US385945A - Alloy - Google Patents

Alloy Download PDF

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Publication number
US385945A
US385945A US385945DA US385945A US 385945 A US385945 A US 385945A US 385945D A US385945D A US 385945DA US 385945 A US385945 A US 385945A
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alloy
daniel
eldredge
specification
ohara
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C22METALLURGY; FERROUS OR NON-FERROUS ALLOYS; TREATMENT OF ALLOYS OR NON-FERROUS METALS
    • C22CALLOYS
    • C22C5/00Alloys based on noble metals
    • C22C5/02Alloys based on gold

Description

NITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

DANIEL OHARA, DANIEL XV. ELDREDGE, AND JOHN LOGAN, OF \VALTHAM,

' MASSACHUSETTS.

ALLOY.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 385,945, dated July 10, 1888.

l Application filed March 2. 1888. I Serial No. 265,925. (No specimens.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, DANIEL OHARA, DAN- IEL W. ELDREDGE, and JOHN LOGAN, of Waltham, in the county of Middlesex and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Alloys, of which the followingis a specification.

Our invention has for its object to providean alloy or compound metal which shall be practically non-magnetic, inoxidizabl'e, and sufficiently resilient to adapt it for use asa material for the hair-springs of watch and chronometer balances.

We do not limit ourselves to the exact proportions above specified, but may vary the 20 same within reasonable limits without depart-- ing from the spirit of our invention.

We claim Au alloy or compound metal composed of gold, nickel, and platinum, in substantially the 2 proportions herein stated,

In testimony whereof we have signed ournames to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses, this 28th day of February, A. D. 1888.

' DANIEL OHARA.

DANIEL W. ELDREDGE.

' JOHN LOGAN.

Witnesses:

HENRY N. FISHER, EDWARD A. MARSH.

US385945D Alloy Expired - Lifetime US385945A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3683616A (en) * 1968-08-19 1972-08-15 Straumann Inst Ag Anti-magnetic timekeeping mechanisms
US20040042349A1 (en) * 2001-02-28 2004-03-04 Frederic Leuba Use of a non-magnetic coating to cover parts in a watch movement
US8215492B2 (en) 2003-09-18 2012-07-10 Pur Water Purification Products, Inc. Water treatment devices and cartridges therefor

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3683616A (en) * 1968-08-19 1972-08-15 Straumann Inst Ag Anti-magnetic timekeeping mechanisms
US20040042349A1 (en) * 2001-02-28 2004-03-04 Frederic Leuba Use of a non-magnetic coating to cover parts in a watch movement
US8215492B2 (en) 2003-09-18 2012-07-10 Pur Water Purification Products, Inc. Water treatment devices and cartridges therefor

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