US3744649A - Squaring and bundle counting machine - Google Patents

Squaring and bundle counting machine Download PDF

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Publication number
US3744649A
US3744649A US3744649DA US3744649A US 3744649 A US3744649 A US 3744649A US 3744649D A US3744649D A US 3744649DA US 3744649 A US3744649 A US 3744649A
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Prior art keywords
articles
bundle
means
hopper
counting
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H Ward
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WARD MACHINERY Co
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WARD MACHINERY Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H29/00Delivering or advancing articles from machines; Advancing articles to or into piles
    • B65H29/001Adaptations of counting devices
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G57/00Stacking of articles
    • B65G57/30Stacking of articles by adding to the bottom of the stack
    • B65G57/305Stacking of articles by adding to the bottom of the stack by means of rotary devices or endless elements
    • B65G57/308Stacking of articles by adding to the bottom of the stack by means of rotary devices or endless elements by means of endless elements
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H33/00Forming counted batches in delivery pile or stream of articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2301/00Handling processes for sheets or webs
    • B65H2301/40Type of handling process
    • B65H2301/42Piling, depiling, handling piles
    • B65H2301/421Forming a pile
    • B65H2301/4212Forming a pile of articles substantially horizontal
    • B65H2301/42122Forming a pile of articles substantially horizontal by introducing articles from under the pile
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2301/00Handling processes for sheets or webs
    • B65H2301/40Type of handling process
    • B65H2301/42Piling, depiling, handling piles
    • B65H2301/422Handling piles, sets or stacks of articles
    • B65H2301/4226Delivering, advancing piles
    • B65H2301/42264Delivering, advancing piles by moving the surface supporting the lowermost article of the pile, e.g. conveyor, carriage
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2701/00Handled material; Storage means
    • B65H2701/10Handled articles or webs
    • B65H2701/17Nature of material
    • B65H2701/176Cardboard
    • B65H2701/1764Cut-out, single-layer, e.g. flat blanks for boxes
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S414/00Material or article handling
    • Y10S414/10Associated with forming or dispersing groups of intersupporting articles, e.g. stacking patterns
    • Y10S414/115Associated with forming or dispersing groups of intersupporting articles, e.g. stacking patterns including article counter

Abstract

A modern fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine that is used in the corrugated board box industry is provided to stack, square, count and eject, in bundles, folded and glued boxes that are being discharged at high speed from printing, scoring, folding and gluding type machines. This squaring and bundle counting machine consists of a flat bed frame with feed rollers at one end, where the glued, flat board boxes enter into a first hopper and are stacked, squared, and compressed therein. A regulated speed belt removes the folded and glued boxes from the bottom of the stack in the first hopper, one by one. The flat boxes are then counted by an electric eye beam and guided up onto a multi-belt conveyor where they are stacked again in a second hopper, from the bottom to a preset number per bundle. A unique arrangement of a moveable bar, and a pusher bar mechanism, operating together with electric eye switches and associated circuits, separate the bundles and ejects them onto a second multi-belt discharge conveyor. The cycle is then repeated without interruption to the flow of the boxes.

Description

i United States Patent [151 Ward,Jr. v I

[ 11 3,744,649 July 10, 1973 [75] Inventor:

1 SQUARlNG-AND BUNDLE COUNTING MACHINE Henry D. Ward, Jr., Phoenix, Md.

. [73] Assignee: The Ward Machinery Company,

Cockeysville, Md. 221 Filed: May 5,1972

21 Appl. No.: 250,650

[52] [1.8. CI. 214/6 BA, 27l/D1G. 7, 271/6, 1 271/80, 271/87 [51] Int. Cl. 865g 57/30 [58] Field of Search 214/6 BA, 7, 6 N; 271/87, DIG. 7, 6, 80

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,030,867 4/1962 Wright 214/6 BA 3,194,127 7/1965 Larsson... 214/6 BA 3,420,387 1/1969 Baum 27l/DIG. 7

Primary Examiner-Robert J. Spar Attorneywalter G. Finch [57] ABSTRACT A modern fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine thatis used in the corrugated board box industry is provided to stack, square, "count and eject, l

in bundles, folded and glued boxes that are being discharged at high speed from printing, scoring, folding and gluding type machines. This squaring andbundle counting machine consists of a flatbed frame with feed rollers at one end, where the glued, flat board boxes enter into a first hopper and are stacked, squared, and a compressed therein.

A regulated speed belt removes the folded and glued boxes from the bottom of thestack in the first hopper,

one by one.

The flat boxes are then counted by an electric eye beam and guidedup onto a multi-beltconveyor where they are stacked again in a second hopper, from the bottom to a preset number per bundle. A unique arrangement of a moveable bar, and a pusher bar mechanism, operating together with electric eye switches and associated circuits, separate the bundles and ejects them onto a second multi-belt discharge conveyor. interruption to the flow of the boxes.

19 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures The cycle is then repeated without PATERTEU JUL 1 0191s HENRYD. WARD, JR.

//vv/v we ATTORNEY PATENTEB L 7 01975 amnesia F a. 2b

PAIENIE JUL v 0 ms misuse FIG. 2a

sion.

of use in the corrugated box industry for stacking,

squaring, counting, and ejecting, in bundles, flat corrugated board boxes that are being discharged at high speeds from printing scoring, folding and gluing type machines. a i

There is a great need for a machine to solve the acceptance of newly glued and folded sheets or boxes coming out of a folder-gluer and receiving them into a hopper or area where they can be squared up, thus eliminating any folding errors which may have occurred and proceeding after that to count them into an exact bundle of a predetermined number. i

i The ability to handle sheets or boxes which are flap cut or may have some other odd shape and the requirement to positively separate the flow of sheets or boxes out of the machine in precisely counted bundlesare two essential requirements of such a machine.

It is also desirable to have a machine where the flow of the bundles out of the machine is directed along the center line, generally speaking, of a folder-gluer. In

other words, it is desirablein order to create an easy material flow and conserve space that the printing, folding, and counting and bundling operations all be done in a direct straight line.

These operations. are usually done in two distinct stages with conventional machines. One, which is the straight line direction directly along the center line of the folder-gluer.

Thus, a need exists in the corrugated board box industry for a modern, automated machine, to be used to stack, square, count and eject, in bundles, flat board boxes that are being discharged at high speed from the printing, scoring, folding and gluing machines.

It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide a squaring andbundle counting machine, of the counter-ejector type.

Another object of this invention is to provide a squaring and bundle counting machine which performs all of the needs described above, its operation is automatic and reliable, and which requires a minimum of supervi- A further object of this invention is to provide a squaring and bundle counting machine that, by the action of an automatic variable speed control device, allows the machine to operate independently of the speed or intervalat which the boxes or sheets are being fed into it from anexternal source.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a squaring and bundle counting machine that is compatible with existing modern companion machinery presently being used in the corrugated board box industry. An object of this invention is to provide a squaring and bundle counting machine for the acceptance of Still another object of this invention is to provide a squaring and bundle counting machine which has the ability to handle boxes or sheets. which are flat cut or may have some other odd shape and to positivelyseparate the flow of boxes or sheets in precisely counted bundles.

Still even another object of this invention in order to save space in a box plant and in orderto create an easy material flow, to provide a squaring and bundle counting machine in which the printing,,folding, stacking,- squaring counting, and bundling operations are all done in a direct straight line.

Other objects and attendant advantages of this invention will become more readily apparent and understood from the following detailed specification and accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a squaring and bundlecounting type machine invorporating features of this invention;

FIGS. 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, and 2c are side elevation sche matic views showing schematically the sequence of operation of the squaring and bundle countingmachine of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 3a and 3b are side elevation schematic views FIG. 3c is a top plan view of the squaring and bundle counting machine of FIG. lshowing schematically the belt arrangements and the adjustment of the carriage for the various size sheets of the corrugated board boxes or sheets;

FIG. 4a is a partial sideelevation view showing an al ternate belt arrangement of the input end of the squaring and bundle counting machine; i

FIG. 4b is a partial top plan view of FIG. FIG. 5 is a schematic of a modifcation of the bundle counting machine.

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a complete squaring and bundle counting machine 10, while FIGS. 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, and 2e and FIGS. 3a, 3b, and 3c show schematically the sequence of its operation.

As shown in FIG. 1, and FIG. 2a, folded flat, glued, board boxes indicated generally by reference numeral 22 and specifically by reference numeral 22a (positions the squaring and bundle counting machine of FIG.

of boxes or sheets will be indicated by the numeral 22 hopper 23. The lower feed roller 46 is knurled to aid in obtaining a positive grip of the end of each box 22. As the boxes 22 are deflected into the hopper 23,

small springs 48 will lead the boxes 22a inwards and downwards into the hopper 23 under a sensing or control roller 50.

Spanking panels or guides 44b are provided to help, guide the incoming boxes 22a squarely into the top of the pile of boxes 22 in hopper 23 so as to maintain a neat pile of boxes in that area. These spanking panels or guides 44b may be adjusted inwards or outwards to accommodate boxes of different sizes.

4a; and j The flat board boxes 22b progressively accumulate into a pile in the hopper 23. As the pile of boxes 22b in the hopper 23 reaches a height of approximately the center line of the lower feed roller 46 as shown in FIG. 2a, the control or sensor roller 50 actuates a switch which starts the drive to the vacuum belt 14, which as previously mentioned, forms the floor of the first hopper 23.

The boxes 22b are attracted to the belt 14 by means of a vacuum box or chamber 36 which is located directly under the belt 14.

This belt 14 is provided with two rows of holes running lengthwise of it, so that as the belt travels, these holes pass over the vacuum box 36. The vacuum pull from the vacuum box 36, together with the pull of the belt 14, remove the boxes 22c one at a time from the bottom of the stack of boxes 22b.

The boxes 220 are then fed one at a time out and along the surface of the vacuum belt 14 through a gap between the gate assembly or stop panel 42 and the belt 14. The boxes 22a are fed into the hopper 23 at substantially the same rate that boxes 22c are fed out the bottom of the hopper 23, onto the belt 14.

To insure that the pile height of boxes 22 in the hopper 23 stays within a fairly narrow range, the control or sensor roller 50 controls a switch to start the belt 14, as well as a rheostat control which controls the speed of the belt 14. This operates so that as the pile of boxes 22 in the hopper 23 approaches its low limit, the belt 14 will slow down so that fewer boxes 220 are being fed out of the hopper 23 than the boxes 22a that are being fed into the hopper 23. The pile height of boxes 22 then beginsto fill up again in the hopper 23.

When the height of the pile of boxes 22 approaches the desired upper limit, the rheostat increases the speed of the belt 14 progressively and the flow of the boxes 220 out of the bottom of the hopper 23 will match or perhaps exceed the rate in which the boxes 22a are being fed into the hopper 23.

This is a means by which this squaring and bundle counting machine can track the flow of boxes or sheets 22 outof the folder-gluer machine. The operation of a foIder-gluer is such that it will operate over a range of speed and thus the squaring and bundle counting machine 10 must maintain a fixed pile height of boxes 22 in the hopper 23 in order to allow the control or sensor roller 50 cooperating with lower feed roller 46 to create a certain downward pressure on that pile which creates a compressive load in the sheets and as well as time to set the freshly glued joints of the boxes 22.

While the boxes 22 are sifting down through the pile, their leading or folding edges are located and defined by the gate assembly 42. The trailing edge of the pile of sheets 22 rests against the oscillating plate 44a which is squeezed about its lower point and it is swinging back and forth at its upper level to squeeze the upper part of the pile where the glued joint of a box 22 is being set. If there happens to be a freshly folded panel which is not square with the box 22, the oscillating plate 44a will squeeze that panel in square with the rest of the box until the glue finally sets and holds it there.

Oscillating plate 44a is driven by a shaft with a cam on it.A link is looped around the cam which, in turn, is connected then to the plate.

' The gate assembly or stop panel 42 is arranged to be shifted longitudinally either towards or away from the oscillating plate 44a to accommodate boxes 22 of different lengths, as shown by the position of the movable carriage 20 in FIGS. 3a and 3b. This carriage 20 is adjustable for the various size lengths of the flat board boxes or sheets 22. FIG. 3a shows the carriage 20 adjusted in the direction of the arrow 40a for small size boxes or sheets 22h, and FIG. 3b shows the carriage 20 adjusted in the direction of the arrow 40b for large size boxes or sheets 22i. Automatic alignment is provided for the centering of the squaring and bundle counting machine 10 as indicated by the center line 30 in FIG. 3c to the center of the flat board boxes or-sheets 22 which are being fed into it.

If it is not desired to count the flow of boxes 22 into bundles, it is, of course, quite feasible to simply use this part of the machine 10 as a squaring device. For example, the boxes 22 can be fed out one at a time from the hopper 23 and laid on'a conventional stacker which would build a stack of predetermined height.

The lower belt assembly under the hopper 23 is composed of the vacuum box 36, two drums 39 and 41, about which the conveyor belt 14 is looped and led over the vacuum box 36. The vacuum box 36 is designed in such a way that the vacuum is only applied to about 4 to 6 inches of the leading edge of the box 22c where it is stacked in the compression hopper 23. It was found by experimentation that if this is not done, an alternate method can be used in providing a belt with a high friction surface on it. A drag is applied on the next box 22 to be fed as the bottom box 220 is drawn partially out of the hopper 23. I

In other words, as shown in FIG. 2a, a box 220 is just beginning to leave the hopper 23 through the gap between gate assembly 42 and the belt 14. As that box 220 continues onward, more and more of the trailing edge of the next box in the hopper 23 is exposed to the belt 14. Of course, there is quite a bit of weight in the hopper 23 and there is a downward driving force from the weight of the control or sensor roller 50 and also from the turning of the lower roller of the two rollers 46 to press the whole upper load of boxes 22 down against the vacuum belt 14.

The friction drive on the next box to be fed will drive it into the gate 42 and cause it to hang up on the gate so it will not fall freely into feeding position when its turn comes. So, by limiting the vacuum to the leading edge of the box and by using a belt with a lower slick surface on it, it has been possible to use a vacuum to attract the box 22 to the belt 16 to give it enough traction to pull out without disturbing the next box up in the pile. The box awaits its turn until the first box 22c is out of the way and as it drops down, it is then exposed to the vacuum and adheres to the belt 14 and continues on its way.

A more versatile method of pulling the boxes from under the pile of boxes 22 in the hopper 23 is shown in FIGS. 4a and 4b. In this system, the vacuum box 36 is eliminated to reduce the cost of the machine 10 considerably. The full width belt 14 is replaced by a multi-belt unit consisting of a series of parallel belts as shown best in FIG. 4b. The muIti-belt unit 100 consists of a series of narrow belts running parallel and spaced across the machine 10.

The two rollers 39 and 41 which form the head and tail rollers carrying the multi-belt unit 100 in FIG. 4a are retained, The vacuum box 36 is replaced by a group of three rollers 101,103, and 105. The multi-belt unit 100 will come forward off of the top of the tail roller 41 in the direction as indicated by the arrow. The level of the rnulti-belt unit 100 at this point under the pile or boxes 22 will be an inch or two below the bottom of the pile but the belt unit 100 will be parallel to the bottom of the pile of boxes. I

The belt unit 100 is then looped around a small roller 105 which will be about 6 or 8 inches back from the leading edge of the pile and it will then go downwards and around a second roller 103 which is below the first roller105. The belt unit 100 will then go up around a third roller 101 which is located substantially under the leading edge of the pile of boxes 22 in the compression hopper 23.

The trailing edge of the pile of boxes 22 in the compression hopper 23 is supported by a small angular plate 103 set at an angle of about 45 degrees and located right at the trailing edge of the pile and just above the multi-belt unit 100.

Under these conditions, the pile of boxes 22 will sit on that angular plate 103 and at least half of the total weight of the pile will be bearing on the belts of the multi'belt unit running up over the third roller 101 positioned at the leading edge of the pile of boxes 22.

The belts of the multi-belt unit l00are designed to have a high coefficient of friction on the surface mate rial so thatthe coefficient of friction of the moving belts will be at least twice the coefficient of friction of two boxes rubbing together so that half of the load of the pile of boxes will have a sufficient driving force to carry the bottom boxes 22c through the gates and out of the hopper 23.

The box22c which is next to be fed will not be disturbed untilthe first box is completely cleared of the.

hopper 23 because that next box to be fed will not be touching the belts of the multi-belt unit 100 anywhere on its, surface until the first box is cleared and allows the secondbox to drop down onto the belts of the multi-belt unit 100 right at the leading edge thereof. This is the reason for depressing the belts of the muIti-belt unit 100 under the trailing edge of the hopper 23.

After the boxes 22 have been fed out of the hopper 23, the problem of counting the boxes 22 and separating the flow of boxes into properly counted bundles of boxes is presented.

T he technique; of using an electric eye or other type of sensor to count the boxes or spaces between boxes is not new and it quite common in all kinds of counting operations. The problem has always been, however, to actually separate the flow of boxes into accurately counted bundles once the count has been determined.

Now, in this particular case, the boxes 22d are being fed into asecond hopper 45 as shown in FIG. 2a by means of bolts of a multi-belt conveyor 16 located at l the forward end of belt 14, as shown best in FIGS. 1,

. edge of the box 22d breaks the beam of the electric eye 28, it is counted.

As the oncoming boxes 22 flow into the hopper 45,

they are carried forward by the belt conveyor 16 until they hit a fixed stop bar 24, as indicated in FIG. 2a.

Each succeeding box 22d follows the same path and the pile of boxes is being built up from below in the hopper The pile of boxes is built from below because the coefficient of friction of the belts of the conveyor 16 is higher than the coefficient of friction of two boxes rub bing one against the other. The weight of the pile of boxes itself is sufficient to cause the oncoming boxes to adhere to the belts l6 and then have enough driving oncoming boxes 22f stop, at the face of that stop bar 26b instead at the face of stop bar 24, as shown in FIG. 20. This means that the box 22f which has been stopped short by the stop bar 26b is now the first box in the next bundle and all boxes 22e above it can be ejected as being part of the bundle just counted by the electric eye 28.

Three or four more boxes are allowed to continue to enter the hopper 45 as shown in FIG. 20. As these boxes 22f accumulate, they finally build up to a point where they touch the bottom of a pusher bar 34b. The pusher bar 34b is free to slide vertically in its mounting assembly. 7

As more and more boxes 22f continue to enter the hopper 45 as shown in FIG. 2d, the lifting of the pusher bar 34c triggers another electric eye 54. This electric eye 54 then indicates to the machine 10 that several boxes 22f have been accumulated in the next bundle and it is safe to remove the first bundle of boxes 22e by means of the conveyor system 18, as shown in FIGS.l,2d and 2e.

This causes two things to happen. First of all, bar 26b continues to lift another step as indicated in FIG. 2d by bar 260. As soon as bar 26c is lifted into its upper position, this triggers a signal to cause the pusher bar 34c to push forward about 10 or 12 inches to push the bundle of boxes 22e onto a set of conveyor belts 18. This bundle of boxes 22e is then free to continue out of the machine 10 on the conveyor system l8 as shown bythe direction of the arrow 58 in FIG. 2e.

As soon as the pusher bar 340 reaches the end of its travel, it triggers another sensor, in this case it is usually a limit switch, which causes the intermediate stop her 26c as shown in FIG. 2d to drop down intothe down position of the stop bar 26a as shown in FIG. 2e.

It also causes the pusher bar 34d to retract into a position about an inch and a half or 2 inches behind the normal point in which boxes 22f are collected.

At this time, one of two things may happen. Either the boxes which have been accumulated in the next bundle of boxes 22fmay. shift forward on the belts 16 win some cases they will remain in their rear position, that is, their leading edges will still be aligned with the face of the intermediate stopbar 26. Now, the next on- .coming boxes will go all the way home to the face of fixed stop bar 24. This causes the pusher bar 34 to retract until it is behind any boxes which may have not moved in the forward position. Pusher bar 34 then takes a short step forward to insure that all of the boxes 22f in the second pile of boxes are aligned with the face of stop bar 24, and the cycle of operations is repeated.

FIG. shows an alternate method of operation of the movable stop bar 26 over that discussed in connection with FIGS. 2a through 2e. When a predetermined number of boxes 22 are counted into the bundle by the electric eye 28, as previously described, a roller assembly 110 lowers the conveyor 16 in the direction of the arrow 112 instead of the movable stop bar 26 being raised as shown in FIG. 2b. The effect is the same, that is, lowering the conveyor 16 so that the stop bar 26a without moving stops the first several boxes in the succeeding bundle. The stop bar 26a is then moved to the position shown in FIG. 2d to raise the first mentioned bundle as previously described. The stop bar 26 and conveyor 16 are subsequently moved to their inti'al positions so that the cycle of operation can be repeated.

The squaring and bundle counting machine is controlled and preset from a control box 12, as shown in FIG. 1, and a handwheel 56 which controls the adjustment for the various thicknesses of the flat board boxes or sheets 22.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is, therefore, to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

l. A system for counting and for separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles of articles of a predetermined number, comprising, a fixed abutment, a movable pusher means spaced from said fixed abutment, a movable abutment positioned intermediate and below said fixed abutment and said movable pusher means, said abutments being in the line of flow of said articles, conveyor means for advancing successively articles in the direction of the face of said fixed abutment, said fixed abutment being adapted to limit the advance of the lowermost article so as to build up at said face a bundle of articles from below, with one article entering the bundle lifting the other articles "comprised in the bundle, means for counting a predetermined number of articles advanced by said conveyor means and stacked in said bundle adjacent the face of said fixed abutment, means for raising said movable abutment after a predetermined number of articles have been stacked in said bundle adjacent said fixed abutment so that the next oncoming article stops at the face of said movable abutment instead of the face of the fixed abutment to start a succeeding bundle below and offset laterally from said first mentioned bundle of articles stacked by said conveyor means from below, means operatively coupled to said pusher means for sensing that said several articles have accumulated in said succeeding bundle and for causing said movable abutment to raise higher to separate said first bundle of articles, means for causing said pusher means to move forward to push said first mentioned bundle from said machine, and means for causing said pusher means to return to a retracted position and arranged so as to push said accumulating bundle to the face of said fixed abutment to complete the stacking of a predetermined number of said articles in said succeeding bundle by said conveyor means and to cause said movable abutment to return to its initial position.

2. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles of articles of a predetermined number as recited in claim 1, and additionally a spaced hopper mechanism for receiving said fiat stiff articles for stacking and squaring thereof before being conveyed by said conveyor means to be counted by said counting means.

3. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 2, and additionally means for feeding said flat stiff articles to said hopper mechanism for stacking and squaring in said hopper mechanism.

4. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 3, and additionally means for squaring said flat stiff articles fed into said hopper mechanism.

5. A system for counting and separating the flow of fiat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 4, and additionally means for compressing said flat stiff articles fed into said hopper mechanism simultaneously with the squaring of said articles fed into said hopper mechanism.

6. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 3, wherein said feeding means for feeding said articles into said hopper mechanism consists of a pair of spaced rollers, one of which is knurled to grip said articles being fed into said hopper mechanism.

7. A system for counting and separating of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 1, and additionally means for controlling the rate of flow of said articles fed by said hopper mechanism.

8. A system for counting and separating of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 1, and additionally means for removing said bundle of articles of a predetermined number pushed by said pusher means from said machine.

9. A system for counting and separating of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 1, wherein said conveyor means for feeding said stiff arti-,

cles for counting consists of a vacuum belt.

10. A system for counting and separating of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 1, wherein said conveyor means consists of a multi-belt feeding device.

11. A system for counting and for separating the flow of fiat stiff articles into counted bundles of articles of a predetermined number, comprising, a fixed abutment, a movable pusher means spaced from said fixed abutment, a movable abutment positioned intermediate and below said fixed abutment and said movable pusher means, said abutments being in the line of flow of said articles, conveyor means for advancing successively articles in the direction of the face of said fixed abutment, said fixed abutment being adapted to limit the advance of the lowermost article so as to build up at said face a bundle of articles from below, with one article entering the bundle lifting the other articles comprised in the bundle, means for counting a predetermined number of articles advanced by said conveyor means and stacked in said bundle adjacent the face of said fixed abutment, means for lowering said conveyor means after a predetermined number of articles have been stacked in said bundle adjacent said fixed abutment so that the next oncoming article stops at the face of said movable abutment instead of the face of the fixed abutment to start a succeeding bundle of articles below and offset laterally from said first mentioned bundle of articles stacked by said conveyor means from below, means operatively coupled to said pusher means for sensing that said several articles have accumulated in said succeeding bundle and for causing said movable abutment to elevate to separate said first bundle of articles from said succeeding accumulating bundle or articles, means for causing said pusher means to move forward to push said first mentioned bundle from said machine, and means for causing said pusher means to return to a retracted position and arranged so as to push said accumulating bundle to the face of said fixed abutment to complete the stacking of a predetermined number of' said articles in said succeeding bundle by said conveyor means and to cause said movable abutment and conveyor means to return to their initial positions. i

12. A fully automatic squaring and bundle counting machine, comprising, a pair of spaced hopper mechanisms, the first of said hopper mechanisms receiving in the top thereof substantially flat stiff articles for stacking and squaring thereof, means for feeding said stacked and squared articles from the bottom of said first hopper mechanism to the second of said hopper mechanismsso as tobuild up a first bundle of articles from belowin said second hopper mechanisms, means for counting apredetermined number of said squared articles fed to said second hopper mechanism, means for forming a start of several articles of a succeeding bundle of articles adjacent to and offsetlaterally from said first bundle of articles in said second hopper mechanisms, means for separating said first bundle of articles from the adjacent succeeding bundle of articles after several articles have accumulated in the succeeding bundle, meansfor moving said first bundle of articles from said second hopper mechanism, and means for moving the succeeding bundle of several articles into the position previously occupied by the first bundle of articles in said second hopper mechanisms to complete the succeeding bundle of articles having a predetermined number of articles in said bundle.

13. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 12, and means for squaring said articles fed into said first hopper mechanism.

14. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 13, and means for compressing said articles fed into said first hopper mechanism simultaneously with the squaring of said articles fed into said first hoppermechanism.

15. A fully automated squaring and bundle countin machine as recited in claim 12, wherein said feeding means for feeding articles into said first hopper mechanism consists of a pair of spaced rollers, one of which is knurled to grip said articles being fed into said first hopper mechanism.

16. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 12, means for controlling the rate of flow of said stacked and squared articles fed from said first hopper mechanism by said feeding means to said second hopper mechanism.

17. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 12, and means for squaring said articles fed into said first hopper mechanism simul- UNIT D STATES PATENT OFFICE V CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION P atc ant No. 3,744 649 Y Dated Jul 10, 1 973 Inven for(s) WARDQ, HENRY' 15.; JR. v it is cer fi fied that error appears in the above-idntified ptent and that said Letters; Patent are hereby corrected as shown below;

column 10, line 32, "22" should read 12 Signed and sealed this 25th day Of 13806 156 973 (SEAL Attest:

EDWARD M. 'FLETCHERJR.

v RENE D. TEGTMEYER Attesting Officer- Acting COmmissionep of Patenbs FORM PO-1050 (10-69) v uscoMM-Dc wan-Poo U,S. GOVEINMENT PRINTING OFFICE: IQ! OI'P'SSI.

Claims (19)

1. A system For counting and for separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles of articles of a predetermined number, comprising, a fixed abutment, a movable pusher means spaced from said fixed abutment, a movable abutment positioned intermediate and below said fixed abutment and said movable pusher means, said abutments being in the line of flow of said articles, conveyor means for advancing successively articles in the direction of the face of said fixed abutment, said fixed abutment being adapted to limit the advance of the lowermost article so as to build up at said face a bundle of articles from below, with one article entering the bundle lifting the other articles comprised in the bundle, means for counting a predetermined number of articles advanced by said conveyor means and stacked in said bundle adjacent the face of said fixed abutment, means for raising said movable abutment after a predetermined number of articles have been stacked in said bundle adjacent said fixed abutment so that the next oncoming article stops at the face of said movable abutment instead of the face of the fixed abutment to start a succeeding bundle below and offset laterally from said first mentioned bundle of articles stacked by said conveyor means from below, means operatively coupled to said pusher means for sensing that said several articles have accumulated in said succeeding bundle and for causing said movable abutment to raise higher to separate said first bundle of articles, means for causing said pusher means to move forward to push said first mentioned bundle from said machine, and means for causing said pusher means to return to a retracted position and arranged so as to push said accumulating bundle to the face of said fixed abutment to complete the stacking of a predetermined number of said articles in said succeeding bundle by said conveyor means and to cause said movable abutment to return to its initial position.
2. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles of articles of a predetermined number as recited in claim 1, and additionally a spaced hopper mechanism for receiving said flat stiff articles for stacking and squaring thereof before being conveyed by said conveyor means to be counted by said counting means.
3. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 2, and additionally means for feeding said flat stiff articles to said hopper mechanism for stacking and squaring in said hopper mechanism.
4. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 3, and additionally means for squaring said flat stiff articles fed into said hopper mechanism.
5. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 4, and additionally means for compressing said flat stiff articles fed into said hopper mechanism simultaneously with the squaring of said articles fed into said hopper mechanism.
6. A system for counting and separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 3, wherein said feeding means for feeding said articles into said hopper mechanism consists of a pair of spaced rollers, one of which is knurled to grip said articles being fed into said hopper mechanism.
7. A system for counting and separating of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 1, and additionally means for controlling the rate of flow of said articles fed by said hopper mechanism.
8. A system for counting and separating of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 1, and additionally means for removing said bundle of articles of a predetermined number pushed by said pusher means from said machine.
9. A system for counting and separating of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 1, wherein said conveyor means for feeding said stiff articles for counting consists of a vacuum belT.
10. A system for counting and separating of flat stiff articles into counted bundles as recited in claim 1, wherein said conveyor means consists of a multi-belt feeding device.
11. A system for counting and for separating the flow of flat stiff articles into counted bundles of articles of a predetermined number, comprising, a fixed abutment, a movable pusher means spaced from said fixed abutment, a movable abutment positioned intermediate and below said fixed abutment and said movable pusher means, said abutments being in the line of flow of said articles, conveyor means for advancing successively articles in the direction of the face of said fixed abutment, said fixed abutment being adapted to limit the advance of the lowermost article so as to build up at said face a bundle of articles from below, with one article entering the bundle lifting the other articles comprised in the bundle, means for counting a predetermined number of articles advanced by said conveyor means and stacked in said bundle adjacent the face of said fixed abutment, means for lowering said conveyor means after a predetermined number of articles have been stacked in said bundle adjacent said fixed abutment so that the next oncoming article stops at the face of said movable abutment instead of the face of the fixed abutment to start a succeeding bundle of articles below and offset laterally from said first mentioned bundle of articles stacked by said conveyor means from below, means operatively coupled to said pusher means for sensing that said several articles have accumulated in said succeeding bundle and for causing said movable abutment to elevate to separate said first bundle of articles from said succeeding accumulating bundle or articles, means for causing said pusher means to move forward to push said first mentioned bundle from said machine, and means for causing said pusher means to return to a retracted position and arranged so as to push said accumulating bundle to the face of said fixed abutment to complete the stacking of a predetermined number of said articles in said succeeding bundle by said conveyor means and to cause said movable abutment and conveyor means to return to their initial positions.
12. A fully automatic squaring and bundle counting machine, comprising, a pair of spaced hopper mechanisms, the first of said hopper mechanisms receiving in the top thereof substantially flat stiff articles for stacking and squaring thereof, means for feeding said stacked and squared articles from the bottom of said first hopper mechanism to the second of said hopper mechanisms so as to build up a first bundle of articles from below in said second hopper mechanisms, means for counting a predetermined number of said squared articles fed to said second hopper mechanism, means for forming a start of several articles of a succeeding bundle of articles adjacent to and offset laterally from said first bundle of articles in said second hopper mechanisms, means for separating said first bundle of articles from the adjacent succeeding bundle of articles after several articles have accumulated in the succeeding bundle, means for moving said first bundle of articles from said second hopper mechanism, and means for moving the succeeding bundle of several articles into the position previously occupied by the first bundle of articles in said second hopper mechanisms to complete the succeeding bundle of articles having a predetermined number of articles in said bundle.
13. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 12, and means for squaring said articles fed into said first hopper mechanism.
14. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 13, and means for compressing said articles fed into said first hopper mechanism simultaneously with the squaring of said articles fed into said first hopper mechanism.
15. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 12, wherein said feeding means for feeding articles Into said first hopper mechanism consists of a pair of spaced rollers, one of which is knurled to grip said articles being fed into said first hopper mechanism.
16. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 12, means for controlling the rate of flow of said stacked and squared articles fed from said first hopper mechanism by said feeding means to said second hopper mechanism.
17. A fully automated squaring and bundle counting machine as recited in claim 12, and means for squaring said articles fed into said first hopper mechanism simultaneously with the compressing of said flat sheets fed into said first hopper mechanism.
18. A fully automated squaring and counting machine as recited in claim 12, wherein said feeding means for feeding said stacked and squared articles to said second of said hopper mechanisms consists of a vacuum belt.
19. A fully automated squaring and counting machine as recited in claim 22, wherein said feeding means for feeding said stacked and squared articles to said second of said hopper mechanisms consists of a multi-belt feeding device.
US3744649A 1972-05-05 1972-05-05 Squaring and bundle counting machine Expired - Lifetime US3744649A (en)

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US4067568A (en) * 1976-07-19 1978-01-10 Pitney-Bowes, Inc. Document feeding and stacking apparatus
US4219294A (en) * 1977-05-13 1980-08-26 S.A. Martin Machine for separating and discharging products in sheet form
US4222313A (en) * 1975-07-15 1980-09-16 Helmut Staufner Machine for counting flat articles
EP0030672A1 (en) * 1979-12-12 1981-06-24 Guschky & Tönnesmann GmbH & Co. KG Device for stacking folding boxes coming out of a folding box glueing machine
US4311475A (en) * 1978-12-26 1982-01-19 Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Counter ejector
US4353542A (en) * 1979-07-27 1982-10-12 Xerox Corporation Sheet collection apparatus and sorters incorporating same
EP0072678A2 (en) * 1981-08-14 1983-02-23 The Post Office Receptacle for flat sheet-like items
US4377363A (en) * 1979-05-23 1983-03-22 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Stacking mechanism
US4397455A (en) * 1977-02-04 1983-08-09 Docutel Corporation Document dispenser with escrow system
EP0085646A1 (en) * 1982-02-02 1983-08-10 Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Apparatus for counting and collecting paperboards
FR2537959A1 (en) * 1982-12-20 1984-06-22 Ward Machinery Co air blowing device for blanks of paperboard stackers
US4522617A (en) * 1983-08-12 1985-06-11 Don Mowry Flexo Parts, Inc. Conversion belt and stop plate assembly for upstacking corrugated box machinery
US4619571A (en) * 1981-04-22 1986-10-28 O. Dorries Gmbh Installation for the distribution of sheets
US4785731A (en) * 1987-09-25 1988-11-22 American Newspaper Publishers Association Bundle count verifier
US4869487A (en) * 1988-02-19 1989-09-26 Tadao Uno Method for feeding a blocked sheet unit
US4957409A (en) * 1989-08-30 1990-09-18 Kabushiki Kaisha Ishikawa Seisakusho, Ltd. Corrugated cardboard box stacking device in a corrugated cardboard box making machine
US5026340A (en) * 1990-05-01 1991-06-25 Thompson Manufacturing Company, Inc. Flap closer
US5079980A (en) * 1990-09-18 1992-01-14 Markem Corporation Method and apparatus for accumulating, cutting and stacking a continuously moving supply of material
WO1993007317A2 (en) * 1989-12-08 1993-04-15 Goodman Robert Mcalpin Jr Loom harness system with spaced parallel rotating shafts
US5207418A (en) * 1990-09-18 1993-05-04 Markem Corporation Label stacking apparatus
EP0540414A1 (en) * 1991-10-30 1993-05-05 Milas Hanimyan Receiver for sheets or stacks of sheets
US5209149A (en) * 1990-04-25 1993-05-11 Wolfgang Mohr Apparatus for the cutting of stacked sheet-like material
US5217425A (en) * 1992-01-06 1993-06-08 Grant Machinery Split-nip squaring apparatus
US5354171A (en) * 1993-10-21 1994-10-11 Pitney Bowes Inc. Method and apparatus for reverse accumulation of folded documents
US5364085A (en) * 1993-03-22 1994-11-15 Gbr Systems Corporation Accumulator with "first page holder" feature
US5443356A (en) * 1992-01-21 1995-08-22 Selco S.R.L. Automatic slide-on panel loading system
US5575463A (en) * 1994-03-15 1996-11-19 Stralfors Ab Method and device for handling sheets which are provided with information in a laser printer
US5641266A (en) * 1992-11-19 1997-06-24 Sunds Defibrator Panelhandling Oy Method for feeding a sheet substack from a sheet stack and apparatus for implementing said method
US5911807A (en) * 1996-09-27 1999-06-15 Markem Corporation Apparatus for cutting a continuously flowing material web
US6059705A (en) * 1997-10-17 2000-05-09 United Container Machinery, Inc. Method and apparatus for registering processing heads
US6146084A (en) * 1998-01-07 2000-11-14 W. V. Doyle Enterprises, Inc. Automated bundling and stacking of folded corrugated boxes
US6247694B1 (en) 1999-12-17 2001-06-19 R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company Automated bindery log extension
US20030090049A1 (en) * 2000-02-23 2003-05-15 Hill Jeffery L. Card package production system with card package stacker and method
US6574943B2 (en) * 2001-08-17 2003-06-10 Blue Print Holding B.V. Conveyor assembly for packagings, and method for delivery of a pack
WO2004113213A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2004-12-29 Gunze Limited Binding device for printed sheet
US20060263193A1 (en) * 2005-05-16 2006-11-23 Stefan Furthmuller Device for stacking flat products
US20060263181A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Automated system for handling food products
US20080185769A1 (en) * 2007-02-02 2008-08-07 Aruze Corp. Card processor
CN100564211C (en) 2005-01-21 2009-12-02 郡是株式会社 Hesitation apparatus for transported flake
US20100190626A1 (en) * 2007-08-23 2010-07-29 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Counter ejector and carton former
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US20110268551A1 (en) * 2010-04-29 2011-11-03 Hidenori Kokubo Counter ejector of cardboard sheet box-making machine
US20130051968A1 (en) * 2010-05-12 2013-02-28 Macarbox, S.L.U. Piling machine for flat items

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Cited By (60)

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US3834290A (en) * 1973-04-26 1974-09-10 V Nelson Apparatus for counting and stacking sheet material
US4222313A (en) * 1975-07-15 1980-09-16 Helmut Staufner Machine for counting flat articles
US4067568A (en) * 1976-07-19 1978-01-10 Pitney-Bowes, Inc. Document feeding and stacking apparatus
US4397455A (en) * 1977-02-04 1983-08-09 Docutel Corporation Document dispenser with escrow system
US4219294A (en) * 1977-05-13 1980-08-26 S.A. Martin Machine for separating and discharging products in sheet form
US4311475A (en) * 1978-12-26 1982-01-19 Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Counter ejector
US4377363A (en) * 1979-05-23 1983-03-22 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Stacking mechanism
US4353542A (en) * 1979-07-27 1982-10-12 Xerox Corporation Sheet collection apparatus and sorters incorporating same
EP0030672A1 (en) * 1979-12-12 1981-06-24 Guschky & Tönnesmann GmbH & Co. KG Device for stacking folding boxes coming out of a folding box glueing machine
US4619571A (en) * 1981-04-22 1986-10-28 O. Dorries Gmbh Installation for the distribution of sheets
EP0072678A3 (en) * 1981-08-14 1983-03-09 The Post Office Receptacle for flat sheet-like items
EP0072678A2 (en) * 1981-08-14 1983-02-23 The Post Office Receptacle for flat sheet-like items
EP0085646A1 (en) * 1982-02-02 1983-08-10 Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Apparatus for counting and collecting paperboards
US4678388A (en) * 1982-02-02 1987-07-07 Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Apparatus for counting and collecting paper boards
FR2537959A1 (en) * 1982-12-20 1984-06-22 Ward Machinery Co air blowing device for blanks of paperboard stackers
DE3324495A1 (en) * 1982-12-20 1984-07-05 Ward Machinery Co Stacking device for blanks
US4522617A (en) * 1983-08-12 1985-06-11 Don Mowry Flexo Parts, Inc. Conversion belt and stop plate assembly for upstacking corrugated box machinery
US4785731A (en) * 1987-09-25 1988-11-22 American Newspaper Publishers Association Bundle count verifier
US4869487A (en) * 1988-02-19 1989-09-26 Tadao Uno Method for feeding a blocked sheet unit
US4957409A (en) * 1989-08-30 1990-09-18 Kabushiki Kaisha Ishikawa Seisakusho, Ltd. Corrugated cardboard box stacking device in a corrugated cardboard box making machine
WO1993007317A3 (en) * 1989-12-08 1993-05-13 Robert Mcalpin Goodman Jr Loom harness system with spaced parallel rotating shafts
WO1993007317A2 (en) * 1989-12-08 1993-04-15 Goodman Robert Mcalpin Jr Loom harness system with spaced parallel rotating shafts
US5209149A (en) * 1990-04-25 1993-05-11 Wolfgang Mohr Apparatus for the cutting of stacked sheet-like material
US5026340A (en) * 1990-05-01 1991-06-25 Thompson Manufacturing Company, Inc. Flap closer
US5207418A (en) * 1990-09-18 1993-05-04 Markem Corporation Label stacking apparatus
US5079980A (en) * 1990-09-18 1992-01-14 Markem Corporation Method and apparatus for accumulating, cutting and stacking a continuously moving supply of material
EP0540414A1 (en) * 1991-10-30 1993-05-05 Milas Hanimyan Receiver for sheets or stacks of sheets
FR2683215A1 (en) * 1991-10-30 1993-05-07 Hanimyan Milas Device for reception of sheet articles or bundles.
US5217425A (en) * 1992-01-06 1993-06-08 Grant Machinery Split-nip squaring apparatus
US5443356A (en) * 1992-01-21 1995-08-22 Selco S.R.L. Automatic slide-on panel loading system
US5641266A (en) * 1992-11-19 1997-06-24 Sunds Defibrator Panelhandling Oy Method for feeding a sheet substack from a sheet stack and apparatus for implementing said method
US5375825A (en) * 1993-03-22 1994-12-27 Gbr Systems Corporation Accumulator with "first page hold" feature
US5364085A (en) * 1993-03-22 1994-11-15 Gbr Systems Corporation Accumulator with "first page holder" feature
US5354171A (en) * 1993-10-21 1994-10-11 Pitney Bowes Inc. Method and apparatus for reverse accumulation of folded documents
US5575463A (en) * 1994-03-15 1996-11-19 Stralfors Ab Method and device for handling sheets which are provided with information in a laser printer
US5911807A (en) * 1996-09-27 1999-06-15 Markem Corporation Apparatus for cutting a continuously flowing material web
US6059705A (en) * 1997-10-17 2000-05-09 United Container Machinery, Inc. Method and apparatus for registering processing heads
US6146084A (en) * 1998-01-07 2000-11-14 W. V. Doyle Enterprises, Inc. Automated bundling and stacking of folded corrugated boxes
US6247694B1 (en) 1999-12-17 2001-06-19 R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company Automated bindery log extension
US20030090049A1 (en) * 2000-02-23 2003-05-15 Hill Jeffery L. Card package production system with card package stacker and method
US6715268B2 (en) * 2000-02-23 2004-04-06 Dynetics Engineering Corporation, Inc. Card package production system with card package stacker and method
US6574943B2 (en) * 2001-08-17 2003-06-10 Blue Print Holding B.V. Conveyor assembly for packagings, and method for delivery of a pack
WO2004113213A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2004-12-29 Gunze Limited Binding device for printed sheet
US20060249892A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2006-11-09 Council For The Central Laboratory Of The Research Councils Binding device for printed sheet
US7431276B2 (en) 2003-06-19 2008-10-07 Gunze Limited Binding apparatus for printed sheets
CN100564211C (en) 2005-01-21 2009-12-02 郡是株式会社 Hesitation apparatus for transported flake
US20060263193A1 (en) * 2005-05-16 2006-11-23 Stefan Furthmuller Device for stacking flat products
US7445417B2 (en) * 2005-05-16 2008-11-04 Wilhelm Bahmueller Maschinenbau-Praezisionswerkzeuge Gmbh Upward and downward stacking shaft having a tray pivoting mechanism
US7858130B2 (en) * 2005-05-17 2010-12-28 Nestec S.A. Automated system for handling food products
US20060263181A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Automated system for handling food products
US20080185769A1 (en) * 2007-02-02 2008-08-07 Aruze Corp. Card processor
US20100190626A1 (en) * 2007-08-23 2010-07-29 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Counter ejector and carton former
US8876681B2 (en) * 2007-08-23 2014-11-04 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Printing & Packaging Machinery, Ltd. Counter ejector and carton former
CN102089229B (en) 2008-07-10 2013-11-06 冲电气工业株式会社 Medium separating device and method
CN102089229A (en) * 2008-07-10 2011-06-08 冲电气工业株式会社 Medium separating device and method
US8657555B2 (en) * 2010-04-29 2014-02-25 Kabushiki Kaisha Isowa Counter ejector of cardboard sheet box-making machine
US20110268551A1 (en) * 2010-04-29 2011-11-03 Hidenori Kokubo Counter ejector of cardboard sheet box-making machine
US20130051968A1 (en) * 2010-05-12 2013-02-28 Macarbox, S.L.U. Piling machine for flat items
US9499370B2 (en) * 2010-05-12 2016-11-22 Macarbox, S.L.U. Piling machine for flat items
CN101875447A (en) * 2010-07-16 2010-11-03 陈石云 Method and device for single plate dislocation of metal plate laminates

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE2262381B2 (en) 1977-06-16 application
JPS4920864A (en) 1974-02-23 application
GB1355738A (en) 1974-06-05 application
JPS5121877B2 (en) 1976-07-06 grant
DE2262381A1 (en) 1973-11-15 application

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