US3841255A - Non-snag anchor - Google Patents

Non-snag anchor Download PDF

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US3841255A
US3841255A US00396239A US39623973A US3841255A US 3841255 A US3841255 A US 3841255A US 00396239 A US00396239 A US 00396239A US 39623973 A US39623973 A US 39623973A US 3841255 A US3841255 A US 3841255A
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anchor
shank
sleeve
opposite
cap
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US00396239A
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R Mansfield
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R Mansfield
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B21/00Tying-up; Shifting, towing, or pushing equipment; Anchoring
    • B63B21/24Anchors
    • B63B21/46Anchors with variable, e.g. sliding, connection to the chain, especially for facilitating the retrieval of the anchor

Abstract

The anchor includes a shank having a cap received over one end. A hook is carried by the cap for securing an anchor line thereto. Flukes are secured about the shank adjacent the opposite end of the anchor. A coil spring interconnects between the cap at one end of the anchor and the opposite end of the anchor whereby the cap is retained on the one end of the shank and transmits anchor line forces of a magnitude less than a predetermined magnitude to the one anchor end. When the anchor becomes snagged, the coil spring permits removal of the cap in response to anchor line forces equal to or greater than the predetermined magnitude of force whereby anchor line forces are transferred from the cap end of the anchor to the fluke end of the anchor and permit unsnagging of the anchor.

Description

United States Patent [19] Mansfield 51 Oct. 15, 1974 NON-SNAG ANCHOR [76] Inventor: Ray Mansfield, Route No. 1,
Glasgow, Ky. 42141 [22] Filed: Sept. 11, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 396,239
[52] U.S. Cl 114/206 R [51] Int. Cl 1363b 21/46 [58] Field of Search 1 14/206 R, 207, 208 R,
114/208 A, 235 WS [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,797,443 3/1974 Woolsey et a1. 114/202 R Primary Examiner-Trygve M. Blix Assistant ExaminerGalen L. Barefoot [5 7 ABSTRACT The anchor includes a shank having a cap received over one end. A hook is carried by the cap for securing an anchor line thereto. Flukes are secured about the shank adjacent the opposite end of the anchor. A coil spring interconnects between the cap at one end of the anchor and the opposite end of the anchor whereby the cap is retained on the one end of the shank and transmits anchoi line forces of a magnitude less than a predetermined magnitude to the one anchor end. When the anchor becomes snagged, the coil spring permits removal of the cap in response to anchor line forces equal to or greater than the predetermined magnitude of force whereby anchor line forces are transferred from the cap end of the anchor to the fluke end of the anchor and permit unsnagging of the anchor.
1 Claim, 4 Drawing Figures NON-SNAG ANCHOR The present invention relates to anchors for watercraft and the like and more particularly to a non-snag or break-away type anchor wherein the anchor line forces are transferable from one end of the anchor to its opposite end to unsnag or break the anchor away from obstructions or the like at or adjacent the bottom of a body of water.
Many small watercraft utilize an anchor having a shank with flukes at one end and an anchor line secured to its opposite end. This type of anchor is normally effective to maintain small watercraft and the like in a relatively fixed position without drifting and can usually be raised without difficulty simply by hauling in the anchor line and the anchor attached thereto. However, not infrequently the anchor becomes snagged on debris, rocks, ledges, submerged timber, etc. with the result that the anchor cannot be pulled up by the normal method of continuously hauling in the anchor line. Should the anchor become snagged in this manner, very often the anchor line must be cut in order to release the watercraft with consequent loss of the anchor and a significant portion of the anchor line.
Break-away or non-snag anchors designed to avoid loss of the anchor upon snagging, and to permit the anchor to be hauled in notwithstanding snagging thereof on underwater debris and the like, have been proposed and constructed in the past. For example, such prior break-away type anchors are described in US. Pat. Nos. 3,150,629; 2,490,460; 2,568,006; 2,669,962; and 3,059,607. However, a review of the anchors disclosed in these patents reveals constructions which are very complicated in both construction and operation and are, in the main, expensive to manufacture. Such anchors normally have a large number of cooperable parts which require extensive initial assemblage thereof to form the anchor and which increase the cost of such anchor. Furthermore, after using such anchors in the manner contemplated, i.e., for transferring the anchor line forces from the end of the anchor remote from the flukes to the crown end of the anchor, such parts are not readily or easily reassembled whereby the anchor can be reused. Moreover, certain of these prior anchors have a variable or undetermined point at which the non-snagging or break-away feature of these anchors becomes effective and therefore may, at times, operate to transfer such anchor line forces to the crown end of the anchor when such transfer is not needed or fail to transfer such forces when needed.
The present invention provides a break-away or nonsnag type anchor which minimizes or eliminates the foregoing and other problems associated with prior break-away or non-snag type anchors having various advantages in construction, operation and mode of use in comparison with such prior anchors. Particularly, the present invention provides a novel and improved break-away type anchor which is inexpensive to fabricate, readily and easily operable to render its breakaway feature effective, repeatable in use at the predetermined magnitude of force required to initiate the break-away feature and simple and inexpensive in construction. To these ends, the present invention provides an anchor comprised of an elongated shank which may be formed of bar stock and to one end of which a plurality of rods are secured. Each rod is bent intermediate its length to provide leg portions defining an acute angle therebetween. The leg portions of the flukes are simply welded to an end of the shank at circumferentially spaced locations thereabout with the welded leg portions extending parallel to the shank whereby the other leg portions project radially outwardly and toward the opposite end of the anchor. Thus, the shank and fluke portions of the anchor are readily and easily formed. To provide the break-away feature, a cylindrical cap opened at one end is receivable over the end of the shank remote from the flukes. The cap carries a hook to which the anchor line is attached. The cap is releasably secured over the end of the shank by a coil spring, the opposite end of the coil spring being secured to the crown end of the anchor. The coil spring extends externally of the shank and is thus readily and easily connected to both the cap and the shank.
In normal use, the anchor line transmits forces to the anchor through the cap and the anchor may be utilized and pulled up in the usual manner simply by hauling in the anchor line. The coil spring, of course, maintains the cap on the end of the shank for anchor line forces less than a predetermined magnitude of force. Should the anchor become snagged on underwater debris or the like, an anchor line pull in excess of a predetermined magnitude, i.e., the spring force, removes the cap from the end of the shank against the bias of the spring. Since the spring is connected at opposite ends to the cap and the crown end of the anchor respectively, removal of the cap from the anchor end remote from the crown end transfers the anchor line forces from that end to the crown end of the anchor. That is, the anchor line forces are shifted to the opposite end of the anchor. Thus, continued pull on the anchor line tends to cant or incline the anchor and thereby withdraws the projecting flukes from the debris and the like to which the anchor has become snagged. The anchor line forces are thus transmitted through the cap and the spring to the crown end of the anchor and the anchor can be thereafter readily hauled in. To reset the anchor for further use, the cap is merely slipped over the end of the anchor remote from the crown end and the anchor is ready to be used once again. A further feature of the invention provides for a cable interconnecting the cap and the opposite end of the anchor. This cable has sufficient slack such that the cap is permitted to be removed from the end of the shank and constitutes a safety line in the event of breakage of the spring.
It will be appreciated that the foregoing described anchor construction can be readily and easily fabricated from parts readily available. For example, the major portion of the anchor, i.e, the shank and the flukes, may be formed from readily available bar stock and rods and secured one to the other by known techniques, for example welding. The spring is also readily available and the cap can be readily fabricated. Thus, the present anchor construction can be formed inexpensively.
Accordingly, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved break-away or non-snag type anchor.
It is another object of the present invention to pro vide a novel and improved break-away or non-snag type anchor which is readily and easily constructed of readily available and low cost parts.
It is still another object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved break-away or non-snag type anchor wherein the anchor line forces are transferred from one end of the anchor to its crown end in response to a pull on the anchor line equal to or greater than a predetermined magnitude of force.
It is a further object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved break-away or non-snag type anchor which can be readily and easily reset after use.
It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved break-away or non-snag type anchor including a safety line interconnecting the cap and the anchor to avoid loss of the anchor.
These and further objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent upon reference to the following specification, appended claims and drawings wherein:
FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a novel and improved break-away or non-snag type anchor constructed in accordance with the present invention;
FIG. 2 is a reduced side elevational view thereof illustrating the anchor as caught on debris orthe like on the bottom of a body of water;
FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 and illustrating the removal of the cap from the anchor in response to anchor line forces in excess of a predetermined magnitude; and
FiG. 4 is a side elevational view illustrating the anchor in a position at which it is broken away from its snagged position as illustrated in FIG. 2.
Referring now to the drawings, particularly to FIG. 1, there is illustrated an anchor generally designated and comprised of a shank 12 which may be in the form of cylindrical bar stock. A plurality of flukes 14 are secured to the lower end of the shank 12. The flukes comprise metal rods which are bent substantially medially of their length to form leg portions 16 and 18 defining an acute angle e therebetween. The rod-like flukes 14 are readily and easily secured to the lower end of shank 12, for example, by welding the leg portions 16 to shank 12. It will be appreciated from a review of FIG. 1 that leg portions 16 are welded about the lower end of shank 12 at circumferentially spaced, preferably equally spaced, locations about shank 12 and extend in a direction generally parallel to the long axis of shank 12. In this manner, the leg portions 14 project radially outwardly and in a direction toward the opposite end of shank 12. It will be appreciated that fewer or more flukes can be provided and that the four flukes illustrated herein are exemplary only.
A cap 20, preferably formed of a cylindrical metal sleeve open at its opposite ends, is received over the upper end of shank 12. The cap has a transversely extending pin 22 passing diametrically through its upper end. A hook or eyelet 24 is secured about pin 22 and provides a connection for securing the anchor line 26 to anchor 10. It will be appreciated that pin 22 and hook 24 prevent cap from slipping down onto the central portion of the shank l2 and thus locate the cap at the upper end of the anchor 10. Cap 20 also has a hook or eyelet 28 which projects radially outwardly from one side thereof.
The cap 20 is retained on the upper end of shank 12 by a helical coil spring 30. Spring 30-has one end shaped in the form of a hook 32 for connection with eyelet 28 on cap 20. The opposite end of spring 30 also has a hook 34 for connection with an eyelet or hook 36 suitably secured to the lower end of shank 12. Spring 30 thus biases cap 20 into the position illustrated in FIG. 1 and the spring force defines the magnitude of anchor line forces acting on cap 20 which will permit removal of cap 20 from the upper end of shank 12. That is, it is only after a pull on anchor line 26 equal to or in excess of a predetermined force that cap 20 can be removed from the upper end of the shank against the bias spring 30.
A flexible cable 38 is also secured at one end to the hook or eyelet 24 on cap 20 and has its opposite end secured to a hook or eyelet 36 suitably secured as by welding to the lower end of shank 12. Cable 38 has sufficient slack when the cap is received about the upper end of shank 12 to permit cap 20 to be removed therefrom before the cable 38 becomes taut. Cable 38 serves to maintain the connection between anchor line 26 and anchor 10 in the event that the spring 30 breaks whereby the anchor will not be lost.
The anchor is utilized in a conventional manner for normal conditions and is of sufficient weight to hold small watercraft in position without drifting. In normal use, anchor 10 may be raised by hauling in anchor line 26. The tension of spring 30 is such that during normal usage cap 20 will be maintained on the upper end of the shank with the anchor line forces acting on the upper end of the anchor for hauling forces of a magnitude less than the magnitude of the spring force. Should the anchor become snagged on underwater debris, for example, the root 40 illustrated in FIGS. 2-4, an anchor line force in excess of the spring force 30 is applied whereby, as illustrated in FIG. 3, the cap 20 is removed from the upper end of shank 12 against the bias of spring 30. Upon such removal, the sole connection between anchor line 26 and anchor 10 and apart from safety line 38 is comprised of cap 20 and spring 30. Note, however, that such connection transfers the anchor forces from the upper end of the anchor to the lower end or crown end of the anchor, i.e., from one side of the center of gravity of the anchor to its opposite side. This transfer of force tends to pivot the anchor to the position illustrated in FIG. 4. This pivoting action also withdraws leg 18 from below root 40. It will be appreciated that such pivoting action coupled with the particular angle of the flukes tends to pivot the anchor to an upside-down position with the leg portions 18 of the flukes being directed generally downwardly. This type of action will release the anchor from snagging on underwater debris and the like. It will be appreciated that, should the spring 30 break under such hauling in forces, safety line 38 will become taut whereby a similar action occurs with respect to the inversion of the anchor. When the anchor is hauled into the water craft, the cap 20 can be readily disposed about the upper end of shank l2 simply by tensioning spring 30 and slipping the open end of cap 20 over the shank 12.
It will be appreciated from the foregoing description that the objects of the present invention are fully accomplished in that there has been provided a readily and easily fabricated break-away or non-snag type anchor wherein anchor line forces equal to or in excess of a predetermined magnitude of force cause the anchor line force to be transferred from the end of the anchor remote from the flukes to the crown end of the anchor whereby the anchor is substantially inverted. The anchor is formed of low cost readily available materials, a minimum number of parts, and readily and easily fabricated. The anchor is also readily and easily reset after use without substantial manipulation of the anchor or any one or more of its parts.
The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodiment is therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather by the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein,
What is claimed and desired to be secured by US. Letters Patent is:
1. An anchor comprising an elongated shank, a cylindrical sleeve open at one end for reception over an end of said shank adjacent one end of said anchor, said sleeve being closed at its opposite end and carrying a hook projecting outwardly from its closed end for securing an anchor line thereto, a plurality of flukes carried by said shank adjacent the opposite end of said anchor, each of said flukes including a rod bent intermediately to form two leg portions defining an acute angle therebetween, means securing a leg portion of each of said flukes to the end of said shank at circumferentially spaced locations thereabout and extending in a direction substantially parallel to the axis of said shank, whereby the other leg portions of said flukes project radially outwardly and in a direction toward the one anchor end, means resiliently coupled between said sleeve and the opposite end of said anchor for retaining said sleeve on the end of said shank for anchor line forces of a magnitude less than a predetermined magnitude acting on said sleeve at the one anchor end, said coupling means being responsive to anchor line forces equal to or greater than said predetermined magnitude of force and in a direction away from said opposite anchor end to permit removal of said sleeve from said shank whereby the anchor line forces are transferred from said one anchor end to said opposite anchor end, a second hook projecting from a side of said sleeve at a predetermined circumferential location thereabout, and a third hook carried by said shank adjacent the opposite end of said anchor, said coupling means including a coil spring having opposite ends secured respectively to said second hook on said sleeve and said third hook on said shank, said spring extending between opposite ends of the anchor externally of said shank, secondary means coupled between said first hook on said sleeve and the third hook carried by said shank adjacent the opposite anchor end to preclude separation of said sleeve and anchor upon removal of said sleeve from said anchor, said secondary means including a cable extending from said sleeve through the coils of said spring to the opposite anchor end and having a slack sufficient to permit the sleeve to be removed from the one anchor end.

Claims (1)

1. An anchor comprising an elongated shank, a cylindrical sleeve open at one end for reception over an end of said shank adjacent one end of said anchor, said sleeve being closed at its opposite end and carrying a hook projecting outwardly from its closed end for securing an anchor line thereto, a plurality of flukes carried by said shAnk adjacent the opposite end of said anchor, each of said flukes including a rod bent intermediately to form two leg portions defining an acute angle therebetween, means securing a leg portion of each of said flukes to the end of said shank at circumferentially spaced locations thereabout and extending in a direction substantially parallel to the axis of said shank, whereby the other leg portions of said flukes project radially outwardly and in a direction toward the one anchor end, means resiliently coupled between said sleeve and the opposite end of said anchor for retaining said sleeve on the end of said shank for anchor line forces of a magnitude less than a predetermined magnitude acting on said sleeve at the one anchor end, said coupling means being responsive to anchor line forces equal to or greater than said predetermined magnitude of force and in a direction away from said opposite anchor end to permit removal of said sleeve from said shank whereby the anchor line forces are transferred from said one anchor end to said opposite anchor end, a second hook projecting from a side of said sleeve at a predetermined circumferential location thereabout, and a third hook carried by said shank adjacent the opposite end of said anchor, said coupling means including a coil spring having opposite ends secured respectively to said second hook on said sleeve and said third hook on said shank, said spring extending between opposite ends of the anchor externally of said shank, secondary means coupled between said first hook on said sleeve and the third hook carried by said shank adjacent the opposite anchor end to preclude separation of said sleeve and anchor upon removal of said sleeve from said anchor, said secondary means including a cable extending from said sleeve through the coils of said spring to the opposite anchor end and having a slack sufficient to permit the sleeve to be removed from the one anchor end.
US00396239A 1973-09-11 1973-09-11 Non-snag anchor Expired - Lifetime US3841255A (en)

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4721054A (en) * 1985-05-30 1988-01-26 Satoru Kobayashi Anchor device
US4808133A (en) * 1987-03-03 1989-02-28 James Austin Marker buoy with self retracting line
US4836126A (en) * 1987-06-19 1989-06-06 Satoru Kobayashi Anchor retrieving device
US4848261A (en) * 1987-06-19 1989-07-18 Satoru Kobayashi Anchor
US5353731A (en) * 1994-04-26 1994-10-11 Richter Rayohl E Marine anchor
US6009826A (en) * 1999-06-21 2000-01-04 Nole; Richard M. Boat anchor with snag release mechanism
US6799642B2 (en) * 2001-02-07 2004-10-05 Andreas Stihl Ag & Co. vibration damper between two components
US20060070566A1 (en) * 2003-01-30 2006-04-06 Pentti Saarelainen Anchor assembly
WO2009032799A1 (en) * 2007-09-05 2009-03-12 Delmar Systems, Inc. Anchors for mooring of objects in a marine environment
US20090314196A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2009-12-24 David Richert Anchor With Snag Release Mechanism
US20130125804A1 (en) * 2011-11-23 2013-05-23 Alan R. Copenhaver Retrievable anchor system
US20150191219A1 (en) * 2014-01-09 2015-07-09 Geoff Samuels Boat Anchor and Method of Making the Same
US20160257380A1 (en) * 2015-03-05 2016-09-08 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Self-installing anchor

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3797443A (en) * 1973-01-02 1974-03-19 Quadall Co Inc Boat anchor

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3797443A (en) * 1973-01-02 1974-03-19 Quadall Co Inc Boat anchor

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4721054A (en) * 1985-05-30 1988-01-26 Satoru Kobayashi Anchor device
US4808133A (en) * 1987-03-03 1989-02-28 James Austin Marker buoy with self retracting line
US4836126A (en) * 1987-06-19 1989-06-06 Satoru Kobayashi Anchor retrieving device
US4848261A (en) * 1987-06-19 1989-07-18 Satoru Kobayashi Anchor
US5353731A (en) * 1994-04-26 1994-10-11 Richter Rayohl E Marine anchor
US6009826A (en) * 1999-06-21 2000-01-04 Nole; Richard M. Boat anchor with snag release mechanism
US6799642B2 (en) * 2001-02-07 2004-10-05 Andreas Stihl Ag & Co. vibration damper between two components
US20060070566A1 (en) * 2003-01-30 2006-04-06 Pentti Saarelainen Anchor assembly
US7121224B2 (en) * 2003-01-30 2006-10-17 Pentti Saarelainen Anchor assembly
GB2464444B (en) * 2007-09-05 2012-02-29 Delmar Systems Inc Anchors for mooring of objects in a marine environment
US8561565B2 (en) * 2007-09-05 2013-10-22 Delmar Systems, Inc. Anchors for mooring of objects in a marine environment
WO2009032799A1 (en) * 2007-09-05 2009-03-12 Delmar Systems, Inc. Anchors for mooring of objects in a marine environment
US20100192830A1 (en) * 2007-09-05 2010-08-05 Evan Zimmerman Anchors for Mooring of Objects in a Marine Environment
GB2464444A (en) * 2007-09-05 2010-04-21 Delmar Systems Inc Anchors for mooring of objects in a marine environment
NO340901B1 (en) * 2007-09-05 2017-07-10 Delmar Systems Inc Anchors for mooring objects in a maritime environment
US7870831B2 (en) 2008-06-23 2011-01-18 David Richert Anchor with snag release mechanism
US20090314196A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2009-12-24 David Richert Anchor With Snag Release Mechanism
US8783201B2 (en) * 2011-11-23 2014-07-22 Alan R. Copenhaver Retrievable anchor system
US20130125804A1 (en) * 2011-11-23 2013-05-23 Alan R. Copenhaver Retrievable anchor system
US20150191219A1 (en) * 2014-01-09 2015-07-09 Geoff Samuels Boat Anchor and Method of Making the Same
US20160257380A1 (en) * 2015-03-05 2016-09-08 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Self-installing anchor
US9643687B2 (en) * 2015-03-05 2017-05-09 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Self-installing anchor

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