US2136014A - Cleat - Google Patents

Cleat Download PDF

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Publication number
US2136014A
US2136014A US112571A US11257136A US2136014A US 2136014 A US2136014 A US 2136014A US 112571 A US112571 A US 112571A US 11257136 A US11257136 A US 11257136A US 2136014 A US2136014 A US 2136014A
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United States
Prior art keywords
rope
cleat
post
base
arm
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Expired - Lifetime
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US112571A
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Alexander A Mcdonald
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Individual
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Publication of US2136014A publication Critical patent/US2136014A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B21/00Tying-up; Shifting, towing, or pushing equipment; Anchoring
    • B63B21/04Fastening or guiding equipment for chains, ropes, hawsers, or the like
    • B63B21/045T-shaped cleats
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/39Cord and rope holders
    • Y10T24/3916One-piece
    • Y10T24/3918Wedge slot

Definitions

  • This invention relates to improvements in cleats of the type utilized for securing ropes or other like load-sustaining lines.
  • the object of the invention is to provide a cleat to which a rope or the like can be secured with a minimum effort and can also be quickly released.
  • a further object of the invention is to provide a cleat comprising a post around which the rope is wound and means which will permit the rope to be firmly secured after the placement of a single convolution of the rope around said post.
  • Another object of the invention is to provide a. cleat to which the single convolution of rope can be secured by the provision of means which cannot possibly become inoperative and which will preclude misplacement of the so-called hauling end of the rope.
  • the invention contemplates a cleat formed of a base having a post provided, preferably, with oppositely extending arms forming in conjunction with the base recesses gradually tapering toward the post.
  • the base is also formed with an opening through which the hauling end of the rope extends and said opening is so located with respect to one of the arms as to position a portion of the rope beneath said arm so that when a single convolution of the rope is wrapped around the post, it can be wedged between the said portion of rope and said arm by pulling in one direction on the free end of the rope, the yielding character of the rope increasing the wedging action.
  • the free end thereof need only be pulled in the opposite direction. In other words, no mechanical devices that might jam or become broken or otherwise inoperative are utilized but, nevertheless, the rope can be quickly and firmly secured on the cleat after a single convolution is laid around the post and, by the same token, can be quickly released.
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of a cleat embodying the present invention, the cleat illustrated in this instance being known as a swinging cleat;
  • Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the cleat disclosed in Fig. 1, the rope being shown attached to the cleat;
  • Fig. 3 is a similar view with the rope removed
  • Fig. 4 is a transverse vertical section on the line 44 of Fig. 3;
  • Fig. 5 is a top plan view of a cleat adapted to be fixed to a supporting surface
  • Fig. 6 is a side elevation of the cleat illustrated in Fig. 5.
  • the so-called swinging type of cleat illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4 is especially adapted for use aboard sailing vessels, particularly yachts, in connection with handling of the sails and rigging. It is referred to as a swinging cleat because instead of being fixedly attached to a supporting surface, it is merely attached at one end to the securing rope, as indicated at I0, which, in turn, is secured to a structural part of the vessel (not shown), so that the cleat is free to swing with the load-sustaining or hauling rope II.
  • the rope I0 is looped through an eye I2 at one end of the base I3 of the cleat and one end of the load line or hauling rope II is secured in an eye I4 at the opposite end of the base.
  • the base is provided with a post I5 around which the free end of the rope II is adapted to be wound, the convolution of the rope being retained on the post by one or more arms I6, I1, formed at the upper end of the post and extending in opposite directions over the base.
  • the under surfaces of the arms I6, II are inclined, as shown, so that said arms, in conjunction with the base, form gradually tapering recesses in which the convolution of rope is received.
  • the base of the cleat is also formed with an opening I8 through which the free end of the load line or rope I2 freely passes, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2.
  • This opening I8 is so located with respect to the arm I6 that the portion of the rope extending from the opening to the post, said portion being indicated at I9, is caused to occupy a position partially beneath said arm.
  • the resiliency of the rope facilitates and increases this wedging action and it will be found that the rope can be securely held on the cleat even though only a single convolution is laid around the post. This, of course, minimizes the time required for securing the rope on the cleat. Likewise, the rope can be quickly released and removed from the post.
  • the base I3 is made deeper and hollow and the opening 18 is formed in an extension 20 formed at one end of said base at a point where it Will be spaced from the supporting surface on which the cleat is secured. Openings 2! are formed in the base to accommodate suitable fastening elements by which the cleat is fixedly securedto its supporting surface.
  • This fixed or stationary cleat is adapted for use where lead of the rope, or that end which sustains the load, is always disposed in the same direction. In all other respects, the two forms of cleat function in the same manner.
  • eyes l2 and I l and opening l8 vary in size, according to the cross-section or size of rope used with the cleat.
  • a cleat of the character described comprising a base, a post, oppositely disposed arms on said post overhanging said base and forming with the base tapering recesses in which a length of rope Wrapped in a convolution around the post can be engaged, portions of the opposed surfaces of said arms and said base being spaced apart recess tapering toward the post, said recess being adapted to receive a rope laid in a convolution around the post, and means provided on said base to position that portion of said rope intermediate said means and post partially beneath said arm, the spacing of said arm and base being such that said convolution around the post will be wedged between said arm and that said portion of rope positioned partially beneath said arm.
  • a base, a post, and an arm on said post overhanging said base and forming in conjunction with the base a recess adapted to receive a rope laid in a convolution around said post, said base having an opening therein through which a portion of the rope is adapted to extend, said opening being so located with respect to said arm and post as to position that portion of the rope intermediate the opening and post partially beneath said arm, and the spacing of said base and overhanging arm being such that the convolution of rope around the post will be wedged between said arm and the said portion of rope positioned partially beneath the arm.

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  • Chemical & Material Sciences (AREA)
  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Combustion & Propulsion (AREA)
  • Mechanical Engineering (AREA)
  • Ocean & Marine Engineering (AREA)
  • Ropes Or Cables (AREA)

Description

Nov. 8, 1938. A. A. MCDONALD CLEAT Filed NOV. 24, 1936,
C44W/%'MA Patented Nov. 8, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GLEAT AlexanderA. McDonald, Quincy, Mass.
Application November 24, 1936, Serial No. 112,571
3 Claims. [(Cl. 114-218) This invention relates to improvements in cleats of the type utilized for securing ropes or other like load-sustaining lines.
Primarily, the object of the invention is to provide a cleat to which a rope or the like can be secured with a minimum effort and can also be quickly released.
A further object of the invention is to provide a cleat comprising a post around which the rope is wound and means which will permit the rope to be firmly secured after the placement of a single convolution of the rope around said post.
Another object of the invention is to provide a. cleat to which the single convolution of rope can be secured by the provision of means which cannot possibly become inoperative and which will preclude misplacement of the so-called hauling end of the rope.
More specifically, the invention contemplates a cleat formed of a base having a post provided, preferably, with oppositely extending arms forming in conjunction with the base recesses gradually tapering toward the post. The base is also formed with an opening through which the hauling end of the rope extends and said opening is so located with respect to one of the arms as to position a portion of the rope beneath said arm so that when a single convolution of the rope is wrapped around the post, it can be wedged between the said portion of rope and said arm by pulling in one direction on the free end of the rope, the yielding character of the rope increasing the wedging action. Likewise, to release the rope the free end thereof need only be pulled in the opposite direction. In other words, no mechanical devices that might jam or become broken or otherwise inoperative are utilized but, nevertheless, the rope can be quickly and firmly secured on the cleat after a single convolution is laid around the post and, by the same token, can be quickly released.
With these and other objects in View, the invention consists in certain details of construction and combinations and arrangements of parts, all as will hereinafter be more fully described and the novel features thereof particularly pointed out in the appended claims.
In the accompanying drawing Figure 1 is a plan view of a cleat embodying the present invention, the cleat illustrated in this instance being known as a swinging cleat;
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the cleat disclosed in Fig. 1, the rope being shown attached to the cleat;
Fig. 3 is a similar view with the rope removed;
Fig. 4 is a transverse vertical section on the line 44 of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a top plan view of a cleat adapted to be fixed to a supporting surface; and
Fig. 6 is a side elevation of the cleat illustrated in Fig. 5.
The so-called swinging type of cleat illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4, is especially adapted for use aboard sailing vessels, particularly yachts, in connection with handling of the sails and rigging. It is referred to as a swinging cleat because instead of being fixedly attached to a supporting surface, it is merely attached at one end to the securing rope, as indicated at I0, which, in turn, is secured to a structural part of the vessel (not shown), so that the cleat is free to swing with the load-sustaining or hauling rope II. The rope I0 is looped through an eye I2 at one end of the base I3 of the cleat and one end of the load line or hauling rope II is secured in an eye I4 at the opposite end of the base.
Intermediate the eyes I2 and I 4, the base is provided with a post I5 around which the free end of the rope II is adapted to be wound, the convolution of the rope being retained on the post by one or more arms I6, I1, formed at the upper end of the post and extending in opposite directions over the base. Preferably, the under surfaces of the arms I6, II, are inclined, as shown, so that said arms, in conjunction with the base, form gradually tapering recesses in which the convolution of rope is received.
In accordance with the present invention, the base of the cleat is also formed with an opening I8 through which the free end of the load line or rope I2 freely passes, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. This opening I8 is so located with respect to the arm I6 that the portion of the rope extending from the opening to the post, said portion being indicated at I9, is caused to occupy a position partially beneath said arm. With this arrangement, when the hauling end of the rope has been drawn taut, and a convolution of rope is laid around the post, the rope can be firmly secured on the cleat by simply pulling on the free end of said rope to wedge the convolution between the arm I6 and the underlying portion I9 of the rope. The resiliency of the rope facilitates and increases this wedging action and it will be found that the rope can be securely held on the cleat even though only a single convolution is laid around the post. This, of course, minimizes the time required for securing the rope on the cleat. Likewise, the rope can be quickly released and removed from the post. It
is only necessary to pull the free end of the rope with a more or less snap action in the opposite direction or away from the post toward the opening I8. This will dislodge the wedged portion of the rope and permit its removal from the post, if complete removal thereof is desired. Not only is the time element important and one of the advantages of the present cleat but it will be apparent that no mechanical attachments, apt to become jammed or otherwise rendered inoperative, are involved. Also, the so-called hauling portion of the rope is not likely to be misplaced due to its being threaded through opening [8.
In the fixed type of cleat shown in Figs. 5 and 6, the base I3 is made deeper and hollow and the opening 18 is formed in an extension 20 formed at one end of said base at a point where it Will be spaced from the supporting surface on which the cleat is secured. Openings 2! are formed in the base to accommodate suitable fastening elements by which the cleat is fixedly securedto its supporting surface. This fixed or stationary cleat is adapted for use where lead of the rope, or that end which sustains the load, is always disposed in the same direction. In all other respects, the two forms of cleat function in the same manner.
It will be appreciated that the eyes l2 and I l and opening l8 vary in size, according to the cross-section or size of rope used with the cleat.
What I claim is:
1. A cleat of the character described comprising a base, a post, oppositely disposed arms on said post overhanging said base and forming with the base tapering recesses in which a length of rope Wrapped in a convolution around the post can be engaged, portions of the opposed surfaces of said arms and said base being spaced apart recess tapering toward the post, said recess being adapted to receive a rope laid in a convolution around the post, and means provided on said base to position that portion of said rope intermediate said means and post partially beneath said arm, the spacing of said arm and base being such that said convolution around the post will be wedged between said arm and that said portion of rope positioned partially beneath said arm.
3. In a cleat of the character described, a base, a post, and an arm on said post overhanging said base and forming in conjunction with the base a recess adapted to receive a rope laid in a convolution around said post, said base having an opening therein through which a portion of the rope is adapted to extend, said opening being so located with respect to said arm and post as to position that portion of the rope intermediate the opening and post partially beneath said arm, and the spacing of said base and overhanging arm being such that the convolution of rope around the post will be wedged between said arm and the said portion of rope positioned partially beneath the arm.
ALEXANDER A. MCDONALD.
US112571A 1936-11-24 1936-11-24 Cleat Expired - Lifetime US2136014A (en)

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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2469443A (en) * 1945-05-11 1949-05-10 Reiter Lambert Anchor line or stringer holder
US2486276A (en) * 1949-02-26 1949-10-25 Bernard A P Guy Hook cap for clothes poles
US2559697A (en) * 1946-11-13 1951-07-10 Anders Roy Mason's line holder
US2901198A (en) * 1955-09-28 1959-08-25 Jr Walter T Gilmore Antenna guy wire anchor
US2962998A (en) * 1956-11-01 1960-12-06 Byron J Long Mooring and rigging device
US3055334A (en) * 1959-09-25 1962-09-25 Rudolph A Allen Cleats
US3112501A (en) * 1961-10-02 1963-12-03 Mary Prince Bell Load-carrying apparatus for an automobile top
US3126858A (en) * 1964-03-31 Combined chock and cleat
US3330243A (en) * 1965-12-02 1967-07-11 Paul R Brown Anchoring device
US4120077A (en) * 1977-05-09 1978-10-17 Roberton & Schwartz Tie-down tensioning device
US4649664A (en) * 1985-09-27 1987-03-17 Mahan Joe C Apparatus for securing a fishing lure to a fishing line
WO1995005969A1 (en) * 1993-08-27 1995-03-02 Christopher Morgan A cleat and a mooring method using the cleat
US5878684A (en) * 1997-08-13 1999-03-09 Adams; Mark J. Cleating device
US6769375B1 (en) * 2002-10-16 2004-08-03 Robert Dean Caporella Clamp-on cleats for boats
US20090260195A1 (en) * 2003-07-30 2009-10-22 Christopher Michael Howard Rope tensioning device
US8661624B1 (en) * 2012-02-22 2014-03-04 Mark C Bracewell Portable and modular cleat with multiple anchoring capability
US10787347B1 (en) 2019-03-04 2020-09-29 Randy Gurule Self-locking pulley
USD1000943S1 (en) * 2019-09-19 2023-10-10 Myron Cross Connector

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3126858A (en) * 1964-03-31 Combined chock and cleat
US2469443A (en) * 1945-05-11 1949-05-10 Reiter Lambert Anchor line or stringer holder
US2559697A (en) * 1946-11-13 1951-07-10 Anders Roy Mason's line holder
US2486276A (en) * 1949-02-26 1949-10-25 Bernard A P Guy Hook cap for clothes poles
US2901198A (en) * 1955-09-28 1959-08-25 Jr Walter T Gilmore Antenna guy wire anchor
US2962998A (en) * 1956-11-01 1960-12-06 Byron J Long Mooring and rigging device
US3055334A (en) * 1959-09-25 1962-09-25 Rudolph A Allen Cleats
US3112501A (en) * 1961-10-02 1963-12-03 Mary Prince Bell Load-carrying apparatus for an automobile top
US3330243A (en) * 1965-12-02 1967-07-11 Paul R Brown Anchoring device
US4120077A (en) * 1977-05-09 1978-10-17 Roberton & Schwartz Tie-down tensioning device
US4649664A (en) * 1985-09-27 1987-03-17 Mahan Joe C Apparatus for securing a fishing lure to a fishing line
WO1987001908A1 (en) * 1985-09-27 1987-04-09 Mahan Joe C Apparatus for securing a fishing lure to a fishing line
WO1995005969A1 (en) * 1993-08-27 1995-03-02 Christopher Morgan A cleat and a mooring method using the cleat
US5878684A (en) * 1997-08-13 1999-03-09 Adams; Mark J. Cleating device
US6769375B1 (en) * 2002-10-16 2004-08-03 Robert Dean Caporella Clamp-on cleats for boats
US20090260195A1 (en) * 2003-07-30 2009-10-22 Christopher Michael Howard Rope tensioning device
US7752719B2 (en) * 2003-07-30 2010-07-13 Michael Christopher Howard Rope tensioning device
US8661624B1 (en) * 2012-02-22 2014-03-04 Mark C Bracewell Portable and modular cleat with multiple anchoring capability
US10787347B1 (en) 2019-03-04 2020-09-29 Randy Gurule Self-locking pulley
USD1000943S1 (en) * 2019-09-19 2023-10-10 Myron Cross Connector

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