US3598119A - Continuous paracervical anesthesia method and device - Google Patents

Continuous paracervical anesthesia method and device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3598119A
US3598119A US3598119DA US3598119A US 3598119 A US3598119 A US 3598119A US 3598119D A US3598119D A US 3598119DA US 3598119 A US3598119 A US 3598119A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
device
tissue
tube
needle
distal end
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Charles A White
Original Assignee
Charles A White
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0067Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the distal end, e.g. tips
    • A61M25/0068Static characteristics of the catheter tip, e.g. shape, atraumatic tip, curved tip or tip structure
    • A61M25/0069Tip not integral with tube
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/10Balloon catheters

Abstract

A medical instrument and method for use in obstetrical or gynecological analgesic procedures to allow the administration of a paracervical block continuously or intermittently with only a single placement. The device has improved retention means, in the form of an inflatable bladder, which minimizes the trauma of insertion and withdrawal while positively assuring retention once the device is inserted in place.

Description

United States atet Inventor Charles A. White 328 Highland Drive, lowa City, Iowa 52240 Appl. No 7,763

Filed Feb. 2, 1970 Patented Aug. 10, 1971 CONTINUOUS PARACERVICAL ANESTHESIA 3,050,066 8/1962 Koehn 128/349 3,173,418 3/1965 Baran 128/351 3,211,151 10/1965 Foderick et al 4 r 128/349 3,308,819 3/1967 128/215 3,358,684 12/1967 l28/214.4 3,508,545 4/1970 128/215 3,539,034 11/1970 128/221 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. B. Mitchell Alt0meysl-1aven E. Simmons and James C. Nemmcrs ABSTRACT: A medical instrument and method for use in obstetrical or gynecological analgesic procedures to allow the administration of a paracervical block continuously or intermittently with only a single placement. The device has improved retention means, in the form of an inflatable bladder, which minimizes the trauma of insertion and withdrawal while positively assuring retention once the device is inserted in place.

PATENTED AUG] 0 am I N VIiN'l M v CHARLES A. WHITE A T TORNE Y BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In recent years, the paracervical block has been known and increasingly used as an effective method of regional anesthesia in obstetrics and also in certain gynecological procedures. It is principally used to minimize pain during the first stage of labor. Different techniques and instruments have been recently devised for allowing the anesthetic agent to be administered either continuously or intermittently with only a single placement of the instrument. Techniques which require only a single placement have distinct advantages since the inconvenience of repeated manipulations is eliminated and sin gle placement minimizes the possibility of unnecessary contamination and trauma which might result from using other techniques which require repeated manipulations. However, with any single placement technique, there is always the problem of proper retention of the administration unit. In other words, since the unit must remain in place sometimes for several hours, movement of the patient as well as cervical dilatation during the first stage of labor can cause the unit to become dislodged thus requiring further manipulation to replace the unit. Where replacement becomes necessary, the advantages of the single placement technique of administering the block are, in part, diminished.

There is known to me in the prior art various methods of retaining the paracervical unit in place. These methods use sutures, retention barbs, or precurved distal ends of the catheter. However, with the prior art devices, the more reliable the retention method used, the more traumatic the introduction and removal of the catheter. Of course, one of the reasons for utilizing a device which allows continuous administration of the anesthetic agent is to minimize the trauma to the vaginal mucosa, and if the method of retention increases the trauma,

one of the advantages is lost.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION I have devised an improved method and device to allow the administration of a paracervical block continuously or intermittently with only a single placement of the anesthesia unit. My invention also provides an improved method of retention of the unit which greatly minimizes the trauma of insertion and completely eliminates the trauma of withdrawal while assuring positive retention under almost all conditions, including fetal and placenta expulsion and manual exploration during labor. In my improved device, I provide two concentric tubes, the inside tube providing for excursion of the needle for initial insertion and for introducing the anesthetic agent, and the outer tube serving as an introducer and also providing a passageway for the flow of fluid to an inflatable retention bladder at the distal end of the unit. With my novel method and device, retention is positively assured by means of the inflatable bladder, and the trauma of introduction is minimized and the trauma of withdrawal eliminated since the insertion and withdrawal are accomplished while the bladder is in a deflated condition.

The advantages and features of the invention will be readily apparent from a consideration of the description contained herein taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an elevational view ofa complete unit constructed according to the principles of my invention and showing the insertion needle in place and the unit in position at the placement site;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the distal end ofthe unit, partly in section, and showing the unit in position at the placement site;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of the distal end of the unit similar to FIG. 2 but showing the needle introduced into the tissue at the placement site;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of the distal end of the unit similar to FIGS. 2 and 3 but showing the unit in place with the retention bladder inflated and with the insertion needle not withdrawn; and

FIG. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of a portion of the unit and showing the details of the proximal end of the tubes.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION As previously indicated, the device of the invention is for use in the administration of paracervical anesthesia during the first stage of labor or during certain gynecological procedures such as dilatation and curettage. Paracervical blocks have proved to be effective in relieving pain occurring during the first stage of labor. When used during the first stage of labor, which may extend over several hours, repeated intermittent injections of the anesthetic solution are often necessary. In order to eliminate the necessity for repeated manipulations and the trauma of repeated needle insertions, my invention employs an indwelling anesthesia unit indicated generally by the reference numeral 10. The unit includes an elongated, hollow external tube 12 having an open distal end 14 and a proximal end 15 which flares outwardly. The external tube 12 is preferably made of a smooth, soft and pliable plastic material which can be sterilized. An internal, hollow tube 16 is received inside of the external tube 12 and extends throughout its length and terminates at the opening in the distal end I4. This forms an annular space 18 between tubes 12 and 16. Internal tube 16 communicates with the opening in the distal end l4 and extends beyond the proximal end I5 terminating in an injection adapter cap 20. The internal tube I6 is also of a soft pliable plastic material similar to that used for the external tube 12. At the point where the internal tube 16 enters the proximal end 15 of the external tube 12 a fluidtight seal is provided by the plug 17.

Freely movable inside of the internal tube I6 is a hollow long needle 22 which also has an adapter cap 24 on its proximal end. The needle 22 is preferably of stainless steel or other suitable material. If desired, a stylet (not shown) may be contained inside the needle 22 during insertion of the unit. When the needle 22 is in place in the internal tube 16, the assembled unit as shown in FIG. I is more rigid because of the rigidity of the needle 22, but the unit does retain considerable flexibility. The length of the needle 22 is such that when the needle 22 is moved to the point of maximum penetration with the adapter cap 24 seated against the outer end of the adapter cap 20 the distal end of the needle 22 will protrude a short distance beyond the distal end I4 of the tube I2 (see FIG. 3). Obviously, the needle 22 can be withdrawn completely from the internal tube 16.

Also connected at the proximal end 15 and communicating with the interior of tube 12 is a fluid supply tube 26. This tube 26 terminates at its proximal end in an adapter cap 28 suitable for connection to a source of fluid supply as more fully described hereinafter. If desired, a removable plug 30 can be provided for temporarily closing off the proximal end of the fluid supply tube 26 until its use. The fluid supply tube 26 extends through the plug I7 in the proximal end I5 of the external tube 12 and communicates with the annular space 18 formed between the exterior wall of internal tube 16 and the interior wall of external tube I2. Spaced from its distal end 14 there is provided in the external tube 12 several radially extending openings 32 surrounding which is a relatively thin stretchable bladder 34. Bladder 34 encloses the openings 32 and is sealed to the exterior surface of the tube I2 so that fluid introduced through supply tube 26 and discharged through the openings 32 will create pressure to expand the bladder 34. Of course, tube I2 is sealed at its distal end 14 to the internal tube 16 so that openings 32 provide the only discharge from annular space 18. Thus, if fluid is introduced under sufl'icient pressure through the fluid supply tube 26 into the annular space I8 the bladder 34 will be inflated.

It will be observed in H6. 1 that there is an enlargement 36 formed on the exterior surface of the tube 12 between the distal end 14 and proximal end 157 This enlargement 36 serves the purpose of allowing the physician to determine the depth of penetration of the instrument into the tissue, as will be described more fully hereinafter.

The function of the various components of the unit and the procedure for their use will now be described. When the physician has determined that the paracervical block should be used, the unit is inserted into the vagina 38 of the patient and manually guided by the physician until the distal end 14 is positioned immediately lateral to the cervix 40 and against the broad ligament 42. Insertion is facilitated by the rigidity of the unit owing to the position of the needle 22 within the internal tube 16. It should be noted, however, that during insertion the distal end of the needle 22 does not protrude, it being withdrawn into the internal tube 16. With the unit 10 properly positioned, the needle 22 is advanced until it penetrates the mucosa of the vagina 38. The extent to which the needle 22 can be advanced is limited by contact of the needles adapter cap 24 with the adapter cap on the proximal end of the tube 16. When the initial puncture has been made, the entire unit 10 is then advanced until the bladder 34 has penetrated the vaginal mucosa. This is illustrated in FIG. 4. The enlargement 36 on the exterior of the tube 12 is used by the physician as a gauge to insure the penetration has been sufficiently deep but not excessive. When the bladder 34 has penetrated the vaginal mucosa, fluid is then introduced through the fluid supply tube 26 to inflatc the bladder 34. Fluid pressure is thereafter maintained as long as it is necessary to keep the bladder 34 inflated. With the bladder 34 inflated, the unit cannot be withdrawn. Moreover, the possibility is greatly minimized of the unit becoming dislodged during further dilation of the cervix, during obstetrical manipulations or dislodged by advancement of the fetus or expulsion of the placenta. With the unit thus being retained in place by bladder 34, the anesthetic solution can be introduced into the tissue through the hollow needle 22 continuously or at required intervals to produce the desired analgesic effect. The needle 22 is sufficiently flexible that it can be retained in the unit throughout the entire procedure, although usually it is preferable to withdraw the needle and insert in the adapter cap 24 a hypodermic needle at the time injection of the anesthetic is to be made. Without the needle 22, the unit 10 is sufficiently long and flexible that after placement it can be taped or otherwise affixed to the thighs or abdomen of the patient. Normally, two of the units will be used during each procedure, so that the anesthetic solution can be introduced into the broad ligaments 42 on opposite sides of the cervix 40.

When the unit 10 is to be removed, the fluid pressure that has been continuously applied through the supply tube 26 to the bladder 34 is relieved and the bladder 34 will be deflated allowing easy nontraumatic withdrawal of the unit. Because of my novel design of the anesthetic unit and the method of retaining it in place, it is obvious that the trauma of insertion is kept to a minimum. Moreover, the trauma of withdrawal, unlike some of the prior art units, is completely eliminated. The unit provides a method of retention which makes it virtually impossible to inadvertently dislodge the unitv The unit is very simple, is inexpensive, and has all the advantages of prior art continuous paracervical devices but has improved retention and causes less trauma. Preferably, all the tubes which form the principal parts of the unit are made of transparent or translucent material so that visual checks of fluid or aspirated blood in the tubes can be conducted. Moreover, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various revisions and modifications can be made in the preferred embodiment of the unit described herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is my intention, however, that all such revisions and modifications as are obvious to those skilled in the art will be included within the scope of the following claims.

] claim: 1. A device for administering a fluid agent into body tissue through an opening in the body, said device comprising a longitudinally extending hollow tube having a distal end and a proximal end, said distal end being open, means at the distal end for puncturing the said tissue, said means for puncturing the tissue including an elongated needle longitudinally movable within said tube, said needle being extendible through the opening in said distal end, an expandable member surrounding said tube near said distal end, means for selectively expanding and contracting said expandable member, and means for introducing the fluid agent into said tube for discharge through the opening in said distal end.

2. The device of claim I in which the means for introducing the fluid agent into the tube includes said needle.

3. The device of claim I in which said means for selectively expanding and contracting said expandable member includes an inner hollow tube contained within said first mentioned hollow tube and forming an annular space therebetween, said first hollow tube having at least one opening therein to provide for communication between said annular space and said expandable member.

4. The device of claim 3 in which said means for puncturing the said tissue includes an elongated needle longitudinally movable within said inner tube, said needle being extendible through the opening in said distal end.

5. The device ofclaini 4 in which said means for introducing the fluid agent includes said needle.

6. The device of claim 4 in which the annular space formed between said first hollow tube and said inner tube is sealed at the distal and proximal ends, and means is provided to connect said annular space to a source of fluid supply.

7. The device of claim 4 in which said inner tube extends beyond the proximal end of said first hollow tube, and said needle is of a length slightly longer than the length of said inner tube so that said needle will protrude slightly from said distal end when fully advanced in said inner tube.

8. A method for administering a fluid agent into body tissue through an opening in the body, said method comprising the steps of inserting a hollow tubular member through said body opening until the end thereof is placed against the tissue into which the agent is to be injected; puncturing the tissue at the placement site; inserting the device a limited distance into the tissue through said puncture; expanding the size of said device at a point within the tissue; injecting the agent through said device into said tissue; contracting the expanded portion of said device; and withdrawing said device from said tissue and through said body opening.

9. The method of claim 8 in which said device is left in place over a period of time and said agent is continuously injected through said device into said tissue.

10. The method of claim 8 in which said device is left in place over a period of time, and said agent is intermittantly and repeatedly injected through said device into said tissue,

Claims (10)

1. A device for administering a fluid agent into body tissue through an opening in the body, said device comprising a longitudinally extending hollow tube having a distal end and a proximal end, said distal end being open, means at the distal end for puncturing the said tissue, said means for puncturing the tissue including an elongated needle longitudinally movable within said tube, said needle being extendible through the opening in said distal end, an expandable member surrounding said tube near said distal end, means for selectively expanding and contracting said expandable member, and means for introducing the fluid agent into said tube for discharge through the opening in said distal end.
2. The device of claim 1 in which the means for introducing the fluid agent into the tube includes said needle.
3. The device of claim 1 in which said means for selectively expanding and contracting said expandable member includes an inner hollow tube contained within said first mentioned hollow tube and forming an annular space therebetween, said first hollow tube having at least one opening therein to provide for communication between said annular space and said expandable member.
4. The device of claim 3 in which said means for puncturing the said tissue includes an elongated needle longitudinally movable within said inner tube, said needle being extendible through the opening in said distal end.
5. The device of claim 4 in which said means for introducing the fluid agent includes said needle.
6. The device of claim 4 in which the annular space formed between said first hollow tube and said inner tube is sealed at the distal and proximal ends, and means is provided to connect said annular space to a source of fluid supply.
7. The device of claim 4 in which said inner tube extends beyond the proximal end of said first hollow tube, and said needle is of a length slightly longer than the length of said inner tube so that said needle will protrude slightly from said distal end when fully advanced in said inner tube.
8. A method for administering a fluid agent into body tissue through an opening in the body, said method comprising the steps of inserting a hollow tubular member through said body opening until the end thereof is placed against the tissue into which the agent is to be injected; puncturing the tissue at the placement site; inserting the device a limited distance into the tissue through said puncture; expanding the size of said device at a point within the tissue; injecting the agent through said device into said tissue; contracting the expanded portion of said Device; and withdrawing said device from said tissue and through said body opening.
9. The method of claim 8 in which said device is left in place over a period of time and said agent is continuously injected through said device into said tissue.
10. The method of claim 8 in which said device is left in place over a period of time, and said agent is intermittantly and repeatedly injected through said device into said tissue.
US3598119A 1970-02-02 1970-02-02 Continuous paracervical anesthesia method and device Expired - Lifetime US3598119A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US776370 true 1970-02-02 1970-02-02

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3598119A true US3598119A (en) 1971-08-10

Family

ID=21728007

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3598119A Expired - Lifetime US3598119A (en) 1970-02-02 1970-02-02 Continuous paracervical anesthesia method and device

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3598119A (en)

Cited By (41)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3890970A (en) * 1974-01-21 1975-06-24 Robert L Gullen Retention cannula or catheter and applicator
US4578061A (en) * 1980-10-28 1986-03-25 Lemelson Jerome H Injection catheter and method
US4586921A (en) * 1983-08-17 1986-05-06 Daniel Berson Method of applying a local anesthetic agent to a wound
US4588398A (en) * 1984-09-12 1986-05-13 Warner-Lambert Company Catheter tip configuration
US4966583A (en) * 1989-02-03 1990-10-30 Elie Debbas Apparatus for locating a breast mass
US5183463A (en) * 1989-02-03 1993-02-02 Elie Debbas Apparatus for locating a breast mass
WO1994008653A1 (en) * 1992-10-21 1994-04-28 Bavaria Medizin Technologie Gmbh Catheter for injecting medicaments
US5419777A (en) * 1994-03-10 1995-05-30 Bavaria Medizin Technologie Gmbh Catheter for injecting a fluid or medicine
US5445645A (en) * 1989-02-03 1995-08-29 Debbas; Elie Apparatus for locating a breast mass
USRE35192E (en) * 1990-11-13 1996-03-26 Phoenix Surgical Products, Inc. Post-surgical anesthesia at a continuous and progressively decreasing administration rate
US5514091A (en) * 1988-07-22 1996-05-07 Yoon; Inbae Expandable multifunctional manipulating instruments for various medical procedures
US5662674A (en) * 1989-02-03 1997-09-02 Debbas; Elie Apparatus for locating a breast mass
US5667489A (en) * 1995-02-21 1997-09-16 Kraff; Colman Ross Expansile surgical sleeve apparatus and method for using same
US5800394A (en) * 1988-07-22 1998-09-01 Yoon; Inbae Method of creating an operating space endoscopically at an obstructed site
EP0962191A1 (en) 1998-06-04 1999-12-08 Cordis Webster, Inc. Catheter for injecting therapeutic and diagnostic agents
US6059734A (en) * 1995-01-06 2000-05-09 Yoon; Inbae Methods of collecting tissue at obstructed anatomical sites
US6165164A (en) * 1999-03-29 2000-12-26 Cordis Corporation Catheter for injecting therapeutic and diagnostic agents
EP1099453A2 (en) 1999-11-12 2001-05-16 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter
US6277089B1 (en) 1990-07-24 2001-08-21 Inbae Yoon Method for ablating portions of the uterus
EP1205207A1 (en) 2000-11-09 2002-05-15 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with controllably extendable injection needle
US20020183720A1 (en) * 1999-03-29 2002-12-05 Hill Irma P. Injection catheter
US20020198511A1 (en) * 2001-06-22 2002-12-26 Varner Signe Erickson Method and device for subretinal drug delivery
US20030105436A1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2003-06-05 Biosense Webster, Inc. Catheter with injection needle
US6575931B1 (en) 1998-06-04 2003-06-10 Biosense Webster, Inc. Catheter with injection needle
US20030171723A1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2003-09-11 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with multi-directional delivery injection needle
US6623474B1 (en) 1998-06-04 2003-09-23 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with needle stop
US6692466B1 (en) 2000-12-21 2004-02-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Drug delivery catheter with retractable needle
US6802823B2 (en) 2001-08-22 2004-10-12 Breg, Inc. Medication delivery system having selective automated or manual discharge
US20050143363A1 (en) * 2002-09-29 2005-06-30 Innorx, Inc. Method for subretinal administration of therapeutics including steroids; method for localizing pharmacodynamic action at the choroid of the retina; and related methods for treatment and/or prevention of retinal diseases
US20060110428A1 (en) * 2004-07-02 2006-05-25 Eugene Dejuan Methods and devices for the treatment of ocular conditions
US20060257451A1 (en) * 2005-04-08 2006-11-16 Varner Signe E Sustained release implants and methods for subretinal delivery of bioactive agents to treat or prevent retinal disease
US20070021730A1 (en) * 1995-10-13 2007-01-25 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Systems and Methods for Delivering Drugs to Selected Locations Within the Body
US20080125709A1 (en) * 2003-12-31 2008-05-29 Gregory Waimong Chang Needle catheter
US20080200377A1 (en) * 2007-02-16 2008-08-21 Trollsas Mikael O Polymer particles
US20090036872A1 (en) * 2004-10-07 2009-02-05 Fitzgerald Peter J Methods, Systems and Devices for Establising Communication Between Hollow Organs and Tissue Lumens
US20090306590A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2009-12-10 Staskin David R Injection guidance system and method
US20100145306A1 (en) * 2008-07-24 2010-06-10 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Various Catheter Devices for Myocardial Injections or Other Uses
US8079982B1 (en) 1998-06-04 2011-12-20 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with needle electrode
US20120221009A1 (en) * 2011-02-28 2012-08-30 Terumo Kabushiki Kaisha Medical device and vascularization method
USRE45638E1 (en) * 1996-12-02 2015-08-04 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Apparatus for percutaneously performing myocardial revascularization having means for sensing tissue parameters and method of use
US20160287794A1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2016-10-06 Xend Medical Systems, Llc Hypodermic needle system activation mechanism

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2936761A (en) * 1958-04-25 1960-05-17 Snyder Henry Howard Catheter
US3050066A (en) * 1958-12-31 1962-08-21 Wilbur R Koehn Retention catheters
US3173418A (en) * 1961-01-10 1965-03-16 Ostap E Baran Double-wall endotracheal cuff
US3211151A (en) * 1961-11-15 1965-10-12 Foderick Catheters
US3308819A (en) * 1963-12-09 1967-03-14 Univ Iowa State Res Found Inc Anesthetic device
US3358684A (en) * 1965-03-12 1967-12-19 Marshall Gerald Parenteral injection devices
US3508545A (en) * 1967-11-16 1970-04-28 Dow Corning Catheter placement unit for paracervical anesthesia
US3539034A (en) * 1966-10-11 1970-11-10 Carl H Tafeen Paracervical block anesthesia assembly

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2936761A (en) * 1958-04-25 1960-05-17 Snyder Henry Howard Catheter
US3050066A (en) * 1958-12-31 1962-08-21 Wilbur R Koehn Retention catheters
US3173418A (en) * 1961-01-10 1965-03-16 Ostap E Baran Double-wall endotracheal cuff
US3211151A (en) * 1961-11-15 1965-10-12 Foderick Catheters
US3308819A (en) * 1963-12-09 1967-03-14 Univ Iowa State Res Found Inc Anesthetic device
US3358684A (en) * 1965-03-12 1967-12-19 Marshall Gerald Parenteral injection devices
US3539034A (en) * 1966-10-11 1970-11-10 Carl H Tafeen Paracervical block anesthesia assembly
US3508545A (en) * 1967-11-16 1970-04-28 Dow Corning Catheter placement unit for paracervical anesthesia

Cited By (79)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3890970A (en) * 1974-01-21 1975-06-24 Robert L Gullen Retention cannula or catheter and applicator
US4578061A (en) * 1980-10-28 1986-03-25 Lemelson Jerome H Injection catheter and method
US4586921A (en) * 1983-08-17 1986-05-06 Daniel Berson Method of applying a local anesthetic agent to a wound
US4588398A (en) * 1984-09-12 1986-05-13 Warner-Lambert Company Catheter tip configuration
US5800394A (en) * 1988-07-22 1998-09-01 Yoon; Inbae Method of creating an operating space endoscopically at an obstructed site
US5656013A (en) * 1988-07-22 1997-08-12 Yoon; Inbae Method of using an expandable multifunctional manipulating instrument for various medical procedures
US5514091A (en) * 1988-07-22 1996-05-07 Yoon; Inbae Expandable multifunctional manipulating instruments for various medical procedures
US5823947A (en) * 1988-07-22 1998-10-20 Yoon; Inbae Method of creating an operating space endoscopically at an obstructed site
US6146401A (en) * 1988-07-22 2000-11-14 Yoon; Inbae Expandable multifunctional instruments for creating spaces at obstructed sites endoscopically
US5865802A (en) * 1988-07-22 1999-02-02 Yoon; Inbae Expandable multifunctional instruments for creating spaces at obstructed sites endoscopically
US5730725A (en) * 1988-07-22 1998-03-24 Yoon; Inbae Expandable multifunctional manipulating instruments for various medical procedures and methods therefor
US6120437A (en) * 1988-07-22 2000-09-19 Inbae Yoon Methods for creating spaces at obstructed sites endoscopically and methods therefor
WO1993011827A1 (en) * 1989-02-03 1993-06-24 Elie Debbas Apparatus and method for locating a breast mass
US5183463A (en) * 1989-02-03 1993-02-02 Elie Debbas Apparatus for locating a breast mass
WO1991016099A1 (en) * 1989-02-03 1991-10-31 Elie Debbas Apparatus and method for locating a breast mass
US4966583A (en) * 1989-02-03 1990-10-30 Elie Debbas Apparatus for locating a breast mass
US5662674A (en) * 1989-02-03 1997-09-02 Debbas; Elie Apparatus for locating a breast mass
US5445645A (en) * 1989-02-03 1995-08-29 Debbas; Elie Apparatus for locating a breast mass
US6602218B2 (en) 1990-07-24 2003-08-05 Inbae Yoon Apparatus for ablation of the endometrium of the uterus
US6277089B1 (en) 1990-07-24 2001-08-21 Inbae Yoon Method for ablating portions of the uterus
USRE35192E (en) * 1990-11-13 1996-03-26 Phoenix Surgical Products, Inc. Post-surgical anesthesia at a continuous and progressively decreasing administration rate
WO1994008653A1 (en) * 1992-10-21 1994-04-28 Bavaria Medizin Technologie Gmbh Catheter for injecting medicaments
WO1995024235A1 (en) 1994-03-10 1995-09-14 Bavaria Medizin Technologie Gmbh Catheter for injecting a fluid or medicament
US5419777A (en) * 1994-03-10 1995-05-30 Bavaria Medizin Technologie Gmbh Catheter for injecting a fluid or medicine
US6059734A (en) * 1995-01-06 2000-05-09 Yoon; Inbae Methods of collecting tissue at obstructed anatomical sites
US5667489A (en) * 1995-02-21 1997-09-16 Kraff; Colman Ross Expansile surgical sleeve apparatus and method for using same
US8083708B2 (en) 1995-10-13 2011-12-27 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Systems and methods for delivering drugs to selected locations within the body
US7670329B2 (en) * 1995-10-13 2010-03-02 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Systems and methods for delivering drugs to selected locations within the body
US20100324471A1 (en) * 1995-10-13 2010-12-23 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Systems and Methods for Delivering Drugs to Selected Locations Within the Body
US20070021730A1 (en) * 1995-10-13 2007-01-25 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Systems and Methods for Delivering Drugs to Selected Locations Within the Body
USRE45638E1 (en) * 1996-12-02 2015-08-04 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Apparatus for percutaneously performing myocardial revascularization having means for sensing tissue parameters and method of use
US8540694B2 (en) 1998-03-25 2013-09-24 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Systems and methods for delivering drugs to selected locations within the body
US8079982B1 (en) 1998-06-04 2011-12-20 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with needle electrode
US6575931B1 (en) 1998-06-04 2003-06-10 Biosense Webster, Inc. Catheter with injection needle
US20030171723A1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2003-09-11 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with multi-directional delivery injection needle
EP0962191A1 (en) 1998-06-04 1999-12-08 Cordis Webster, Inc. Catheter for injecting therapeutic and diagnostic agents
US6623473B1 (en) 1998-06-04 2003-09-23 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with multi-directional delivery injection needle
US20030187396A1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2003-10-02 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with controllably extendable injection needle
US20030195470A1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2003-10-16 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with needle stop
US7468057B2 (en) 1998-06-04 2008-12-23 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with controllably extendable injection needle
US8977344B2 (en) 1998-06-04 2015-03-10 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with needle electrode
US6905476B2 (en) 1998-06-04 2005-06-14 Biosense Webster, Inc. Catheter with injection needle
US7806872B2 (en) 1998-06-04 2010-10-05 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with needle stop
US20030105436A1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2003-06-05 Biosense Webster, Inc. Catheter with injection needle
US20080319314A1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2008-12-25 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter
US6623474B1 (en) 1998-06-04 2003-09-23 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with needle stop
US7905864B2 (en) 1998-06-04 2011-03-15 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with multi-directional delivery injection needle
US20020183720A1 (en) * 1999-03-29 2002-12-05 Hill Irma P. Injection catheter
US6165164A (en) * 1999-03-29 2000-12-26 Cordis Corporation Catheter for injecting therapeutic and diagnostic agents
US7416547B2 (en) 1999-03-29 2008-08-26 Biosense Webster Inc. Injection catheter
EP1099453A2 (en) 1999-11-12 2001-05-16 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter
EP1205207A1 (en) 2000-11-09 2002-05-15 Biosense Webster, Inc. Injection catheter with controllably extendable injection needle
US6692466B1 (en) 2000-12-21 2004-02-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Drug delivery catheter with retractable needle
US7485113B2 (en) 2001-06-22 2009-02-03 Johns Hopkins University Method for drug delivery through the vitreous humor
US20080154204A1 (en) * 2001-06-22 2008-06-26 The Johns Hopkins University Method and device for subretinal drug delivery
US20020198511A1 (en) * 2001-06-22 2002-12-26 Varner Signe Erickson Method and device for subretinal drug delivery
US7309333B2 (en) 2001-08-22 2007-12-18 Breg, Inc. Medication delivery system having selective automated or manual discharge
US6802823B2 (en) 2001-08-22 2004-10-12 Breg, Inc. Medication delivery system having selective automated or manual discharge
US20050143363A1 (en) * 2002-09-29 2005-06-30 Innorx, Inc. Method for subretinal administration of therapeutics including steroids; method for localizing pharmacodynamic action at the choroid of the retina; and related methods for treatment and/or prevention of retinal diseases
US8152758B2 (en) 2003-12-31 2012-04-10 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Needle catheter
US20080125709A1 (en) * 2003-12-31 2008-05-29 Gregory Waimong Chang Needle catheter
US8454582B2 (en) 2004-07-02 2013-06-04 Surmodics, Inc. Methods and devices for the treatment of ocular conditions
US20060110428A1 (en) * 2004-07-02 2006-05-25 Eugene Dejuan Methods and devices for the treatment of ocular conditions
US20090036872A1 (en) * 2004-10-07 2009-02-05 Fitzgerald Peter J Methods, Systems and Devices for Establising Communication Between Hollow Organs and Tissue Lumens
US7967808B2 (en) * 2004-10-07 2011-06-28 Flea Street Translational, Llc Methods, systems and devices for establising communication between hollow organs and tissue lumens
US20060257451A1 (en) * 2005-04-08 2006-11-16 Varner Signe E Sustained release implants and methods for subretinal delivery of bioactive agents to treat or prevent retinal disease
US8003124B2 (en) 2005-04-08 2011-08-23 Surmodics, Inc. Sustained release implants and methods for subretinal delivery of bioactive agents to treat or prevent retinal disease
US20090306590A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2009-12-10 Staskin David R Injection guidance system and method
US8439867B2 (en) 2005-06-07 2013-05-14 David R. Staskin Injection guidance system and method
US20080200377A1 (en) * 2007-02-16 2008-08-21 Trollsas Mikael O Polymer particles
US20100145306A1 (en) * 2008-07-24 2010-06-10 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Various Catheter Devices for Myocardial Injections or Other Uses
US20120221009A1 (en) * 2011-02-28 2012-08-30 Terumo Kabushiki Kaisha Medical device and vascularization method
US9101418B2 (en) * 2011-02-28 2015-08-11 Terumo Kabushiki Kaisha Medical device and vascularization method
US20160287795A1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2016-10-06 XEND Medical, LLC Method of using a hypodermic needle system
US20160287794A1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2016-10-06 Xend Medical Systems, Llc Hypodermic needle system activation mechanism
US20160287797A1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2016-10-06 XEND Medical, LLC Hypodermic needle system having a spacer
US20160287792A1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2016-10-06 XEND Medical, LLC Plugged hypodermic needle system
US20160287793A1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2016-10-06 XEND Medical, LLC Hypodermic needle system having plunger
US20160287796A1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2016-10-06 Xend Medical Systems, Llc Cartridge system to which a syringe body can be attached

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3540451A (en) Drainage cannula with tissue connecting assemblies on both ends
US3416532A (en) Drainage tube with means for scraping away debris therewithin
US3459189A (en) Trocar catheter
US3516407A (en) Inflatable intranasal tampon
US3358684A (en) Parenteral injection devices
US3459184A (en) Intravenous catheter placement unit
US3598118A (en) Method of introducing an intravenous catheter into the vascular system
US3568679A (en) Catheter placement unit
US3459188A (en) Paracentesis stylet catheter
US3406687A (en) Guide and positioning means for a needle
US4114603A (en) Intracranial pressure monitoring catheter
US5624399A (en) Catheter having an intracervical/intrauterine balloon made from polyurethane
US3680562A (en) Surgical drainage apparatus for bladder
US6156006A (en) Medical instrument system for piercing through tissue
US4019515A (en) Enemata administering device
US6293952B1 (en) Medical instrument system for piercing through tissue
US3739778A (en) Catheter introduction system
US5284474A (en) Trochar system for laparoscopy
US4475898A (en) Fetal ventriculo-amniotic shunt
US5338297A (en) Cervical canal balloon catheter
US6551300B1 (en) Device and method for delivery of topically applied local anesthetic to wall forming a passage in tissue
US6030365A (en) Minimally invasive sterile surgical access device and method
US5342296A (en) Method for draining antrum
US5653683A (en) Intracavitary catheter for use in therapeutic radiation procedures
US5830228A (en) Methods and systems for deployment of a detachable balloon at a target site in vivo