US537955A - George e - Google Patents

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US537955A
US537955A US537955DA US537955A US 537955 A US537955 A US 537955A US 537955D A US537955D A US 537955DA US 537955 A US537955 A US 537955A
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hook
garment
fabric
george
cap
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Expired - Lifetime
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A44HABERDASHERY; JEWELLERY
    • A44CPERSONAL ADORNMENTS, e.g. JEWELLERY; COINS
    • A44C7/00Ear-rings; Devices for piercing the ear-lobes
    • A44C7/004Ear-clips
    • A44C7/006Ear-clips with a pivotable back clamping arm
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/44Clasp, clip, support-clamp, or required component thereof
    • Y10T24/44291Clasp, clip, support-clamp, or required component thereof including pivoted gripping member
    • Y10T24/44376Spring or resiliently biased about pivot

Definitions

  • This invention relates to improvements in metallic clasps, such as are particularly but not exclusively designed for use upon garment supporters for ladies and childrens wear, and it has for its object to provide a device which shall be cheap and simple to manufacture, and one which will grasp the garment with a secure hold and at the same time, be extremely easy to fasten or release from the garment, thus overcoming in a great measure the objection to clasps of this character now in common use.
  • Figure l is a front, Fig. 2 a side elevation, and Fig. 3 a rear View, of the preferred form of clasp.
  • Fig. 4. is a vertical section through the same.
  • Figs. 5, 6, and '7 are rear views in perspective, illustrating different forms of gripping jaws for the clasp.
  • Fig. 8 is a view of the device gripping a garment.
  • the body porti-on, lettered A in the drawings is formed with laterally extending ears a., which are adapted to be bent around the end of the web constituting the supporter proper in order to attach the device thereto, and it is obvious that any of the ordinary well known means for securing a strong union may be employed if desired.
  • the body portion is formed with a downwardly extending tongue B, preferably curved toward the rear somewhat, as shown best in Figs. 2 and 4t and provided at its lower end with a forwardly curved hook b, having its end b turned Well up toward the body A.
  • the end of the hook is smooth, but I may find it advantageous for some purposes as will hereinafter appear, to serrate or tooth this end, as shown for instance at b', in Figs. 6 and 7.
  • a cooperating member consisting of a shank por-1 tion C terminating at the lower end in an inclosing ring for the end of the hook, such inclosing ring being preferably in the form of a concavo-convex cap D.
  • this inclosing ring or cap is provided with a lip d preferably projecting upward, and in any instance, with its edge lying in position to cooperate with the extreme lower portion of the hook so as to hold said hook within the cap as illustrated in Figs. 3 to '7 or allow the same to be snapped outA as in Fig. 2.
  • the front of the cap portion serves as a limiting stop for the end of the hook.
  • the hook tongue B and portions C of the co-operating member are sufiiciently elastic to allow the end of the hook to spring past the lip on the cap portion, which will thus serve as an efficient means for holding the hook in closed position when engaged with the fabric as illustrated in Fig. 8.
  • the body portion In engaging the device, the body portion is grasped, the hook passed beneath the fabric of the garment to be supported and the cap pressed down until the hook carrying the fabric with it, snaps past the lip on the cap, when any direct pull on the fabric will be taken up by the lipD and end of the hook b, there being so little tendency to cause the hook to move outward so that with a direct pull on the webbing of the supporter it is almost impossible to release the device.
  • the edge of the lip D may, if desired, be toothed and serrated, as shown in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, and in every instance, it is preferably made with recesses e at each side into which the fabric may pull when drawn down.
  • the hinging of the two members together may be accomplished in any well known manner, but I preferably strike up a small earffrom the base of the hooked tongue B and curve this ear forward around a pivoted bar g formed on the upper end of the cooperating member C, usually by simply slitting the end of this member'.
  • the device it Will be observed is extremely simple,easilyand cheaply manufactured and what is of greater importance, may be engaged with and released from the fabric of the garment with the greatest facility, and at the same time, when in engagement, will hold with a secure grip against any strains upon the garment or supporter.
  • thel clasp for garment supporters herein described consisting of the body portion formed at the top for the attachment of the webbing and at the bottom into the spring tongue terminating in an upwardly turned hook and the overlying member hinged at the upper end tothe body at a point intermediate the ends of thev body said overlying member being formed at the bottom with a circular orifice adapted to surround the hook on the body, and itself having at the bottom an upwardly projecting lip co-operatng with the hook to form a snap catchl for grasping the fabric of the garment to be supported when caught over the same; substantially as described.

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  • Professional, Industrial, Or Sporting Protective Garments (AREA)

Description

Patented Apr. 2.3, 1895.
mi mams PETERS co, PnoTaurHn, WASHINGTON, D. c.
' UNTTED STATES PATENT QEETEE.
GEORGE E. ADAMS, OF NEIV BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO THE TRAUT dr IIINE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF SAME PLACE.
CLASP.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 537,955, dated April 23, 1895.
Application tiled November 2, 1893. Serial No. 489,834.. (No model.)
To @ZZ whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, GEORGE E. ADAMS, of New Britain, in the county of Hartford and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Clasps; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exactdescription of the same, refererence being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, and to the letters of reference marked thereon.
This invention relates to improvements in metallic clasps, such as are particularly but not exclusively designed for use upon garment supporters for ladies and childrens wear, and it has for its object to provide a device which shall be cheap and simple to manufacture, and one which will grasp the garment with a secure hold and at the same time, be extremely easy to fasten or release from the garment, thus overcoming in a great measure the objection to clasps of this character now in common use.
Referring to the accompanying drawings: Figure lis a front, Fig. 2 a side elevation, and Fig. 3 a rear View, of the preferred form of clasp. Fig. 4. is a vertical section through the same. Figs. 5, 6, and '7 are rear views in perspective, illustrating different forms of gripping jaws for the clasp. Fig. 8 is a view of the device gripping a garment.
Similar letters of reference in the several figures indicate the same parts.
In carrying this invention into practice, I preferably stamp the parts up from sheet metal,as is usual in this class of devices, and one of the parts, which I shall for convenience, term the body porti-on, lettered A in the drawings, is formed with laterally extending ears a., which are adapted to be bent around the end of the web constituting the supporter proper in order to attach the device thereto, and it is obvious that any of the ordinary well known means for securing a strong union may be employed if desired. The body portion is formed with a downwardly extending tongue B, preferably curved toward the rear somewhat, as shown best in Figs. 2 and 4t and provided at its lower end with a forwardly curved hook b, having its end b turned Well up toward the body A. In the preferred construction, the end of the hook is smooth, but I may find it advantageous for some purposes as will hereinafter appear, to serrate or tooth this end, as shown for instance at b', in Figs. 6 and 7.
To the front of the body portion and preferably at the base of the tongue is hinged a cooperating member consisting of a shank por-1 tion C terminating at the lower end in an inclosing ring for the end of the hook, such inclosing ring being preferably in the form of a concavo-convex cap D. At the lower end, this inclosing ring or cap is provided with a lip d preferably projecting upward, and in any instance, with its edge lying in position to cooperate with the extreme lower portion of the hook so as to hold said hook within the cap as illustrated in Figs. 3 to '7 or allow the same to be snapped outA as in Fig. 2.
It will be observed that the front of the cap portion serves as a limiting stop for the end of the hook. The hook tongue B and portions C of the co-operating member are sufiiciently elastic to allow the end of the hook to spring past the lip on the cap portion, which will thus serve as an efficient means for holding the hook in closed position when engaged with the fabric as illustrated in Fig. 8.
In engaging the device, the body portion is grasped, the hook passed beneath the fabric of the garment to be supported and the cap pressed down until the hook carrying the fabric with it, snaps past the lip on the cap, when any direct pull on the fabric will be taken up by the lipD and end of the hook b, there being so little tendency to cause the hook to move outward so that with a direct pull on the webbing of the supporter it is almost impossible to release the device. 'Io insure a better grip, the edge of the lip D may, if desired, be toothed and serrated, as shown in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, and in every instance, it is preferably made with recesses e at each side into which the fabric may pull when drawn down.
y Obviously, the hinging of the two members together may be accomplished in any well known manner, but I preferably strike up a small earffrom the base of the hooked tongue B and curve this ear forward around a pivoted bar g formed on the upper end of the cooperating member C, usually by simply slitting the end of this member'.
The device it Will be observed is extremely simple,easilyand cheaply manufactured and what is of greater importance, may be engaged with and released from the fabric of the garment with the greatest facility, and at the same time, when in engagement, will hold with a secure grip against any strains upon the garment or supporter.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new is- As an improved article of manufacture, thel clasp for garment supporters herein described, consisting of the body portion formed at the top for the attachment of the webbing and at the bottom into the spring tongue terminating in an upwardly turned hook and the overlying member hinged at the upper end tothe body at a point intermediate the ends of thev body said overlying member being formed at the bottom with a circular orifice adapted to surround the hook on the body, and itself having at the bottom an upwardly projecting lip co-operatng with the hook to form a snap catchl for grasping the fabric of the garment to be supported when caught over the same; substantially as described.
GEORGE E. ADAMS,
Witnesses:
R. A. MOORE, Jr., G. W. TRAUT.
US537955D George e Expired - Lifetime US537955A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2450090A (en) * 1946-02-02 1948-09-28 William H Hunt Clamp for attaching articles to the tops of automobiles
US5153969A (en) * 1992-01-16 1992-10-13 Arrendiell Robert W Cord clasp
US5363538A (en) * 1992-01-16 1994-11-15 Arrendiell Robert W Cord clasp

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2450090A (en) * 1946-02-02 1948-09-28 William H Hunt Clamp for attaching articles to the tops of automobiles
US5153969A (en) * 1992-01-16 1992-10-13 Arrendiell Robert W Cord clasp
US5363538A (en) * 1992-01-16 1994-11-15 Arrendiell Robert W Cord clasp

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