US2295793A - Run-resisting knitted fabric - Google Patents

Run-resisting knitted fabric Download PDF

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US2295793A
US2295793A US397094A US39709441A US2295793A US 2295793 A US2295793 A US 2295793A US 397094 A US397094 A US 397094A US 39709441 A US39709441 A US 39709441A US 2295793 A US2295793 A US 2295793A
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yarn
fabric
loop
course
loops
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Kaufman Charles August
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Kaufman Charles August
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/06Non-run fabrics or articles

Description

Sept. 15, 1942.
c. A. KAUFMAN RUN-RESISTING KNIT TED FABRIC Filed June 7, 1941 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR f/W c. A. KAUFMAN 2,295,793
. Sept. 15, 1942.
c. A. KAUFMAN v RUN-RESISTING KNITTED FABRIC Sept. 15, 1942.
Filed June 7, 1941 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 I Patented Sept. 15, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE RUN-RESISTING KNITTED FABRIC Charles August Kaufman, New York, N. Y. Application June 7, 1941, Serial No. 397,094
16 Claims.
.This invention relates to knitted fabrics, particularly to weft knit fabrics so constructed as to resist or prevent runs which ordinarily result from the breaking of a yarn in plain knit fabric. The invention may find its most general applicationto hosiery fabric of the character produced upon knitting machines of the Cotton" type.
An important object of the invention is to produce a run-resisting knitted fabric in whichspecially formed loops of yarn, which may be called a binder yarn, are interlooped with the plain knitted loops which form the body of the fabric in such a manner as to provide, with respect to every plain knitted loop of selected courses or of every course, a positive connection between each loop of each wale and another loopof another wale.
A further object of the invention is to incor-' porate such a run-resisting binder yarn in the loops of selected courses of a plain knit fabric without alteration or distortion of the basic knitted structure and in such manner that the fabric will still have the necessary elasticity or stretchability.
in the preferred procedure by which the fabric of yarn forming the loops of courses I to 5 respectively are designated by. letters A to E inclusive. The knitted structure thus far described is the usual plain knit fabric which may be referred to as the basic knitted structure.
In Figure 1 a binder yarn is shown interlooped in every course of the basic fabric. The binder yarn which appears in courses I and 2 is designated a, that which appears in courses 2 and 3 is designated b, and those which appear in the remaining coursesare designated 0' and d respectively.
A further object of the invention is to provide a run-resisting fabric which can readily be produced upon a fiat knitting machine of the Cotton type provided with the usual transfer or lace mechanism and having ordinary transfer points arranged for every needle as hereinafter described.
A preferred embodiment of the present invention has been selected for purposes of illustration and description and a preferred procedure, by which such illustrative embodiment maybe produced, will be described. The preferred procedure or method herein disclosed is the subject matter of a co-pending application filed by me wherein the said method is claimed. Certain modifications thereof will also be described, but it will be apparent to those skilled in the art of knitting that the invention is susceptible of embodiment, and may be produced by pro cedure, not specifically described herein.
In the accompanying drawings, I
Figure 1 is a. fragmentary plan view of the reverse side or back of a piece of knitted fabric embodying the present invention, showing the upper side of the fabric as it would appear on a knitting machine when viewed from the front thereof.
Figures 2 to 7 inclusive are diagrammatic elevations,
From an examination of courses I and 2 beginning at the lower left hand corner of Figure 1, it will be observed that the binder yarn a extends upwardly from the further side of the fabric through the needle loop of yarn A in wale III,
in perspective, illustrating certain steps over one leg of this loop, and over and loosely around one leg of the needle loop of yarn A in wale I I, returning on the under side of the fabric under the point of engagement-of yarn A and yarn B at the junction of courses I and 2.
Thereafter the binder yarn again comes to the upper side of the fabric through the sinker loop of yarn B in wale 20, only half of which is shown, and then passes loosely over the two legs of the needle loop of yarn B in wale l0 and downwardly through the sinker loop of this yarn in wale 2|. The binder yarn a then passes upwardly through the needle loop of yarn A in wale II, and its position with respect to the remaining loops of basic yarn in courses I and 2 is respectively the same as heretofore described with respect to the preceding loops of these two courses.
A further examination of Figure 1 reveals that the described structure is duplicated with respect to yarns B and C in courses 2 and 3, except for the fact that the direction of the loops of binder .yarn' b are reversed laterally with respect to the loops of binder yarn a. Starting at the right margin of the figure, it will be seen that the binder yarn b extends upwardly through the needle loop of yarn B in wale l3, across the left leg of this loop and the right leg of the adjoining needle loop in Wale l2, there going down through the needle loop of yarn B in wale l2, loosely engaging the right leg of this needle loop and returning on the furtherside of the fabric to, and coming upwardly through, the sinker loop of yarn C in wale 24, only half of which is shown. Thereafter the binder yarn 1) passes loosely over both legs of the needle loop of yarn C in wale l3,
, downwardly through the sinker loop of this :yam
in wale 23 and upwardly through the needle loop of yarn Bin wale l2, after which the relationof the binder yam to the succeeding loops of basic yarn in courses 2 and 3 is a repetition of that heretofore described with respect to the preceding loops.
Figure 1 shows th described structure of the binder yarn a in connection with the yarns A and B forming courses I and 2, repeated by the binder yarn c and the yarns C and D forming courses 3 and 4, and the structure described with respect to binder yarn b and yarns B and ,C in courses 2 and 3, repeated by binder yarn d in connection with yarns D and E in courses 4 and 5.
It will be seen that this structure provides a positive engagement of every needle and every sinker loop by a binder yarn so that upon the breaking of any loop of the basic knitted fabric, whether said rupture occurs in a needle loop or a sinker loop, a run will be checked regardless of whether it occurs in a needle Wale or in a sinker wale. For example, let it be assumed that the needle loop of yarn C in wale I2 is broken. This would normally release the needle loop of yarn B in wale l2 and start a run in the direct-ion of course i, but in the described structure the needle loop of yarn B in wale 12 will be held from pulling through the next succeeding needle loop by the binder yarn b where it passes through this needl loop in course 2 and also where it passes around the right leg of this needle loop in course 2. I
By way of further example, let it be assumed thatthe sinker loop of yarn B in sinker Wale 22 becomes broken. This would normally release the sinker loop of yarn C in Wale 22 and start a run in the direction of course 5, but the binder yarn b passes through the sinker loop of yarn C in ,course 3 and also engages the left leg of this sinker loop in course 3, thereby holding the unbroken loop and preventing it from releasing the next succeeding sinker loop in wale 22 of course 4. v
It will be observed that the binder yarn has been introduced into the basic fabric so that it does not normally constitute an essential component of that fabric. If all loops of the basic yarn remain intact, the binder yarn may be broken or even removed without disrupting the basic fabric. The binder yarn. is interlooped withthe basic yarn without increasing the: length of the basic fabric or necessarily distorting or displacing any of the loops of the basic yarn.
Examining the structure of Figure 1 with particular reference to the effect of the binder yarn upon elasticity or stretchability, it will be understood that as the fabric is stretched in Wale-wise directiomeach course becomes wider by an increase in length of the vertical components of the basic knitted loops, and that the binder yarn will not restrain this widening of theecnurses because it extends across the fabric in approximately course-wise direction, with the loops of the binder yarnjn relatively loose engagement the binder yarn are free to straighten out and assume a position more nearly horizontal than that shown in Figure l, and thus increase the effective length of the binder yarn between the margins of the basic knitted fabric.
The embodiment of the invention selected for illustration in Figure 1 shows the binder yarn in every course of the fabric so that every loop of the basic fabric in every course is engaged by the binder yarn, but obviously the binder yarn may be omitted at intervals as desired while retaining to a lessened extent the benefits of this invention. For example, a structure like that of Figure 1 except for the omission of the binder yarns b and 41, would have desirable runresisting properties, and the binder yarn would stop a run in either direction at a point in the course next following the course in which a break occurred, if the break occurred in a loop not engaged by a binder yarn, or in the second succeeding course, if the break occurred in a loop engaged by a binder yarn. In some instances it might even be desirable to separate the insertion of the binder yarn by more than one intervening course of the basic fabric, or to confine therinsertion of binder yarns to selected pairs of courses in some particular part of the fabric. Wherever the binder yarn is thus inserted the direction of the binder loops, which is the same throughout any one pair of courses, may be predetermined as desired.
The loops of the binder yarn'a' are shown in Figure 1 extending diagonally to the right from course 2 to course I, and those of the yarn b diagonally tothe left from course 3 ;to course 2; The same alternation of direction is continued regularly throughout succeeding courses of the fabric shown, but these loops may all extend in the same direction if desired. For example, if the yarns B, b, D and d were not present in Figure 1, and the yarns A, C and E were directly interlooped with each other. to form the basic knitted fabric, with binder yarns a and c engaged therewith in the manner shown, a structure ,would be provided in which the loops of binder yarn all extended diagonally in the samedirection. T
The fabric shown in Figure 1 may be knitted on a flat knitting machine of the previously mentioned type from one cone of yarn to form the basic fabric, and the same yarn from the same cone may be interlooped upon itself in the manner hereinafter described to form the binder yarn. In other words, a single yarn may be laid back and forth and, in the manner hereinafter described, it may be formed into basic loops or binder loops as desired. The yarn may readily be laid as a binder yarn after every course or after. any selected number of courses of the basic fabric, as will readily be understood.
Two or more yarns from different cones may be used, particularly if itis desired to employ as a. binder a yarn differing from the yarn of the basic knitted fabric, as for example, a somewhat thinner or finer yarn. When employing a. different binder yarn, it is practicable to draw the basic yarn for alternate courses from two separate cones and the binder yarn from a third cone. Two of the yarns may be alike to form the basic fabric and the third may be the yarn selected to form the binder. The three yarnsfrom different cones may then be inserted in regular alternation as in the well known three carrier knitting operation, the binder yarn being inserted after every second course of the basic yarn. When the three yarns from different cones have been thus laid and interlooped as hereinafter described, a structure differing from that shown in Figure 1 will result. The two yarns which may be alike will appear as the basic fabric yarns A and B respectively, and again as yarns C and D of Figure 1, while the other yarn will appear as binder yarn a and again as binder yarn c'- of Figure 1. Operating in this manner the finished fabric will not contain any yarns corresponding to binder yarns b and d of Figure 1, but only binder yarns corresponding to 'a' and c' which will have been introduced after every second course of the basic yarn. Such a structure wherein all. yarns are alike may also be produced advantageously from three cones of yarn by the three carrier operation just described.v
The foregoing and other arrangements of a thinner or different binder yarn with relation to the basic yarn may be effected without the use of the Well known idle course operation. If idle course operation is employed and the req uisite number of carriers are available, two yarns can be laid successively from the same side of the machine and therefore a thinner or differ-- ent yarn or any one of a group of yarns, may be introduced as a binder whenever desired, and any one of another group of yarns may be introduced to form the basic fabric. Proceeding in this manner a structure, as for example that shown in Figure 1, could be produced wherein the binder yarns a to 41 inclusive may be drawn from one or more cones of binder yarn, and the basic yarns A to E inclusive may also be drawn from one or more cones of basic yarn.
Having thus described certain run-resisting fabrics embodying the present invention, there will now be described, by particular reference to Figures 2 to 7 inclusive, a practicable and illustrative sequence of operation of the usual knitting instrumentalities by which the fabric of this invention maybe formed. Inasmuch as it is intended that these operations should be carried out upon fiat knitting machines of well known types, as for exampleupon the well known Reading machine, it is unnecessary toshow all of the standard parts which cooperate with each other during these operations, and the showing is limited to a few'needles of the usual type and a few corresponding transfer points of the usual type; it being understood that in practice a transfer point is provided for each needle mounted in the needle bar, except as here inafter pointed out. The needles and transfer points are operated in the manner hereinafter described to bring about the interlooping of the binder yarn or yarns with the yarn or yarns forming the basic knitted fabric.
. It is well known that flat knitting machines of the type mentioned are provided with a main cam shaft mounting contoured cams which actuate the various knitting instrumentalities, and that such cams for each of the various knitting instrumentalities are so shapedand synchronized as to cause their respective knitting instrumentalities to function in the usual predetermined and specified manners. One group of cams is usually laid out to actuate the knitting instrumentalities in respect to their functions in the ordinary knitting cycle, whereas another group of cams, mounted on the main cam shaft directly adjacent to the first group, is usually laid out to function during lace, transfer or narrowing operations. Either group of cams may be brought into operating position through the shogging movement of the main cam shaft upon which both groups of cams are mounted. To actuate the knitting instrumentalities in respect to their movements as hereinafter described, each cam of that group of cams functioning during the transfer operation may be altered in contour so as to impart the described movements to their respective knitting instrumentalities in synchronized relation each to the other when the knitting machine is shogged to said group of cams from the ordinary knitting cycle, ,or the knitting machine may be provided with a third group of cams each placed on the main cam shaft adjacent to a corresponding cam of the first group but on the opposite side thereof in respect to the second group, and the selective mechanism of the knitting machine may be arranged to bring into operation any of the three groups of cams when desired. Each cam of the second and third group of cams may be contoured and arranged in respect to each other'so as to permit the knitting instrumentalities controlled by each group respectively, to function successively and in synchronized relation in the manner hereinafter described.
Referring to Figure 2, a series of needles N to N inclusive, of the usual spring beard type are shown diagrammatically. Yarn A, which is one of those forming the basic knitted fabric, is looped upon the needles as it would appear at the beginning of the sequence of operations about to be described.
Figure 3 also shows the needles and a corresponding series of transfer points P to P of the usual type. come a binder yarn, is shown as it would appear after having been laid across the bank of needles and indented and measured in loose course formation between the needles by the sinkers and dividers which are assumed to be present but are not shown. It is not intended that the exact extent of the indentation and measurement of the yarn a should be indicated by Figure 3 or any subsequent figure of the drawings; the illustration being more or less diagrammatic. In actual practice a. suflicient length of yarn a will be measured and indented so that there will be enough yarn between adjacent needles to permit the transfer of basic loops as hereinafter described and to allow the binder yarn to lie relatively loosely within the finished basic fabric without distorting or straining the normal loops of that fabric. In the fabric illustrated in Figure 1 it will be observed that a greater length of yarn Yarn a, which is intended to bferring operation.
hold this yarn against the shanks of the needles in position to be grasped by the hooks of the needles. The needles will now descend and when the hooks have grasped the yarn a, the transfer points P and the beards of the needles will be brought together in the customary manner in order to close the beards of'the descending needles before they reach the previously formed loops of the yarn A which are resting in the usual manner upon the knocking over bits, assumed to be present but not shown. This step is indicated 'in Figure 4 wherein it will be observed that the heard of each needle is closed around the binder yarn a.
As the needles and points descend together from the position shown in Figure 4 to that shown in Figure 5, the sinkers and dividers having been sufliciently retracted, the points P together with the beards of the needles containing yarn a will pass through the loops of the yarn A. The needles and points may now be disengaged and, as during the usual transfer cycle, moved upward with the loops of the yarn A held upon the points P, while the binder yarn a is still held in the hooks of the needles.
The loops of'yarn A are on points P and may be simultaneously transferred in the same direction from one needleto the next, either to the left or right as desired, while each loop of the binder yarn a continues to be held by the hook of the needle upon which it was formed. The loops of yarn A may be transferred despite the fact that a loop of yarn a passes through each needle loop of yarn A. sufficient length of binder yarn a shall have been measured to permit this transfer to take place. Thus in Figure 6 the loops of yarn A are engaged by the points P during the transfer of each of these loops from the needle upon which it was formed to the needle next adjoining on the right. The relative movement of the points and needles is such thateach loop of the basic fabric, except possibly the outermost loop, is lifted, moved to the right, and placed upon the next adjacent needle over a loop of yarn a still held by the needle upon which it was formed. The transferring isthereupon completed by movement of the points P and the needles N as in the usual transfer cycle. This will leave the several loops of yarns A and a on the needles as shown in Figure '1; the loops of yarn a being held on their original needles respectively while the loops of yarn A are held on the needles next adjacent to the right above the loops of yarn a'. In this figure an additional needle N not heretofore illustrated, is shown in engagement with the loop of the basic knitted fabric transferred from needle N This figure also shows at the left in dotted lines another loop which, it may be assumed, has been transferred to the needle N from a needle next adjoining it on the left by a transfer point now shown in dotted lines above this needle. In order that the loop of yarn A at the edge of preventing such casting off is to arrange the transfer points so that while a loop may be formed on the outermost needle, no point will be provided to remove that loop during the trans- There are now two loops on each needle shown 1 one loop of the yarn a It is important that a I in Figure '1, namely, one loop of the yarn A over possibly at the edge of the fabric, of the basic yarn placed on the same needle. will be observed that the yarn a has been brought into the position shown in Figure ,7 without increasing the knitted, and that it lies within the course formed by yarn A without distorting any of the loops of the basic fabric. The loops of the yarn a at this stage lie generally across the fabric, extending downwardly through each needle loop of the basic fabric, and around the shank of an adjacent needle. The needles with the two yams A and a thereon are now in such position that the next course of the basic fabric may be knitted by the usual sequence of operations while the transfer pointsremain inactive and out of contact with the needles.
are two loops With the needles in raised position and the be drawn down through the loops of yarns A and a, after which these loops will be cast off the needles by the normal action of the usual instrumentalities and a single course of new undistorted basic loops will thus be added to the fabric.
After the knitting of the last mentioned course, the fabric will take the form shown in Figure 1, assuming that the yarns A, a and B are the yarns which have been laid, interlooped and knitted as just described, and that the remainder of the fabric has not yet been knitted.
If it is desired to introduce the binder yarn b as shown in Figure 1, the sequence of operations heretofore described will be repeated except that when the loops of yarn B are held by the points P, the points will be shifted to the left and will transfer the loops of the basic fabric to the left instead of to the right. This will have the effect of reversing the direction of the loops of the binder yarn shown in Figure '7. As previously fabric by the usual sequence of operations, the
binder yarn b will appear in the fabric as shown in Figure 1.
If it is desired to produce a fabric in which the loops of binder yarns all lie in the same direction in every pair of courses, or in selected pairs of courses of the basic fabric, the points P will transfer loops of each such course of the basic yarn in the same direction after each binder yarn has been laid. For example, if the transferring operation first described is repeated, the yarn b will take a position in the finished fabric in relation to yarns B and C which is in all respects a duplication of the position of yarn a in relation to yarns A and B. If it is not desired to have the binder yarn in every pair of courses, the knitting of several courses of yarn of the basic fabric in the regular manner may follow the introduction of each binder yarn.
Having thus described the novel fabric of the invention and a preferred procedure for its production, it'will be understood that the invention may be variously modified and embodied within the scope ofthe subjoined claims.
I claim as my invention:
1. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising basic-yarn interlooped in plain knit courses of.
but in no case, except length of the fabric being regular undistorted needle loops and sinker loops, and binder yarn extending substantially from edge to edge 'of the fabric in selected pairs of adjoining courses wherein both legs of every needle loop and sinker loop are engaged in regularly repeated sequence by the binder yarn which is looped around both legs of a needle loop in one course of each pair of courses and around both legs of an adjacent sinker loop in the other course of each pair of courses.
2. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising two different yarns, one being basic yarn interlooped in plain knit courses of regular undistorted needle loops and sinker loops, and the other being thinner binder yarn extending substantially from edge to edge of the fabric in selected pairs of adjoining courses of the, thicker basic yarn wherein both legs of every needle loop and sinker loop are engaged in regularly repeated sequence by the thinner binder yarn which"is looped around both legs of a needle loop in one course of each pair of courses and around both legs of an adjacent sinker loop in the other course of each pair of courses. I 3. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising basic yarn interlooped in plain knit courses of regular undistorted needle loops and sinker loops, and binder yarn extending substantially from edge to edge of the fabric in every pair of adjoining courses throughout a substantial portion of the fabric wherein both legs of every needle loop and sinker loop are engaged in regularly repeated sequence by the binder yarn. which is looped around both legs of a needle loop in one course of each pair of courses and around both legs of an adjacent sinker loop in the other course of each pair of courses.
4. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising basic yarn interlooped in plain knit courses of regular undistorted needle loops and sinker loops,
and a binder yarn extending substantially from edge to edge of the fabric in joining courses throughout a substantial portion of the fabric wherein both legs of every needle loop and sinker loop are engaged in regularly repeated sequence by the binder yarn which is looped around both legs of a needle loop in one course of each pair of courses and around both legs of an adjacent sinker loop in the other course selected pairs of adof each pair of courses, the said sinker loop of each sequence being adjacent the said needle loop on one side throughout one of said pairs of courses and on the opposite side throughout the next pair of courses.
5. Run-resisting fabric comprising a plurality of plain knit courses of basic yarn in regular formation having interlooped therewith in selected pairs of courses binder yarn which extends through every sinker loop of one course and through every needle loop of the previously knitted course of each selected pair of courses in the following order, namely, through a sinker loop of one course, through two needle loops of the previously knitted course, back through the first mentioned sinker loop in the first mentioned course and thence directly across the intervening needle loop in the first mentioned course to the next sinker loop in said course.
6. Run-resisting fabric comprising a plurality of plain knit courses of basic yarn in regular formation having interlooped therewith in every pair of adjoining courses throughout a substantial portion of the fabric binder yarn which extends through every sinker loop of one course and through every needle loop of the previously knitted course of each pair of courses in the following order, namely, through a sinker loop of one course, through two needle loops of the previously knitted course, back through the first mentioned sinker loop in the first mentioned course and thence directlyacross the intervening needle loop in the first mentioned course to the next sinker loop in said course.
'7. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising basic yarn interlooped in plain knit courses of regular undistorted needle loops and sinker loops,
and binder yarn for selected courses extending substantially from edge to edge of the fabric in a series of loops having legs of unequal length with one bight engaging both legs of a needle loop in one course of the fabric and the other bight engaging both legs of an adjoining sinker loop in an adjoining course of the fabric.
8. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising basic yarn interlooped in plain knit courses of regular undistorted needle loops and sinker loops, and binder yarn for selected courses extending substantially from edge to edge of the fabric in a series of loops having legs of unequal length with the longer leg of each binder loop extending on the back of the fabric across both legs of a needle loop and through the adjoining sinker loop to the face of the fabric in one course and then extending through an adjoining needle loop in an adjoining course to the back of the fabric and thence to the next needle loop in said adjoining course, the shorter leg of each said binder loop extending on the face of the fabric across both legs of the first mentioned needle loop in the first mentioned course to the first mentioned needle loop in said adjoining course.
9. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising basic yarn interlooped in plain knit courses of regular undistorted needle loops and sinker loops, and binder yarn for every course extending substantially from edge to edge of the fabric throughout a substantial portion thereof in a series of loops having legs of unequal length with the longer leg of each binder loop extending on the back of the fabric across both legs of a needle loop and through the adjoining sinker loop to the face of the fabric in one course and then extending through an adjoining needle loop in an adjoining course to the back of the fabric and thence to the next needle loop in said adjoining course, the shorter leg of each said binder loop extending on the face of the fabric across both legs of the first mentioned needle loop in the first mentioned course to the first mentioned needel loop in said adjoining course.
10. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising basic yarn interlooped in regular plain knit undistorted needle loops and sinker loops arranged in wales and courses, and binder yarn interlooped with the basic yarn in selected pairs of adjoining courses in a series of S-shaped loops extending substantially from edge to edge of the fabric, each said loop of binder yarn having legs of unequal length one of which extends across four wales in two adjoining courses partly on the back and partly on the face of the fabric while the other leg extends across only two of said wales in the same two courses but entirely on the faceof the fabric.
11. Run-resisting knitted fabric comprising basic yarn interlooped in regular plain knit undistorted needle loops and sinker loops arranged in wales and courses, and binder yarn interlooped with the basic yarn in every pair of adjoining courses throughout a substantial portion of the fabric in a series of S-shaped' loops vextending substantially from edge to edge of the fabric, each said loop of binder yarn having legs of unequal length one of which extends across four wales in two adjoining courses partly on the back and partly on the face of the fabric, while the other leg extends across only two of said wales in the same two courses but entirely on the face of the fabric.
12. Run-resisting knitted fabric according to claim 11 wherein the legsof each loop of binder yarn are substantially parallel throughout any given pair of courses and extend in one common direction throughout selected pairs of courses and in another common direction throughout the intervening pairs of courses.
13. Run-resisting fabric comprising a. plurallowing order, namely, through a sinker loop of ity of plain knit courses of basic yarn in regular formation having interlooped therewith in selected pairs of courses binder yam which extends through every sinker loop of one course and through every needle loop of the previously knitted course of each selected pair of courses in the following order, namely, through a sinker loop of one course, thence along one side of the fabric to a needle loop of a non-adjacent wale in the previously knitted course, through said needle loop and along the other side of the fabric to a needle loop of the adjacent wale in the said one course. thence along one side of the fabric to a needle loop of a non-adjacent wale in the previously knitted course, through said needle loop and along the other side of the fabric to a needle loop of the adjacent wale in the said previously knitted course, through said 'last mentioned needle loop, through said first mentioned sinker loop and thence to the next sinker loop in the first mentioned course.
15. Run-resisting knitted fabric according to claim 7 wherein the binder yarn is thinner than the basic yarn.
16. Run-resisting knitted fabric according to claim 8 wherein the binder yarn is thinner than the basic yarn.
CHARLES AUGUST KAUFMAN.
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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2662383A (en) * 1947-12-09 1953-12-15 Lombardi Knitting Machine Co I Knitting mechanism and method
US2955444A (en) * 1956-07-03 1960-10-11 Stucki Robert Process of knitting a non-run fabric
US3342044A (en) * 1963-11-14 1967-09-19 Wall J Non-run reversible knit-weave
US5174134A (en) * 1989-09-08 1992-12-29 Shima Seiki Mfg., Ltd. Knitting method of thick fabric less in elasticity
US20090100878A1 (en) * 2005-05-26 2009-04-23 Takuya Miyai Fabric knitting method and knitted product
USD838499S1 (en) * 2017-06-09 2019-01-22 Suominen Corporation Material sheet with patterned surface
USD851943S1 (en) * 2017-06-09 2019-06-25 Suominen Corporation Material sheet with patterned surface

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2662383A (en) * 1947-12-09 1953-12-15 Lombardi Knitting Machine Co I Knitting mechanism and method
US2955444A (en) * 1956-07-03 1960-10-11 Stucki Robert Process of knitting a non-run fabric
US3342044A (en) * 1963-11-14 1967-09-19 Wall J Non-run reversible knit-weave
US5174134A (en) * 1989-09-08 1992-12-29 Shima Seiki Mfg., Ltd. Knitting method of thick fabric less in elasticity
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