US3750427A - Knitting method - Google Patents

Knitting method Download PDF

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US3750427A
US3750427A US00876090A US3750427DA US3750427A US 3750427 A US3750427 A US 3750427A US 00876090 A US00876090 A US 00876090A US 3750427D A US3750427D A US 3750427DA US 3750427 A US3750427 A US 3750427A
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stitches
needle
stitch
knitting
row
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US00876090A
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L Gilchrist
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L Gilchrist
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/22Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration
    • D04B1/24Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel

Abstract

Method of knitting garments by hand is carried out by casting-on the desired number of stitches on one neelde, and thereafter forming the successive rows by knitting through each stitch twice before removing it from the needle, whereby the successive stitches are drawn closely together and the loops formed by each stitch are transverse the plane of the work. A dense, shaperetaining knitted texture is obtained.

Description

United States Patent [1 1 Gilchrist [1 1 3,750,427 [451 Aug. 7, 1973 KNITTING METHOD [76] Inventor: Lee D. Gilchrist, 222 Sidewinder Dr., K. I. Sawyer Air Force Base, Mich. 49843 [22] Filed: Nov. 12, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 876,090
[52] 11.8. C1. 66/172 R, 66/189 [51} Int. Cl D04b 3/02 [58] Field 01 Search 66/169, 1 A, 170, 66/198, 1,172, 2,183,189
[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,276,148 3/1942 Bisch 66/172 R 2,944 1/1878 Germany 66/1 R 421,132 11/1925 Germany 66/170 213,259 5/1967 Sweden 66/1 104,991 5/ 1924 Switzerland 66/1 Primary Examiner-Wm. Carter Reynolds Attorney-Sidney Greenberg [57] ABSTRACT 6 Claims, No Drawings KNITTING METHOD The present invention relates to a method of knitting, and particularly to a hand knitting method of making knitted garments or other knitted products.
It is an object of the invention to provide an improved knitting method and knitted product.
It is another object of the invention to provide a knitting method for making knitted garments and other products of relatively dense texture, increased warmth without increased bulk, and improved shape-retaining properties.
Still another object of the invention is to provide a knitting method of the above type wherein different sized needles may be used while still providing the same number of stitches per unit length of the knitted rows.
Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description and the appended claims.
In a typical knitting process for practicing the present invention, the yarn is cast-on in conventional manner on one of two needles to be used in the knitting procedure, the number of stitches cast-on depending on the desired width of the knitted product. The casting on of these stitches may be done by forming a slip knot in the yarn and placing it on one of the needles, inserting the other needle through the loop on the first needle and knitting a stitch without removing the loop from the first needle, transferring the thus knitted stitch on the second needle to the first needle, knitting through the latter switch without removing it from the needle, transferring the thus knitted stitch from thesecond needle to the first needle, and then repeating the last two steps until the desired number of stitches are cast Thereafter, in accordance with the invention, the step of knitting through each stitch twice is carried out before transferring the stitch to the other needle. This step is not to be confused with the procedure of knitting two together which is conventionally used for decreasing stitches in a row. In the step of knitting through each stitch twice," also referred to hereinafter as double knitting, the successive stitches are pulled closer together and the loops formed by each stitch are transverse the plane of the work, as contrasted with conventionally knitted products in which the knit loops extend along the plane of the work.
By knitting through each stitch twice" is meant inserting a first needle through two stitches on a second needle and working through both stitches (i.e., either knit or purl through both) and thereafter removing from the second needle the stitch of these two stitches which is nearest the working point of the second needle, and repeating these steps. As a result, each stitch that is thus removed has been worked through twice.
As used herein, the expression "working" a stitch means either "knit or purl, as will be understood by those versed in the knitting art.
The following are particular methods which may be employed in accordance with the invention to provide different knit patterns:-
Doublc front knit: Insert first needle in front of the work through the second and the first stitch on a second needle and knit through to form a new stitch which remains impaled on the first needle. Remove the first stitch from the second needle. Knit through the first two stitches now on the second needle in the same manner and remove only the first stitch from the second needle. The new stitch on the first needle remains impaled thereon as a new stitch is drawn through two more stitches on the second needle. Continue to the end of the row and slip the last stitch.
Double back knit: Insert the needle in the back side through the first stitch and then the second stitch and knit through. Remove the first stitch from the needle. Knit through the first two stitches now on the needle in the same manner and remove only the first stitch from the needle. Continue to the end of the row and slip the last stitch.
Double purl: Insert needle in front side through the first and then the second stitch and purl through. Remove the first stitch from the needle. Purl through the first two stitches now on the needle in the same manner and remove only the first stitch from the needle. Continue to the end of the row and slip the last stitch.
Any of the above stitches may be used in any combination with each other to obtain the desired pattern and variation in tightness.
The following are examples of patterns which may be obtained using the method of the invention:
Herringbone pattern: Formed by double back knitting across one row and double purling back the next row.
Silhouette pattern: Formed bydouble front knitting across one row and double purling back the next row.
Braid pattern: Formed by double front knitting across one row and double front knitting back the next row. This can be varied to provide different types of braids by double back knitting onerow and double front knitting the next row. This difference is denoted mainly by whether a herringbone pattern or a silhouette pattern is desired between the rows of braid.
A completely different braid pattern is derived when one row is double purled across and the next row is double purled back.
Instead of using a conventional method of casting-on the stitches as described above, the following double knit cast-on method may be employed in accordance with another feature'of the invention:
Form a slip-knot and place on needle A. Insert needle B through the loop on needle A and knit a stitch through the loop on needle A but do not remove the loop from needle A. Transfer the thus knitted stitch on needle B to needle A. Insert needle B through the two stitches on needle A and knit a stitch through the two stitches, leaving them on needle A. Transfer the worked stitch on needle B to needle A. Continue the described steps of knitting through the first two stitches and placing the resulting stitch on needle A until the desired number of stitches have been obtained. It will be understood that instead of knitting the stitches they may be purled, or a combination of knit and purl stitches may be used.
By using the foregoing double knit cast-on method, the cast-on row will be uniform in gauge with the remainder of the work knitted in accordance with the invention. This affords the advantage that the ultimate width of the finished work can be immediately determined from the width of the cast-on row.
To increase the number of stitches at the beginning of a double knit row, the following procedures may be used. If working in back of the stitch, knit in back of the first stitch, and without removing it from the needle, work a double back knit stitch. If working in front of the stitch, knit in front of the first stitch, and without removing it from the needle, work a double front knit stitch. When working a double purl row, purl through the first stitch, and without removing the stitch, double purl through the first two stitches.
To increase in the middle of a row, work double stitches, as described above, across the row to the point of increase. Work a double stitch and instead of removing the first stitch, work through that first stitch again and then remove it from the needle.
To decrease the number of stitches, work through three stitches and remove two stitches.
An advantage afforded by the invention in connection with increasing and decreasing stitches as described is that the regions where the increase or decrease operations are effected are not readily distinguishable from the rest of the work, due to the arrangement of the double knit stitches produced by the invention.
To bind-off the work produced by the described double knit method, work the first three stitches in the pattern used, and pass the first stitch worked over the other two stitches, thereafter work one stitch in the pattern used and repeat the described pass-over step, and then repeat the last two steps until the end of the row. Should a very loose bind-off be desired, the known method of binding-off by passing one stitch over one stitch may be used.
Although in a typical procedure for knitting through each stitch twice the needle is inserted through two consecutive stitches, it is also within the scope of the invention to insert the needle through two stitches separated by one or more stitches, and then knitting through the next corresponding pair of stitches.
Where appropriate or desired, more than two stitches may be knit through at a time, in order to obtain a more tightly knit product. Thus, if three stitches areworked through at a time, and one stitch is removed from the needle, and these steps are repeated with successive stitches, each stitch will have been worked through three times. It will be understood, therefore, that while double knit" and double purl stitches are referred to above in connection with procedures of working through each stitch twice, a more general designation for stitches provided in accordance with the invention is multiple-knit, or multiple-purl, or more generally multiple-worked.
The knitting method of the invention and the knitted product resulting therefrom afford numerous advantages in addition to those already mentioned. A wide variety of novel knitted patterns such as those described above and many others may be obtained by the disclosed knitting method. The stitches produced by the described procedure are such that a run in the article so knitted will not be caused even if a stitch is dropped. If a stitch is pulled, it will not cause the adjacent stitches to tighten, and when the pulled stitch is released, it will return to its original size and place. Patterns may be cut out of fabrics so knitted without unravelling of the knitted work. Buttonholes can be made by snipping the desired number of stitches and binding off the loops resulting from the removal of the snipped stitches; The knitted .work produced in accordance with the invention has a much firmer, closer knit with more stability and less stretch than conventionally knitted products. By virtue of the close knit, the knitter can use a much smaller yarn on larger needles than in usual knitting methods.
While the knitting method described is particularly applicable to a hand knitting procedure, the invention may also apply to the operation of knitting machines constructed and arranged to carry out the method of the invention and produce the knitted products resulting therefrom.
While the present invention has been described with reference to particular embodiments thereof, it will be understood that numerous modifications may be made by those skilled in the art without actually departing from the invention. Therefore, it is intended herein to cover all such equivalent variations as come within the true spirit and scope of the invention.
What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. In a method of knitting, the step of casting-on stitches on. a first needle which comprises placing a yarn loop on the needle, working a stitch on said loop with a second needle, transferring the thus worked stitch to said first needle, workinga stitch through both stitches on the latter needle, and repeating the last two steps until a predetermined number of stitches are caston said first needle.
2. A method of knitting comprising casting-on stitches on a first needle as defined in claim 1, and thereafter providing at least one row of multipleworked stitches by working each stitch on said first needle with said second needle a plurality of times and removing at least one of the thus worked stitches from said first needle.
3. A method of knitting comprising casting-on a row of stitches on a first needle as defined in claim 1, thereafter knitting a plurlity of rows, and binding-off the last of said rows.
4. A method as defined in claim 3, wherein said binding-off step comprises forming a plurality of multipleworked stitches, passing one of said stitches over adjacent ones of said stitches, and repeating said last two steps.
5. A method of knitting as defined in claim 2, and binding-off the last row of multiple-worked stitches.
6. A method of knitting a defined in claim 5, wherein said binding-off step comprises forming a plurality of multiple-worked stitches, passing one of said stitches over adjacent ones of said stitches, and repeating said last two steps.
# i i I I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3|?5 0 7 D t d August 7! Lee D. Gilchrist Inventor(s) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:
In the heading, the inventor: address should be:
BGOkBEyHISB- 01223 ,col. 1. linear); "switch" should bestitch '1 Col. line '53, "a" should be as e Signed and sealed this 17th day of September 1974.
(SEAL) A t s i McCOY M'. GIBSON JR. C. DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Claims (6)

1. In a method of knitting, the step of casting-on stitches on a first needle which comprises placing a yarn loop on the needle, working a stitch on said loop with a second needle, transferring the thus worked stitch to said first needle, working a stitch through both stitches on the latter needle, and repeating the last two steps until a predetermined number of stitches are caston said first needle.
2. A method of knitting comprising casting-on stitches on a first needle as defined in claim 1, and thereafter providing at least one row of multiple-worked stitches by working each stitch on said first needle with said second needle a plurality of times and removing at least one of the thus worked stitches from said first needle.
3. A method of knitting comprising casting-on a row of stitches on a first needle as defined in claim 1, thereafter knitting a plurlity of rows, and binding-off the last of said rows.
4. A method as defined in claim 3, wherein said binding-off step comprises forming a plurality of multiple-worked stitches, passing one of said stitches over adjacent ones of said stitches, and repeating said last two steps.
5. A method of knitting as defined in claim 2, and binding-off the last row of multiple-worked stitches.
6. A method of knitting as defined in claim 5, wherein said binding-off step comprises forming a plurality of multiple-worked stitches, passing one of said stitches over adjacent ones of said stitches, and repeating said last two steps.
US00876090A 1969-11-12 1969-11-12 Knitting method Expired - Lifetime US3750427A (en)

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AU (1) AU2191270A (en)
CA (1) CA927123A (en)
CH (1) CH515361A (en)
DE (1) DE2054376A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2069407A5 (en)
GB (1) GB1316468A (en)
IE (1) IE34624B1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3902336A (en) * 1973-04-02 1975-09-02 Lena Knowles Knitting methods and fabrics produced thereby
US20140283558A1 (en) * 2013-03-20 2014-09-25 Mark Zaremski Knitting fabric and method of use

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2944C (en) *
CH104991A (en) * 1923-09-24 1924-05-16 Isch Rudolf Crochet process and metal fork for its execution.
DE421132C (en) * 1924-08-31 1925-11-06 Martha Kupfermann Geb Kwiatkow Method of making crochet patterns
US2276148A (en) * 1939-11-24 1942-03-10 Morris R Myers Lockstitch and pattern to prevent thread runs
US2296303A (en) * 1940-08-26 1942-09-22 Hosiery Patents Inc Art of seaming
US2435068A (en) * 1945-04-16 1948-01-27 Bellamy Virginia Woods Number knitting
AT177200B (en) * 1952-06-06 1954-01-11 Mary Bracic Process for the production of ladder-proof knitted fabrics
US2748579A (en) * 1950-03-25 1956-06-05 Leysat Henri Sornin De Knitting method

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2944C (en) *
CH104991A (en) * 1923-09-24 1924-05-16 Isch Rudolf Crochet process and metal fork for its execution.
DE421132C (en) * 1924-08-31 1925-11-06 Martha Kupfermann Geb Kwiatkow Method of making crochet patterns
US2276148A (en) * 1939-11-24 1942-03-10 Morris R Myers Lockstitch and pattern to prevent thread runs
US2296303A (en) * 1940-08-26 1942-09-22 Hosiery Patents Inc Art of seaming
US2435068A (en) * 1945-04-16 1948-01-27 Bellamy Virginia Woods Number knitting
US2748579A (en) * 1950-03-25 1956-06-05 Leysat Henri Sornin De Knitting method
AT177200B (en) * 1952-06-06 1954-01-11 Mary Bracic Process for the production of ladder-proof knitted fabrics

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3902336A (en) * 1973-04-02 1975-09-02 Lena Knowles Knitting methods and fabrics produced thereby
US20140283558A1 (en) * 2013-03-20 2014-09-25 Mark Zaremski Knitting fabric and method of use

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CA927123A1 (en)
IE34624L (en) 1971-05-12
AU2191270A (en) 1972-05-11
GB1316468A (en) 1973-05-09
CA927123A (en) 1973-05-29
FR2069407A5 (en) 1971-09-03
DE2054376A1 (en) 1971-06-16
IE34624B1 (en) 1975-06-25
CH515361A (en) 1971-11-15

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