US3782393A - Method of making a cigarette of reduced biological damage capability - Google Patents

Method of making a cigarette of reduced biological damage capability Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3782393A
US3782393A US3782393DA US3782393A US 3782393 A US3782393 A US 3782393A US 3782393D A US3782393D A US 3782393DA US 3782393 A US3782393 A US 3782393A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
tobacco
cigarette
paper
weight
ammonia
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
I Michelson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
AMERICAN SAFETY EQUIP
AMERICAN SAFETY EQUIPMENT CORP US
Original Assignee
AMERICAN SAFETY EQUIP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24BMANUFACTURE OR PREPARATION OF TOBACCO FOR SMOKING OR CHEWING; TOBACCO; SNUFF
    • A24B15/00Chemical features or treatment of tobacco; Tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/18Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/24Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by extraction; Tobacco extracts
    • A24B15/241Extraction of specific substances
    • A24B15/243Nicotine
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24BMANUFACTURE OR PREPARATION OF TOBACCO FOR SMOKING OR CHEWING; TOBACCO; SNUFF
    • A24B15/00Chemical features or treatment of tobacco; Tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/18Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/28Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24BMANUFACTURE OR PREPARATION OF TOBACCO FOR SMOKING OR CHEWING; TOBACCO; SNUFF
    • A24B15/00Chemical features or treatment of tobacco; Tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/18Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/28Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances
    • A24B15/287Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances by inorganic substances only
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24DCIGARS; CIGARETTES; TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS; MOUTHPIECES FOR CIGARS OR CIGARETTES; MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS OR MOUTHPIECES
    • A24D1/00Cigars; Cigarettes
    • A24D1/02Cigars; Cigarettes with special covers

Abstract

This invention relates to a method for making a cigarette which has the same smoking properties as an ordinary cigarette but reduces components contained in the smoke of such a cigarette which cause cancer on the skin of mice. The method includes adding to the cigarette paper calcium sulfamate in an amount of from 0.1% to 1.0%, by weight, based on the combined weight of the tobacco and cigarette paper. Ammonia is added to the tobacco in an amount of from 0.015% to 0.15%, by weight, based on the combined weight of the cigarette paper and tobacco and the tobacco containing ammonia is wrapped with the cigarette paper containing the sulfamate salt. The preferred amount of calcium sulfamate in the paper, by weight, is from 0.2% to 0.8% and the preferred amount of ammonia in the tobacco is from 0.03% to 0.12%, by weight.

Description

Elite States Patent [191 Michelson [4 1 Jan.1,1974

[ METHOD OF MAKING A CIGARETTE OF REDUCED BIOLOGICAL DAMAGE CAPABILITY [75] Inventor: Irving Michelson, New Rochelle,

[73] Assignee: American Safety Equipment Corporation, New York, N.Y.

[22] Filed: Aug. 2, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 277,335

Primary Examiner-Melvin D. Rein Att0rneyC. A. Miketta et a1.

[57] ABSTRACT This invention relates to a method for making a cigarette which has the same smoking properties as an ordinary cigarette but reduces components contained in the smoke of such a cigarette which cause cancer on the skin of mice. The method includes adding to the cigarette paper calcium-sulfamate in an amount of from 0.1% to 1.0%, by weight, based on the combined weight of the tobacco and cigarette paper. Ammonia is added to the tobacco in an amount of from 0.015% to 0.15%, by weight, based on the combined weight of the cigarette paper and tobacco and the tobacco containing ammonia is wrapped with the cigarette paper containing the sulfamate salt. The preferred amount of calcium sulfamate in the paper, by weight, is from 0.2% to 0.8% and the preferred amount of ammonia in the tobacco is from 0.03% to 0.12%, by weight.

7 Claims, No Drawings METHOD OF MAKING A CIGARETTE OF REDUCED BIOLOGICAL DAMAGE CAPABILITY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In recent years, the concern for the health of tobacco smokers, particularly cigarette smokers, has increased. The reason for this concern is because of the evidence gathered by scientists around the world that smoking definitely endangers the health of the smoker to a greater or lesser extent, depending upon the amount of the smoke, the extent to which it is inhaled, and the persons susceptibility to being injured by tobacco smoke. For example, it is definitely established that cigarette smokers are more apt to develop lung cancer, bronchitis, emphysema, and suffer other biological damage than non-smokers. Figures from Smoking and Health, report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General, indicate that heavy smokers are to 25 times more susceptible to the risk of lung cancer than that of non-smokers and that light smokers changes of developing lung cancer is five to 10 times that of nonsmokers. In addition, the mortality of smokers because of bronchitis and emphysema is five to eight times that of non-smokers.

Because of the foregoing and other evidence that smoking is detrimental to the health and well-being of people of all ages, the Federal government of the United States has required all cigarette manufacturers to place on cigarette packages the warning that The Surgeon General Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous To Your Health. In spite of this warning, the consumption of cigarettes and other tobacco has actually decreased very little from the prior years. It is thus very apparent that people who are addicted to cigarette smoking are very unlikely to quit merely because they run the risk of having their health seriously impaired.

It is thus a desideratum in the art to produce a tobacco composition, the smokeof which has a reduced amount of components which are apt to cause biological damage to the smoker. It is therefore not surprising that in the past decade the prior art has endeavored to produce a safe tobacco, particularly safe cigarettes. For the most part, the prior art attempts have centered around the idea of filtering out or screening the tars produced during the smoking of the tobacco. However, this has not been entirely satisfactory because inter alia it appears that the materials produced in the smoking of the cigarette which cause biological damage can not be filtered out selectively and therefore the filtered smoke still contains substantially the same proportions of deleterious material as the unfiltered smoke.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides cigarette meeting the above desideratum in that the cigarettes produced by the method of the present invention produce a smoke which contains fewer components which cause cancer on the skin of mice than a corresponding untreated cigarette. This surprising result is obtained by the present invention by adding a critical amount of calcium sulfamate to cigarette paper and adding a critical amount of ammonia to the tobacco.

Thus, it can be seen, that the principal object of the present invention is to disclose and provide a method for making a cigarette composed of cured tobacco wrapped in paper, the smoke of said cigarette having a significantly reduced amount of components which cause tumors on the skin of mice.

Another object of the present invention is to disclose and provide a method for treating cigarette paper with DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The foregoing objects, and others, are accomplished by the present invention by the addition of from 0.1% to 1.0% of calcium sulfamate, calculated as Ca(- SO NHQ to the cigarette paper and the addition of ammonia to the tobacco in an amount of from 0.015% to 0.15%, by weight. The preferred range of calcium sulfamate added to the paper is from 0.2% to 0.8% and thepreferred range of ammonia added to the tobacco is from 0.03% to 0.12%, all percentages being by weight, based on the combined weight of the tobacco and cigarette paper.

The ammonia can be added to the tobacco in any convenient manner; however, it is preferred to add the ammonia to the tobacco (preferably cut or shredded tobacco) by spraying a solution of ammonium hydroxide on the tobacco while the tobacco is being rolled and tumbled in order to insure that the ammonia is distributed substantially uniformly throughout the tobacco. Thereafter, if necessary, the tobacco can be dried to remove the solvent (e.g. water) for the ammonia. However, inasmuch as tobacco utilized for cigarettes contains a certain amount of moisture it may not be necessary to dry the tobacco after the addition of ammonia thereto.

It is even more preferred if the ammonia is added during the time when other additives such as humec tants, sweetners and flavoring agents are being added to the tobacco. These additives are added to the tobacco by so-called casing solutions. For example, in general, there are at least two casing solutions which are added separately to the tobacco. Hurnectants such as glycerine are added to the tobacco by dissolving the humectant in water andthen spraying the resulting solution on the tobacco. Sweeteners are also added in the same manner in that the sweetener is dissolved in an aqueous medium and the resulting solution sprayed on the tobacco. These two types of additives are usually applied as one solution. Inasmuch as ammonium hydroxide is water soluble it is preferred if the ammonium hydroxide is added to the above-identified aqueous casing solution. However, it is also possible that ammonia can be added when the flavoring agents are added to the tobacco. Generally speaking, the flavoring agents such as peppermint oil are applied in an alcohol medium.

The calcium sulfamate is conveniently added to the paper via an aqueous solution inasmuch as calcium sulfamate is soluble in water. Thus, it becomes convenient, to add the calcium sulfamate in an aqueous solution which will contain other normal cigaratte paper additives by passing a roll of commercial cigarette paper through the aqueous solution of calcium sulfamate and squeezing the excess solution out by pressure rollers. Normally, utilizing this method, 70 percent of the calcium sulfamate solution will be retained on the paper. Therefore in order to prepare a cigarette paper containing 0.2 percent, by weight, of calcium sulfamate (calculated on the weight of the paper and tobacco) the cigarette paper is passed through an aqueous solution containing 6.34 pounds of calcium sulfamate made up to l2 gallons by the addition of water. In order to prepare a cigarette containing 0.8 percent calcium sulfamate it is merely necessary to pass the cigarette paper through an aqueous solution containing 25.35 pounds made up to 12 gallons by the addition of water.

In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present inventiontwo different groups of cigarettes were made containing varying amounts of calcium sulfamate and ammonia. The first group contained 0.06 percent ammonia in the tobacco and 0.38 percent calcium sulfamate on the paper. The second group contained about 0.09 percent of ammonia in the tobacco and 0.58 percent of calcium sulfamate on the paper. Another group of cigarettes was designated as the control group and contained the same standard blend of cigarette tobacco and the same batch of cigarette paper as was utilized on the test cigarettes. The untreated cigarettes provide a control against which to compare the treated cigarettes, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment.

The cigarettes from all three groups are smoked in a manifold-type smoking machine, one 2-second puff per minute, with the suction pressure equal to that which delivered 17.5 ml./sec. of smoke in sample cigarettes of the respective groups. The smoke is condensed in two liter collection flasks immersed in dry ice-methanol mixture. The condensate is removed from the flasks with acetone. The acetone suspension is concentrated in a flash evaporator until all of the acetone is driven off. The remaining crude tar is treated with an equal volume of acetone and then eight volumes of heptane are added slowly with vigorous shaking to provide a two-phase system. The upper phase is concentrated in a flash evaporator until all of the heptane is apparently driven off. It has been shown that this fraction of the tar contains all of the carcinogenic activity that is found in crude cigarette tar.

The various tars collected as exemplified above were diluted such that equivalent weights of crude tar were present in the appropriate test solution for each group of cigarettes used. Female lCR Swiss mice at 6070 days of age were used in the test for tumor activity. The mice were divided into two groups, 100 in each group. The mice in each group were shaved and then painted two times daily, 5 days a week, for 44 weeks with the solution of tar obtained as indicate supra. About once a month the tar was replaced by a fresh batch which was obtained in exactly the same manner as the original tar. After a period of 44 weeks it was determined tha the smoke of the Group I treated cigarettes produced 50 percent fewer tumors on the skin of mice than the control group had and the Group II cigarettes produced 40 percent fewer tumors than the control group. At the end of the sixtieth week the Group I cigarettes produced 30 percent fewer tumors than the smoke of the untreated cigarettes and the Group ll cigarettes produced 27 percent fewer tumors than the smoke of the untreated cigarettes.

in the foregoing embodiment the ammonia was applied to the tobacco by spraying a 58 percent ammo nium hydroxide solution onto the tobacco; however, the ammonium can be added to the tobacco in any convenient manner and the invention is not limited to spraying an aqueous solution of ammonium hydroxide thereon. Similarly, the calcium sulfamate can be added to the cigarette paper in any convenient manner and not necessarily by an aqueous solution thereof.

I claim:

1. A method for producing a cigarette which, when smoldered produces a smoke which has a lesser amount of components which cause tumors on the skin of mice which comprises uniformly distributing throughout the paper from about 0.1% to 1.0%, by weight, of calcium sulfamate and uniformly distributing throughout the tobacco of the cigarette from about 0.015% to 0.15%, by weight, of ammonia and wrapping the thus obtained paper around the tobacco to produce a cigarette.

2. A method according to claim 1 wherein the amount of calcium sulfamate in the paper, by weight, is from 0.2% to 0.8% and the amount of ammonia in tobacco is from 0.03% to 0.12%, by weight.

3. A method according to claim 1 wherein the ammonia is uniformly distributed throughout the tobacco by contacting said tobacco with a solution of ammonium hydroxide.

4. A method according to claim 3 where the solution containing ammonium hydroxide is an aqueous solution.

5. A method according to claim 3 wherein the ammonium hydroxide is in an alcoholic medium.

6. A method according to claim 1 wherein the calcium sulfamate is added to the paper by contacting said paper with a solution containing calcium sulfamate.

7. A method according to claim 6 wherein the solution containing calcium sulfamate is an aqueous solution.

Claims (6)

  1. 2. A method according to claim 1 wherein the amount of calcium sulfamate in the paper, by weight, is from 0.2% to 0.8% and the amount of ammonia in tobacco is from 0.03% to 0.12%, by weight.
  2. 3. A method according to claim 1 wherein the ammonia is uniformly distributed throughout the tobacco by contacting said tobacco with a solution of ammonium hydroxide.
  3. 4. A method according to claim 3 where the solution containing ammonium hydroxide is an aqueous solution.
  4. 5. A method according to claim 3 wherein the ammonium hydroxide is in an alcoholic medium.
  5. 6. A method according to claim 1 wherein the calcium sulfamate is added to the paper by contacting said paper with a solution containing calcium sulfamate.
  6. 7. A method according to claim 6 wherein the solution containing calcium sulfamate is an aqueous solution.
US3782393A 1972-08-02 1972-08-02 Method of making a cigarette of reduced biological damage capability Expired - Lifetime US3782393A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US27733572 true 1972-08-02 1972-08-02

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3782393A true US3782393A (en) 1974-01-01

Family

ID=23060415

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3782393A Expired - Lifetime US3782393A (en) 1972-08-02 1972-08-02 Method of making a cigarette of reduced biological damage capability

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3782393A (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4215706A (en) * 1978-10-13 1980-08-05 Loew's Theatres, Inc. Nicotine transfer process
US6153119A (en) * 1997-05-09 2000-11-28 Sung; Michael Method and product for reducing tar and nicotine in cigarettes
US20030131860A1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2003-07-17 Ashcraft Charles Ray Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20040099279A1 (en) * 2002-11-25 2004-05-27 Chapman Paul Stuart Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20040099280A1 (en) * 2002-11-25 2004-05-27 Stokes Cynthia Stewart Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20050016556A1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2005-01-27 Ashcraft Charles Ray Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20070137666A1 (en) * 2005-12-13 2007-06-21 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Incorporation of ammonia-release compounds in smoking articles
US20080295854A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2008-12-04 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US20110023901A1 (en) * 2009-07-30 2011-02-03 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded paper, smoking article and method
US9302522B2 (en) 2010-12-13 2016-04-05 Altria Client Services Llc Process of preparing printing solution and making patterned cigarette wrappers
US9668516B2 (en) 2012-05-16 2017-06-06 Altria Client Services Llc Banded cigarette wrapper with opened-area bands

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3461879A (en) * 1967-06-30 1969-08-19 Celanese Corp Oxidized cellulose tobacco substitute composition
US3517672A (en) * 1968-08-09 1970-06-30 American Safety Equip Method of treating a smoking composition to reduce undesirable products therefrom
US3545448A (en) * 1966-05-19 1970-12-08 Ici Ltd Process for making a modified carbohydrate material for smoking mixtures and the material made thereby

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3545448A (en) * 1966-05-19 1970-12-08 Ici Ltd Process for making a modified carbohydrate material for smoking mixtures and the material made thereby
US3461879A (en) * 1967-06-30 1969-08-19 Celanese Corp Oxidized cellulose tobacco substitute composition
US3517672A (en) * 1968-08-09 1970-06-30 American Safety Equip Method of treating a smoking composition to reduce undesirable products therefrom

Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4215706A (en) * 1978-10-13 1980-08-05 Loew's Theatres, Inc. Nicotine transfer process
US6153119A (en) * 1997-05-09 2000-11-28 Sung; Michael Method and product for reducing tar and nicotine in cigarettes
US20060005847A1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2006-01-12 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20030131860A1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2003-07-17 Ashcraft Charles Ray Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US7237559B2 (en) 2001-08-14 2007-07-03 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20050016556A1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2005-01-27 Ashcraft Charles Ray Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US6929013B2 (en) 2001-08-14 2005-08-16 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20050241660A1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2005-11-03 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20050241659A1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2005-11-03 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20060011207A1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2006-01-19 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US7677256B2 (en) 2001-08-14 2010-03-16 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US6997190B2 (en) 2002-11-25 2006-02-14 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20060124146A1 (en) * 2002-11-25 2006-06-15 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20040099280A1 (en) * 2002-11-25 2004-05-27 Stokes Cynthia Stewart Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US6976493B2 (en) 2002-11-25 2005-12-20 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US20040099279A1 (en) * 2002-11-25 2004-05-27 Chapman Paul Stuart Wrapping materials for smoking articles
US8042552B2 (en) 2005-12-13 2011-10-25 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Incorporation of ammonia-release compounds in smoking articles
US20070137666A1 (en) * 2005-12-13 2007-06-21 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Incorporation of ammonia-release compounds in smoking articles
WO2007083196A2 (en) * 2005-12-13 2007-07-26 Philip Morris Products S.A. Incorporation of ammonia-release compounds in smoking articles
WO2007083196A3 (en) * 2005-12-13 2007-11-08 Philip Morris Prod Incorporation of ammonia-release compounds in smoking articles
US8555897B2 (en) * 2005-12-13 2013-10-15 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Method of making a cigarette and method of reducing cytotoxicity in tobacco smoke
US20120006340A1 (en) * 2005-12-13 2012-01-12 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Incorporation of ammonia release compounds in smoking articles
US20140041674A1 (en) * 2005-12-13 2014-02-13 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Incorporation of ammonia release compounds in smoking articles
US10051883B2 (en) * 2005-12-13 2018-08-21 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Incorporation of ammonia release compounds in smoking articles
US8939156B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2015-01-27 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US10028524B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2018-07-24 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US9161570B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2015-10-20 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US8707967B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2014-04-29 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US8733370B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2014-05-27 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US8833377B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2014-09-16 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US8844540B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2014-09-30 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US20080295854A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2008-12-04 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US8925556B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2015-01-06 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US8905043B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2014-12-09 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US20110155158A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2011-06-30 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded Papers, Smoking Articles and Methods
US8701682B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2014-04-22 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded paper, smoking article and method
US20110023901A1 (en) * 2009-07-30 2011-02-03 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Banded paper, smoking article and method
US9302522B2 (en) 2010-12-13 2016-04-05 Altria Client Services Llc Process of preparing printing solution and making patterned cigarette wrappers
US9668516B2 (en) 2012-05-16 2017-06-06 Altria Client Services Llc Banded cigarette wrapper with opened-area bands

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3525582A (en) Smoking tobacco charge incorporating encapsulated vitamin a and mode of introduction
US3411515A (en) Method of preparing a reconstituted tobacco sheet employing a pectin adhesive
US3428053A (en) Production of reconstituted tobacco
US3316919A (en) Processing of smoking tobacco
US3204641A (en) Methods of processing tobacco leaf stem material
US3561451A (en) Process of manufacturing reconstituted tobacco of light color
US3460543A (en) Cigarette filter
US3584630A (en) Tobacco product having low nicotine content associated with a release agent having nicotine weakly absorbed thereon
De Stefani et al. Risk factors for laryngeal cancer
US3280823A (en) Additive-releasing filter for releasing additives into tobacco smoke
US2734509A (en) Wetting
US3251365A (en) Tobacco smoke filter
US4108151A (en) Gamma alumina filled paper wrapper for smoking articles
US2907686A (en) Cigarette substitute and method
US4590955A (en) Cigarette paper with reduced CO on burning
US2576021A (en) Tobacco substitute containing bagasse
US3255760A (en) Tobacco product which produces less tars
US3545448A (en) Process for making a modified carbohydrate material for smoking mixtures and the material made thereby
US4696315A (en) Herbal snuff composition
US3703901A (en) Tobacco composition
US3236244A (en) Tobacco smoke filter element
US5944026A (en) Tobacco products or materials resembling tobacco products containing natural substances having an antioxidative effect and processes for the preparation thereof
US4008723A (en) Smoking mixture
US3807416A (en) Reconstituted-tobacco smoking materials
US2003690A (en) Tobacco product