US3709372A - Intravenous supply container support - Google Patents

Intravenous supply container support Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3709372A
US3709372A US3709372DA US3709372A US 3709372 A US3709372 A US 3709372A US 3709372D A US3709372D A US 3709372DA US 3709372 A US3709372 A US 3709372A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
standard
means
mounting
apparatus
frame
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
L Alexander
Original Assignee
L Alexander
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/1414Hanging-up devices
    • A61M5/1415Stands, brackets or the like for supporting infusion accessories

Abstract

Apparatus for supporting intravenous supply bottles including an upright standard and a cross bar extending substantially horizontally across the top of the standard. An elongated cantilever spring secured to the standard extends to opposite sides of the standard beneath the cross bar. Reaches of the spring are adapted to press into tight frictional contact with upwardly facing ends of supply bottles depending from catches in the cross bar. A mounting for the standard permits vertical adjustment of the standard relative to a bed or other body support.

Description

United States Patent [191 Alexander [54] INTRAVENOUS SUPPLY CONTAINER SUPPORT [76] Inventor: Larry T. Alexander, 750 NE. Burnside, Gresham, Oreg. 97030 [22] Filed: Jan. 6, 1971 [21] App1.No.: 104,402

[52] U.S. CI ..211/74, 5/92,128/214 R, 248/318 [51] Int. Cl. ..A6lg 12/00, A47b 73/00 [58] Field of Search ..5/92, 317 R; 211/74, 71; 128/214 R, 227; 248/318, 328, 340; 222/181 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS [in 3,709,372 1 Jan.9,1973

2,470,524 5/1949 Scudder ..5/92 X 1,704,979 3/1929 Kusterle ..5/92

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,244,324 9/1960 France ..248/3 18 227,746 9/1943 Switzerland ..128/2l4 R Primary Examiner-Roy D. Frazier Assistant Examiner-Abraham Frankel Attorney-Koliuch & Hartwell [57] ABSTRACT Apparatus for supporting intravenous supply bottles including an upright standard and a cross bar extend ing substantially horizontally across the top of the standard. An elongated cantilever spring secured to the standard extends to opposite sides of the standard beneath the cross bar. Reaches of the spring are adapted to press into tight frictional contact with upwardly facing ends of supply bottles depending from catches in the cross bar. A mounting for the standard permits vertical adjustment of the standard relative to a bed or other body support.

8 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PAIENTEUJAM -9|915 Larry TFHexander BY INVENTORS maid 4 /W Hi'i' gs.

INTRAVENOUS SUPPLY CONTAINER SUPPORT practice. As is known, a container, generally a bottle,-

of intravenous feeding solution is suspended at an elevation above a patient and a supply tube leads from the container to a needle which is inserted into the patients vein to supply solution thereto. This practice has become so common that it is used not only with patients in stationary hospital beds, but also in vehicles, such as ambulances and helicopters, and when moving patients on movable carts in a hospital.

In the past, intravenous containers have been supported merely by hanging them loosely on elevated standards. When such containers are moved with vehicles or movable carts, they tend to swing, hitting against the standard or against other bottles suspended therewith. Since such containers may be glass bottles there is a possibility they may break. Further, they may have such swinging latitude as to pull the needle from a patients vein.

A general object of the invention is to provide novel supporting apparatus for intravenous supply containers which restrains containers supported thereon against swinging movement.

Another object of the invention is to provide such apparatus which permits quick and easy installation of a supply container.

Another object is to provide such apparatus which in no way interferes with visual observations of fluid levels in a container.

A further object of the invention is to provide novel support apparatus for intravenous supply containers which may be mounted on the frame ofa body-supporting device and is adjustable vertically relative to such frame. Such a vertically-adjustable support has particular advantage when it is used on a stretcher, which is to be carried in an ambulance. Explaining further, the head room in an ambulance often is restricted, thus it is desirable to be able to adjust the vertical height of a standard for holding intravenous bottles so that the standard will fit conveniently within the ambulance. Such problems exist also in other vehicles in which stretchers or hospital carts may be conveyed.

These and other objects and advantages will become more fully apparent as the following description is read in conjunction with the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a stretcher for use in an ambulance upon which is mounted apparatus according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged elevation view, taken generally along the line 2-2 in FIG. 1, of apparatus according to the invention supporting an intravenous supply container;

. FIG. 3 is an enlarged top plan view of the apparatus taken generally along the line 3-3 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged top plan view, taken generally along the line 44 in FIG. 2, of means for mounting the apparatus on the frame of the stretcher; and

FIG. 5 is a side elevation view taken generally along the line 5-5 in FIG. 4, of such mounting means.

Referring now to the drawings, and first more specifically to FIG. 1, at is indicated a stretcher, such as may be used in an ambulance. The stretcher has a body-supporting frame 12 which includes a pair of elongated, laterally spaced tubular side rails 14, 16 extending longitudinally of the stretcher, and a series of laterally spaced, elongated tubular cross members 18 which extend transversely of and] are secured at their ends to side rails 14, 16. The stretcher has vertically adjustable legs 20 which are supported on casters 22. The

legs are collapsible to permit the stretcher to be loaded into an ambulance in which there is limited head room.

Indicated generally at 30 is apparatus for supporting a pair of intravenous supply containers, such as that indicated at 32. As is best illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, a container 32 may be a bottle having a neck 34 at one of its ends and having a bail 36 connected adjacent its other end. The bail is swingably supported on band 36a and projects from the end of the: bottle when dependently supporting a bottle. A tube 38 is connected to the neck of the bottle through which solution, such as that indicated at 40, may be supplied from the bottle to a patient. Such bottles generally are made of clear glass to permit observation of the level of solution in the bottle. Bail 36 is provided for suspending the bottle with its neck down and its other end facing up.

Referring now to apparatus 30, :it comprises an elongated, upright tubular standard 44. Standard 44 has a straight, vertical lower portion 44a, a bent-over portion 44b intermediate its ends (see in FIGS. 1 and 3), and a straight, vertical upper portion 44c which is offset from, and extends substantially parallel to, portion 44a.

Mounting standard 44 on the frame of the stretcher is a mounting clamp 50. The clamp rigidly grips one of the side rails and one of the cross members of the stretcher frame, as is illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, and supports standard 44 in a substantially upright position.

Referring still to FIGS. 4 and 5, clamp 50 includes a pair of mating, disengageable members 52, 54. Each of these members is substantially L-shaped when viewed in plan (see FIG. 4). A plurality of screws 56 extend upwardly through member 54 and into threaded bores in member 52 to clamp the two members together. Members 52, 54 have facing semicylindrical grooves 58, formed therein, respectively, which fit over opposite sides of side rail 14, and define a passage receiving side rail 14, as is best seen in FIG. 5. Another set of facing semicylindrical grooves formed in members 52, 54 extend substantially normal to grooves 58, 60 and define a passage to receive cross member 18, as seen in FIG. 4. Tightening of screws 56 clamps members 52, 54 rigidly onto side rail 14 and cross member 18.

Members 52, 54 have vertically aligned apertures extending therethrough which slidably receive lower portion 44a of the standard, permitting the standard to be shifted vertically between different adjusted positions. The aperture in member 52 is indicated generally at 64 in FIG. 4. One marginal portion of aperture 64 is defined by a section 52a of member 52 which is spaced a short distance from and may be: biased toward the major section 52b of member 52. A thumb screw 66 extends through section 52a and into a threaded bore in section 52b. The thumb screw is operable to bias section 52a toward section 52b to tighten the side margins of the aperture against the standard, thus to lock the standard in a selected vertically adjusted position. Standard 44 and mounting clamp 50 together form what is referred to herein as a mounting in the apparatus.

Referring now specifically to FIGS. 2 and 3, secured to the upper end of portion 44c of standard 44 is an elongated cross bar 70, also referred to herein as support means. The cross bar is connected at its center to the standard and extends substantially horizontally outwardly to opposite sides of the standard. The opposite ends of cross bar 70, also referred to herein as support arms, are substantially similar, each having a pair of catches, more specifically, vertically spaced bailreceiving indents or depressions, indicated generally at 72, 74.

Connected to the upper portion 440 of standard 44 directly beneath cross bar 70 is an elongated cantilever spring 80, also referred to herein as restraining means. The spring is secured at its center to the standard, with opposite end portions, or reaches, projecting laterally outwardly to opposite sides of the standard. As is best seen in FIG. 2, the spring is substantially symmetric about its connection with the standard. Each reach of spring is biased downwardly and is yieldable upwardly to permit positioning of a container on the apparatus.

With a bottle hung on the cross bar as illustrated in FIG. 2, a reach of the spring extends across the upturned end of the bottle and exerts a downward bias on said end of the bottle. With the spring thus biased into tight frictional contact with the end of the bottle, the bottle is urged away from the cross bar to maintain bail 36 in its catch in the cross bar, and also is restrained against swinging movement relative to the standard. Another bottle may be hung from the opposite end of the cross bar and contacted by the other end of the spring member, and similarly would be restrained against swinging movement.

Describing now the operation of the apparatus, with thumb screw 66 loosened, standard 44 may be adjusted vertically to place the cross bar at a desired elevation above the body-supporting frame of the stretcher. Tightening screw 66 locks the standard in the position selected. A bottle ofintravenous solution is hung on the cross bar with its bail received in one of catches 72, 74, and with the spring disposed between the cross bar and the upturned end of the bottle. The spring presses firmly against the upturned end of the bottle to restrain it against swinging and to prevent the bail from being jarred from the catch in which it is hung.

Bottles of intravenous solution are available in different sizes and with various bail lengths. The vertical spacing between the two catches at an end of the cross bar permits the apparatus to support bottles of various sizes and bail lengths. Explaining further, a larger bottle having a longer bail would be hung in catch 72, and would be firmly engaged by the spring. A smaller bottle having a shorter bail would be hung in catch 74 and still would be firmly engaged by the spring.

Several advantages are obtained by such support apparatus. The apparatus permits rapid and easy hanging of intravenous solution bottles thereon, with the spring restraining the bottles against swinging. With the spring member engaging only the upturned end of a bottle, there is no obstruction along the sides of the bottle which would interfere with observation of the level of solution remaining in the bottle. Further, the support can be adjusted vertically relative to the body-supporting frame of a stretcher or bed and the offset in the standard permits bottles hung thereon to extend over a While an embodiment of the invention has been disclosed herein, it should be obvious to those skilled in the art that variations and modifications are possible without departing from the spirit of the invention.

It is claimed and desired to secure by Letters Patent:

1. Apparatus for supporting an intravenous supply container having a bail connected to and projecting from an end thereof comprising a mounting,

an elevated support arm secured to and projecting outwardly from the mounting, said arm having a catch adapted to receive-said bail with the container-depending from the catch and said support arm, and

an elongated cantilever spring secured to and extending outwardly from said mounting below the catch positioned to extend across said end of a container depending from the support arm, operable to exert a downward bias on said end of a container depending from the support arm and yieldable upwardly for container positioning purposes.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein multiple catches, each comprising an indent in the arm, are provided at different elevations in the arm.

3. The apparatus of claim I, wherein said mounting comprises a standard and means for mounting said standard on a body-supporting frame having a side rail extending longitudinally of the frame and a cross member extending transversely of the frame, said means mounting the standard including a pair of opposed, mating clamp portions defining therebetween a first passage for receiving the side rail of the frame, a second passage for receiving the cross member of the frame, said second passage extending substantially normal to said first passage, and means for clamping said clamp portions against opposite sides of the side rail and cross member received in said passages.

4. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said means mounting the standard further comprises means defining an aperture through which a lower portion of the standard extends for vertical movement between various adjusted positions relative to such frame, and means for clamping side margins of said aperture against the standard for locking the same in a selected adjusted position.

5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said mounting comprises a standard and means for mounting said standard on a body-supporting frame including means for gripping a portion of said frame, means adjustably receiving said standard permitting vertical movement of the standard between various adjusted positions relative to such frame, and means for locking said standard in a selected adjusted position.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein said means receiving said standard comprises means defining'an aperture through which a lower portion of said standard extends, and said locking means comprises means for clamping side margins of the aperture against the standard. I

7. Apparatus for supporting a plurality of intravenous supply containers, each of which includes a bail connected to and projecting from an end thereof comprising an upright standard,

support means secured adjacent the top of said standard having a pair of horizontally spaced catches, each adapted to receive a bail of a container with its associated container depending therefrom, and

an elongated cantilever spring secured to and extending outwardly from said standard below said catches positioned to extend across the ends of containers depending from the support means, operable to exert a downward bias on said ends of containers depending from the support means and

Claims (8)

1. Apparatus for supporting an intravenous supply container having a bail connected to and projecting from an end thereof comprising a mounting, an elevated support arm secured to and projecting outwardly from the mounting, said arm having a catch adapted to receive said bail with the container depending from the catch and said support arm, and an elongated cantilever spring secured to and extending outwardly from said mounting below the catch positioned to extend across said end of a container depending from the support arm, operable to exert a downward bias on said end of a container depending from the support arm and yieldable upwardly for container positioning purposes.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein multiple catches, each comprising an indent in the arm, are provided at different elevations in the arm.
3. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said mounting comprises a standard and means for mounting said standard on a body-supporting frame having a side rail extending longitudinally of the frame and a cross member extending transversely of the frame, said means mounting the standard including a pair of opposed, mating clamp portions defining therebetween a first passage for receiving the side rail of the frame, a second passage for receiving the cross member of the frame, said second passage extending substantially normal to said first passage, and means for clamping said clamp portions against opposite sides of the side rail and cross member received in said passages.
4. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said means mounting the standard further comprises means defining an aperture through which a lower portion of the standard extends for vertical movement between various adjusted positions relative to such frame, and means for clamping side margins of said aperture against the standard for locking the same in a selected adjusted position.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said mounting comprises a standard and means for mounting said standard on a body-supporting frame including means for gripping a portion of said frame, means adjustably receiving said standard permitting vertical movement of the standard between various adjusted positions relative to such frame, and means for locking said standard in a selected adjusted position.
6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein said means receiving said standard comprises means defining an aperture through which a lower portion of said standard extends, and said locking means comprises means for clamping side margins of the aperture against the standard.
7. Apparatus for supporting a plurality of intravenous supply containers, each of which includes a bail connected to and projecting from an end thereof comprising an upright standard, support means secured adjacent the top of said standard having a pair of horizontally spaced catches, each adapted to receive a bail of a container with its associated container depending therefrom, and an elongated cantilever spring secured to and extending outwardly from said standard below said catches positioned to extend across the ends of containers depending from the support means, operable to exert a downward bias on said ends of containers depending from the support means and yieldable upwardly for container positioning purposes.
8. The apparatus of claim 7, wherein said support means comprises an elongated cross bar extending transversely of said standard, said catches comprise indents in the cross bar adjacent its opposite ends, and said cantilever spring is connected adjacent its center to said standard with opposite ends projecting laterally outwardly to opposite sides of said standard.
US3709372A 1971-01-06 1971-01-06 Intravenous supply container support Expired - Lifetime US3709372A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10440271 true 1971-01-06 1971-01-06

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3709372A true US3709372A (en) 1973-01-09

Family

ID=22300287

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3709372A Expired - Lifetime US3709372A (en) 1971-01-06 1971-01-06 Intravenous supply container support

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3709372A (en)

Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3923279A (en) * 1974-09-25 1975-12-02 James E Gresley Hanger apparatus for supporting intravenous containers
US4005844A (en) * 1975-08-25 1977-02-01 Stryker Corporation Solution bottle holder
US4023757A (en) * 1976-03-05 1977-05-17 Allard Charles D Patient controls holder
US4231126A (en) * 1979-01-19 1980-11-04 Earl Hurkett Water bed wave generator
US4262872A (en) * 1979-02-28 1981-04-21 American Hospital Supply Corporation Collapsible pole assembly
US4325061A (en) * 1980-10-27 1982-04-13 William Wolar Protective means for attachments affixed to electrically operated beds
US4367859A (en) * 1980-07-14 1983-01-11 The Horton Company Ceiling-mounted holder for intravenous fluid receptacles
US4572536A (en) * 1983-05-26 1986-02-25 Doughty Val J I V Pole interconnection coupling
US4600209A (en) * 1984-07-02 1986-07-15 Kerr Jr Robert L Transport support for freestanding umbilical accessory
US4666111A (en) * 1985-11-14 1987-05-19 Robert Schuler Holder for IV tube
US4875651A (en) * 1988-12-06 1989-10-24 Wergin Dennis D Transducer mounting device
US4879798A (en) * 1986-07-15 1989-11-14 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Method for patient equipment transport and support system
US4886237A (en) * 1988-09-23 1989-12-12 Dennis Robert R Universal articulatable support for retaining intravenous stands in medical applications
US4905944A (en) * 1989-01-26 1990-03-06 Baxter International Inc. Home care intravenous stand
WO1990003157A1 (en) * 1988-09-30 1990-04-05 The General Hospital Corporation Transport system for portable patient care apparatus
US5016307A (en) * 1990-03-23 1991-05-21 Linda Rebar Integral stretcher and intravenous fluid carrier/gravity dependent drainage support
US5054732A (en) * 1989-07-17 1991-10-08 Sukup Eldon R Intravenous feeder support for stroller
US5319816A (en) * 1992-12-07 1994-06-14 Hill-Rom Company, Inc. IV rack transferrable from an IV stand to a hospital bed
US5358205A (en) * 1993-04-16 1994-10-25 Starkey Douglas G Device to connect I.V. pole and patient support
US5499721A (en) * 1994-07-29 1996-03-19 Schroer Manufacturing Company Supply stand clamp
USRE36258E (en) * 1995-03-02 1999-07-27 Ccl Label, Inc. Label hangers for bottles
US5987670A (en) * 1998-04-23 1999-11-23 The General Hospital Corporation Medical equipment transport system
US6375133B1 (en) 1998-03-04 2002-04-23 Emergent Innovations, Llc. Intravenous (IV) pole for transport with multiple infusion devices
US6481679B1 (en) 2000-11-17 2002-11-19 Bryant K. Bennett System for mounting medical accessories on supportive structures
US6585206B2 (en) * 2000-06-05 2003-07-01 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Medical accessory support
US6619599B2 (en) 1998-03-04 2003-09-16 Emergent Innovations, Llc Intravenous (IV) pole supporting systems
US6971617B2 (en) * 2001-05-04 2005-12-06 Texas Children's Hospital Apparatus for supporting medical fluids
US20060031989A1 (en) * 2004-08-03 2006-02-16 Graham Mark A Equipment support rail for hospital bed
US20070124858A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2007-06-07 Ahlman Scott M Patient single surface system
US20070176063A1 (en) * 2006-01-19 2007-08-02 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Patient support with mobile iv stand transport handle
US20070267556A1 (en) * 2006-05-19 2007-11-22 Arnold Herskovic Clamping Device
US20100146702A1 (en) * 2008-09-08 2010-06-17 Impact Instrumentation, Inc. Litter attachment bracket
US20120326876A1 (en) * 2010-03-04 2012-12-27 Keimyung University Industry Academic Cooperation Foundation Functional table for transferring patient
US8459602B2 (en) 2006-05-19 2013-06-11 Arnold Herskovic Clamping device
US8733719B2 (en) 2010-11-12 2014-05-27 Wildcard Enterprises Llc Method and apparatus for use in management of medical intravenous pole assemblies
US9033349B2 (en) 2011-11-27 2015-05-19 Stryker Corporation Pole and topper for mobile medical device
US20150297826A1 (en) * 2014-04-18 2015-10-22 Regents Of The University Of Minnesota Intravenous line lifter devices, systems and methods
US9506487B1 (en) 2015-06-12 2016-11-29 Dennis L. Merritt Clamp mechanism for use with a short pole which retains IV bags and motorized medicine dispensing machines

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US39952A (en) * 1863-09-15 Improved medicine-case
US1199553A (en) * 1915-06-03 1916-09-26 Meinecke & Company Surgical-accessory-supporting appliance.
US1246078A (en) * 1917-06-18 1917-11-13 Michael J Ford Hospital-bed.
US1704979A (en) * 1929-03-12 Frank ktjsterle and charles h
US1708666A (en) * 1928-03-16 1929-04-09 Tokheim Oil Tank & Pump Co Mount for displaying samples of liquid
US2470524A (en) * 1946-07-13 1949-05-17 Jarvis & Jarvis Inc Intravenous stand attachment for wheel stretchers
FR1244324A (en) * 1959-08-21 1960-09-19 Standard support for the use of plasma bulbs bottles and injections of international capacity
US3090589A (en) * 1960-05-05 1963-05-21 Mcphilben Mfg Co Inc Pivotal support means for pendant lighting fixtures including globe attaching means
US3318457A (en) * 1966-10-18 1967-05-09 Irwin R Krasnoff Assembly for use in intravenous feeding
US3337880A (en) * 1965-06-07 1967-08-29 Florian F Florek Support for an intravenous bottle
US3407812A (en) * 1965-11-09 1968-10-29 Dade Reagents Inc Method for performing plasmapheresis in situ

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US39952A (en) * 1863-09-15 Improved medicine-case
US1704979A (en) * 1929-03-12 Frank ktjsterle and charles h
US1199553A (en) * 1915-06-03 1916-09-26 Meinecke & Company Surgical-accessory-supporting appliance.
US1246078A (en) * 1917-06-18 1917-11-13 Michael J Ford Hospital-bed.
US1708666A (en) * 1928-03-16 1929-04-09 Tokheim Oil Tank & Pump Co Mount for displaying samples of liquid
US2470524A (en) * 1946-07-13 1949-05-17 Jarvis & Jarvis Inc Intravenous stand attachment for wheel stretchers
FR1244324A (en) * 1959-08-21 1960-09-19 Standard support for the use of plasma bulbs bottles and injections of international capacity
US3090589A (en) * 1960-05-05 1963-05-21 Mcphilben Mfg Co Inc Pivotal support means for pendant lighting fixtures including globe attaching means
US3337880A (en) * 1965-06-07 1967-08-29 Florian F Florek Support for an intravenous bottle
US3407812A (en) * 1965-11-09 1968-10-29 Dade Reagents Inc Method for performing plasmapheresis in situ
US3318457A (en) * 1966-10-18 1967-05-09 Irwin R Krasnoff Assembly for use in intravenous feeding

Cited By (58)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3923279A (en) * 1974-09-25 1975-12-02 James E Gresley Hanger apparatus for supporting intravenous containers
US4005844A (en) * 1975-08-25 1977-02-01 Stryker Corporation Solution bottle holder
US4023757A (en) * 1976-03-05 1977-05-17 Allard Charles D Patient controls holder
US4231126A (en) * 1979-01-19 1980-11-04 Earl Hurkett Water bed wave generator
US4262872A (en) * 1979-02-28 1981-04-21 American Hospital Supply Corporation Collapsible pole assembly
US4367859A (en) * 1980-07-14 1983-01-11 The Horton Company Ceiling-mounted holder for intravenous fluid receptacles
US4325061A (en) * 1980-10-27 1982-04-13 William Wolar Protective means for attachments affixed to electrically operated beds
US4572536A (en) * 1983-05-26 1986-02-25 Doughty Val J I V Pole interconnection coupling
US4600209A (en) * 1984-07-02 1986-07-15 Kerr Jr Robert L Transport support for freestanding umbilical accessory
US4666111A (en) * 1985-11-14 1987-05-19 Robert Schuler Holder for IV tube
US4879798A (en) * 1986-07-15 1989-11-14 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Method for patient equipment transport and support system
US4886237A (en) * 1988-09-23 1989-12-12 Dennis Robert R Universal articulatable support for retaining intravenous stands in medical applications
US4945592A (en) * 1988-09-30 1990-08-07 The General Hospital Corporation Transport system for portable patient care apparatus
WO1990003157A1 (en) * 1988-09-30 1990-04-05 The General Hospital Corporation Transport system for portable patient care apparatus
US4875651A (en) * 1988-12-06 1989-10-24 Wergin Dennis D Transducer mounting device
US4905944A (en) * 1989-01-26 1990-03-06 Baxter International Inc. Home care intravenous stand
US5054732A (en) * 1989-07-17 1991-10-08 Sukup Eldon R Intravenous feeder support for stroller
US5016307A (en) * 1990-03-23 1991-05-21 Linda Rebar Integral stretcher and intravenous fluid carrier/gravity dependent drainage support
WO1991014416A1 (en) * 1990-03-23 1991-10-03 Rebar Linda A Integral stretcher and intravenous fluid carrier/gravity dependent drainage support
US5319816A (en) * 1992-12-07 1994-06-14 Hill-Rom Company, Inc. IV rack transferrable from an IV stand to a hospital bed
US5358205A (en) * 1993-04-16 1994-10-25 Starkey Douglas G Device to connect I.V. pole and patient support
US5499721A (en) * 1994-07-29 1996-03-19 Schroer Manufacturing Company Supply stand clamp
USRE36258E (en) * 1995-03-02 1999-07-27 Ccl Label, Inc. Label hangers for bottles
US6375133B1 (en) 1998-03-04 2002-04-23 Emergent Innovations, Llc. Intravenous (IV) pole for transport with multiple infusion devices
US6619599B2 (en) 1998-03-04 2003-09-16 Emergent Innovations, Llc Intravenous (IV) pole supporting systems
US5987670A (en) * 1998-04-23 1999-11-23 The General Hospital Corporation Medical equipment transport system
US20060038098A1 (en) * 2000-06-05 2006-02-23 Metz Darrell L Medical accessory support
US6585206B2 (en) * 2000-06-05 2003-07-01 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Medical accessory support
US20030230687A1 (en) * 2000-06-05 2003-12-18 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Medical accessory support
US6966086B2 (en) 2000-06-05 2005-11-22 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Medical accessory support
US6481679B1 (en) 2000-11-17 2002-11-19 Bryant K. Bennett System for mounting medical accessories on supportive structures
US6971617B2 (en) * 2001-05-04 2005-12-06 Texas Children's Hospital Apparatus for supporting medical fluids
US7624463B2 (en) * 2004-08-03 2009-12-01 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Equipment support rail for hospital bed
US20060031989A1 (en) * 2004-08-03 2006-02-16 Graham Mark A Equipment support rail for hospital bed
US20100095454A1 (en) * 2004-08-03 2010-04-22 Graham Mark A Equipment support rail for hospital bed
US8065768B2 (en) 2004-08-03 2011-11-29 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Equipment support rail for hospital bed
US7490377B2 (en) 2005-12-05 2009-02-17 Ahlman Ip, Inc. Patient single surface system
US20090083907A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2009-04-02 Ahlman Scott M Patient single surface system
US20070124858A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2007-06-07 Ahlman Scott M Patient single surface system
US8046851B2 (en) 2005-12-05 2011-11-01 Ahlman Ip, Llc Patient single surface system
US8381335B2 (en) 2005-12-05 2013-02-26 Ahlman Ip, Llc Patient single surface system
US8813277B2 (en) 2005-12-05 2014-08-26 Ahlman Ip, Llc Patient single surface system
US7784121B2 (en) 2005-12-05 2010-08-31 Ahlman Ip, Llc Patient single surface system
US20100287697A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2010-11-18 Ahlman Scott M Patient single surface system
US7637464B2 (en) 2006-01-19 2009-12-29 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Patient support with mobile IV stand transport handle
US20070176063A1 (en) * 2006-01-19 2007-08-02 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Patient support with mobile iv stand transport handle
US20070267556A1 (en) * 2006-05-19 2007-11-22 Arnold Herskovic Clamping Device
US8011629B2 (en) 2006-05-19 2011-09-06 Arnold Herskovic Clamping device
US8459602B2 (en) 2006-05-19 2013-06-11 Arnold Herskovic Clamping device
US8443472B2 (en) * 2008-09-08 2013-05-21 Impact Instrumentation, Inc. Litter attachment bracket
US20100146702A1 (en) * 2008-09-08 2010-06-17 Impact Instrumentation, Inc. Litter attachment bracket
US20120326876A1 (en) * 2010-03-04 2012-12-27 Keimyung University Industry Academic Cooperation Foundation Functional table for transferring patient
US9027182B2 (en) * 2010-03-04 2015-05-12 Keimyung University Industry Academic Cooperation Foundation Functional table for transferring patient
US8733719B2 (en) 2010-11-12 2014-05-27 Wildcard Enterprises Llc Method and apparatus for use in management of medical intravenous pole assemblies
US9033349B2 (en) 2011-11-27 2015-05-19 Stryker Corporation Pole and topper for mobile medical device
US9511185B2 (en) * 2014-04-18 2016-12-06 Regents Of The University Of Minnesota Intravenous line lifter devices, systems and methods
US20150297826A1 (en) * 2014-04-18 2015-10-22 Regents Of The University Of Minnesota Intravenous line lifter devices, systems and methods
US9506487B1 (en) 2015-06-12 2016-11-29 Dennis L. Merritt Clamp mechanism for use with a short pole which retains IV bags and motorized medicine dispensing machines

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3486176A (en) Safety and patient assist device
US3517625A (en) Extensible mounting assembly with means to grip desk
US4434963A (en) Slide clamp including elevation stabilizer
US5802636A (en) Integrated siderail and accessory rail for a bed
US5655238A (en) Extreme position surgery table top attachment
US3923162A (en) Shower caddy
US5147287A (en) Neck support means for cervical surgery
US5362021A (en) Multi-adjustable surgical tray apparatus
US4989848A (en) Apparatus for adjusting the position of the upper body support of an orthopedic table
US2281209A (en) Combination bed and carriage
US5531238A (en) Attachment apparatus for a walker caddy container
US5848449A (en) Slide lock device and method for securing a patient positioning mold
US4054282A (en) Auxiliary operating table for hand surgery and the like
US2985311A (en) Tie rack
US6231016B1 (en) Medical support carrier
US4968013A (en) Footrest glide assembly
US6540093B1 (en) Window shelf system
US4742981A (en) Surgical support system
US2628142A (en) Telescoping support for a tray having a tiltable head
US5074445A (en) Garment hanger with swivel hook and ganging hook
US3026079A (en) Adjustable support means for liquid dispensing vessels
US4106736A (en) Article supporting apparatus
US2067891A (en) Leg-supporting means for obstetrical beds
US3077613A (en) Exercise bar for bed
US6058531A (en) Dual-position assist and guard rail for beds