 National Instruments Corporation Graphical system for modelling a process and associated method
US4809680A (en) 1986-09-01 1989-03-07 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope tip
US4782819A (en) 1987-02-25 1988-11-08 Adair Edwin Lloyd Optical catheter
US4769014A (en) 1987-06-02 1988-09-06 Superior Biosystems Inc. Gastroenteric feeding tube for endoscopic placement
US4769014B1 (en) 1987-06-02 1990-02-13 Superior Biosystems Inc
EP0299240A2 (en) 1987-07-14 1989-01-18 Richard Wolf GmbH Endoscopic television equipment
US4919651A (en) 1988-04-15 1990-04-24 Santa Barbara Medical Foundation Clinic Catheter having a double lumen and a balloon and method of using the same for controlled operative cholangiography
US4846153A (en) 1988-06-10 1989-07-11 George Berci Intubating video endoscope
US5059182A (en) 1989-04-12 1991-10-22 David H. Laing Portable infusion device
US4996975A (en) 1989-06-01 1991-03-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic endoscope apparatus capable of warning lifetime of electronic scope
US5187579A (en) 1990-01-19 1993-02-16 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Medical image displaying method and apparatus
US5329940A (en) 1990-02-14 1994-07-19 Adair Edwin Lloyd Endotracheal tube intubation assist device
US5025778A (en) 1990-03-26 1991-06-25 Opielab, Inc. Endoscope with potential channels and method of using the same
US5220198A (en) 1990-08-27 1993-06-15 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Solid state imaging apparatus in which a solid state imaging device chip and substrate are face-bonded with each other
US5168863A (en) 1990-08-27 1992-12-08 Medical Concepts, Inc. Sterile endoscopic system
US6339446B1 (en) 1991-01-14 2002-01-15 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscopic image display system and method for the same that displays on hi-vision monitor
US5720293A (en) 1991-01-29 1998-02-24 Baxter International Inc. Diagnostic catheter with memory
US5285778A (en) 1991-04-19 1994-02-15 Mackin Robert A Endotracheal tube wih fibers optic illumination and viewing and auxiliary tube
US5131380A (en) 1991-06-13 1992-07-21 Heller Richard M Softwall medical tube with fiberoptic light conductor therein and method of use
US5353783A (en) 1991-12-09 1994-10-11 Nakao Naomi L Endoscopic method using sheath
US5469254A (en) 1992-04-06 1995-11-21 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for measuring three-dimensional position of a pipe from image of the pipe in an endoscopic observation system
US5423311A (en) 1992-07-06 1995-06-13 Catheter Imaging Systems Catheter imaging apparatus
US5334150A (en) 1992-11-17 1994-08-02 Kaali Steven G Visually directed trocar for laparoscopic surgical procedures and method of using same
US5400771A (en) * 1993-01-21 1995-03-28 Pirak; Leon Endotracheal intubation assembly and related method
US5526928A (en) 1993-01-22 1996-06-18 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Package for packaging a protection cover with channel for endoscope
US5409480A (en) 1993-02-16 1995-04-25 Uram; Martin Laser endoscope system console
US5297477A (en) 1993-03-08 1994-03-29 Bert Phillips Educational egg art toy
US5435339A (en) 1993-04-07 1995-07-25 Kdi American Products Company Manual air relief valve
US5740802A (en) 1993-04-20 1998-04-21 General Electric Company Computer graphic and live video system for enhancing visualization of body structures during surgery
US5896166A (en) 1993-06-02 1999-04-20 Envision Medical Corporation Remote CCD video camera with non-volatile digital memory
US5817015A (en) 1993-06-22 1998-10-06 Adair; Edwin L. Endoscope with reusable core and disposable sheath with passageways
US5830121A (en) 1993-10-27 1998-11-03 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Endoscopic apparatus having an endoscope and a peripheral device wherein total usage of the endoscope is quantified and recorded
US5932035A (en) 1993-10-29 1999-08-03 Boston Scientific Corporation Drive shaft for acoustic imaging catheters and flexible catheters
US20030055314A1 (en) 1993-11-23 2003-03-20 Tony Petitto Technique for depth of field viewing of images using an endoscopic instrument
US5665064A (en) 1993-12-06 1997-09-09 Sherwood Medical Company Gastroenteric feeding tube for endoscopic placement and method of use
US5604531A (en) 1994-01-17 1997-02-18 State Of Israel, Ministry Of Defense, Armament Development Authority In vivo video camera system
US5645519A (en) 1994-03-18 1997-07-08 Jai S. Lee Endoscopic instrument for controlled introduction of tubular members in the body and methods therefor
US5527261A (en) 1994-08-18 1996-06-18 Welch Allyn, Inc. Remote hand-held diagnostic instrument with video imaging
US5636625A (en) 1994-08-30 1997-06-10 Machida Endoscope Co., Ltd. Tracheal airway apparatus
US5873816A (en) 1994-11-02 1999-02-23 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Electronic endoscope having an insertional portion a part of which is a conductive armor
JPH08191440A (en) 1995-01-10 1996-07-23 Fukuda Denshi Co Ltd Method and device for correcting endoscope image
US6245029B1 (en) 1995-02-21 2001-06-12 Nissho Corporation Stylet and connector therefor
US6612980B2 (en) 1995-07-24 2003-09-02 Medical Media Systems Anatomical visualization system
US20040133074A1 (en) 1995-07-24 2004-07-08 Chen David T. Anatomical visualization system
US7063660B2 (en) 1995-07-24 2006-06-20 Medical Media Systems Anatomical visualization system
US20020007108A1 (en) 1995-07-24 2002-01-17 Chen David T. Anatomical visualization system
US5638819A (en) 1995-08-29 1997-06-17 Manwaring; Kim H. Method and apparatus for guiding an instrument to a target
US5676635A (en) 1995-08-30 1997-10-14 Levin; Bruce Instrument for insertion of an endotracheal tube
USD398595S (en) 1995-08-31 1998-09-22 International Business Machines Corporation Computer monitor screen with a graphical window
USD390666S (en) 1995-12-05 1998-02-10 Minidoc AB Patient computer for controlled individualized medication
US5989230A (en) 1996-01-11 1999-11-23 Essex Technology, Inc. Rotate to advance catheterization system
US5772693A (en) 1996-02-09 1998-06-30 Cardiac Control Systems, Inc. Single preformed catheter configuration for a dual-chamber pacemaker system
JP2002214127A (en) 1996-02-27 2002-07-31 Massachusetts Inst Of Technol <Mit> Method and device for performing optical measurement by using optical fiber imaging guide wire, catheter or endoscope
US6004263A (en) 1996-03-13 1999-12-21 Hihon Kohden Corporation Endoscope with detachable operation unit and insertion unit
US6554765B1 (en) 1996-07-15 2003-04-29 East Giant Limited Hand held, portable camera with adaptable lens system
US6692432B1 (en) 1996-07-15 2004-02-17 East Giant Limited Hand-held portable camera for producing video images of an object
US6198963B1 (en) 1996-07-17 2001-03-06 Biosense, Inc. Position confirmation with learn and test functions
US6364827B1 (en) 1996-07-29 2002-04-02 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Endoscope with at least one sensing and recording device
US6115523A (en) 1996-10-04 2000-09-05 University Of Florida Plastic optical fiber airway imaging system
US6322498B1 (en) 1996-10-04 2001-11-27 University Of Florida Imaging scope
US6053313A (en) 1996-10-25 2000-04-25 Ave Connaught Catheter packaging system
US5941816A (en) 1997-04-15 1999-08-24 Clarus Medical Systems, Inc. Viewing system with adapter handle for medical breathing tubes
US6468212B1 (en) 1997-04-19 2002-10-22 Adalberto Vara User control interface for an ultrasound processor
USD391247S (en) 1997-05-27 1998-02-24 Fujitsu Limited "Activate application of iimage data" icon for a display screen
USD393850S (en) 1997-06-12 1998-04-28 Boston Technology, Inc. Icon for a computer display
US5908294A (en) 1997-06-12 1999-06-01 Schick Technologies, Inc Dental imaging system with lamps and method
US5848691A (en) 1997-07-07 1998-12-15 Wilson-Cook Medical Inc. Package for sphincterotome or catheter including structure maintaining shape of distal tip
US6120435A (en) 1997-07-16 2000-09-19 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope system in which operation switch sets designed to function and be handled same way are included in endoscope and image processing apparatus respectively
US6117071A (en) 1997-07-29 2000-09-12 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Endoscope with movable imaging unit for zooming or focusing
US6911027B1 (en) 1997-08-15 2005-06-28 Somnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Device for the ablation of tissue
USD406894S (en) 1997-09-23 1999-03-16 Cobe Laboratories, Inc. Apheresis system
US5986693A (en) 1997-10-06 1999-11-16 Adair; Edwin L. Reduced area imaging devices incorporated within surgical instruments
US5929901A (en) 1997-10-06 1999-07-27 Adair; Edwin L. Reduced area imaging devices incorporated within surgical instruments
US6043839A (en) 1997-10-06 2000-03-28 Adair; Edwin L. Reduced area imaging devices
US20110034769A1 (en) 1997-10-06 2011-02-10 Micro-Imaging Solutions Llc Reduced area imaging device incorporated within wireless endoscopic devices
US5913816A (en) 1997-10-31 1999-06-22 Imagyn Medical Technologies, Inc. Intubation device and method
US6447444B1 (en) 1997-11-04 2002-09-10 Sightline Technologies Ltd. Video rectoscope
US6310642B1 (en) 1997-11-24 2001-10-30 Micro-Medical Devices, Inc. Reduced area imaging devices incorporated within surgical instruments
US6543447B2 (en) 1997-12-01 2003-04-08 Saturn Biomedical Systems Inc Intubation instrument
US5938603A (en) 1997-12-01 1999-08-17 Cordis Webster, Inc. Steerable catheter with electromagnetic sensor
US6655377B2 (en) 1997-12-01 2003-12-02 Saturn Biomedical Systems Inc. Intubation instrument
USD414870S (en) 1998-01-02 1999-10-05 Instromedix, Inc. Vital signs monitor
US5989231A (en) 1998-01-15 1999-11-23 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Optical gastrostomy and jejunostomy
USD412748S (en) 1998-01-22 1999-08-10 Ultraguide, Ltd. Monitor for medical equipment
US6862467B2 (en) 1998-01-26 2005-03-01 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Imaging catheter assembly with distal end inductive coupler and embedded transmission line
US6550475B1 (en) 1998-03-11 2003-04-22 Oldfield Family Holdings Pty. Limited Endotracheal tube for selective bronchial occlusion
US5967988A (en) 1998-04-08 1999-10-19 Medtronic, Inc. Catheter having echogenicity enhancement
US6462770B1 (en) 1998-04-20 2002-10-08 Xillix Technologies Corp. Imaging system with automatic gain control for reflectance and fluorescence endoscopy
US6623480B1 (en) 1998-07-24 2003-09-23 University Of Kentucky Research Foundation Flexible recording/high energy electrode catheter with anchor for ablation of atrial flutter by radio frequency energy
US6814727B2 (en) 1998-08-05 2004-11-09 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Automatic/manual longitudinal position translator and rotary drive system for catheters
US6099354A (en) 1998-08-10 2000-08-08 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Planar connector
US8292874B2 (en) 1998-10-23 2012-10-23 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Catheter having improved bonding region
USD426204S (en) 1998-11-09 2000-06-06 Alliedsignal Inc. Housing for computerized diagnostic system
US7846091B2 (en) 1999-01-26 2010-12-07 Newton Laboratories, Inc. Autofluorescence imaging system for endoscopy
USD456027S1 (en) 1999-03-30 2002-04-23 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Graphic operating element for a medical monitor
USD491954S1 (en) 1999-03-30 2004-06-22 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Graphic user interface for a medical monitor
US20090177032A1 (en) 1999-04-14 2009-07-09 Garibaldi Jeffrey M Method and apparatus for magnetically controlling endoscopes in body lumens and cavities
US7048687B1 (en) 1999-04-14 2006-05-23 Ob Scientific, Inc. Limited use medical probe
US7773122B2 (en) 1999-05-27 2010-08-10 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Image pick-up module and method for assembling such an image pick-up module
US20040111081A1 (en) 1999-06-02 2004-06-10 Whitman Michael P. Electro-mechanical surgical device
USD447569S1 (en) 1999-06-16 2001-09-04 Huntleigh Technology, Plc Medical device casing
US6547757B1 (en) 1999-07-30 2003-04-15 Biotronik Mess-und Therapiegeräte GmbH & Co. Ingenieurbüro Berlin Catheter
US7022075B2 (en) 1999-08-20 2006-04-04 Zonare Medical Systems, Inc. User interface for handheld imaging devices
US6237604B1 (en) 1999-09-07 2001-05-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Systems and methods for preventing automatic identification of re-used single use devices
US8317689B1 (en) 1999-09-13 2012-11-27 Visionscope Technologies Llc Miniature endoscope system
USD470505S1 (en) 1999-09-30 2003-02-18 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Icon of a user interface for a medical playback device
USD455760S1 (en) 1999-09-30 2002-04-16 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Icon of a user interface for a medical playback device
USD465789S1 (en) 1999-09-30 2002-11-19 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Graphic operating icon of a user interface for a portion of a medical playback device
US6890298B2 (en) 1999-10-14 2005-05-10 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Video laryngoscope with detachable light and image guides
USD601582S1 (en) 2000-01-04 2009-10-06 Apple Inc. User interface for computer display
US6458076B1 (en) 2000-02-01 2002-10-01 5 Star Medical Multi-lumen medical device
WO2001067964A2 (en) 2000-03-16 2001-09-20 Medigus Ltd. Fundoplication apparatus and method
US20040210295A1 (en) 2000-03-24 2004-10-21 Stephen Brushey Anesthesia conduction catheter for delivery of electrical stimulus
US6902529B2 (en) 2000-04-10 2005-06-07 Olympus Corporation Endoscope apparatus
US6712760B2 (en) 2000-04-10 2004-03-30 Pentax Corporation Television device of portable endoscope
US6692430B2 (en) 2000-04-10 2004-02-17 C2Cure Inc. Intra vascular imaging apparatus
US6712756B1 (en) 2000-05-19 2004-03-30 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope system having transponder for discriminating endoscope
US6626828B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2003-09-30 The University Of Tokyo Body cavity-observing apparatus
US7651277B2 (en) 2000-07-17 2010-01-26 Tyco Electronics Corporation Connector and receptacle containing a physical security feature
US20020126960A1 (en) 2000-07-17 2002-09-12 Michael Gurreri Connector and receptacle containing a physical security feature
US6565506B2 (en) 2000-07-28 2003-05-20 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscope
US6520916B1 (en) 2000-08-02 2003-02-18 Medtronic, Inc. Ultrasound imaging system and method for implantable and invasive devices
US8606347B2 (en) 2000-08-23 2013-12-10 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Catheter locator apparatus and method of use
US8265732B2 (en) 2000-08-23 2012-09-11 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Catheter locator apparatus and method of use
US20130035589A1 (en) 2000-08-23 2013-02-07 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Catheter locator apparatus and method of use
US6553241B2 (en) 2000-08-31 2003-04-22 Mallinckrodt Inc. Oximeter sensor with digital memory encoding sensor expiration data
US20070113204A1 (en) 2000-10-06 2007-05-17 Lg Electronics Inc. Method of displaying menus in mobile telephone
US7660453B2 (en) 2000-10-11 2010-02-09 Imaging Therapeutics, Inc. Methods and devices for analysis of x-ray images
US20030112921A1 (en) 2000-10-11 2003-06-19 Philipp Lang Methods and devices for analysis of x-ray images
US6585639B1 (en) 2000-10-27 2003-07-01 Pulmonx Sheath and method for reconfiguring lung viewing scope
US6966876B2 (en) 2000-11-03 2005-11-22 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Device for holding and positioning an endoscopic instrument
WO2002055126A2 (en) 2001-01-11 2002-07-18 Given Imaging Ltd. Device and system for in-vivo procedures
US8591407B2 (en) 2001-01-25 2013-11-26 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoscopic vision system
EP1707123B1 (en) 2001-03-02 2008-06-18 Boston Scientific Limited Imaging catheter for use inside a guiding catheter
USD466519S1 (en) 2001-06-05 2002-12-03 Mobigence, Inc. Display arrangement for a keypad
US20040171914A1 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-09-02 Dov Avni In vivo sensing device with a circuit board having rigid sections and flexible sections
US7033316B2 (en) 2001-07-06 2006-04-25 Pentax Corporation Endoscope system
US7151956B2 (en) 2001-07-12 2006-12-19 Moritex Corporation Imaging apparatus and an imaging head used therefor
US6929600B2 (en) 2001-07-24 2005-08-16 Stephen D. Hill Apparatus for intubation
USD459477S1 (en) 2001-07-30 2002-06-25 I.N. Incorporated Ventilator housing and stand
US6986738B2 (en) 2001-08-06 2006-01-17 Given Imaging Ltd System and method for maneuvering a device in vivo
US20030060678A1 (en) 2001-08-29 2003-03-27 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Endoscopic image filing system
US7063663B2 (en) 2001-09-07 2006-06-20 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Endoscopic system with a solid-state light source
US8075583B2 (en) 2001-09-19 2011-12-13 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Catheter with a polyimide distal tip
USD471226S1 (en) 2001-10-10 2003-03-04 Gray David W Set of characters
USD471227S1 (en) 2001-10-10 2003-03-04 Gray David W Set of characters
US7942814B2 (en) 2001-10-19 2011-05-17 Visionscope Technologies Llc Miniature endoscope with imaging fiber system
US6960161B2 (en) 2001-12-28 2005-11-01 Karl Storz Imaging Inc. Unified electrical and illumination cable for endoscopic video imaging system
US7471310B2 (en) 2001-12-28 2008-12-30 Karl Storz Imaging, Inc. Intelligent camera head
US20050200698A1 (en) 2001-12-28 2005-09-15 Amling Marc R. Updateable endoscopic video imaging system with unified electro-optic cable
US8386023B2 (en) 2001-12-31 2013-02-26 Infraredx, Inc. Catheter probe arrangement for tissue analysis by radiant energy delivery and radiant energy collection
US20040237048A1 (en) 2002-01-22 2004-11-25 Fujitsu Limited Menu item selecting device and method
EP1347638A1 (en) 2002-03-12 2003-09-24 Karl Storz Imaging Inc. Automatic adjustment of endoscopic video camera systems
US8194122B2 (en) 2002-03-12 2012-06-05 Karl Storz Imaging, Inc. Universal scope reader
US7591780B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2009-09-22 Sterling Lc Miniaturized imaging device with integrated circuit connector system
US20110137117A1 (en) 2002-03-18 2011-06-09 Jacobsen Stephen C Miniaturized Imaging Device Including GRIN Lens Optically Coupled to SSID
US7787939B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2010-08-31 Sterling Lc Miniaturized imaging device including utility aperture and SSID
US7270650B2 (en) 2002-04-23 2007-09-18 Medtronic, Inc. Catheter anchor system and method
US7090661B2 (en) 2002-04-23 2006-08-15 Medtronic, Inc. Catheter anchor system and method
US7497825B2 (en) 2002-05-13 2009-03-03 Micron Technology, Inc. Data download to imager chip using image sensor as a receptor
US8194121B2 (en) 2002-05-16 2012-06-05 C2Cure, Inc. Miniature camera head
US7404794B2 (en) 2002-05-22 2008-07-29 Scholly Fiberoptic Gmbh Microendoscope
US6761561B2 (en) 2002-06-07 2004-07-13 Schick Technologies Wireless dental camera
US7126581B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2006-10-24 Panasonic Automotive Systems Company Of America Multimode multizone interface
US6860611B2 (en) 2002-07-01 2005-03-01 Robert Gentz Camera and light apparatus
US20050021182A1 (en) 2002-07-25 2005-01-27 Yulun Wang Medical tele-robotic system
USD483872S1 (en) 2002-09-27 2003-12-16 Baxter International Inc. Display portion for a medical machine
WO2004030526A1 (en) 2002-09-30 2004-04-15 Power Medical Interventions, Inc. Self-contained sterilizable surgical system
US20060025650A1 (en) 2002-10-03 2006-02-02 Oren Gavriely Tube for inspecting internal organs of a body
US20060020171A1 (en) 2002-10-21 2006-01-26 Gilreath Mark G Intubation and imaging device and system
US6875169B2 (en) 2002-10-31 2005-04-05 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Camera unit with a coupling for a detachable light and image guide
US20090069694A1 (en) 2002-11-12 2009-03-12 David Amundson Coronary sinus access catheter with forward-imaging means
EP1421913A1 (en) 2002-11-19 2004-05-26 Surgical Navigation Technologies, Inc. Image guided catheter navigation system for cardiac surgery
US20040097805A1 (en) 2002-11-19 2004-05-20 Laurent Verard Navigation system for cardiac therapies
US7131873B2 (en) 2002-11-25 2006-11-07 Hirose Electric Co., Ltd. Electrical connector capable of preventing plugging error
JP2004181237A (en) 2002-11-29 2004-07-02 Siemens Ag Medical system
WO2004060158A1 (en) 2002-12-18 2004-07-22 Boston Scientific Limited Systems for guiding catheters using registered images
US20040181431A1 (en) 2002-12-18 2004-09-16 Rainer Kuth Device for generating standardized medical findings
US7898085B2 (en) 2002-12-25 2011-03-01 Olympus Corporation Solid-state imaging device and manufacturing method thereof
US20060171856A1 (en) 2003-01-17 2006-08-03 Heinrich Jehle High throughput polymer-based microarray slide
US7223232B2 (en) 2003-01-21 2007-05-29 Pentax Corporation Endoscope probe system having confocal optical systems
US6945929B2 (en) 2003-02-21 2005-09-20 Fujinon Corporation Imaging device assembly for electronic stereoscopic endoscope system
US20040165833A1 (en) 2003-02-21 2004-08-26 Betker Jay Brian Optical terminus keying
US20050154262A1 (en) 2003-04-01 2005-07-14 Banik Michael S. Imaging system for video endoscope
US7413543B2 (en) 2003-04-01 2008-08-19 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Endoscope with actively cooled illumination sources
US7288074B2 (en) 2003-04-03 2007-10-30 Ucl Business Plc Guide wire structure for insertion into an internal space
US20040199088A1 (en) 2003-04-03 2004-10-07 Bakos Gregory J. Guide wire having bending segment
US7373005B2 (en) 2003-04-10 2008-05-13 Micron Technology, Inc. Compression system for integrated sensor devices
US7985213B2 (en) 2003-04-25 2011-07-26 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Delivery catheter and method of manufacture
US20050054914A1 (en) 2003-05-05 2005-03-10 Duerk Jeffrey L. MRI probe designs for minimally invasive intravascular tracking and imaging applications
US20080275301A1 (en) 2003-05-09 2008-11-06 Daltray Pty, Ltd Sigmoidoscope With Integral Obturator
US8172864B2 (en) 2003-05-12 2012-05-08 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Balloon catheter with improved pushability
US20130324968A1 (en) 2003-05-21 2013-12-05 Jeffrey A. Klein Infiltration cannula
US20040239760A1 (en) 2003-05-27 2004-12-02 Olympus Corporation Medical image recording apparatus, endoscopic image display method, endoscopic image capture method, and portable storage medium therefor
US20040252871A1 (en) 2003-06-16 2004-12-16 Tecotzky Raymond H. Communicating computer-aided detection results in a standards-based medical imaging environment
US6909795B2 (en) 2003-06-16 2005-06-21 R2 Technology, Inc. Communicating computer-aided detection results in a standards-based medical imaging environment
US7011285B2 (en) 2003-07-02 2006-03-14 Inventec Corporation Modular stand structure
US20050038318A1 (en) 2003-08-13 2005-02-17 Benad Goldwasser Gastrointestinal tool over guidewire
US7530946B2 (en) 2003-08-15 2009-05-12 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Compact endoscope
US20090099417A1 (en) 2003-08-15 2009-04-16 Hartwick Darrell J Disposable endoscope
US20050054895A1 (en) 2003-09-09 2005-03-10 Hoeg Hans David Method for using variable direction of view endoscopy in conjunction with image guided surgical systems
US20050073017A1 (en) 2003-10-01 2005-04-07 Deok-Hoon Kim Electronic package of photo-image sensors in cellular phone camera modules, and the fabrication and assembly thereof
US8308637B2 (en) 2003-10-06 2012-11-13 Olympus Corporation Endoscope
US7366562B2 (en) 2003-10-17 2008-04-29 Medtronic Navigation, Inc. Method and apparatus for surgical navigation
US8262622B2 (en) 2003-10-28 2012-09-11 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Surgical gel seal
US7901348B2 (en) 2003-12-12 2011-03-08 University Of Washington Catheterscope 3D guidance and interface system
EP1707102A1 (en) 2004-01-19 2006-10-04 Olympus Corporation Capsule type medical treatment device
EP1709899A1 (en) 2004-01-26 2006-10-11 Olympus Corporation Capsule-type endoscope
US20050177024A1 (en) 2004-02-10 2005-08-11 Mackin Robert A. Endotracheal camera
US20110275894A1 (en) 2004-02-10 2011-11-10 Mackin Robert A Catheter with camera and illuminator at distal end
US7297105B2 (en) 2004-02-10 2007-11-20 Mackin Robert A Endotracheal camera
US20080021273A1 (en) 2004-02-10 2008-01-24 Mackin Robert A Detachable Endotracheal Camera
US20050192477A1 (en) 2004-02-26 2005-09-01 Olympus Winter & Ibe Gmbh Rigid endoscope optics with a compound housing
US20060235274A1 (en) 2004-02-26 2006-10-19 Olympus Winter & Ibe Gmbh Rigid endoscope optics with a compound housing
US20060287576A1 (en) 2004-03-02 2006-12-21 Olympus Corporation Endoscope
US7273452B2 (en) 2004-03-04 2007-09-25 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Vision catheter system including movable scanning plate
USD506195S1 (en) 2004-03-05 2005-06-14 Motion Computing, Inc. Tablet personal computer
US20050203338A1 (en) 2004-03-10 2005-09-15 Couvillon Lucien A.Jr. Endoscope with fiber optic transmission of digital video
US20050251013A1 (en) 2004-03-23 2005-11-10 Sriram Krishnan Systems and methods providing automated decision support for medical imaging
US7672491B2 (en) 2004-03-23 2010-03-02 Siemens Medical Solutions Usa, Inc. Systems and methods providing automated decision support and medical imaging
US20050216041A1 (en) 2004-03-26 2005-09-29 Olympus Corporation Treatment method
US7998062B2 (en) 2004-03-29 2011-08-16 Superdimension, Ltd. Endoscope structures and techniques for navigating to a target in branched structure
US20050250983A1 (en) 2004-04-16 2005-11-10 Anthony Tremaglio Endoscopic instrument having reduced diameter flexible shaft
US20100030057A1 (en) 2004-04-19 2010-02-04 Oren Gavriely Imaging catheter
US20060004286A1 (en) 2004-04-21 2006-01-05 Acclarent, Inc. Methods and devices for performing procedures within the ear, nose, throat and paranasal sinuses
US20070167682A1 (en) 2004-04-21 2007-07-19 Acclarent, Inc. Endoscopic methods and devices for transnasal procedures
WO2005102175A2 (en) 2004-04-26 2005-11-03 Super Dimension Ltd. System and method for image-based alignment of an endoscope
US20050277808A1 (en) 2004-05-14 2005-12-15 Elazar Sonnenschein Methods and devices related to camera connectors
US8496580B2 (en) 2004-05-14 2013-07-30 G.I. View Ltd. Omnidirectional and forward-looking imaging device
US7789823B2 (en) 2004-05-14 2010-09-07 Olympus Corporation Endoscope and endoscope apparatus
US7303528B2 (en) 2004-05-18 2007-12-04 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Serialization of single use endoscopes
US20090118580A1 (en) 2004-07-02 2009-05-07 Wei-Zen Sun Image-type intubation-aiding device
US7922654B2 (en) 2004-08-09 2011-04-12 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Fiber optic imaging catheter
WO2006018841A2 (en) 2004-08-16 2006-02-23 Navicath Ltd. Image-guided navigation for catheter-based interventions
US7585273B2 (en) 2004-08-26 2009-09-08 C2Cure, Inc. Wireless determination of endoscope orientation
USD514558S1 (en) 2004-09-07 2006-02-07 Control4 Corporation Mobile touchscreen
US7713189B2 (en) 2004-09-11 2010-05-11 Olympus Winter & Ibe Gmbh Video endoscope with a rotatable video camera
US20090318758A1 (en) 2004-09-24 2009-12-24 Vivid Medical, Inc. Pluggable vision module and portable display for endoscopy
US8556806B2 (en) 2004-09-24 2013-10-15 Vivid Medical, Inc. Wavelength multiplexing endoscope
US20080045800A2 (en) 2004-09-24 2008-02-21 Mina Farr Solid state illumination for endoscopy
US20100198009A1 (en) 2004-09-24 2010-08-05 Vivid Medical, Inc. Disposable endoscope and portable display
US8199187B2 (en) 2004-09-30 2012-06-12 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Adapter for use with digital imaging medical device
US8211128B1 (en) 2004-10-15 2012-07-03 Facundus Edward C Multifunction gastric bypass apparatus and method
US20060171586A1 (en) 2004-11-08 2006-08-03 Bogdan Georgescu Method of database-guided segmentation of anatomical structures having complex appearances
US20060117185A1 (en) 2004-11-30 2006-06-01 Kyocera Mita Corporation Timestamp administration system and image forming apparatus
US8480404B2 (en) 2004-11-30 2013-07-09 Eric A. Savitsky Multimodal ultrasound training system
US20120058457A1 (en) 2004-11-30 2012-03-08 Savitsky Eric A Multimodal Ultrasound Training System
US20100030138A1 (en) 2004-12-02 2010-02-04 Chek-Med Systems, Inc. Gastrojejunal feeding tube
US20060122460A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2006-06-08 Henry Kamali Airway management
WO2006070360A1 (en) 2004-12-27 2006-07-06 Given Imaging Ltd. In vivo sensing device with a circuit board having rigid sections and flexible sections
WO2006071948A2 (en) 2004-12-28 2006-07-06 Melder Patrick C Endoscopic imaging system
US8069420B2 (en) 2004-12-29 2011-11-29 Karl Storz Endoscopy-America, Inc. System for controlling the communication of medical imaging data
US7896802B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2011-03-01 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope insertion portion
US8075477B2 (en) 2005-01-17 2011-12-13 Olympus Corporation Electric connector for endoscope, endoscope, and method for assembling electric connector
US20080255416A1 (en) 2005-01-27 2008-10-16 Super Dimension, Ltd. Endoscope with Miniature Imaging Arrangement
US20100211005A1 (en) 2005-02-01 2010-08-19 Edwards Eric S Apparatus and methods for self-administration of vaccines and other medicaments
US7930016B1 (en) 2005-02-02 2011-04-19 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue closure system
US8050746B2 (en) 2005-02-02 2011-11-01 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue visualization device and method variations
US7860556B2 (en) 2005-02-02 2010-12-28 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue imaging and extraction systems
US20090054803A1 (en) 2005-02-02 2009-02-26 Vahid Saadat Electrophysiology mapping and visualization system
US7860555B2 (en) 2005-02-02 2010-12-28 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue visualization and manipulation system
EP1849401A1 (en) 2005-02-14 2007-10-31 Olympus Corporation Endoscope device
US8162825B2 (en) 2005-02-15 2012-04-24 Olympus Corporation Endoscope
US7831070B1 (en) 2005-02-18 2010-11-09 Authentec, Inc. Dynamic finger detection mechanism for a fingerprint sensor
US20060224040A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2006-10-05 Given Imaging Ltd. In vivo imaging device and method of manufacture thereof
US8162824B2 (en) 2005-04-04 2012-04-24 Invuity, Inc. Optical waveguide sheath
US7901353B2 (en) 2005-04-04 2011-03-08 Invuity, Inc. Illuminated cannula
US7780650B2 (en) 2005-05-04 2010-08-24 Spirus Medical, Inc. Rotate-to-advance catheterization system
US20100010334A1 (en) 2005-05-16 2010-01-14 Bleich Jeffery L Spinal access and neural localization
US20060264918A1 (en) 2005-05-20 2006-11-23 Laserscope Laser system and delivery device operation logging method and kit
US8496001B2 (en) 2005-06-08 2013-07-30 Dräger Medical GmbH Process and device for the automatic identification of breathing tubes
US8486023B2 (en) 2005-06-14 2013-07-16 Stephen T. Pyles Intrathecal catheter having a stylet with a curved tip
US7491167B2 (en) 2005-07-01 2009-02-17 Hoya Corporation Image capturing unit for endoscope
US7914448B2 (en) 2005-07-01 2011-03-29 invendo medical, GmbH Cooling means for electronic components preferably of an endoscope
US7628752B2 (en) 2005-07-11 2009-12-08 Hoya Corporation Image capturing unit for electronic endoscope
US20100047733A1 (en) 2005-07-12 2010-02-25 Sialo-Lite Ltd. Device, system and method for procedures associated with the intra-oral cavity
US20090082625A1 (en) 2005-07-15 2009-03-26 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope and endoscope apparatus
US7304277B2 (en) 2005-08-23 2007-12-04 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc Resonator with adjustable capacitor for medical device
US20070049794A1 (en) 2005-09-01 2007-03-01 Ezc Medical Llc Visualization stylet for medical device applications having self-contained power source
US20090253955A1 (en) 2005-09-02 2009-10-08 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Electronic endoscope
USD562456S1 (en) 2005-09-26 2008-02-19 C. R. Bard, Inc. Ultrasound case
US20070075208A1 (en) 2005-10-04 2007-04-05 Avermedia Technologies, Inc. Supporting stand
US7423496B2 (en) 2005-11-09 2008-09-09 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Resonator with adjustable capacitance for medical device
US8547689B2 (en) 2005-11-09 2013-10-01 George Moser Reconfigurable computer
US20090118577A9 (en) 2005-12-13 2009-05-07 Gyrus Acmi, Inc. Medical device made with a super alloy
US7547277B2 (en) 2005-12-15 2009-06-16 Microvision, Inc. Method and apparatus for calibrating an endoscope system
US7806121B2 (en) 2005-12-22 2010-10-05 Restoration Robotics, Inc. Follicular unit transplantation planner and methods of its use
US20070162095A1 (en) 2006-01-06 2007-07-12 Ezc Medical Llc Modular visualization stylet apparatus and methods of use
US8235887B2 (en) 2006-01-23 2012-08-07 Avantis Medical Systems, Inc. Endoscope assembly with retroscope
US20110004058A1 (en) 2006-01-30 2011-01-06 Vision - Sciences Inc. Controllable Endoscope
US7662151B2 (en) 2006-02-15 2010-02-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Contact sensitive probes
US7740578B2 (en) 2006-02-21 2010-06-22 Little Paul K Direct reading endoscopic measuring instrument and method
US8016749B2 (en) 2006-03-21 2011-09-13 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Vision catheter having electromechanical navigation
US20070225561A1 (en) 2006-03-24 2007-09-27 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope and display device
US20070232882A1 (en) 2006-03-31 2007-10-04 Glossop Neil D System, Methods, and Instrumentation for Image Guided Prostate Treatment
US20070235626A1 (en) 2006-04-05 2007-10-11 Nec Infrontia Corporation Angle adjustment apparatus for electronic device
US20090060425A1 (en) 2006-04-10 2009-03-05 Finisar Corporation Active optical cable with integrated control features
WO2007121139A2 (en) 2006-04-14 2007-10-25 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. In vivo localization and tracking of tissue penetrating catheters using magnetic resonance imaging
EP1847214A2 (en) 2006-04-20 2007-10-24 Karl Storz Endovision, Inc. Ultra wide band wireless optical endoscopic device
US20110295072A1 (en) 2006-04-20 2011-12-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Imaging assembly with transparent distal cap
US20090161927A1 (en) 2006-05-02 2009-06-25 National University Corporation Nagoya University Medical Image Observation Assisting System
US7604627B2 (en) 2006-05-11 2009-10-20 Kourosh Kojouri Nasopharyngeal sheath for nasogastric intubation
US8162820B2 (en) 2006-05-17 2012-04-24 Kent Moore Stereovideoscope and method of using the same
US20090299137A1 (en) 2006-05-31 2009-12-03 Wave Group Ltd. Abdominal observation device
US20090143651A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2009-06-04 Bengt Kallback Device for Invasive Use
US7391606B2 (en) 2006-06-14 2008-06-24 Qisda Corporation Electronic device
US20090316975A1 (en) 2006-07-28 2009-12-24 Varian Medical Systems International Ag Anatomic orientation in medical images
US8408269B2 (en) 2006-07-28 2013-04-02 Novadaq Technologies, Inc. System and method for deposition and removal of an optical element on an endoscope objective
US20110160535A1 (en) 2006-08-04 2011-06-30 Avantis Medical Systems, Inc. Surgical access port with embedded imaging device
US7978891B2 (en) 2006-08-08 2011-07-12 Seimens Aktiengesellschaft Method and processor for generating a medical image using stored pan/zoom preferences
US20080037850A1 (en) 2006-08-08 2008-02-14 Stefan Assmann Method and processor for generating a medical image
US20080240527A1 (en) 2006-08-15 2008-10-02 The Borad Of Regents, The University Of Texas System, A Instiution Of Higher Learning Methods, Compositions and Systems for Analyzing Imaging Data
US20090149706A1 (en) 2006-08-18 2009-06-11 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope apparatus and signal processing method thereof
US20080077043A1 (en) 2006-08-25 2008-03-27 Manu Malbrain Enteral feeding catheter and apparatus for determining the intra-abdominal pressure of a patient
US8160676B2 (en) 2006-09-08 2012-04-17 Medtronic, Inc. Method for planning a surgical procedure
US20080123922A1 (en) 2006-09-08 2008-05-29 Medtronic, Inc. Method for planning a surgical procedure
US20080062624A1 (en) 2006-09-13 2008-03-13 Paul Regen Transformable Mobile Computing Device
US20080074492A1 (en) 2006-09-22 2008-03-27 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscopic apparatus and control method for endoscopic apparatus
US20080081949A1 (en) 2006-09-28 2008-04-03 Zvika Gilad In vivo imaging device and method of manufacture thereof
US20080091065A1 (en) 2006-10-04 2008-04-17 Olympus Medical Systems Corporation Medical image processing apparatus, endoscope system and medical image processing system
US20080139896A1 (en) 2006-10-13 2008-06-12 Siemens Medical Solutions Usa, Inc. System and Method for Graphical Annotation of Anatomical Images Using a Touch Screen Display
US7976459B2 (en) 2006-10-17 2011-07-12 Intra L.L.C. Portable endoscope for intubation
US20080108869A1 (en) 2006-10-20 2008-05-08 Femsuite Llc Optical surgical device and methods of use
US20100030020A1 (en) 2006-10-20 2010-02-04 Femsuite Llc Optical surgical device and method of use
USD558351S1 (en) 2006-10-31 2007-12-25 Sonosite, Inc. Ultrasound display apparatus
US8421626B2 (en) 2006-10-31 2013-04-16 Corning Cable Systems, Llc Radio frequency identification transponder for communicating condition of a component
US20080294007A1 (en) 2006-11-09 2008-11-27 Tadatsugu Takada Bending portion of insertion part of endoscope and endoscope provided with insertion part including bending portion
US7993264B2 (en) 2006-11-09 2011-08-09 Ams Research Corporation Orientation adapter for injection tube in flexible endoscope
US20110255760A1 (en) 2006-11-22 2011-10-20 General Electric Company Systems and methods for synchronized image viewing with an image atlas
US8135195B2 (en) 2006-11-22 2012-03-13 General Electric Company Systems and methods for synchronized image viewing with an image atlas
US20080140020A1 (en) 2006-12-08 2008-06-12 Utah Medical Products Inc. Lockable enteral feeding adapter
US20080147000A1 (en) 2006-12-13 2008-06-19 University Of Washington Catheter tip displacement mechanism
US20090299363A1 (en) 2006-12-21 2009-12-03 Vahid Saadat Off-axis visualization systems
US20090275799A1 (en) 2006-12-21 2009-11-05 Voyage Medical, Inc. Axial visualization systems
US20080172006A1 (en) 2007-01-15 2008-07-17 Medrad, Inc. Patency Check Compatible Check Valve And Fluid Delivery System Including The Patency Check Compatible Check Valve
US20090268019A1 (en) 2007-01-16 2009-10-29 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Image pickup apparatus and endoscope
US20090046906A1 (en) 2007-01-22 2009-02-19 Richard Wohlgemuth Automated imaging device and method for registration of anatomical structures
JP2008194334A (en) 2007-02-15 2008-08-28 Fujifilm Corp Endoscope image display method, device, and program
USD582916S1 (en) 2007-02-26 2008-12-16 Sony Corporation Monitor display
US20100010302A1 (en) 2007-02-26 2010-01-14 Vision-Sciences Inc. Endoscopic reflector
US8574192B2 (en) 2007-03-02 2013-11-05 Covidien Lp Catheter tunneling systems, instruments and methods
US20080236575A1 (en) 2007-03-29 2008-10-02 Robert Michael Chuda Intubation device with video, stylet steering, prep and storage system
US20110301415A1 (en) 2007-04-04 2011-12-08 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscopic system that uses overtube
US20080294000A1 (en) 2007-04-06 2008-11-27 Hoya Corporation Endoscope support system
GB2448421A (en) 2007-04-11 2008-10-15 Forth Photonics Ltd Workstation for a colposcopy
US8444802B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2013-05-21 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Catheter having a readily bondable multilayer soft tip
US8409081B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2013-04-02 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Illumination light application structure and endoscope provided with the same
US20080281351A1 (en) 2007-05-02 2008-11-13 John Croushorn Portable pneumatic abdominal aortic tourniquet
US20080281157A1 (en) 2007-05-08 2008-11-13 Masaaki Miyagi Connector and medical apparatus
US20100204546A1 (en) 2007-05-10 2010-08-12 Noam Hassidov Semi disposable endoscope
US20080300456A1 (en) 2007-05-31 2008-12-04 Irion Klaus M Video Endoscope
US20080319391A1 (en) 2007-06-21 2008-12-25 Jackson Francis J Self powered enteral tube feeding device
USD644246S1 (en) 2007-06-23 2011-08-30 Apple Inc. Icon for a portion of a display screen
US20100280316A1 (en) 2007-06-28 2010-11-04 Dietz Dennis R Catheter
US8285362B2 (en) 2007-06-28 2012-10-09 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Catheter with deflectable imaging device
US20090030283A1 (en) 2007-07-11 2009-01-29 Scholly Fiberoptic Gmbh Endoscope
US20090105538A1 (en) 2007-07-26 2009-04-23 Jacques Van Dam Endoscope System
US20090030276A1 (en) 2007-07-27 2009-01-29 Voyage Medical, Inc. Tissue visualization catheter with imaging systems integration
US7850370B2 (en) 2007-08-01 2010-12-14 Ortronics, Inc. Positional differentiating connector assembly
US20090043167A1 (en) 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 Lighthouse Imaging Corporation Endoscope
US20090062609A1 (en) 2007-08-27 2009-03-05 Hoya Corporation Endoscope system
JP2009056238A (en) 2007-09-03 2009-03-19 Olympus Medical Systems Corp Endoscope apparatus
USD591423S1 (en) 2007-09-07 2009-04-28 Sonosite, Inc. Ultrasound platform
US20090187425A1 (en) 2007-09-17 2009-07-23 Arthur Solomon Thompson PDA software robots leveraging past history in seconds with software robots
WO2009049322A2 (en) 2007-10-11 2009-04-16 Avantis Medical Systems, Inc. Endoscope assembly comprising retrograde viewing imaging device and instrument channel
USD615199S1 (en) 2007-11-12 2010-05-04 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Monitor
US20090137893A1 (en) 2007-11-27 2009-05-28 University Of Washington Adding imaging capability to distal tips of medical tools, catheters, and conduits
US20090143648A1 (en) 2007-11-30 2009-06-04 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Endoscope system for gastrostomy catheter placement
US20090149705A1 (en) 2007-12-05 2009-06-11 Hoya Corporation Imaging-device driving unit, electronic endoscope, and endoscope system
US8360964B2 (en) 2007-12-10 2013-01-29 Stryker Corporation Wide angle HDTV endoscope
US20090155750A1 (en) 2007-12-12 2009-06-18 Casio Computer Co., Ltd. Electronic dictionary device with a handwriting input function
US20090163769A1 (en) 2007-12-21 2009-06-25 Robertson David W Endoscope including a multifunction conductor
USD614634S1 (en) 2007-12-21 2010-04-27 Laerdal Medical As Icon for a portion of a computer screen for a medical training system
US20090171148A1 (en) 2007-12-27 2009-07-02 Shih-Chieh Lu Capsule endoscope system having a sensing and data discriminating device and discrimination method thereof
US20090167851A1 (en) 2008-01-02 2009-07-02 Miller Jeffrey J Imager Assembly For Remote Inspection Device
US20090209826A1 (en) 2008-01-09 2009-08-20 Ezc Medical Llc Intubation systems and methods
US20090198102A1 (en) 2008-01-31 2009-08-06 Tien-Sheng Chen Rectum Examination Device And Rectum Examination Set
US20090198106A1 (en) 2008-02-05 2009-08-06 Ichihashi Masaki Endoscope apparatus
US8139296B2 (en) 2008-02-12 2012-03-20 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Reimaging optical system and endoscope using the same
US8183510B2 (en) 2008-02-12 2012-05-22 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. Image sensor with buried self aligned focusing element
US20090216080A1 (en) 2008-02-25 2009-08-27 Kazuhiko Nakamura Electronic communication system and endoscope system
US20090213140A1 (en) 2008-02-26 2009-08-27 Masaru Ito Medical support control system
WO2009108854A1 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-09-03 The Regents Of The University Of California Feeding tube system
US20090214089A1 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-08-27 Therametric Technologies, Inc. System and Method for Data Analysis And Capture
US20090225159A1 (en) 2008-03-07 2009-09-10 Scott Schneider Visual inspection device
US8152712B2 (en) 2008-03-11 2012-04-10 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscope system and method for inspecting electronic endoscope
US20090234220A1 (en) 2008-03-12 2009-09-17 Simens Aktiengesellschaft Catheter and associated medical examination and treatment device
US8206289B2 (en) 2008-03-12 2012-06-26 Olympus Corporation Electric connection portion and adaptor endoscope
US20090237497A1 (en) 2008-03-18 2009-09-24 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Endoscope camera head and method for manufacturing the same
US8228369B2 (en) 2008-03-31 2012-07-24 Olympus Corporation Endoscope apparatus
US20090259097A1 (en) 2008-04-09 2009-10-15 Thompson Ronald J Cannula visualization arrangement
US8262559B2 (en) 2008-04-11 2012-09-11 Storz Endoskop Produktions Gmbh Apparatus and method for endoscopic 3D data collection
US20110152613A1 (en) 2008-04-14 2011-06-23 Carnegie Mellon University Articulated device with visualization system
US20100179384A1 (en) 2008-04-25 2010-07-15 Hans David Hoeg Wirelessly Powered Medical Devices And Instruments
US8425405B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2013-04-23 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Electronic endoscope apparatus
US20110098530A1 (en) 2008-06-17 2011-04-28 Fujifilm Corp. Electronic endoscope
US20090326321A1 (en) 2008-06-18 2009-12-31 Jacobsen Stephen C Miniaturized Imaging Device Including Multiple GRIN Lenses Optically Coupled to Multiple SSIDs
US20090318797A1 (en) 2008-06-19 2009-12-24 Vision-Sciences Inc. System and method for deflecting endoscopic tools
US20090318798A1 (en) 2008-06-23 2009-12-24 Errol Singh Flexible visually directed medical intubation instrument and method
US20090318757A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2009-12-24 Percuvision, Llc Flexible visually directed medical intubation instrument and method
US20130237755A1 (en) 2008-06-23 2013-09-12 Errol O. Singh Flexible visually directed medical intubation instrument and method
US20090326481A1 (en) 2008-06-30 2009-12-31 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Discriminating oral-tip adaptor
US8388376B2 (en) 2008-07-01 2013-03-05 Fujifilm Corporation Electronic endoscope
US20100016757A1 (en) 2008-07-10 2010-01-21 Superdimension, Ltd. Integrated Multi-Functional Endoscopic Tool
US20100022824A1 (en) 2008-07-22 2010-01-28 Cybulski James S Tissue modification devices and methods of using the same
US8052596B2 (en) 2008-08-14 2011-11-08 Korea Plant Service & Engineering Co., Ltd. Arc-shaped flexible printed circuit film type endoscope using imaging device
USD613411S1 (en) 2008-08-27 2010-04-06 Deka Products Limited Partnership Graphical user interface module for patient-operated medical device
USD598109S1 (en) 2008-08-27 2009-08-11 Deka Products Limited Partnership Graphical user interface module for patient-operated medical device
US20110144481A1 (en) 2008-08-28 2011-06-16 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. A device, apparatus and method for obtaining physiological signals by way of a feeding tube
US20100063352A1 (en) 2008-09-10 2010-03-11 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscope system and drive control method thereof
US20100063355A1 (en) 2008-09-10 2010-03-11 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscope system and control method for the same
US8231522B2 (en) 2008-09-18 2012-07-31 Fujifilm Corporation Electronic endoscope system
US20100073470A1 (en) 2008-09-22 2010-03-25 Fujifilm Corporation Imaging apparatus and endoscope
US8049061B2 (en) 2008-09-25 2011-11-01 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Expandable member formed of a fibrous matrix having hydrogel polymer for intraluminal drug delivery
US20110294361A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2011-12-01 Andreas Schrader Electric plug-in connection system
US20100081873A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 AiHeart Medical Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for optical viewing and therapeutic intervention in blood vessels
US8600133B2 (en) 2008-10-01 2013-12-03 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Selection of snapshots of a medical image sequence
US20100085273A1 (en) 2008-10-02 2010-04-08 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Image display apparatus and image display method
US8216185B2 (en) 2008-10-20 2012-07-10 Berger J Lee Cannulated apertured grooved director
US20100121142A1 (en) 2008-11-12 2010-05-13 Ouyang Xiaolong Minimally Invasive Imaging Device
US20100121155A1 (en) 2008-11-12 2010-05-13 Ouyang Xiaolong Minimally Invasive Tissue Modification Systems With Integrated Visualization
US20100121139A1 (en) 2008-11-12 2010-05-13 Ouyang Xiaolong Minimally Invasive Imaging Systems
US20110282144A1 (en) 2008-11-17 2011-11-17 Mayo Foundation For Medical Education And Research Diagnostic capsules, delivery/retrieval systems, kits and methods
WO2010066788A2 (en) 2008-12-10 2010-06-17 Ambu A/S Endoscope with a bending portion
US20110288372A1 (en) 2008-12-10 2011-11-24 Lasse Kjeld Gjoeske Petersen Endoscope having a camera housing and method for making a camera housing
US20110015614A1 (en) 2008-12-16 2011-01-20 Rykhus Jr Robert L Needleless injection device components, systems, and methods
US20100174141A1 (en) 2009-01-08 2010-07-08 Zvika Gilad Device and method for assembling in vivo sensing devices
US20100249639A1 (en) 2009-01-20 2010-09-30 Samir Bhatt Airway management devices, endoscopic conduits, surgical kits, and methods of using the same
US8314835B2 (en) 2009-01-23 2012-11-20 Olympus Corporation Endoscope adapter including light emitting diode, and adapter type endoscope
USD609350S1 (en) 2009-01-23 2010-02-02 Deka Products Limited Partnership Display for dialysis machine
US20100191053A1 (en) 2009-01-28 2010-07-29 Cani Optical Systems, Llc Portable Endoscope For Diverse Medical Disciplines
US20130030249A1 (en) 2009-02-06 2013-01-31 Endoclear Llc Visualized endotracheal tube placement systems
US20100204561A1 (en) 2009-02-11 2010-08-12 Voyage Medical, Inc. Imaging catheters having irrigation
US8403836B2 (en) 2009-02-13 2013-03-26 Fujifilm Corporation Light guide, light source apparatus and endoscope system
US8454578B2 (en) 2009-02-18 2013-06-04 AUST Development, LLC Apparatus and methods for making coated liners and tubular devices including such liners
US20100230140A1 (en) 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Wistron Corporation Rigid-flex printed circuit board module, and manufacturing method and processing method therefor
US8241199B2 (en) 2009-03-23 2012-08-14 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Blood pump, medical apparatus having a blood pump and method for assisting the positioning of a blood pump
US20100249507A1 (en) * 2009-03-26 2010-09-30 Intuitive Surgical, Inc. Method and system for providing visual guidance to an operator for steering a tip of an endoscopic device toward one or more landmarks in a patient
US20100249512A1 (en) 2009-03-27 2010-09-30 EndoSphere Surgical, Inc. Cannula with integrated camera and illumination
US20100305503A1 (en) 2009-04-09 2010-12-02 John Fang Optically guided feeding tube, catheters and associated methods
WO2010123858A2 (en) 2009-04-20 2010-10-28 Envisionier Medical Technologies, Inc. Imaging system
US20100286477A1 (en) 2009-05-08 2010-11-11 Ouyang Xiaolong Internal tissue visualization system comprising a rf-shielded visualization sensor module
US20120062714A1 (en) 2009-05-08 2012-03-15 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Real-time scope tracking and branch labeling without electro-magnetic tracking and pre-operative scan roadmaps
US8602967B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2013-12-10 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoscope with distal tip having encased optical components and display orientation capabilities
US20100286475A1 (en) 2009-05-08 2010-11-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoscope with distal tip having encased optical components and display orientation capabilities
US8485966B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2013-07-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoscope with distal tip having encased optical components and display orientation capabilities
USD621515S1 (en) 2009-06-02 2010-08-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Skin analyzing device
USD658295S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2012-04-24 Esaote Europe B.V. Portable ecography machine
USD657059S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2012-04-03 Esaote Europe B.V. Portable ecography machine
US20110263938A1 (en) 2009-06-18 2011-10-27 Avi Levy Multi-camera endoscope
US8408815B2 (en) 2009-06-18 2013-04-02 Senko Advanced Components, Inc. Optical fiber connector and adapter
US20110009694A1 (en) 2009-07-10 2011-01-13 Schultz Eric E Hand-held minimally dimensioned diagnostic device having integrated distal end visualization
US8597179B2 (en) 2009-07-23 2013-12-03 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope apparatus
WO2011018812A1 (en) 2009-08-10 2011-02-17 Alberto Bauer System and method to execute tracheal intubation
US20110037876A1 (en) 2009-08-13 2011-02-17 Olive Medical Corp. System, apparatus and methods for providing a single use imaging device for sterile environments
US20110036965A1 (en) 2009-08-14 2011-02-17 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd Electronic device having adjustable table stand
US8512232B2 (en) 2009-09-08 2013-08-20 Gyrus Acmi, Inc. Endoscopic illumination system, assembly and methods for staged illumination of different target areas
US8587710B2 (en) 2009-09-24 2013-11-19 Pantech Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for controlling picture using image recognition
US20110245605A1 (en) 2009-10-01 2011-10-06 Jacobsen Stephen C Needle Delivered Imaging Device
US20110251456A1 (en) 2009-10-01 2011-10-13 Jacobsen Stephen C Method and Apparatus For Viewing A Body Cavity
US20110137118A1 (en) 2009-10-06 2011-06-09 Apple Biomedical, Inc. Medical inspection device
US20130253348A1 (en) 2009-10-08 2013-09-26 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan Real time clinical decision support system having linked references
US20110113329A1 (en) 2009-11-09 2011-05-12 Michael Pusateri Multi-touch sensing device for use with radiological workstations and associated methods of use
US8599264B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2013-12-03 Fluke Corporation Comparison of infrared images
US8336541B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2012-12-25 Ai Medical Devices, Inc. Endotracheal intubation device
US20110130631A1 (en) 2009-11-30 2011-06-02 Romana Geisser Adapter device to couple an endoscope with a medical appliance
US20110130627A1 (en) 2009-11-30 2011-06-02 King Systems Corporation Visualization Instrument
US20110137127A1 (en) 2009-12-08 2011-06-09 Ai Medical Devices, Inc. Dual screen intubation system
US8496574B2 (en) 2009-12-17 2013-07-30 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Selectively positionable camera for surgical guide tube assembly
US20120316515A1 (en) 2009-12-23 2012-12-13 C.R. Bard ,Inc. Catheter Assembly/Package Utilizing a Hydrating/Hydrogel Sleeve and Method of Making and Using the Same
US20120029290A1 (en) 2009-12-24 2012-02-02 Olympus Corporation Endoscope apparatus and optical adapter used in the endoscope apparatus
US20110160537A1 (en) 2009-12-24 2011-06-30 Tien-Sheng Chen Stylet with a Camera Device
USD659836S1 (en) 2009-12-29 2012-05-15 Cardionet, Inc. Portable heart monitor
US8400767B2 (en) 2010-01-06 2013-03-19 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Electronic apparatus with stable support member system
US20110172687A1 (en) 2010-01-11 2011-07-14 Woodruff Scott A Telemetry Device with Software User Input Features
US20110196204A1 (en) 2010-02-11 2011-08-11 Al Medical Devices, Inc. Shape-conforming intubation device
US8471392B2 (en) 2010-02-15 2013-06-25 Olympus Corporation Semiconductor apparatus and endoscope apparatus
US20110270295A1 (en) 2010-02-17 2011-11-03 Reprise Technologies, Llc System and method for image-guided arthroscopy
US20110201882A1 (en) 2010-02-18 2011-08-18 Ai Medical Devices, Inc. Endotracheal tube exchanger and detachable stylet assembly therefor
US20110218400A1 (en) 2010-03-05 2011-09-08 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical instrument with integrated wireless camera
US8206374B2 (en) 2010-03-15 2012-06-26 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Catheter having improved traceability
WO2011126812A1 (en) 2010-03-29 2011-10-13 Endoclear, Llc Airway cleaning and visualization
US20110245607A1 (en) 2010-03-31 2011-10-06 Kentaro Hayashi Endoscopic gaseous material feed system
US20110245606A1 (en) 2010-03-31 2011-10-06 Kentaro Hayashi Endoscopic gaseous material feed system
US20110245608A1 (en) 2010-03-31 2011-10-06 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscopic imaging device and endoscope apparatus
US8485967B2 (en) 2010-03-31 2013-07-16 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscopic imaging device and endoscope apparatus having a configuration to prevent condensation
US20110249106A1 (en) 2010-04-07 2011-10-13 Olympus Corporation Image pickup apparatus, endoscope and manufacturing method for image pickup apparatus
US20110249025A1 (en) 2010-04-07 2011-10-13 Omron Corporation Image processing apparatus
US8152560B2 (en) 2010-04-19 2012-04-10 Tyco Electronics Corporation Connectivity sensing assembly
US20110257478A1 (en) 2010-04-20 2011-10-20 Spinewindow Llc Method and apparatus for performing retro peritoneal dissection
US20110295061A1 (en) 2010-05-10 2011-12-01 Nanamed, Llc Method and device for imaging an interior surface of a corporeal cavity
US20110289441A1 (en) 2010-05-20 2011-11-24 General Electric Company Anatomy map navigator systems and methods of use
USD638943S1 (en) 2010-05-21 2011-05-31 Lead Technology Capital Management, Llc Eye tracking device
US20120010469A1 (en) 2010-06-03 2012-01-12 Somedics Rd Catheter guiding tool
US8585586B2 (en) 2010-06-08 2013-11-19 Fujifilm Corporation Electronic endoscope system, processor for electronic endoscope, and target tracing method
US20110311116A1 (en) 2010-06-17 2011-12-22 Creighton University System and methods for anatomical structure labeling
US20130027533A1 (en) 2010-07-02 2013-01-31 Intuitive Surgical Operations, Inc. Dual optical path prism and camera in a minimally invasive surgical system
US20120006950A1 (en) 2010-07-07 2012-01-12 Jesse Vandiver Pivoting stand for a display device
US8280205B2 (en) 2010-07-23 2012-10-02 Tyco Electronics Corporation Fiber optic connector and alignment mechanism for single lens multi-fiber connector
US20130128020A1 (en) 2010-07-23 2013-05-23 Olympus Corporation Image pickup apparatus, endoscope and image pickup apparatus manufacturing method
US20120029279A1 (en) 2010-07-29 2012-02-02 Kucklick Theodore R Arthroscopic System
US20130303849A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-11-14 Covidien Lp Catheter with imaging assembly and console with reference library and related methods therefor
WO2012033936A2 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-03-15 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Catheter with imaging assembly
US20120172665A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-07-05 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Assembly with Imaging Electronics
US20120065469A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2012-03-15 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Catheter with imaging assembly
US20130188030A1 (en) 2010-09-10 2013-07-25 Olympus Corporation Image pickup unit and endoscope distal end portion including the image pickup unit
USD643936S1 (en) 2010-09-17 2011-08-23 Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation Controller for liquid chromatograph analyzer
US20120071723A1 (en) 2010-09-21 2012-03-22 Olympus Corporation Endoscope apparatus and measurement method
US20130317300A1 (en) 2010-09-23 2013-11-28 George Berci Simultaneous Display Video Laryngoscope And Video Stylet
US20120078174A1 (en) 2010-09-27 2012-03-29 Kok-Ming Tai Configurable Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube
US20120084680A1 (en) 2010-10-01 2012-04-05 Imerj LLC Gesture capture for manipulation of presentations on one or more device displays
US20120086790A1 (en) 2010-10-12 2012-04-12 Masayuki Takahira Endoscope apparatus
USD650484S1 (en) 2010-10-27 2011-12-13 Panasonic Corporation Medical ultrasound equipment
US8514556B2 (en) 2010-10-28 2013-08-20 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Electronic device with support mechanism
US20120108960A1 (en) 2010-11-03 2012-05-03 Halmann Menachem Nahi Method and system for organizing stored ultrasound data
USD695410S1 (en) 2010-11-15 2013-12-10 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Monitor
US20120130171A1 (en) 2010-11-18 2012-05-24 C2Cure Inc. Endoscope guidance based on image matching
US20120131488A1 (en) 2010-11-23 2012-05-24 David Karlsson Gui controls with movable touch-control objects for alternate interactions
US20130250079A1 (en) 2010-11-26 2013-09-26 Olympus Corporation Fluorescence endoscope apparatus
US20120136212A1 (en) 2010-11-30 2012-05-31 Komukai Makito Illumination optical unit for endoscope and method of manufacturing the same
US8573824B2 (en) 2010-11-30 2013-11-05 Fujifilm Corporation Illumination optical unit for endoscope and method of manufacturing the same
US20130271588A1 (en) 2010-12-09 2013-10-17 Yaniv Kirma Flexible Electronic Circuit Board for a Multi-Camera Endoscope
US20130250061A1 (en) 2010-12-09 2013-09-26 Scholly Fiberoptic Gmbh Endoscope and method for recording at least one stereoscopic image by means of an endoscope
US8297440B2 (en) 2011-01-04 2012-10-30 Fellowes, Inc. Case with support mechanism for an electronic device having a screen
US20120190922A1 (en) 2011-01-24 2012-07-26 Fujifilm Corporation Endoscope system
US20120197078A1 (en) 2011-01-31 2012-08-02 Eric Stanley Insufflation needle with integrated image sensor
US20120197086A1 (en) 2011-01-31 2012-08-02 Nellcor Puritan Bennett Llc Medical visualization technique and apparatus
US20120203065A1 (en) * 2011-02-04 2012-08-09 The Penn State Research Foundation Global and semi-global registration for image-based bronchoscopy guidance
US8568159B2 (en) 2011-03-04 2013-10-29 Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd. Connector
US20120242814A1 (en) 2011-03-25 2012-09-27 Kenneth Kubala Miniature Wafer-Level Camera Modules
US8602979B2 (en) 2011-03-31 2013-12-10 Fujifilm Corporation Electronic endoscope having front-view and side-view image capturing
US8390995B2 (en) 2011-04-07 2013-03-05 Wistron Corporation Adjusting device of adjusting a view angle of a panel module and computer system having the same
US20130231533A1 (en) 2011-05-23 2013-09-05 Stephanos Papademetriou Medical applications of a miniature videoscope
US20130007668A1 (en) 2011-07-01 2013-01-03 James Chia-Ming Liu Multi-visor: managing applications in head mounted displays
US20130184683A1 (en) 2011-07-25 2013-07-18 Mina W.B. Chow Devices and methods for transnasal dilation and irrigation of the sinuses
US20130066150A1 (en) 2011-09-09 2013-03-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Zoom lens module and endoscope system including the same
US20130103000A1 (en) 2011-09-09 2013-04-25 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Catheter assembly
US20130067397A1 (en) 2011-09-12 2013-03-14 Microsoft Corporation Control area for a touch screen
US20130265403A1 (en) 2011-09-22 2013-10-10 Olympus Medical Systems Corp. Endoscope
US20130155591A1 (en) 2011-12-20 2013-06-20 Fujitsu Limited Electronic apparatus
US20130162789A1 (en) 2011-12-22 2013-06-27 Himax Imaging Limited Endoscope with a light source
US20130169777A1 (en) 2011-12-28 2013-07-04 Olympus Corporation Imaging mechanism and endoscope apparatus
US20130172678A1 (en) 2011-12-29 2013-07-04 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Space-optimized visualization catheter with oblong shape
US20130177222A1 (en) 2012-01-09 2013-07-11 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Systems, methods and computer readable storage media storing instructions for generating an image series
US20130184584A1 (en) 2012-01-17 2013-07-18 Richard E. Berkey Systems and methods for computerized ultrasound image interpretation and labeling
US20130198687A1 (en) 2012-01-30 2013-08-01 Ian Douglas Bird Selection of presets for the visualization of image data sets
US20130197484A1 (en) 2012-01-31 2013-08-01 Dane T. Seddon Methods and systems for attaching medical device sections
US20130216112A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Joachim Graessner Structured, image-assisted finding generation
US20130245568A1 (