US4746206A - Motorcycle with automatically adjustable mirror to reduce image movement - Google Patents

Motorcycle with automatically adjustable mirror to reduce image movement Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US4746206A
US4746206A US06/929,301 US92930186A US4746206A US 4746206 A US4746206 A US 4746206A US 92930186 A US92930186 A US 92930186A US 4746206 A US4746206 A US 4746206A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
motorcycle
mirror
means
combination
mirrors
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related
Application number
US06/929,301
Inventor
John E. Kusztos
James Y. Pearce
Original Assignee
Kusztos John E
Pearce James Y
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Kusztos John E, Pearce James Y filed Critical Kusztos John E
Priority to US06/929,301 priority Critical patent/US4746206A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US4746206A publication Critical patent/US4746206A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62JCYCLE SADDLES OR SEATS; ACCESSORIES PECULIAR TO CYCLES AND NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR, e.g. ARTICLE CARRIERS, CYCLE PROTECTORS
    • B62J29/00Adaptations or arrangements of mirrors for use on cycles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/20Control lever and linkage systems
    • Y10T74/20576Elements
    • Y10T74/20732Handles
    • Y10T74/2078Handle bars
    • Y10T74/20822Attachments and accessories

Abstract

A motorcycle mirror mounting system that controls the position of the mirrors of a motorcycle during tilting and/or turning of the motorcycle. A tilt sensor detects the degree and direction of tilting of the motorcycle frame and provides data representative thereof to a central controller. In accordance with its adjustment determinations, the controller acts through one or more servo control circuits to continuously adjust the positions of the mirrors to maintain the mirrors in positions providing substantially the same view to the rear as during straight driving. Thus, an image that would normally appear near the center of a mirror during straight riding, and which would appear to move either to the left or right of, and toward either the upper or lower boundaries of, the mirror during tilting of the motorcycle, is maintained substantially at the center of the mirror. If the mirrors are mounted on the motorcycle handlebars, then a turn sensor senses the degree and direction of turning of the mirrors relative to the motorcycle frame and provides data representative thereof to the central controller which acts through the servo control circuits to adjust the mirror positions for the turning as well as the tilting.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention pertains to a motorcycle mirror mount that automatically adjusts the rear view mirrors of a motorcycle to present substantially the same view during tilting and turning of the motorcycle as during straight riding, regardless of the degree and direction of tilt or turn of the motorcycle.

Unlike automobiles and other vehicles that ride on three or more wheels, two-wheeled motorcycles, motorscooters and the like lean or tilt when the operator turns to the right or left, as when turning a corner, changing lanes on a highway, or simply following the curvature of a road. Motorcycles generally have rear view mirrors mounted on them to enable the operator to monitor traffic and road conditions behind him. During turns the motorcycle mirrors tilt with the frame of the motorcycle, with the result that one mirror is raised to an elevated position with respect to its position during straight riding while the other mirror is lowered. On some motorcycles, the mirrors are mounted on a wind fairing that is fixedly connected to the motorcycle frame. However, on other motorcycles the mirrors are mounted on the handlebars, with the result that when the front fork-handlebar assembly is turned to cause the motorcycle to turn, the mirrors are also turned with respect to the frame of the motorcycle.

Motorcycle operators often experience difficulty in detecting vehicles behind them, for example vehicles approaching the motorcycle from either the left rear or right rear. This problem is exacerbated as the motorcycle tilts during a turn. Due to the tilting the motorcycle operator has a significantly diminished view behind him. If the turn is great, with a high degree of tilting and/or turning, the operator cannot utilize conventionally mounted mirrors to see behind him, but instead must either turn his head or look beneath his arm on the side toward which his vehicle is tilting. Either of these maneuvers by the operator is difficult to execute while wearing a helmet. Moreover, both are unsafe, as they require a prolonged time without viewing the road ahead, as compared with a quick glance at the rear view mirrors. This situation is even worse when the mirrors are mounted on the motorcycle handlebars and so turn with respect to the motorcycle frame as the operator turns the front wheel of the motorcycle.

Adjustable mirror mounts are known for other vehicles. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 3,469,901 discloses an electrical system for automatically angularly adjusting the mirrors on the cab of a tractor trailer. A series of spaced electrical contacts is arranged on the fifth wheel of the tractor, while the kingpin plate of the trailer carries a conducting bar adapted to engage the contacts as the tractor turns with respect to the trailer. Contact between the various electrical contacts and the conductor bar causes activation of an electromagnetic device for pivoting or turning the rear view mirrors to provide the operator with an appropriate rear view both during straight driving and during turning.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,749,480 discloses another automatic tractor-trailer mirror rotation system, including a relative rotation sensor, an electronic signal generator, a motor, and control circuitry for coupling the motor to the signal generator and for providing a feedback signal to the signal generator. The system rotates either the right or the left rear view mirror relative to the right or left rear wheel as the tractor turns relative to the trailer. The system is said to be very simple to install without requiring substantial modification to the vehicle.

Other self-aligning rear view mirror systems are disclosed in, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,199,075; 3,383,154; and 3,640,609. U.S. Pat. No. 3,199,075 discloses a system which moves the mirror between predetermined positions in response to operation of the right or left turn signal indicator. U.S. Pat. No. 3,383,154 shows a mechanical arrangement, utilizing a weight, for moving the mirror according to a particular ratio between the arcuate motion of the weight and the arcuate motion of the mirror. U.S. Pat. No. 3,640,609 discloses a hydraulic system responsive to the rotation of a shaft in the vehicle steering column for controlling the mirror position.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a motorcycle mirror mounting system that controls the position of the mirrors of a motorcycle during tilting and/or turning of the motorcycle. A tilt sensor detects the degree and direction of tilting of the motorcycle frame and provides data representative thereof to a central controller. In accordance with its adjustment determinations, the controller acts through one or more servo control circuits to continuously adjust the positions of the mirrors to maintain the mirrors in positions providing the motorcycle operator with substantially the same view to the rear during such tilting or turning as is provided during straight driving. Thus, an image that would normally appear near the center of a mirror during straight riding, and which would appear to move either to the left or right of, and toward either the upper or lower boundaries of, the mirror during tilting of the motorcycle, is maintained substantially at the center of the mirror.

The motorcycle mirror is mounted in a mirror mount, and a support locates the mirror a predetermined distance laterally ourwardly from the frame of the motorcycle in a predetermined position with respect to the motorcycle seat so that the mirror provides a selected rearward view. The mirror is pivotally mounted, permitting it to pivot with respect to the predetermined position. A tilt sensor is provided for sensing tilting of the motorcycle in relation to a vertical plane through the motorcycle frame. The tilt sensor output is applied to a central controller which controls the mirror position to continuously provide the motorcycle operator with a view to the rear that is substantially equivalent to the selected rearward view that is provided during straight riding with the mirror in the original predetermined position.

One embodiment of the mirror mounting system according to the present invention is particularly suited for use with handlebar mounted mirrors and includes a turn sensor for detecting rotational movement of the front fork-handlebar assembly of the motorcycle and the mirror with respect to a plane through the motorcycle frame. The central controller receives a data signal, derived from the degree and direction of turn sensed by the turn sensor, and in turn acts through one or more servo circuits to further adjust the mirrors according to the degree of turn.

The system can be entirely analog, or the sensor outputs can be converted to digital signals, permitting a microprocessor to be utilized as the central controller.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other aspects and advantages of the present invention are more apparent from the following detailed description and claims, particularly when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which like parts bear like reference numerals. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view depicting the negotiation of a curve in the road by a motorcycle during which the motorcycle and the operator tilt with respect to a vertical plane through the frame of the motorcycle;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic illustration of the motorcycle operator's rear view in the mirrors of the motorcycle during straight riding;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic illustration similar to FIG. 2, depicting the operator's rear view in conventionally mounted motorcycle mirrors when the motorcycle is tilted to the left such that the left side mirror dips and the right side mirror is elevated;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a motorcycle having a wind fairing and equipped with mirror mounts in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a cutaway, perspective view, in partial schematic form, of a motorcycle mirror mounting system in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a block diagram of one embodiment of a system for controlling the position of the mirrors on a motorcycle, suitable for incorporation into the mirror mounting system of FIG. 5 in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a second embodiment of a system in accordance with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

As depicted in FIG. 1, as a motorcycle 12, with a motorcycle operator 10 riding thereon, turns to follow a curve or turn in a road, motorcycle 12 and rider 10 tilt from the vertical plane passing through the motorcycle frame. In contrast, during straight riding, the motorcycle and operator generally remain in a vertical plane. Motorcycle 12 is equipped with rear view mirrors 14 and 16.

FIG. 2 illustrates the view provided to the operator by rear view mirrors 14 and 16 during straight riding. As illustrated, each of mirrors 14 and 16, at approximately the center thereof, shows an image 18 of a vehicle that is travelling behind the motorcycle. If mirrors 14 and 16 are mounted by means of conventional mirror mounts, as the motorcycle 12 tilts one of mirrors 14 and 16 is moved upwardly and the other is moved downwardly, both with respect to their FIG. 2 straight riding position. As a result, image 18 appears to move across the reflective surfaces of the mirrors and partially or fully to disappear. Thus, as illustrated in FIG. 3, when motorcycle 12 tilts to the left, right side mirror 14 moves upwardly and left side mirror 16 moves downwardly, and so image 18 moves to the lower right portion of mirror 14 and to the upper right portion of mirror 16, almost disappearing from the operator's view. The opposite situation occurs during tilting of the motorcycle to the right, causing right side mirror 14 to move downwardly and left side mirror 16 to move upwardly.

FIG. 1 depicts mirrors 14 and 16 mounted on the handlebars 28 of motorcycle 12. In contrast, FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a motorcycle 20 having a wind fairing 26 in front of the handlebars 28 to reduce wind resistance, with mirror mounts 22 and 24 mounted on fairing 26. Handlebars 28 rotate within fairing 26 with respect to the fairing and the motorcycle frame 30; however, mirror mounts 22 and 24 and mirrors 14 and 16 do not rotate with the turning of the handlebars.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, cutaway view in partial schematic form of mirror mount 22 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, and mirror mount 24 can be essentially the same. Mirror mount 22 includes a support element 40, for securing the mount to the motorcycle, and a housing 42. Support element 40 is sufficiently long to insure that housing 42 projects outwardly from the sidewalls 44 (FIG. 4) of fairing 26, for example being at least about six inches horizontally from the sidewall More preferably, support element 40 provides at least a six inch clearance between housing 42 and any point along frame 30.

Housing 42 may be of rounded, conical or any other shape and has an opening 46 accommodating a mirror assembly 47. Housing 42 is connected to support element 40 by means of swivel mount 50 which may be of any conventional type, preferably of the type permitting rough hand adjustment of the housing 42 and mirror 48 relative to element 40 and fairing 26. Mirror assembly 47 includes a mirror member 48 which is supported within housing 42 by a support plate 52. Support plate 52, in turn, is pivotably held within housing 42 by freely movable means such as universal joint 54. Universal joint 54 permits limited pivoting of mirror assembly 47 about orthogonal axes, for example the vertical and horizontal axes of support plate 52 and mirror member 48. Alternatively, support plate 52 could be held within housing 42 by means of a ball-and-socket joint affixed to the rear wall of housing 42 and permitting pivoting about the same axes.

A control system 60 for mirror mount 22 or 24 is provided on a printed circuit board 62 positioned within housing 42. As seen in FIG. 6, control system 60 includes a central controller 64 for controlling the pivoting of plate 52 in response to the tilting of the motorcycle. Central controller 64 receives data representative of the direction of tilt and the degree of tilt from tilt sensor 66. By way of example, tilt sensor 66 could be of the gravity reference type. Accordingly, tilt sensor 66 could comprise a pendulous element suspended inside a case. Tilt sensor 66 provides an output signal, as from a potentiometer, dependent upon the deflection of the pendulous element from its vertical position when motorcycle 20 tilts to the right or to the left. By way of example, to differentiate between a right tilt and a left tilt, tilt sensor 66 could provide a positive going output signal to indicate a right tilt and a negative going output signal to indicate a left tilt.

Alternatively, tilt sensor 66 could comprise a gyro attitude transducer in which pivoting about a horizontally oriented gimbal axis is quantified to provide a similar output signal. Further still, tilt sensor 66 could comprise a mercury switch for providing a signal upon displacement of a mercury bubble either to the right or to the left within a containment tube having its longitudinal axis normally aligned with the horizontal when the motorcycle is vertical.

Controller 64 determines the adjustment necessary to mirror member 48 to provide a full rear view corresponding substantially to that provided during straight riding and applies appropriate signals to vertical and horizontal servo control circuits 82 and 84 to cause the servo control cicruits to control corresponding servo motors 86 to pivot plate 52 and mirror 48 about a pair of orthogonal axes of mirror assembly 47.

When system 60 is activated or when it is deactivated, or preferably both, as by the operation of the motorcycle ignition switch (not shown) by the motorcycle operator, controller 64 causes servo circuits 82 and 84 to control motors 86 and to automatically move mirror member 48 into an initial position, which preferably is a position providing a straight riding rear view for riders of average height. This initial position may be pre-set by the motorcycle operator by manual ad]ustment of housing 42 on swivel mount 52. Thereafter, system 60 maintains mirror member 48 in this straight riding position with respect to housing 42 during straight riding.

When tilt sensor 66 detects tilting of the motorcycle the tilt sensor generates a voltage signal indicating the detected direction and degree of tilting. This voltage signal is applied to controller 64, and in response controller 64 applies signals to servo control circuits 82 and 84 to cause motors 86 to move mirror member 48 to provide the requisite straight-riding view during the tilting. As a result, mirrors 14 and 16 are adjusted to center image 18 substantially at their central portions.

In the foregoing, each mirror mount has been described as being secured to fairing 26 of motorcycle 20 so as not to rotate with respect to frame 30 during turning of handlebars 28. Mirror mounts 22 and 24, however, could be secured to handlebars 28, as depicted in FIG. 1. FIG. 7 shows modified system 60' in accordance with the present invention which, in addition to the tilt circuitry of FIG. 6, includes turn sensor 88. Turn sensor 88 detects the relative rotation of handlebars 28 with respect to the motorcycle frame 30. Turn sensor 88 could comprise an electrical contact-based device that operates similar to the electrical contact-conduction bar turn sensor of U.S. Pat. No. 3,469,901. Alternatively, turn sensor 88 could comprise any other rotation sensing device as is known to those skilled in the art.

As with tilt sensor 66, turn sensor 88 applies a signal to controller 64 representing the degree and direction of rotation of handlebars 28 with respect to frame 30. Central controller 64 applies signals to servo control circuits 82 and 84 to cause motors 86 to pivot the mirror assembly 47 to compensate for the movement away from the straight riding view attributable to rotation of handlebars 28. Otherwise, system 60' is similar to system 60.

Central controller 64 and servo control circuits 82 and 84 can be conventional servomechanism control circuitry designed to control the position of mirror assembly 47 in response to the output from tilt sensor 66 and/or turn sensor 88. See, for example, the two-volume treatise Servomechanism and Regulating Svstem Design, Chestnut and Mayer, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Second Edition, 1959. Alternatively, central controller 64 can include a microprocessor, in which event central controller 64 also might include an analog to digital converter between tilt sensor 66 and the microprocessor and between turn sensor 88 and the microprocessor.

Although the present invention has been described with reference to preferred embodiments, numerous modifications, rearrangements, and substitutions could be made, and the result would remain well within the scope of the invention.

Claims (13)

What is claimed is:
1. In combination with a motorcyle, a motorcycle mirror mount for automatically positioning a rear view mirror of the motorcycle to reduce movement of the image of nearby objects in the rear view provided by the mirror to an operator on the motorcycle during sideways tilting of the motorcycle, said mirror mount comprising:
a mirror;
support means;
means for attaching said support means on the motorcycle;
means for mounting said mirror to said support means while permitting pivoting of said mirror relative to said support means about a pair of genreally orthogonal axes to position said mirror to provide to the motorcycle operatior an image of nearby objects to the rear of the motorcycle;
tilt sensing means for sensing tilting of the mirror and providing a signal representative of the direction and degree of the sensed tilting; and
control means responsive to the signal from said tilt sensing means for pivoting said mirror relative to said support means to a position reducing movement of the image of the nearby objects, as viewed by the motorcycle operator, thereby providing to the motorcycle operator substantially the same view of the nearby objects regardless of the direction and degree of sideways tilting.
2. The combination of claim 1 further comprising turn sensing means of sensing turning of said mirror about an axis substantially normal to the longitudinal direction of the motorcycle frame and lying in a vertical plane extending longitudinally through the motorcycle frame and providing a signal representative of the direction and degree of the sensed turning; and
wherein said control means is further responsive to the signal from said turn sensing means for pivoting said mirror relative to said support means to a position reducing movement of the image of the nearby objects as viewed by the motorcycle operator, thereby providing to the motorcycle operator substantially the same view of the nearby objects regardless of the direction and degree of turning.
3. The combination of claim 2 wherein said attaching means attaches said support means to the handlebar of the motorcycle.
4. The combination of claim 2 wherein said control means comprises an analog to digital converter for converting the representative signal to digital signals, and digital processing means for processing the digital signals to provide signals for controlling the pivoting.
5. The combination of claim 4 wherein said digital processing means comprises a microprocessor.
6. The combination of in claim 1 wherein said attaching means attaches said support means to a wind fairing of the motorcycle.
7. The combination of in claim 1 wherein said control means comprises an analog to digital converter for converting the representative signal to a digital signal and digital processing means for processing the digital signal to provide signals for controlling the pivoting.
8. The combination of claim 7 wherein said digital processing means comprises a microprocessor.
9. The combination of claim 1 wherein said support means comprises a housing and wherein said control means is within said housing.
10. The combination of claim 9 wherein said tilt sensing means is within said housing.
11. The combination of claim 1 wherein at least one of said support means, said attaching means, and said mounting means includes means permitting manual pivoting of said mirror relative to the motorcycle, for positioning said mirror in an initial position.
12. The combination of claim 11 wherein said control means includes means responsive to at least one of activation of said control means and deactivation of said control means for positioning said mirror in the initial position.
13. The combination of claim 1 wherein said control means includes means responsive to at least one of activation of said control means and deactivation of said control means for positioning said mirror in a predetermined position.
US06/929,301 1986-11-12 1986-11-12 Motorcycle with automatically adjustable mirror to reduce image movement Expired - Fee Related US4746206A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US06/929,301 US4746206A (en) 1986-11-12 1986-11-12 Motorcycle with automatically adjustable mirror to reduce image movement

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US06/929,301 US4746206A (en) 1986-11-12 1986-11-12 Motorcycle with automatically adjustable mirror to reduce image movement
PCT/US1988/001618 WO1989010858A1 (en) 1986-11-12 1988-05-13 Motorcycle mirror mount

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US4746206A true US4746206A (en) 1988-05-24

Family

ID=25457632

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US06/929,301 Expired - Fee Related US4746206A (en) 1986-11-12 1986-11-12 Motorcycle with automatically adjustable mirror to reduce image movement

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US4746206A (en)
WO (1) WO1989010858A1 (en)

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4831366A (en) * 1988-02-05 1989-05-16 Yazaki Corporation Head up display apparatus for automotive vehicle
US4837551A (en) * 1988-02-03 1989-06-06 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for automotive vehicle
US4906089A (en) * 1988-07-28 1990-03-06 Giovanni Biondi Automotive tilt mirror
WO1990010555A1 (en) * 1989-03-07 1990-09-20 Roltra-Morse S.P.A. An electric actuation device for a vehicle external rearview mirror
US4978196A (en) * 1987-04-15 1990-12-18 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for a vehicle
US4999012A (en) * 1987-04-16 1991-03-12 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for a vehicle
US5028912A (en) * 1988-02-03 1991-07-02 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for automotive vehicle
US5034732A (en) * 1988-02-05 1991-07-23 Yazaki Corporation Head up display apparatus for automotive vehicle
US5056890A (en) * 1987-04-16 1991-10-15 Yazaki Corporation Displaying apparatus for a vehicle having a projector on the ceiling of the vehicle
US5125071A (en) * 1986-09-10 1992-06-23 Hitachi, Ltd. Computer command input unit giving priority to frequently selected commands
WO1997013655A1 (en) * 1995-10-11 1997-04-17 He Holdings, Inc. Doing Business As Hughes Electronics Viewing apparatus with a counterbalanced and articulated mirror
US5826115A (en) * 1987-11-16 1998-10-20 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Camera with an image stabilizing function
US5917667A (en) * 1996-08-19 1999-06-29 Turner; Philip R. Helmet shield mirror
US6268794B1 (en) * 2000-01-21 2001-07-31 Harley-Davidson Motor Company Group, Inc. Integrated security, tip-over, and turn signal system
US20040212484A1 (en) * 2001-09-04 2004-10-28 Exon Science Inc. Control device and method for automatically adjusting view angle of rearview angle of outside camera in response to output of navigation system
WO2004110817A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2004-12-23 Zohar Agrest System and method for automatic adjustment of mirrors for a vehicle
EP1338473A3 (en) * 2002-02-25 2004-12-29 Exon Science Inc. Device and method for adjusting view range of vehicular monitoring device
EP1580066A1 (en) * 2004-03-26 2005-09-28 Hamm AG Construction vehicle for soil working with a pair of rear view mirrors
FR2872597A1 (en) * 2004-07-05 2006-01-06 Renault Sas System and method for automatically controlling the positioning of an environmental detection element on board a motor vehicle
US7012510B2 (en) 2001-09-04 2006-03-14 Exon Science Inc. Device and method for adjusting view range of vehicular monitoring device
US20060262432A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Kabushiki Kaisha Honda Lock Review correcting/controlling system for vehicle
US20070263301A1 (en) * 2004-06-17 2007-11-15 Zohar Agrest System and Method for Automatic Adjustment of Mirrors for a Vehicle
US20080080074A1 (en) * 2006-09-01 2008-04-03 Kabushiki Kaisha Honda Lock Open vehicle rear view system
US20080300754A1 (en) * 2007-06-04 2008-12-04 Hsiu-Ping Lin Protecting systems for vehicles
US20090021582A1 (en) * 2007-07-20 2009-01-22 Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle and Driving Assist System for Vehicle
US20100232045A1 (en) * 2006-08-23 2010-09-16 Donnelly Corporation Vehicle interior rearview mirror assembly with actuator
US8840131B1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-23 Planet Rider LLC Three-wheeled vehicle
WO2015108689A1 (en) * 2014-01-17 2015-07-23 Intel Corporation Automatic rear-view mirror adjustments
WO2015147663A1 (en) * 2014-03-24 2015-10-01 Ambrożkiewicz Bartosz System for adjusting the angle of powered two-wheeler rear view mirrors in relation to the rider's head position

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE102013200157A1 (en) * 2013-01-09 2014-07-10 Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft Method for adjusting a rearview mirror at a motorcycle, involves detecting position of rider relative to fixed point of motorcycle by sensor, and setting adjusted rear mirrors in dependence on detected position

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3195075A (en) * 1962-08-20 1965-07-13 Sylvania Electric Prod Variable directional coupler
US3199075A (en) * 1961-11-13 1965-08-03 George H Simmons Signal controlled adjustable rear view mirror
US3383154A (en) * 1964-05-04 1968-05-14 Bert A. Reed Self-aligning rear vision mirrors
US3469901A (en) * 1966-12-09 1969-09-30 Gerald L Cook Automatically adjusted mirrors for tractor-trailers
US3640609A (en) * 1968-07-17 1972-02-08 Clyde M Mckee Automatically controlled mirror
US3749480A (en) * 1971-08-19 1973-07-31 Witt R De Mirror rotation correction system
US3762795A (en) * 1970-07-01 1973-10-02 Etudes Realis Electronique Observation instrument with panoramic vision
JPS5326036A (en) * 1976-08-23 1978-03-10 Ichikoh Ind Ltd Resetting means for remote control mirror
JPS5950833A (en) * 1982-09-16 1984-03-24 Ichikoh Ind Ltd Automatic varied-angle controller for electrically driven remote control mirror
JPS5953247A (en) * 1982-09-20 1984-03-27 Jidosha Denki Kogyo Co Ltd Electrically-driven mirror device

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3199075A (en) * 1961-11-13 1965-08-03 George H Simmons Signal controlled adjustable rear view mirror
US3195075A (en) * 1962-08-20 1965-07-13 Sylvania Electric Prod Variable directional coupler
US3383154A (en) * 1964-05-04 1968-05-14 Bert A. Reed Self-aligning rear vision mirrors
US3469901A (en) * 1966-12-09 1969-09-30 Gerald L Cook Automatically adjusted mirrors for tractor-trailers
US3640609A (en) * 1968-07-17 1972-02-08 Clyde M Mckee Automatically controlled mirror
US3762795A (en) * 1970-07-01 1973-10-02 Etudes Realis Electronique Observation instrument with panoramic vision
US3749480A (en) * 1971-08-19 1973-07-31 Witt R De Mirror rotation correction system
JPS5326036A (en) * 1976-08-23 1978-03-10 Ichikoh Ind Ltd Resetting means for remote control mirror
JPS5950833A (en) * 1982-09-16 1984-03-24 Ichikoh Ind Ltd Automatic varied-angle controller for electrically driven remote control mirror
JPS5953247A (en) * 1982-09-20 1984-03-27 Jidosha Denki Kogyo Co Ltd Electrically-driven mirror device

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5125071A (en) * 1986-09-10 1992-06-23 Hitachi, Ltd. Computer command input unit giving priority to frequently selected commands
US4978196A (en) * 1987-04-15 1990-12-18 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for a vehicle
US5056890A (en) * 1987-04-16 1991-10-15 Yazaki Corporation Displaying apparatus for a vehicle having a projector on the ceiling of the vehicle
US4999012A (en) * 1987-04-16 1991-03-12 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for a vehicle
US4999011A (en) * 1987-04-16 1991-03-12 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for a vehicle
US5826115A (en) * 1987-11-16 1998-10-20 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Camera with an image stabilizing function
US4837551A (en) * 1988-02-03 1989-06-06 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for automotive vehicle
US5028912A (en) * 1988-02-03 1991-07-02 Yazaki Corporation Display apparatus for automotive vehicle
US5034732A (en) * 1988-02-05 1991-07-23 Yazaki Corporation Head up display apparatus for automotive vehicle
US4831366A (en) * 1988-02-05 1989-05-16 Yazaki Corporation Head up display apparatus for automotive vehicle
US4906089A (en) * 1988-07-28 1990-03-06 Giovanni Biondi Automotive tilt mirror
WO1990010555A1 (en) * 1989-03-07 1990-09-20 Roltra-Morse S.P.A. An electric actuation device for a vehicle external rearview mirror
WO1997013655A1 (en) * 1995-10-11 1997-04-17 He Holdings, Inc. Doing Business As Hughes Electronics Viewing apparatus with a counterbalanced and articulated mirror
US5815302A (en) * 1995-10-11 1998-09-29 Hughes Electronic Viewing apparatus with a counterbalanced and articulated mirror
US5917667A (en) * 1996-08-19 1999-06-29 Turner; Philip R. Helmet shield mirror
US6268794B1 (en) * 2000-01-21 2001-07-31 Harley-Davidson Motor Company Group, Inc. Integrated security, tip-over, and turn signal system
US7012510B2 (en) 2001-09-04 2006-03-14 Exon Science Inc. Device and method for adjusting view range of vehicular monitoring device
US20040212484A1 (en) * 2001-09-04 2004-10-28 Exon Science Inc. Control device and method for automatically adjusting view angle of rearview angle of outside camera in response to output of navigation system
EP1338473A3 (en) * 2002-02-25 2004-12-29 Exon Science Inc. Device and method for adjusting view range of vehicular monitoring device
WO2004110817A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2004-12-23 Zohar Agrest System and method for automatic adjustment of mirrors for a vehicle
EP1580066A1 (en) * 2004-03-26 2005-09-28 Hamm AG Construction vehicle for soil working with a pair of rear view mirrors
US20070263301A1 (en) * 2004-06-17 2007-11-15 Zohar Agrest System and Method for Automatic Adjustment of Mirrors for a Vehicle
EP1614999A2 (en) * 2004-07-05 2006-01-11 Renault SAS System and method of automatically controlling the position of an environment detecting sensor, on board a motorised vehicule.
EP1614999A3 (en) * 2004-07-05 2008-10-29 Renault SAS System and method of automatically controlling the position of an environment detecting sensor, on board a motorised vehicule.
FR2872597A1 (en) * 2004-07-05 2006-01-06 Renault Sas System and method for automatically controlling the positioning of an environmental detection element on board a motor vehicle
US7325936B2 (en) * 2005-05-17 2008-02-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Honda Lock Rearview correcting/controlling system for vehicle
US20060262432A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Kabushiki Kaisha Honda Lock Review correcting/controlling system for vehicle
US20100232045A1 (en) * 2006-08-23 2010-09-16 Donnelly Corporation Vehicle interior rearview mirror assembly with actuator
US20080080074A1 (en) * 2006-09-01 2008-04-03 Kabushiki Kaisha Honda Lock Open vehicle rear view system
US7837339B2 (en) * 2006-09-01 2010-11-23 Kabushiki Kaisha Honda Lock Open vehicle rearview mirror system for switching between normal and blind-spot views
US20080300754A1 (en) * 2007-06-04 2008-12-04 Hsiu-Ping Lin Protecting systems for vehicles
US20090021582A1 (en) * 2007-07-20 2009-01-22 Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle and Driving Assist System for Vehicle
US8840131B1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-23 Planet Rider LLC Three-wheeled vehicle
WO2015108689A1 (en) * 2014-01-17 2015-07-23 Intel Corporation Automatic rear-view mirror adjustments
WO2015147663A1 (en) * 2014-03-24 2015-10-01 Ambrożkiewicz Bartosz System for adjusting the angle of powered two-wheeler rear view mirrors in relation to the rider's head position

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO1989010858A1 (en) 1989-11-16

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
AU775010B2 (en) Tilting vehicle provided with steerable rear wheels
US5959555A (en) Apparatus for checking blind spots of vehicle
JP5366285B2 (en) Personal balance vehicles
US7090040B2 (en) Motion control of a transporter
US5094472A (en) Camber control system for motor vehicle
US20030205419A1 (en) Riderless stabilization of a balancing transporter
JP5243795B2 (en) Control of personal transport equipment based on user location
EP0293396B1 (en) A control system for automatic adjustment of the rearview mirror of a vehicle
DE19943410B4 (en) Steering control system for a vehicle
US4702572A (en) System for viewing an infant in the rear seat of a vehicle
DE19723045B4 (en) Headlamp assembly for a vehicle
US6806848B2 (en) Display apparatus for vehicle
US5186486A (en) Active link for a stabilizer bar
US6390631B1 (en) System for automatic adjustment of external mirrors for motor vehicles when driving in curves
US6874918B2 (en) Headlamp device for vehicle
US6010237A (en) Head lamp device for vehicle
US5857535A (en) Seat for self-propelled narrow-track vehicle
US4831366A (en) Head up display apparatus for automotive vehicle
EP0994009A1 (en) An agricultural machine with a self-leveling cab
ES2280345T3 (en) Trailer for balance vehicles.
US6430521B1 (en) Vehicle headlamp leveling device
US7647999B2 (en) Multitrack curve-tilting vehicle, and method for tilting a vehicle
US20010039469A1 (en) Automatic headlight aiming device for vehicles
CN101443752B (en) System, vehicle and method for automatically adjusting automotive side rearview mirror
US5426571A (en) Motorcycle headlight aiming device

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
LAPS Lapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
FP Expired due to failure to pay maintenance fee

Effective date: 19960529

STCH Information on status: patent discontinuation

Free format text: PATENT EXPIRED DUE TO NONPAYMENT OF MAINTENANCE FEES UNDER 37 CFR 1.362