US892706A - Hydrocarbon-burner. - Google Patents

Hydrocarbon-burner. Download PDF

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US892706A
US892706A US23735804A US1904237358A US892706A US 892706 A US892706 A US 892706A US 23735804 A US23735804 A US 23735804A US 1904237358 A US1904237358 A US 1904237358A US 892706 A US892706 A US 892706A
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chamber
oil
burner
pipe
air
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US23735804A
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Leegora A Blubaugh
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Leegora A Blubaugh
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D5/00Burners in which liquid fuel evaporates in the combustion space, with or without chemical conversion of evaporated fuel

Description

PATENTED JULY 7, 1908.

L. A. BLUBAUGH. HYDROCARBON BURNER.

APPLICATION FILED 17120.19, 1904.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

No. 892,706. PATENTED JULY 7, 1908. L. A. BLUBAUGH.

HYDROGARBON BURNER.

APPLIOATION rum) DEO.19.1'904.

s SHEETS-SHEET 2.

II/I/l/II/ IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII i I PATENTED JULY '7, 1908.

L. A. BLUBAUGH.

HYDROCARBON BURNER.

APPLICATION IILED DBO. 19.1904.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

. [*zaenZZr Zegb UNITED STATEFSFATENT OFFICE.

LEEGORA A. BLUBAUGH, OF BAKERSFIELD, CALlFORNIA.

HYDROCABB ON-BURNER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 7, 1908 Application filed. December 19, 1904. Serial No. 237,358.

.State of California, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Hydrocar- '-bon-Burners, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to hydrocarbon burners particularly designed for use in burning crude, heavy hydrocarbon oils, such, for instance, as the heavy asphaltum oils of the California fields, which contain a large percentage of asphaltum.

The object I have in view is to provide a ositive, efficient and durable means wherey such heavy oils may be utilized to generate heat either in a cook stove, heating stove, bake oven, furnace or other apparatus or place where it is desired to generate heat and to provide such means in such form and of such construction as to avoid clogging of the burner or interference with its perfect operation or with the perfect combustion of the liquidv fuel, and to prevent any carbonizetion, or caking or coking of the minerals or impurities of the oil so that perfect distribution of the heat generated from the fuel will not be prevented.

A further object of my invention is to provide such a burner for such class of oil whereby the same may be burned without smoke.

A further object of my invention is to provide an automatic feed for such a burner so that the apparatus may be kept in constant service without the requirement of constant attendance thereon.

A further object of my invention is to provide for the safety of the apparatus by the provision of suitable means for carrying away any excess oil fed into the burner by any accidental cause whatsoever.

As shown in the accompanying drawings: Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view 0 a fire-pot of a stove and of a hydrocarbon burning apparatus embodying my invention in'place t erein. Fig. 2 1s a sectional plan view on the line X -Qi of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of a fire-pot of a stove and-a somewhat modified form of my invention. Fig. 4 is a sectional plan view on the line XX of Fig. 3. Fig. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of a modified form of my invention. Fig. 6 is a sectional plan view on the line X '-X of Fig. 5.

In the drawings, 2 represents the walls of a fire-pot and 3 the flange upon which the fire grates ordinarily rest and on which the firepot proper ordinarily is supported.

4 represents the body portion of my generator and this body portion may be, as

shown in Figs. 1 and 3, cylindrical in form,

or, it may be as shown in Fig. 5, oblong or rectilinear. The bottom of the body 4 is preferably concave and adapted to receive a imng of refractory material 5.

As shown in Fig. 1 an oil pipe 6 is connected with and communicates through the bottom of the body 4 and terminates prefcr ably just within the body, a duct or way 7 being formed in the refractory material which is preferably carried up at its center in the form of a boss, so that the we 7 terminates just below the first series of air inlet erforations 8 and above the main u )per Sill ace of the refractory material 5, which surface, as shown, is also preferably inclined downward toward the center. The body 4 is open at its top so that an open generating chamber 9 is formed, and in this chamber a series of holes lead through the wall of the body 4. Preferably, the centers of the first row of these holes or air inlets 8 are one-half inch above the bottom of the ta cred chamber, and the concavity formed a ove the refractory material and the holes must be sufficiently close together to revent any carbonization on the inside wall of the body 4. By making the holes or air inlets 8 close together only a small heated surface is left between the air inlets and the ingress of air through the inlets 8 is sufiicient to effectually prevent carbonization on the inner surface of the body 4. These air inlets 8 must open directly into the chamber 9 and not at an angle, in order to effectuate a thorough mingling of the oil with the air in the chamber 9. By bringing the air inlets straight into the chamber, a greater commotion is effected in the combustion chamber and this insures a more thorough mingling of the vaporizing oil and air.

In order to sup ort the body 4 in position on the fire-pot i prefer to employ angle plates 10 having flanges '11, through which rivets or other means, pass through the wall of the body 4 and hold the body 4 and the angle plates 10 in fixed position. The horizontal flanges of the angle plates 10 have their outer ends adapted to rest on the flanges 3 of the walls of the stove.

12 represents the refractory material filled in between the walls of the stove and the body 4 so that the inlet of air from below the burner must be entirely through the combustion chamber, although means may be provided for admitting air above the body 4.

13 represents the overflow pipe, which as shown, extends up above the top of the refractory material 5, but terminates below the lower series of air inlets 8. This overflow pipe is connected with any suitable outlet, such as a sewer or tank for receivmg any overflow of oil.

The oil pipe 6 is connected withasuitable source of supply, the oil being supplied to the chamber 9 under just sufficient head to cause it to flow u into the chamber 9, although the oil. supp y, in order to insure such pressure, may be located at sufficient height above the burner to insure suflicient gravity pressure for this purpose, and the oil supply tank may be located at any distance subservient to safety and convenience.

In order to insure the automatic regulation of the supply of oil to the chamber 9 and to prevent the supply of any excess thereto, and at the same time to obviate the necessity of constant attendance u on the burner, I interpose in the oil pipe 6 etween the source of supply and the chamber 9, an automatic cut-off mechanism. This mechanism consists of a chamber 14 formed in a suitable reservoir and to which the portion of the pipe 6 leading to the chamber 9 is connected at about its center. At the top of the chamber 14 and forming a closure therefor, is a body 15 provided with an oil inlet way 16 and a valve way 17. 18 represents a ball or float adapted to operate in the.

chamber 14, and rovided on its periphery with a tapering va ve 19 adapted to operate in the way 17 The body 15 is projected upward above .the way 16 and the way 17 extended up through this projection. A regulating hand wheel 20 operates in this extension through a packing gland and by operating this regulating device 20, the limit of upward movement of the valve 19 may be con trolled so that the valve 19, if desired, may be prohibited from, at any time, entirely shutting ofl' the flow of oil to the chamber 9. With the provision of this automatic regulation of the supply of oil, it will be seen that whenever the supply of oil in the chamber 14 is suflEicient to cause the ball 18 to rise and project the valve 19 into the duct 17, that the supply of oil entering the chamber 14 will be thereby cut down or entirely out ofl, and that as the supply of oil in the chamber 14 is reduced, the ball 18 drops and permits the inflow of a further supply of oil. Another result which is accomp ished by this automatic operating valve 19 is that the duct 17 is mechanically c eaned by the operation of the valve 19 so that the duct 17 will at no time become clogged.

About the body 4 below the angle plate 1.0, I have provided an air chamber 21 This air chamber is formed by a metallic wall either cylindrical or square in form, and supported from the angle lates 10 as shown. This chamber is close except, through a series of ducts 22 in which I mount puppet valves 23.

If the burner is to be operated in connection with a forced draft,as for instance, from a blower connected with the pipe 24, the pressure of air in the chamber21 will hold the valve 23 closed, preventing the egress of air. If, however, a low pressure were desired, and the blower were stopped, the pu pet valves 23 would open from the atmosp eric pressure without and would permit suflicient air to enter the chamber 21 for the proper combustion within the chamber 9.

In order to prevent the ball 18 from dropping down into the chamber 14 a suilicient distance to allow the valve 19 to entirely escape from the way 17 so that the valve 19 could turn away from such way and not bein position to operate therein upon the rise of the ball, a stop 25 is provided which limits the downward movement of the ball. This stop 25 is referably in the form of a rod passing horlzontally through the chamber 14. 26 represents a valve which may be closed when the burner is not in operation to positively shut ofl the flow of oil to the burner.

In Fig. 3 I have shown a slightly modified form of my burner. This modification consists in the provision of means for introducing steam to the atomizing oil in the chamber 9. When such apparatus is used, the oil supply pipe 6 is preferably introduced into the chamber 9 at one side of the center of the bottom thereof and the central opening utilized for the water pipe 27, which, as shown, extends up into the fire-pot or chamber 28 above the chamber 9. To the lower end of this ipe 27 is connected a water supply pipe 29 t rough a reducing plug 30 into which a small water supply pipe 31 is positioned. This water supply ipe 31 is loosely mounted in a duct of the re ucing plug 30 and extends up through the interior of the pipe.27 and through the plate 32 and referably has a hooked end 33, the central opening of the plate 32 being provided with an elongated opening 34 through which the pipe 31 extends and so that when the hook 33 of the pipe 31 is turned in proper position, the plate 32 and parts attac ed thereto, may be removed, as hereinafter set forth. Preferably, the pipe 27 is made in two pieces connected together in a screw-plug 35, secured in place in the central opening of the bottom of the 4. Extending downwardly from the perip or (pipe 36Iform1ng a steam supp openin into the chamber 9 just above the first ser es of air inlet holes 8. 38 represents a short cylinder screwed on the outside 'of the cylinder 36 and extending above the plate 32 and having a screw cap 39 forming a steam generating chamber 40above the plate 32. '41' represents short tubes or pipes extending; up'from the steam dischar e or outlet ducts 42 into the chamber '40 a ove the water level therein. These pi es 41' communicate throu h the steam disc arge ducts 42 in the charm er 37 of the pipe 36. The large opening 34 through the plate 32 forms an overflow outlet into the overflow ipe 27 which is connected at its lower end t rough the T 43 with the water overflow pi e 44, leading to the sewer or other outlet. n the pipe 27 I supply perforations 45 which are mclined downwardly and inwardly. These perforations 45 permit air to enter the pipe 27.

In Figs. 5 and 6, the burner of big. 1 is modified to show, instead of a cylindrical chamber 9 a rectilinear chamber 46, which is preferably used in large sized burners.

The bottom of the casing 47 is provided with refractory material, 5, the up er surface of which is concave and provide with a series of channels 48 leading into a duct or opening 7 above the end of the oil supply pipe 6. The casing 47 is provided with a series of air inlet holes 8 similarly arranged and corresponding to the inlet holes 8 of Figs. 1 and 3. The operation is as follows: Where the burner is constructed without the water and steam apparatus of Fig. 3, the valve 26 is opened to allow oil from the chamber 14 to flow through the pipe 6 and up onto the refractory material 5 in the chamber 9, the regulation of the valve 19 and ball 18 being such that the supply of oil will be automatically sufficient to maintain just a small quantity of oil on the surface of the refractory material. The initial ignition of the heavy crude oil may be accomplished in the chamber 9 in the.

usual manner, as for instance, by waste supplied on top of the oil and the burning of such Waste heats the surface of the oil so that vaor arises therefrom and this vapor being lgnited by the burning waste the oil entering the chamber 9 vaporizes and the vapor ignites and as the wall 4 and therefractory material 5 becomes heated, the vaporization is increased. Air flows into the chamber 9 from the chamber 21, and if the chamber 21 is connected with an air compressor, the forced draft of the air through the air inlets 8 creates a tremendous commotion of the rising vapor and thoroughly insures the comlete combustion thereof. This air rushing 1nto the inlets 8 and the heat vapors arising to meet the same, tend to create a vacuum between the oil and the air, which sucks the oil up, atomizing it and forcibly com mingling the atomizing oil or vapor with the air. Unless the burner is burned with "a ver low draft, there will be no fire on the oil. 7 be blue flame burns at the opening of the inlet ports 8 in the combustion cham ber. The drawing up of the vaporizing oil in the air currents, assing in the chamber 9 and through the inlets 8, prevents carbonization in the bottom of the chamber 9, either on the sides of the chamber or on the refractory material 5, and an intense heat is thus generated without the production of smoke, the combustion being complete and perfect. With some oils, however, of exceedingly heavy gravity and containing a large ercentage of asphaltum and mineral, in or er to effect perfect combustion, it is desirable to introduce steam to the burning and atomizing vapor. For such purpose I utilize a burner of the construction shown in Fig. 3, the water being converted into steam in the chamber 40 and being delivered through the chamber 37 down into the rising atomizing vapor as it leaves the body of oil and passes out across the plane of the inlet ports 8.

Any excess of water in the chamber 40 is drained off through the overflow pipe 27 into the ipe 44, thus preventing water from b ing rought in contact with any portion of the highly heated wall 4 of the combustion chamber, and avoiding any pulling therein.

Great difiiculty has been found in burning the California crude oils, owing to the presence therein of a substance, known among 011 men as BS. Th s substance has so far been found to be impossible to chemically classify or distinguish, but it seems to be a liquid saltpeter or a liquid silica and is explosive and highly inflammable. It is exceedingly heavy, being much heavier than any oil and when precipitated into water will sink a considerable distance therein. It

is of a consistency. and of a nature like ex ceedingly thick and heavy syrup or molasses,

has been found to accumulate in the valve ways and prevent the regulation of the flow of oil there-through. When properly furnished to the burner with water and in con-.

nection with the other oil, it forms a very valuable heating agent. In order to secure an automatic valve which will automatically regulatethe supply of oil to the burner and at the same time automatically and in the burning of such oils, this substance clean the valve seat or inlet, I have )rovided to the burner. By this means the difficulty in the regulation of the feed of oil to the burner, in practice, has been found to be successfully overcome.

.Having now described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A hydrocarbon burner having a combustion chamber, the Wall of said chamber being provided with a series of air inlets, means for supplying oil to the bottom of said chamber below said air inlets, an automatic valve in connection with said oil supplyin means for controlling the supply of oil to said chamber, means forming a closed chamber about the sidesand bottom of said combustion chamber, inlets in the said last named chamber and valves operated by atmospheric pressure for controlling the admission of air through said inlets.

2. A hydrocarbon burner having an opentopped combustion chamber provided with air inlets at its sides, means for supplying oil to the bottom of said combustion chamber below said air inlets, a water supply pipe extending up through said combustion chamber above the top thereof, means forming a steam generating chamber into which said Water .pipe communicates, a cylindrical body h aving its upper end in communication with said steam chamber and extending down about said Water pi e and opening into said combustion cham er near the bottom thereof.

3. A hydrocarbon burner having an open topped combustion chamber provided with air inlets, means for supplying oil to the bottom'of said combustion chamber below said inlets, means providing a closed chamber about said combustion chamber, means for supplying air under pressure to said last named chamber, means providing a steam chamber above said combustion chamber, means for supplying water to said steam chamber and means for communicating the steam from said steam chamber down to and discharging the same into said combustion chamber near the bottom thereof.

4. A hydrocarbon burner having an open through said combustion c amber, means forming a steam generating chamber into which said water pipe communicates, an

overflow pipe from said steam chamber and means for communicating the steam generat ing in said steam chamber down into said combustion chamber to discharge the same near the bottom thereof.

5. A hydrocarbon burner having an open topped combustion chamber, having a series of air inlets in its wall, means for supplying oil to said combustion chamber below said air inlets, a pipe extending up through said combustion chamber-and supportin a plate forming the'bottom of the steam c amber, meansforming the sides and top of said steam chamber, a water pipe extending up through said first named ipe through said plate and into said steam c amber,.an overflow outlet being left through said plate around said water pipe, a concentric steam supply pipe about said first named pipes and extending from said plate down to near the bottom of said combustion chamber, an opening thereinto, the upper end of said concentric pipe being connected with said plate and means for supplying steam fromthe top of said steam c amber into the chamber of said concentric pipe.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at Los Angeles California this 17th day of November 1904. i

' LEEGORA A. BLUBAUGH.

In presence of FREDERICK S. LYON, F. M. TOWNSEND.

US23735804A 1904-12-19 1904-12-19 Hydrocarbon-burner. Expired - Lifetime US892706A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2527921A (en) * 1947-12-26 1950-10-31 Every William Ward Conversion oil burner, including a vertically adjustable float chamber
US2536379A (en) * 1948-04-08 1951-01-02 Socony Vacuum Oil Co Inc Humidity control in pot type vaporizing burners
US2549279A (en) * 1945-11-28 1951-04-17 Yvelin Charles Vaporizing type liquid fuel burner
US2581238A (en) * 1946-08-08 1952-01-01 Socony Vacuum Oil Co Inc Vaporizing vertical pot type oil burner
US2646110A (en) * 1947-10-09 1953-07-21 William O Horne Pot-type oil burner

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2549279A (en) * 1945-11-28 1951-04-17 Yvelin Charles Vaporizing type liquid fuel burner
US2581238A (en) * 1946-08-08 1952-01-01 Socony Vacuum Oil Co Inc Vaporizing vertical pot type oil burner
US2646110A (en) * 1947-10-09 1953-07-21 William O Horne Pot-type oil burner
US2527921A (en) * 1947-12-26 1950-10-31 Every William Ward Conversion oil burner, including a vertically adjustable float chamber
US2536379A (en) * 1948-04-08 1951-01-02 Socony Vacuum Oil Co Inc Humidity control in pot type vaporizing burners

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